Docstoc

Head Start (PDF)

Document Sample
Head Start (PDF) Powered By Docstoc
					                                      Head Start
                                      state collaboration offices




             2007
A n n u A l S tAt e P r o f i l e S
Table of Contents


Introduction ............................................................................................v




Program Accomplishments by State .............................................ix




Collaboration with Regional Offices ..........................................347




Oral Health Addendum ..................................................................371




Office of Head Start Contact ........................................................417




Index .....................................................................................................419
                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   v




Introduction



S    ince its inception in 1965, Head Start has served more
than 23 million low-income children and their families. It
provides comprehensive services in education, health, nutrition,
and social services to preschoolers and in Early Head Start, to
pregnant women, infants, and toddlers. Head Start and Early
Head Start programs are found in all 50 states, the District of
Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the Outer Pacific
Islands, and 150 Tribal nations. Program options include
center-based, home-based, and a combination. In 2007, a total
of 908,412 children, birth to age five, were enrolled in all Head
Start programs.

The Head Start program is administered by the Office of Head
Start, Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Grants
are awarded by the ACF Regional Offices and the Office of
Head Start’s American Indian Alaska Native and Migrant and
Seasonal Program Branches directly to public agencies, private
community and faith-based organizations, Indian Tribes, and
school systems for the purpose of operating Head Start pro-
grams at the community level.

The Head Start program has a long tradition of delivering
quality, comprehensive services designed to foster healthy
development in low-income children. Head Start grantee and
delegate agencies provide a range of individualized services in
the areas of education and early childhood development; medi-
cal, dental, and mental health; nutrition; and social services.
Parent involvement is key to program governance and service
delivery. In addition, Head Start collaborates with an array of
community partners to provide services that are responsive and
appropriate to each child and family’s developmental, ethnic,
cultural, and linguistic heritage and experience. To ensure qual-
ity services and fiscal accountability, all Head Start grantees
must adhere to the Head Start Program Performance Standards,
first published in 1972 and revised in 1998, and to other regu-
lations.

On December 12, 2007, President George W. Bush signed
into law, the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act
of 2007 (P.L. 110-134). The law upholds Head Start’s long-
vi   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         standing commitment to the development of young children, their families, and program staff. The Office
         of Head Start will be issuing regulations to reflect the new law and inform programs of new policies and
         procedures.


         Purpose of the Head Start-State Collaboration Offices
         Despite its Federal-to-local program structure, the Head Start community has long recognized that the states
         play an important role in the formulation and implementation of policies and initiatives that affect low-
         income children and their families. Collaboration on behalf of children and families is one of Head Start’s
         highest priorities.

         To further the collaborative efforts between Head Start and state partners, in 1990, the Head Start Bureau,
         now the Office of Head Start (OHS), designated Head Start-State Collaboration grants. The purpose was to
         promote the development of multi-agency and public/private partnerships at the state level to:

         ♦ Help build early childhood systems and enhance access to comprehensive services and support for all low-
           income children.

         ♦ Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other programs, services, and initiatives,
           augmenting Head Start’s capacity to be a partner in state initiatives on behalf of children and their fami-
           lies.

         ♦ Facilitate the involvement of Head Start in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions affecting the
           Head Start target population and other low-income families.

         Head Start-State Collaboration funds are used to ensure the coordination of Head Start services with health
         care, welfare, child care, education, community service activities, family literacy services, activities relating
         to children with disabilities, and services to homeless families. The Head Start-State Collaboration Offices
         play many roles in the development and enhancement of state-level efforts to build early childhood systems
         through linkages, coordination, and integration of policies and services.


         Funding the Head Start-State Collaboration Offices
         In 1990, the first wave of Head Start-State Collaboration grants were competitively awarded to 12 states:
         Kentucky, Maine, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South
         Dakota, Texas, and Virginia. In 1992, a second wave of HSSCOs were funded in 10 more states: Alaska,
         California, Colorado, Iowa, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Carolina, and Vermont.

         The report of the Advisory Committee on Head Start Quality and Expansion, issued in December 1993,
         specifically mentioned the Head Start-State Collaboration grants and recommended that: “[DHHS] should
         carefully consider placing these grants in Governors’ offices to help ensure greater coordination with all
         services for young children. In addition, any new collaboration projects should be developed with sustained
         involvement of representatives of the Head Start community in the planning and decision-making process.”
         Based on these recommendations, as well as the recognized need to sustain a visible presence in each state,
         funding was expanded to facilitate collaboration in priority areas.

         In 1996 and 1997, Head Start-State Collaboration grants were awarded to the 28 remaining states, plus the
         District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. In 2001, Collaboration Coordinators were added for the American
         Indian Alaskan Native and the Migrant and Seasonal farmworker populations.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   vii




In addition to annual funding, supplemental funding also has been made available periodically to the HSSCO
on a competitive basis for innovative activities and special projects in defined categories. Limited to $50,000,
these seed funds have been instrumental in engaging new and existing partners in strategic efforts to develop
and enhance professional development opportunities and to promote comprehensive, unified planning around
service delivery systems for young children and their families.


Priority Areas and Effective Implementation
In the 1998 reauthorization of the Head Start Act, Congress outlined eight priority areas for the Head Start-
State Collaboration Offices (HSSCOs). The HSCCOs are charged with facilitating coordination of Head
Start services with a complex array of other services. The HSSCOs are mandated to —

There are eight areas to which the State Collaboration Offices are to pay particular attention —

     ♦ Promote access to timely health care services
     ♦ Encourage collaboration with welfare systems
     ♦ Improve the availability and affordability of quality child care services
     ♦ Expand partnerships with school systems
     ♦ Collaborate with existing community services activities
     ♦ Strengthen family literacy services
     ♦ Increase opportunities for children with disabilities
     ♦ Support access for homeless children
Although the HSSCOs are expected to address the eight priority areas over the course of their five-year
grants, they are not required to address all of them each year.

The HSSCOs have demonstrated clearly the value of establishing a presence at the state level. Each state
develops a comprehensive five-year plan to determine goals and objectives that guide the work of its Collabo-
ration Office. HSSCOs have found that engaging many stakeholders in a strategic planning process, including
key state agencies, the state Head Start Association, Head Start grantees, and other early childhood organi-
zations, foundations, and businesses, has contributed to the credibility of the Collaboration Office and the
success of collaboration efforts.

Furthermore, those HSSCOs most successful in fostering working partnerships and facilitating a more coor-
dinated approach to planning and service delivery are influenced strongly by:

     ♦ Their level of autonomy and access to the Governor’s office
     ♦ The skills and experience of the Collaboration Director
     ♦ A willingness to work in partnership with the state Head Start
       Association and the Head Start and early childhood communities


The HSSCOs have established themselves as an effective single point of contact in each state for inform-
ing the Head Start community about state planning and programs. Likewise, the Collaboration Offices are
an important resource for state agencies seeking Head Start information and services. Effective partnerships
continue because the interests and needs of both Head Start and the states are addressed.
viii |     Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         HSSCOs have developed the capacity to work with partners to adjust plans and to respond in a timely man-
         ner to funding opportunities and shifts in programmatic priorities at the Federal and state levels. This flex-
         ibility is based on strong relationships and effective systems for data management and communications with
         the Head Start community. Ongoing support from Governors and other high-level state officials to develop
         initiatives with state agencies is essential. The result can be mutually beneficial changes in service delivery
         systems.


         Achievements in Collaboration
         This Annual State Profiles Report is based on the information submitted by each Head Start-State
         Collaboration Office to the Office of Head Start. The report highlights activities and achievements in 2007.
         It includes:

         ♦ A compilation of profiles from each State Collaboration Office.
           Each profile identifies the accomplishments in each of the priority areas, as well as describes new partner-
           ships and unique activities. Each HSSCO was also asked questions about local, state, and regional partner-
           ships with oral health providers and experts. This information is summarized in the state profile.

         ♦ A compilation of Regional Office collaboration.
           State accomplishments regarding collaboration with the ACF Regional Offices are summarized in this
           section.

         ♦ Oral Health Addendum.
           If states provided lengthy and detailed information about their oral health activities, a full version of
           their responses has been included at the end of this report.
program accomplishments
                by state
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS              |   1




                                      Alabama


Collaboration Director                Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                      areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
linda Hampton
                                      plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Alabama Dept. of Children’s Affairs
2 north Jackson Street                Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Suite 602                             services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Montgomery, Al 36104                  are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 334-223-0714                   at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 334-223-0712
                                      in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
linda.hampton@dca.al.gov              ♦ Statewide early learning standards for children birth to five
                                        were completed by a consortium of state agency representa-
Lead Agency Contact                     tives and community/faith-based practitioners. Aligning
                                        standards and statewide training are next steps.
Chris McInnish
Deputy Commissioner                   ♦ Forty-two percent of all Head Start grantees received state
                                        pre-kindergarten funding. That amounts to $1,035,096 ad-
Phone: 334-223-0502
                                        ditional funding, thus allowing improved quality program-
fax: 334-240-3054                       ming. This enables grantees to comply with professional
chris.mcinnish@dca.alabama.gov          development requirements. Pre-kindergarten funding will
                                        be used to hire 20 bachelor degree level teachers.
ACF Regional Contact
                                      ♦ Funding in the amount of $950,000 was allocated to Head
fannie Jenkins                          Start from the Alabama Legislature for the first time in the
                                        history of the State to offset the Federal 1 percent budget
ACf Region IV
                                        cut. This was distributed to all Head Start grantees upon
Atlanta federal Center                  meeting the State’s reporting requirements.
60 forsyth Street, nW
Suite 4M60                            ♦ Eighty-six percent of Head Start programs applied for state
                                        pre-kindergarten grants for FY09. The number of grants
Atlanta, GA 30303
                                        funded depends on state allocation yet to be determined.
Phone: 404-562-2852
fax: 404-562-2983                     ♦ A grant totaling $4,500 provided for the introduction of
fannie.jenkins@acf.hhs.gov              I Am Moving, I Am Learning during the annual Alabama
                                        Head Start Association (HSA) Conference for all Head
                                        Start grantees.

                                      ♦ State plan developed during National Pre-kindergarten/
                                        Head Start meeting, which was presented to the Alabama’s
                                        Children’s Policy Council for adoption and implementa-
                                        tion. Head Start gained recognition and insured ongoing
2   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




           representation on the Policy Council.

        ♦ Statewide Memorandum of Agreement completed between Head Start and IDEA Part B and Part C
          programs. Child Care was included as a full partner for the first time to provide services to special needs
          children enrolled in child care settings.

        ♦ Early Intervention System provided training for Head Start teachers on specific disabilities during
          quarterly district meetings throughout the State, thus improving the quality of services provided.

        ♦ Collaborative grant submitted to NPCDI and OSEP to better prepare providers to work effectively
          in inclusive preschool settings. While the grant was not funded, the process strengthened statewide
          partnerships.

        ♦ The Early Care Consortium, which consists of the departments of Rehabilitation Services, Human Re-
          sources, Education, Mental Health and Mental Retardation, and Head Start, identified best practices for
          use across programs for children ages birth to five.


        Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
        your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
        Health Care
        The Oral Health Coalition of Alabama includes the Alabama Medicaid Agency, Health Department, Alabama
        Arise, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama Association of Pediatric Dentists, Alabama Association of Pediatri-
        cians, Head Start, Cooperative Extension, and other groups that have increased utilization of dental services
        from 39.4% in 2006 to 41% in 2007. Children seen by a dentist for extractions increased from 4,927 to 4,988
        for the same period. Prevention rates for Alabama increased from 89.6% to 90.9%. All counties in Alabama
        have at least one dentist, and 89% of all Head Start enrollees have dental homes, and 92% have received pre-
        ventive services. The coalition is addressing workforce shortages, dental varnishes, and other initiatives.

        Oral Health
        A complete listing of members of the Oral Health Coalition of Alabama can be found at the end of this
        report.

        Welfare
        The HSSCO partnered with Alabama Arise, advocates, and other community groups to encourage passage of
        legislation increasing the state income tax threshold from $4,800 for a family of four to $12,500. The legisla-
        tion successfully passed the legislature and is awaiting the Governor’s signature. This was a significant feat for
        supporters of low-income families

        Child Care
        No activities reported.
                                                                                             AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS   |   3




Education
Partnership between Head Start and Alabama State University (HBCU) resulted in a kindergarten study and
conference. Head Start teachers, Head Start parents, kindergarten teachers, and school superintendents were
surveyed regarding their expectations for school readiness. Factors common to both Head Start and public
schools included social and emotional development, language, and math readiness. Participants participated
in a statewide kindergarten conference where meaningful dialogue occurred regarding what children actu-
ally need to be successful in school. The report found that Head Start parents had the highest expectation for
school readiness followed by Head Start teachers. Gaps were identified including areas emphasized on the
Head Start outcomes framework. Public schools used a variety of grading methods which made it difficult to
determine where emphasis was placed on children’s learning.

Community Services
Secured representation on the Alabama Children’s Policy Council after six years of trying to help policy mak-
ers understand the importance of Head Start’s presence in all 67 Alabama counties. The Council conducts
annual needs assessments and makes recommendations regarding children’s issues from birth to 19 to the
Governor and Legislature.

Family Literacy Services
The Early Language and Literacy Classroom Observation is used in both Head Start and state pre-kinder-
garten to increase the quality of the classroom environment for all children. Alabama Public Television is
partnering with Head Start and pre-kindergarten in impoverished rural counties as an interactive, visual, and
auditory supplement in this area.

Services to Children with Disabilities
No activities reported.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
Representation on the Governor’s Statewide Interagency Council on Homelessness has brought an awareness
of children of the chronically homeless. Alabama received an award from the Department of Housing and
Urban Development for this initiative to end homelessness by 2010.

Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
No activities reported.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ The HSSCO publishes a quarterly newsletter and annual report, distributed to all Head Start grantees,
  state partners, the Governor, and Legislature.

♦ First ever kindergarten conference held to share findings of a kindergarten study that examined Head
  Start teachers, parents, kindergarten teachers, and school superintendents’ attitude regarding school readi-
  ness. Kindergarten and Head Start teachers were able to share strategies to ensure school success. Report
  cards from every school district were used to determine which factors were measured in kindergarten and
  which variables were aligned at each level. The study showed that Head Start and kindergarten agree that
4   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




           the most important factors are social and emotional development, math, and language development. Other
           domains listed in Head Start Child Outcomes Framework were not measured in kindergarten, i.e. approaches
           to learning, creative arts, physical health, and development, etc. Head Start parents were found to have
           greater expectations of school readiness, followed by Head Start teachers.

        ♦ Participated on national Webinar as a presenter on Collaboration and Best Practices, as part of an orienta-
          tion for new HSSCO Directors.

        ♦ The Alabama Early Learning Guidelines were completed and are in the process of being printed and dis-
          tributed statewide. Head Start representation was included in the planning and implementation process.
          Scheduled focus groups that included Head Start staff and parents for input. Next steps include aligning
          all standards across programs.

        ♦ More than ten Head Start staff received scholarships through the Alabama Teacher Education And
          Compensation Helps (T.E.A.C.H.) program to assist in meeting the Federal professional development
          mandate.


        Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
        families in your State.
        East Coast Migrant and Seasonal Head Start has received resource information relative to professional devel-
        opment and disabilities services. It is fully represented as part of the Head Start community to be included in
        conferences and HSA activities.


        How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
        upcoming year?
        Following the Improving Head Start Act for School Readiness Act of 2007, several new areas will be includ-
        ed in the 2008-09 work plan, i.e. a statewide survey, activities involving the State Early Childhood Council,
        intentional inclusion of homeless families, and English Language Learners. The eight priority areas remain
        relevant with some work done in each. Over the 5-year grant period, most activities are scheduled to continue.
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS              |   5




                                 Alaska


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Paul S. Sugar
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
AK Department of education and
early Development
                                 Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
801 West 10th Street             services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 200                        are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
PO Box 110500                    at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Juneau, AK 99801                 in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 907-465-4862
                                 The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) worked
fax: 907-465-2806                with the State Department of Health & Social Services
paul_sugar@alaska.gov            (H&SS) to begin dissemination and implementation of the
                                 Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) plan.
ACF Regional Contact             Regular work groups met via audio conference; regional and
                                 state level meetings were held in 2007. Head Start has multiple
Julianne Crevatin                members on the committees including a member from the
                                 HSSCO. The ECCS draft was completed in December 2005,
ACf Region X
                                 with the final publications out in late Spring 2006. The HSSCO
2201 Sixth Avenue                and ECCS office gave joint and individual presentations on
Suite 300, MS-70                 the Early Learning Guidelines and the ECCS plan at state-
                                 wide and regional conferences and trainings throughout 2007.
Seattle, WA 98121
Phone: 206-615-3637
                                 The HSSCO worked with the Governor’s Office, the Educa-
fax: 206-615-2574                tion and Early Development (EED) Commissioner, and Best
jcrevatin@acf.hhs.gov            Beginnings (Alaska’s public/private pre-k initiative) to sub-
                                 mit a grant proposal to the National Governors Association
                                 for funding and technical assistance to develop a Governor’s
                                 Summit on Early Childhood. The proposal was funded, and
                                 the additional state departments, the University system, and
                                 other entities such as child care associations and the Head
                                 Start Association planned for the summit which took place in
                                 December 2007.


                                 Five year plan — Outcome 4, Goal 3

                                 An education assistant was hired, within EED through
                                 dedicated funding, to work with the State Head Start grants,
                                 the HSSCO, the Alaska Community Preschool Project, and
                                 Preschool Certification. The position was filled for approxi-
                                 mately 11 months. Additionally, the legislature funded the
6   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        early learning component within EED, which allowed for the creation of a third position in the department
        to work on HSSCO activities with specific focus on systems, materials, training and technical assistance
        development based on Alaska’s Early Learning Guidelines. The HSSCO was then able to intensify its work
        with the EED Commissioner’s Office, other state departments, Tribal entities, school districts, Head Start,
        preschool practitioners, business leaders, philanthropic foundations, and legislators to begin the implementa-
        tion process for the Alaska pre-kindergarten initiative based on the Ready to Read, Ready to Learn task force
        recommendations. This public/private pre-k initiative is now called “Best Beginnings.”

        The Department of Education & Early Development created a new component and a new position titled
        Early Learning. This component provides state general funds that support the work of the Best Beginnings
        initiative, furthering the work of Alaska’s Early Learning Guidelines, and the work of the HSSCO. This
        position came on line in November 2007 and has worked to bring Head Start involvement into the develop-
        ment of the Alaska Revised Developmental Profile based on specific goals across all domains of the Alaska
        Early Learning Guidelines (ELGs). Developed training materials for community presentations on the ELGs
        and held the first of three regional training of trainer’s sessions on the community uses of the ELGs. A core
        document was developed to support the work of the guidelines that set out activities for home and center use.
        The support document looked across all domains at 6-month intervals from birth to kindergarten. From this
        core document, a series of parent activity booklets will be developed, printed, and disseminated. Work began
        on the development of ELGs training for practitioners through workshops, in-service, and incorporation into
        existing coursework in the State’s universities.


        All outcomes and goals with a focus on Outcome 4 goals 1 and 2

        At the local level, the HSSCO continued to develop and implement initiatives and pilots to create Alaskan
        models in urban, rural, and remote settings. By utilizing local level professional development, some specific
        curriculum and approaches, and multiple funding sources as incentives, the HSSCO is seeing more local part-
        nerships and collaboration. Examples of these initiatives and pilots are provided below.

        In Alaska, most everything done concerning Early Care and Education involves Child Care, Child Care
        Licensing, ECCS, and Infant Learning Programs from the Alaska Department of Health & Social Services,
        the HSSCO, the State Head Start grant program, the 619 special education program, and other topic-specific
        staff in the Alaska Department of Education & Early Development; the University of Alaska system, the
        Child Care Resource & Referral Network, Head Start grantees, the Federally-contracted T/TA system for
        Alaska’s Head Start, the System for Early Education Development (SEED), the Alaska Association for the
        Education of Young Children, and Best Beginnings.

        In 2007, work continued on the implementation of the task force recommendations and the creation and early
        implementation efforts of Best Beginnings. A guidance council for this new group was formed, along with
        plans for the development of a system that could integrate its efforts with the HSSCO Early Learning Lead-
        ership Council and the ECCS Leadership Council. In late 2007, the implementation team, the Early Learn-
        ing Council, and the umbrella group made up of members from all councils worked toward the development
        of one high-level policy council. To that end, the state departments began the formation of the Interdepart-
        mental Early Childhood Coordinating Council (IECCC) to determine how the state entities would function
        with private partners to elevate ECE policy issues.

        Work with the Child Care Office in the Alaska Department Health & Social services continued with these
        activities:

        ♦ Inclusion of the Child Care Resource and Referral agencies in the development, dissemination, and imple-
          mentation of Alaska’s Early Learning Guidelines. The Department of Education and Early Development,
          HSSCO, and the Child Care Office provided the leadership and funding for this project in collaboration
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   7




   with Part B 619 and Part C Special Education. The first training-of-trainers took place in 2007, with two
   others set for 2008.

♦ Regular and frequent meetings between the child care administrator and the HSSCO.

♦ Inclusion of the child care administrator in the Alaska Head Start Leadership Council meetings.

♦ Inclusion of child care programs in collaborative models for the Alaska Community Preschool Project,
  along with school districts, Head Start, Even Start, and Parents As Teachers.

♦ Joint participation on the System for Early Education Development Council, the Alaska Strengthening
  Families Initiative team, the Early Childhood Comprehensive Services grant team, the Alaska pre-kinder-
  garten initiative (Best Beginnings), and all levels of the new leadership council.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
Many predominantly native communities in Alaska are losing public health nursing child health screen-
ing capabilities due to cutbacks in state funding. The Native Health Corporations are picking up the service
provision, however many do not currently have the capacity to travel to all of the communities to be served.
It is projected that it will take 2-3 years for this to develop. In the meantime, the HSSCO has developed a
partnership with Head Start, Public Health Nursing, the Yukon/Kuskokwim (Y/K) Health Corporation,
Denali Kid Care, Reach Out and Read, the Bethel Lions club, the Bethel VFW Ladies Auxiliary, the Bethel
Police and Fire departments, and other local volunteers. The objective is to provide a Bethel-based Health
Round-Up for up to six of the surrounding villages serving Head Start children and families. This Round-Up
will allow the existing infrastructure to provide the other Y/K Delta communities with on site screening while
preparation continues towards the full local implementation by the native health corporation. This project will
serve as a model of collaboration for other Head Start programs that may encounter difficulties in meeting the
Federal health screening requirements due to the state Public Health Nursing cutbacks and the development
needs of the Native Health Corporations expected to provide the service. In 2007, the State saw collaboration
support for this project move from fiscal to technical assistance. Local and regional systems have taken over
the primary fiscal responsibility for the program.

♦ Dissemination and beginning training of the Alaska Head Start Physical Activity & Nutrition (PAN)
  manual. This training is now provided for multi-system providers through the Child Nutrition unit of
  EED along with the Obesity Prevention Team in H&SS.

♦ The HSSCO and the Alaska Head Start Association (HSA) participation in the planning committee
  for the 2007Alaska Health Summit.


Outcome 1

♦ Continued involvement in building infrastructure and capacity of Behavioral & Mental Health Services

              ♦ Planned and implemented the 2007 Regional Safe Families Safe Homes multi-
                system collaboration on working with children and families exposed to violence.
8   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




                      ♦ Continued work on the Strengthening Families (SF) Initiative and began planning
                        for additional cadres of early care and education program participants. Held plan-
                        ning sessions for selection of a curriculum for use in SF programs and planned for a
                        2008 multi-system curriculum training.

                      ♦ Continued work with the ECCS Mental Health Committee on a plan to change
                        state processes for funding Early Childhood Mental Health services including
                        consultations. The following groups participate in the work group: Head Start,
                        Child Care, Part C/Infant Learning Program, Part B (Special Education), EPSDT,
                        DSDS, OCS/CAPTA, Title IV E, and Medicaid.

                      ♦ Continued work for a multi-system standardization of the screening process used
                        for EPSDT well child visits.


        Outcome 1, Goal 2

        Oral Health
        Continued involvement in the State Oral Health Advisory Committee, the Alaska Dental Action Coalition,
        and the Oral Health Education & Prevention Committee (as well as serving on the HSSCO Oral Health
        Committee).

        ♦ Participated in committee and work group meetings.

        ♦ Disseminated the results of an open mouth survey of Head Start children in a statewide sample.

        ♦ Continued regional multi-system follow-up on collaborative implementation of the Cavity Free
          Kids Curriculum.

        ♦ Shared data and interviews for the Cavity Free Kids summary and follow-up document.

        ♦ Began review of information for oral health brochure creation.

        ♦ Continued the Community Initiative Pilot Health Round-Up

        A detailed listing of statewide oral health activities and partnerships can be found at the end of this report.

        Welfare
        The HSSCO has seen its collaboration efforts strengthened in 2007 with the inclusion of the Director of
        Public Assistance in the Department of Health & Social Services on a few ongoing collaboration projects.
        The HSSCO looks to build on these efforts in 2008.

        Beginning in July 2003, TANF dollars were no longer used for Head Start purposes. The State continues to
        utilize its TANF funding in other areas. In the restructuring of state government, the Alaska Department of
        Health & Social Services created the Office of Children’s Services (OCS) within the Welfare section. Most
        remote Alaskan communities are eligible for waivers of the 5-year limit to TANF funds due to lack of eco-
        nomic opportunities in those communities.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   9




The HSSCO continued work with OCS in the implementation of the Strengthening Families Initiative. The
HSSCO ensured that at least one Head Start program would be selected for the Strengthening Families pilot,
as well as at least one rural/remote community. Implementation of an additional round of the Strengthen
Families Initiative took place in 2007 with new ECE program selection and a Legislative awareness session.
The HSSCO also began planning for a curriculum selection process and follow up training for programs
involved in the Strengthening Families Initiative. These should take place in 2008.

Outcome 6

Child Care
See response in first section of this report.

Outcome 3 goals 1, 2 and 3

Outcome 3, goal 2 and Outcome 4, Goals 1 and 3

Education
♦ Early Learning Guidelines project (see above)

♦ Improved collaboration with the Division of Teaching & Learning Support.

♦ Closer ties established with the Office of Special Education.

              ♦ Presentation to the State Conference of Special Education Directors on Strength-
                ening Head Start and LEA collaboration efforts. Head Start Disabilities Coordina-
                tors participation in the State Special Education Directors Conference in Septem-
                ber 2007.

              ♦ Held an informational breakfast meeting with Head Start Disabilities Coordinators
                and school district Special Education Directors.

              ♦ Facilitated collaborative efforts between individual Head Start programs and school
                district Special Education programs.

              ♦ Continued Head Start staff eligibility to take Education & Early Development
                department online course work on IEPs & the IEP process, Working with Chil-
                dren with Disabilities, and Children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders. The
                HSSCO continues to work for additional joint trainings and course work.

Outcome 2, Goal 1

♦ Closer ties established with the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) section.

              ♦ Continued presentations at a variety of statewide and regional conferences for Head
                Start, Child Care, and Educational entities on the continuity of Federal approaches
                regarding Head Start, child care, and schools through NCLB, Head Start require-
                ments and reauthorization, and Good Start, Grow Smart, the Early Learning Guide-
                lines, and other state ECE initiatives.
10   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Outcome 5

         ♦ Began meetings with the new manager of the State McKinney-Vento Homeless Education grant
           programs.

                      ♦ Introduction to existing systems and initial planning for multi-system work.

                      ♦ Held regional multi-system face to face in Fall 2007. (See the “Services to
                        Homeless Children and Families” section.)

         Outcome 5

         ♦ Secured additional funding for the Reach Out and Read (ROR) Initiative, incorporating information on
           literacy development into the well-child visits (and giving a book to each child) provided through four
           regional or sub-regional Public Health Nursing offices, two Native Health Corporations, and a Family
           Practice clinic in Anchorage. Implementation continued through 2007 with approximately 10,000 books
           disseminated.

                      ♦ Alaska has more than doubled the number of clinics providing this service.

                      ♦ Further funding secured through a U.S. Department of Education grant as part
                        of the Alaska Community Preschool Project.

         Outcome 1 and Outcome 4

         ♦ In 2007, the HSSCO saw continued efforts to regain Alaska Head Start’s E-rate eligibility. The new
           approach will focus on changing the State’s definition of an elementary school to include preschool and
           Head Start for non-foundation funding purposes.

         Outcome 5, Goals 5 and 6 and Outcome 4, Goal 3

         The Alaska Community Preschool Project (ACPP): The HSSCO is finishing the final carry-over year of
         this pilot project in seven urban, rural, and remote communities around Alaska. Some include school district
         and Head Start collaboration; others include districts with Even Starts, Parents As Teachers, child care, or
         just schools. All must provide a balanced approach providing opportunities for play and exploration, medi-
         ated learning experiences, and teacher-directed instruction. They incorporate a dialogic reading program and
         Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment-Basic into their existing program. To date, 250 children are being
         served. Almost 80 teachers, classroom aides, specialists, and administrators have been trained in Mediated
         Learning Experiences through five rounds of intensive 5-day training (with monthly follow up audio confer-
         ences) in Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment–Basic.

         Outcome 4, Goal 1 and Outcome 5, Goal 6

         Community Services
         Alaska has only one Community Action Agency (CAA) that is actively involved in almost all projects the
         HSSCO supports. The HSSCO holds a seat on the Board of RurAL CAP as the EED representative.

         Established relationships with other non-CAA community agencies through participation in the Alaska Faith
         Based & Community Initiative, and through state, regional, and local initiatives.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   11




Family Literacy Services
♦ Both Even Start and the Reach Out and Read programs either provide Family Literacy Services or links
  to programs that provide literacy services.

♦ Shared training in Mediated Learning and Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment for early childhood and
  dialogic reading.

♦ Implemented a Family Literacy strand at the 2007 Alaska Head Start Leadership Conference with a post-
  conference day of training provided through the National Head Start Family Literacy Center.

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ Aside from the above-mentioned efforts with Special Education (IDEA Part B), the HSSCO continued
  to work with Health & Social Services (H&SS) on a Memorandum of Agreement around IDEA Part C.
  Final departmental approval is still pending. Sign-off is expected in 2008.

♦ Continued support and involvement in the Alaska Transition Training Initiative. Three regional training
  and planning sessions were held around the State.

♦ Shared training for school districts, Even Start, and Head Start programs in Mediated Learning and
  Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment-Basic. Continued ongoing planning and implementation for ex-
  panding these training efforts to include school district kindergarten teachers and staff along with addi-
  tional Early Childhood program teachers and staff. Implementation to take place in 2006-07.


Outcome 2, all Goals

Services to Homeless Children and Families
Three regional workshops were conducted in October 2007 to improve collaboration around education of and
services for homeless children and youth. The HSSCO helped support the project by hiring Patricia Julianelle,
a consultant to the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, to facilitate the workshops. The
project was spearheaded by the HSSCO Director, and the State McKinney-Vento Program Manager, who
worked with School District homeless liaisons and Head Start directors and Family Services Coordinators.
The goal of the project was to ensure that all key agencies working with homeless children and youth were
provided with the most current information regarding recent changes in the Head Start, McKinney-Vento,
and IDEA reauthorizations so that cross-system issues could be discussed and inter-agency relationships
could be strengthened.

School District Liaisons in Fairbanks, Anchorage, and Kenai invited Head Start staff and community service
agencies to full-day working meetings. Workshops were tailored to meet regional needs. After key issues
were presented, various agencies met in small groups to develop or strengthen working agreements to ensure
maximum utilization of existing resources, clarify working roles and responsibilities, and streamline/improve
communication. Strategic plans were drafted and work continues locally. New Memorandum of Agreements
(MOAs) have been established; existing MOAs have been updated and renewed. Some transportation prob-
lems have been solved by sharing resources and drivers. Information pamphlets designed for unaccompanied
youth have been published and distributed.
12   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
         Through the implementation of ECCS, which includes the System for Early Education Development
         (SEED), the Early Learning Guidelines, the Ready to Read, Ready to Learn, the Governor’s Office, and
         EED, the HSSCO and/or Head Start grantees are involved in virtually all active Early Childhood projects
         at the state level. Head Start representatives sit on many committees in the recent efforts to develop and
         implement the Alaska pre-kindergarten initiative in committees working on issues from advocacy to literacy
         curriculum development and QRIS.


         Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
         Outcome 5, Goals 2, 5, and 6

         The HSSCO continues to build on the work facilitated by the Region X Office to strengthen the relationship
         with the Alaska HSA. Collaboration with Head Start programs, school districts, and community organiza-
         tions are continuing and, in some cases, expanding. Additional state resources were focused on language,
         literacy, math, science, cognition, and school readiness, as well as funding for professional development, safety
         issues, and the implementation of an ACF-initiative response process targeting assistance to specific ACF pri-
         orities. Finally, the HSSCO has seen some success in articulating the braided funding approach of the State in
         its support of Federally-funded Head Start grantees.


         Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
         families in your State.
         As there are significantly higher populations of Alaska Natives, Asians, and Pacific Islanders in Alaska, the
         HSSCO supports the State’s Hispanic population in much the same way it supports other populations with
         culturally and linguistically unique needs. The HSSCO celebrates and incorporates cultural diversity with
         specific involvement and activities, provides as much home language use in the day-to-day activities and home
         communications as possible, and utilize these connections to strengthen English language development.


         How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
         upcoming year?
         Aside from ongoing projects, the HSSCO intends to be more intentional in efforts with the Welfare system.
         While the Strengthening Families initiative brought the HSSCO back into the welfare system office, and
         the HSSCO has begun meeting with higher-level personnel in Public Assistance, the HSSCO still needs to
         expand its efforts. This effort also holds true for Community Services. While the HSSCO works well with the
         CAA and other individual community programs, work with faith-based and other community organizations
         needs to continue to expand and develop at the local and regional level. The HSSCO will work to develop
         regional and local partnerships to meet the goals of those specific activities. The HSSCO also seeks to increase
         involvement in the Best Beginnings initiative and in the work integrating the existing state and private early
         care and education efforts with new initiatives and partners. This effort would move the HSSCO closer to
         working for all of Alaska’s children and families, including Head Start, rather than a Head Start program
         reaching out to others who serve children and families.
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 13




                                American Indian/
                                Alaska Native

Collaboration Director          Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Brian D. f. Richmond
                                plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
American Indian/Alaska native
tA network /AeD
                                Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
1875 Connecticut Avenue, nW     services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Room #1036-n                    are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Washington, D.C. 20009          at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 202-884-8609             in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 202-884-8660
                                An over arching goal of the American Indian/Alaska Native
brichmon@aed.org                (AIAN) Collaboration Office is to establish and enhance col-
                                laborative efforts to support American Indian/Alaska Native
ACF Regional Contact            Head Start programs in the 27 states in which AIAN grantees
                                are located.
Renee Perthuis
Acting Branch Chief             Regarding collaboration with pre-kindergarten, the AIAN
                                Collaboration Director distributed the following message to
American Indian/Alaska native
Program Branch                  the AIAN-TAN Local Specialists to forward to their AIAN
                                grantees: “There is a big push at the national level to secure
Office of Head Start
                                funding for Universal Pre-k. ...In states where this [pre-k]
1250 Maryland Avenue, SW        collaboration has occurred, proactively and inclusively, ECE
8th floor                       programs have been strengthened. The key, it seems, is for all
Washington, D.C. 20034          parties concerned to have an honest dialogue about their assets
                                and challenges, and how they can best plan to collaborate.
Phone: 202-260-1721             Please urge your grantees, if they have not already done so, to
fax: 202-401-5113               work with their Head Start Tribal consortiums, Head Start
reneeaian@acf.hhs.gov           State Associations, Child Care partners, etc., to collaborate
                                on the future of ECE within their states. We cannot afford to
                                miss this window of opportunity.”

                                ♦ Participated in the “National Forum on Head Start and
                                  Pre-K” held in Washington, D.C., where it was stated that
                                  while “there are more players in the sandbox now...we don’t
                                  need to arm wrestle over the children.” Participants were
                                  urged to focus on the following questions:

                                      ♦ What is working?
                                      ♦ What challenges do we face at the state
                                        and national levels?
14   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




               ♦ What recommendations to improve the system do you have regarding policy or practices?
               ♦ What can we do individually to make it better?
         ♦ Distributed Pre-K Now report entitled Better Outcomes for All: Promoting Partnerships between Head Start
           and State Pre-K to all AIAN-TAN local specialists for their perusal and distribution to their respective
           grantees. The report addresses four common collaboration challenges: comprehensive services, differing
           missions, eligibility requirements, and teacher credentials.

         ♦ Created a tip sheet on “Collaboration with Child Care and Pre-K” for distribution to AIAN grantees.
           This addressed wrap-around services, and how the needs of children and families can best be met through
           collaborative arrangements with other early childhood care providers.


         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
         your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
         Health Care
         ♦ Developed a tip sheet on “Collaboration with Health Service Providers” to offer suggestions to AIAN
           grantees on ways to build productive relationships with their local health care service providers.

         ♦ Developed a draft logic model to further discussion of collaborative work pertaining to oral health. This
           was shared with the Indian Health Service/Head Start Program Director for her perusal. The model uses
           the basic outline of a CDC logic model. Outputs in the draft logic model were framed as measurable
           components that could be used in evaluating the progress of the project.

         ♦ Shared information for the promotion of mental health with AIAN-TAN and TAC-12 staff concerning
           a series of free conference calls, sponsored by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, on different
           aspects of child trauma. Staff were asked to distribute the information to their grantees.

         Oral Health
         AIAN local, state, and other oral health-related activities can be found at the end of this report.

         Welfare
         ♦ Provided AIAN-TAN Local Specialists with information on U.S. Department of Justice grants for com-
           bating domestic violence, etc., and providing a safer environment to benefit children and families on the
           reservations.

         Child Care
         ♦ Prepared for a topical conference call on the “Fiscal Challenges of Collaboration” (with child care, etc.) by
           inviting all AIAN grantees to provide specific questions they wished to have addressed. With responses
           received from Head Start directors, the AIAN Collaboration Director collaborated with the AIAN-TAN
           Fiscal Specialist to research and compile appropriate materials to be used, and together, they created an
           interactive session.

         ♦ Facilitated the “Fiscal Challenges to Collaboration” conference call, with more than 43 participants
           representing 23 grantees across 13 different states. After sharing protocol, AIAN Collaboration Director
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   15




   and AIAN-TAN Fiscal Specialist launched into a cost allocation role-play based on grantees’ previously-
   submitted questions. At the conclusion, the conference call was opened for additional questions from the
   participants; these focused on employing staff for both Head Start and child care; regulations for child
   care transportation vis-à-vis Head Start regulations; how to more readily discern distribution of admin-
   istrative costs across programs; and whether it is fiscally- and regulatory-permissible to support a mixed
   classroom of Head Start- and child care-sponsored children. Most questions were answered immediately,
   with a promise of follow-up for those that were more complex. Staff later sent out applicable follow-up
   resources.

♦ Modified the materials developed for the Fiscal Challenges of Collaboration conference call to create a
  useful tip sheet for those who were unable to attend.

♦ Contacted the National Indian Head Start Directors Association (NIHSDA) President and the Alaska
  Head Start Association Vice-Chair to announce that, for the NIHSDA Conference in Anchorage, the
  AIAN Collaboration Director is proposing to put together a “Collaboration Forum” with a panel of AIAN
  grantees who demonstrate best practices in collaboration (with child care, pre-kindergarten, local school
  district, or health services, etc.). To prepare for the forum, AIAN Collaboration Director invited individual
  directors who exhibited best practices to participate in a preliminary conference call. Panelists discussed
  format and content, and decided on an optimal structure for the forum where participants could share
  information and freely ask questions.

♦ Facilitated a “Collaboration Forum on Maximizing Resources” at NIHSDA, where six AIAN Head Start
  directors with experience in building successful collaborative relationships shared their challenges and
  successes with their AIAN colleagues. The overall goal of the forum was “to empower Head Start grant-
  ees with helpful ideas to create productive collaborative relationships for the benefit of American Indian/
  Alaska Native children and families.” Collaboration forum panelists represented a diversity of Tribal
  cultures and geographic locations. Forum panelists shared information on collaborating with Child Care,
  LEAs, local colleges and universities, public libraries, health professionals, fitness centers, Tribal housing
  departments, and other Head Start programs. They also discussed a proactive strategy for marketing their
  programs. According to feedback received, the forum was very successful in inspiring other to create new
  collaborations.

Education
♦ Participated in the “Strengthening State Systems Meeting,” held in Washington, D.C. During the meet-
  ing, the AIAN Collaboration Director worked with Cluster 6 (AZ, NM and UT) to share ideas and learn
  what innovative practices were being employed to promote collaboration and program support in those
  states. Arizona tackled declining resources by addressing the problem legislatively and, after an intense
  marketing campaign, saw the passage of Proposition 203, which will provide an estimated $150 million-
  $180 million annually for early childhood development in the State.

♦ In follow-up to meeting, the AIAN Collaboration Director provided AIAN-TAN Local Specialists in
  Arizona with information on Proposition 203, “Arizona’s Early Childhood Development and Health
  Initiative,” which is projected to provide funds for early childhood programs over the next several years.
  (Money will be disbursed through “regional partnership councils” comprised of members from those
  regions. In deference to sovereignty, if an Indian Tribe is located within that region, there must be at least
  “one public official or employee of a Tribal government” represented on the council. An Indian Tribe can
  also elect to have its Tribal lands treated as a separate region by the board.) The AIAN Collaboration
  Director explained that Proposition 203 means that Tribes can access more resources for early childhood
  development, but it is vitally important to plan ahead. Tribes will need to decide if they want to operate
  independently as a separate region (which means more autonomy, but more paperwork) or participate as
16   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




            a member of a regional partnership council. The AIAN Collaboration Director requested that the AIAN-
            TAN Local Specialists provide this information to the Tribes and share with them the Web site link for
            more information.

         ♦ Worked with ten staff from five Arizona Head Start programs (Cocopah, CRIT, Gila River, Hopi and
           Pascua Yaqui) to discuss potential resources available under Proposition 203, visions for their individual
           programs, SWOT analysis, SMART objectives, and collaborative next steps. The AIAN Collaboration
           Director worked with grantees on various exercises to develop their plans for the future.

         ♦ Interviewed three Head Start directors to ascertain how their programs have become models for success
           in professional development through community partnerships and collaborations. Information collected
           will be shared with all AIAN grantees in a Professional Development Resource Manual.

         ♦ Interviewed the Outreach-Based Training Specialist for the College of Menominee Nation to determine
           the status of the college’s Family Service Worker training program. The information will be shared with
           AIAN grantees looking to provide training to their FSW staff.

         Community Services
         ♦ Presented information on collaborative partnerships and professional development opportunities for
           Family Service Workers to a cluster of 34 participants representing ten Tribal grantees from California
           and other states. Participants said that they learned: ways to make a partnership better, how to collaborate
           with the community partnerships, and new ideas to make new collaborations.

         ♦ Aided in the collaboration between Hopi Head Start and the Arizona Community Foundation by
           providing background and contact information on a regional affiliate (i.e., the Hopi Foundation, a.k.a.
           Lomasumi’nangwtukwsiwmani). The Foundation is now interested in supporting Head Start’s plans for
           new facilities construction.

         Family Literacy Services
         ♦ Thanked the director of WGBH Boston’s “Between the Lions” early literacy program for her report on
           the American Indian Head Start Literacy Initiative with the pueblos of New Mexico. (The project “made
           a significant difference in the English language literacy skills of American Indian children in the partici-
           pating Head Start programs.”) Also, discussed plans to provide assistance to AIAN grantees in Oklahoma
           and/or Alaska. The AIAN Collaboration Director provided names of the Oklahoma grantees and Local
           Specialist, and also provided contact information for the Region X TA Program Director (since, at that
           time, Alaska corresponded to Region X).

         ♦ Researched grants to support family literacy for an AIAN Head Start grantee in North Dakota in response
           to a request from AIAN-TAN Local Specialist. Sent information on one possible corporate source and
           shared information on Reading Is Fundamental, which will donate books.

         ♦ Contacted a representative from the National Book Scholarship Fund to inquire about the possibility of
           AIAN grantees obtaining books for their programs and to ascertain whether or not their application cycle
           was still viable.

         ♦ Discussed with the Michigan Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) a scheduled family lit-
           eracy training in that state. The Michigan HSSCO requested contact information for AIAN-TAN Local
           Specialist in Michigan to include him in the loop and extend the invitation for Tribal Head Start grantees
           in Michigan to attend the training (sponsored by Sonoma State).
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   17




Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ Participated in a Wisconsin gathering of Tribal Head Start directors, Wisconsin Department of Public
  Instruction (DPI), Department of Health and Family Services (DHFS), and Bureau of Indian Educa-
  tion (BIE) staff to discuss “expanding interagency collaboration to improve service to infants, toddler and
  young children with disabilities and their families.” Nine of the eleven Wisconsin Tribes were represented,
  as well as CESA (Cooperative Educational Services Agencies) Early Childhood Program Support Teach-
  ers and County Birth to RESource staff who worked in areas that include the Tribes. Gathering was a
  pivotal initiative to discuss and expand Tribal and state collaboration.

♦ Provided feedback on non-compliance issues related to collaboration (1304.41(a)(4)) for a Tribal Head
  Start program. The AIAN Collaboration Director suggested that to rectify the non-compliance, the
  grantee might work with the LEA to renegotiate an interagency agreement. Several useful collaboration
  resources were shared with the grantee.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
No activities reported.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ Working with AIAN grantees in 27 states, the AIAN Collaboration Director does not have direct influ-
  ence in any one state’s policies, plans, processes, or decisions. However, at the request of AIAN grantees
  and/or AIAN-TAN Local Specialists, the AIAN Collaboration Director networks with HSSCO coun-
  terparts to seek clarification on policies and to encourage states to actively include Tribal representatives in
  joint planning sessions in acknowledgment of their status as sovereign nations. If AIAN grantees feel that
  they have been incorrectly disallowed services, the AIAN Collaboration Director works with appropriate
  state officials to generate a positive outcome or decision.

♦ The South Dakota Head Start Association president and the Region VIII TA Liaison told the AIAN
  Collaboration Director that, with the departure of the South Dakota HSSCO Director, they would like
  to have Tribal grantee input into a replacement. The AIAN Collaboration Director provided them with
  contact information for the Tribal Head Start directors in South Dakota and also put them in contact with
  the AIAN-TAN Local Specialist, in case of further assistance needed.

♦ Participated in collaboration conference call for Wisconsin with the HSSCO, AIAN-TAN Local Special-
  ist, and other state representatives to brainstorm how to follow up on successes of the September con-
  ference. AIAN staff was able to persuade state officials to consider holding their next meeting at Tribal
  facilities, which would help to increase the participation and respect of Tribal grantees.

♦ Participated in a brainstorming conference call related to collaborative efforts among AIAN grantees in
  three states (MI, MN, and WI) that are interested in working on combining resources (e.g., cooperative
  training) to enhance program efforts. A draft survey was circulated among the group, which was approved
  and will be sent to AIAN grantees in the three states to gauge training needs.

♦ Contacted the California Integrated Waste Management Board to inquire about the state’s FY2007-08
  application documents for California’s Tire-Derived Product Grant Program. This program can help local
  Head Start programs with funding for playground resurfacing to insure safe outdoor play spaces for chil-
  dren. Representative said they are “currently working with legal department to finalize the new applica-
  tion.” After later follow-up, the AIAN Collaboration Director informed Local Specialists for California
  that $2.4 million is now available (with a maximum of $100,000 per grant) for use with resurfacing Head
  Start playgrounds. Local Specialists were to contact their grantees.
18   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
         ♦ Conducted numerous foundation grant searches for AIAN grantees to find funding sources to support
           immediate program needs (e.g., facilities construction, playground resurfacing, dental services to under-
           served communities, children’s mental health services, community gardens). For example, when learning
           of some Alaska Head Start grantees’ aged buildings sinking into the permafrost, the AIAN Collaboration
           Director located four foundations offering possible sources of funds for new building construction.

         ♦ Welcomed new HSSCO directors to the HSSCO team and provided them with information on the Head
           Start Program Performance Standards that relate specifically to Tribal grantees (i.e., sending copies of the
           AIAN-TAN “Tip sheet on Information for Monitoring Reviewers” that enumerates differences for grant-
           ees of sovereign nation status).


         Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
         families in your State
         AIAN programs exist in 27 states. Support for services to Hispanic children was provided to individual pro-
         grams, as requested. For example, when asked by a Family Service Worker for Hispanic families, the AIAN
         Collaboration Director shared Web site links for the Head Start publications (in Spanish) and the Migrant
         and Seasonal Head Start (Region XII) T/TA center. The AIAN Collaboration Director also provided contact
         information for a Region XII T/TA staff who volunteered to provide support as needed.


         How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
         upcoming year?
         ♦ Will utilize format of successful Collaboration Forum to replicate similar gathering at this year’s National
           Indian Head Start Directors Association conference.

         ♦ Will continue work with the Wisconsin gathering, the Arizona Indian Head Start Directors Association,
           and other innovative groups to expand Tribal and state collaborations.
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 19




                                  Arizona


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Connie Shorr
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Governor’s Office for Children,
Youth and families
                                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Division of School Readiness      services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
1700 West Washington Street       are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Suite 101                         at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phoenix, AZ 85007                 in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 602-542-3199
                                  ♦ Statewide Quality Rating System Development.
fax: 602-542-4644                   Accomplished the integration of Head Start into the
cshorr@az.gov                       system design. Head Start Program Performance Standards
                                    and PRISM review will be used as tools within the system
Lead Agency Contact                 to ease the access and participation of Head Start pro-
                                    grams participation. Challenges remain around inclusion of
eva lester                          Tribal Head Start programs, but discussion continues. The
                                    Tribal programs are not licensed by the State, therefore the
Phone: 602-542-6003
                                    threshold for admission into the new state quality system is
fax: 602-542-4644                   more difficult to establish.
elester@az.gov
                                  ♦ Department of Education and Head Start partnerships.
ACF Regional Contact
                                    Through meetings and document exchange with Head
                                    Start grantees, Department of Education representatives,
Kristen Hayes                       and the Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO)
                                    Director, established protocol for establishing and main-
ACf Region IX                       taining healthy relationships with LEAs. The Department
90 7th Street                       of Education is sending communications to the LEAs with
9th floor                           review of protocol and responsibilities for LEAs to follow
                                    in the service of children with special needs.
San francisco, CA 94103
Phone: 415- 437-8440
                                  ♦ Head Start Community Assessments. The HSSCO gath-
fax: 415-437-8438                   ered, and through a partnership, commissioned a report on
kristen.hayes@acf.hhs.gov           Arizona Head Start programs community assessments.

                                  ♦ Arizona Head Start Association (AHSA) Strategic Plan-
                                    ning. The HSSCO planned facilitated and contracted for
                                    consultation services for a strategic planning process with
                                    the AHSA. The goal of the process was to renew the roles
                                    of each organization, establishing with the HSSCO their
                                    desired deliverables from the AHSA. In order to achieve
20   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




            this goal, a comprehensive process was conducted including: review of the HSSCO direction, grant work,
            and reporting; and review of AHSA background information and other documentation relative to the
            historical and current state of the organization. Conducted a pre-planning meeting with the AHSA
            Executive Director and Board Executive Committee to develop the meeting plan, objectives, and agenda;
            conducted a review and developed the vision, mission, and guiding principles; accomplished an environ-
            mental scan and established key directions. With the entire AHSA, the HSSCO went though a series of
            meetings and individual interviews in order to accomplish the following tasks: establish outcomes, define
            the goals and measurable objectives; and develop of possible specific strategies. The process resulted in a
            draft document Strategic Plan for AHSA. The plan was handed over to the AHSA for further develop-
            ment and use.

         ♦ AHSA 2006 Annual Report. The HSSCO contracted with the AHSA to produce and distribute the
           annual report.

         ♦ Arizona’s Early Childhood Emergent Leaders Project. March 16, 2007 “Living Leadership: State
           Development and Importance of Collaboration.” The HSSCO provided support and participated in the
           activities to increase the Head Start participation, including hosting a Head Start issue day; securing Head
           Start participation in a day at the capital; and increasing outreach in recruiting. Ten Head Start represen-
           tatives were invited (though only four attended, including directors and other management staff, joined the
           Emergent Leaders for the day. Agenda included Gov. Napolitano’s State of the State Address and Press
           Conference, as well as information about the political process. Head Start presentation included

                       ♦ Quality: Teacher credentials, ratios, group size, curriculum, comprehensive services,
                         and systems approach.

                       ♦ Partnerships: How partnerships are valued at Head Start; how partnerships are
                         measured, including examples from around the State (ADE, child care, services,
                         increasing number of children served, community colleges or universities), and roles
                         of partners and outcomes.

                       ♦ Community Assessments: What Head Start grantees do and how often. Handouts
                         were provided with resources for more information (Web sites, contact numbers of
                         Head Start statewide).


         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
         your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
         Health Care
         ♦ The HSSCO Director worked with the State ECCS Director to identify and outline the overlap between
           the two grants, shared responsibilities, and areas where sharing of resources would maximize work results.
           The ECCS director will continue to work with the HSSCO Director during and after the transition of the
           ECCS grant to First Things First.

         ♦ The HSSCO, in partnership with the AHSA, distributed 100 additional Child Care Health and Safety
           Manuals. Distribution includes a one-on-one introduction/orientation to the manual including recom-
           mendations for use, review of contents and tools, and registration materials for updates and communica-
           tion purposes. This project is a continuation of the work begun last year in creating new partnerships with
           child care and Head Start and in addressing the health and safety of children in Arizona.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   21




♦ Asthma Prevention and Awareness Toolkits were distributed to all grantees and delegate Head Start cen-
  ters. The toolkit included sections of information concerning: Introductions to Asthma, Children, Parents,
  Teachers, and Environmental Awareness Information.

♦ The purpose of the Mental Health Conference was to provide early childhood staff a hands-on training
  so as to better cope with the increasing challenges that they face in the areas of behavioral health with
  children and families. To that end, the AHSA asked for volunteers to be part of a planning committee
  to develop the conference that would be inclusive of Head Start and Early Head Start staff, child care
  community representatives, early childhood community representatives, and the HSSCO. The 1st Annual
  Mental Health Conference was held October 5-6. Approximately 100 Head Start and Early Childhood
  Educators attended. Forty individuals in Arizona are now certified in the Non-Violent Crisis Intervention
  Program as a result of their participation in a pre-conference session. The second day saw a wide range of
  training sessions for participants on First Things First, Conscious Discipline, and Working with Children
  Exposed to Violent Behavior. Overall, the comments received were very positive, and plans are being
  discussed for next year’s conference.

♦ The May 16 “Train the Trainer” Environmental Health Project designed by ADEQ was merged to include
  the Asthma Coalition’s work with the screening of children. Both ADEQ and the Asthma Coalition are
  working to expand the project outside Maricopa County, and this training began that process. However
  funds have yet to be identified to fully implement the program statewide. The AHSA Director has contin-
  ued the dialogue with Hazel Chandler and Mannie Bowler regarding the issue of asthma. Ms. Chandler
  has established collaborative relationships with the City of Phoenix and Maricopa County Head Start
  programs and has provided asthma screenings for children and educational materials to staff and parents
  regarding identification of asthma triggers in the classroom and home. More than 120 classrooms have
  conducted the screenings and have been provided the information; more will be completed by the end of
  November. Another fund source will need to be identified in order to continue the project in Maricopa
  County and expand efforts statewide. In meetings with Ms. Chandler and Ms. Bowler, it was decided that
  the Head Start template that has already been developed and implemented in Maricopa County can be
  used statewide. “First Things First” funding will be requested to expand the program statewide.

Oral Health
♦ AHSA’s Health Committee developed an Oral Health Manual designed to help Head Start programs,
  and others, implement program practices to strengthen work in the area of Oral Health. The subcommit-
  tee members have been meeting together quarterly.

♦ The Health Committee now has a new member — Dr. Cottam — who is one of the stronger partners
  that AHSA has in the development of language to address the language change within the EPSDT
  program. With Dr. Cottam’s assistance, more partners will be brought together to further the work in this
  area. AHSA developed a position paper on changes to the Arizona health care cost containment system
  regarding EPSDT language. There have been three support letters submitted regarding this position paper
  by First Things First, United Way of Northern Arizona, and A.T. Still University, the Arizona School of
  Dentistry and Oral Health.


State-level

The statewide Oral Health Coalition originates in the Department of Health Services, Bureau of Oral Health
and meets at least quarterly to assure oral health of all children, with specific focus on underserved popula-
tions. Specific focus areas have included promoting fluoride varnish and educating parents about the impor-
tance of good oral health, particularly for children’s baby teeth.
22   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




           Contact: Anna Self
           Community Development Coordinator
           AHDS Bureau of Oral Health
           Phone: 602-542-1866


         Local-level

         The AHSA has been working closely with partners in the oral health community to engage in collaboration
         and partnerships.

         Head Start Partners include:

           Carolyn Willmer
           Chair, Arizona Head Start Association Health Committee
           City of Phoenix Human Services Department
           200 West Washington, 19th floor
           Phoenix, AZ 85003-1611
           Phone: 602-534-3037
           Carolyn.willmer@phoenix.gov


           David leard, Health Services Manager
           northern Arizona Council of Governments Head Start
           121 e. Aspen Avenue
           flagstaff, AZ 86001
           Phone: 928-213-5207
           dleard@nacog.org


           Connie Morrison, Health Coordinator
           Pinal Gila Community Child Services
           1750 South Arizona Blvd.
           Coolidge, AZ 85228
           Phone: 520-723-1224
           Connie.morrison@pgccs.org


         Oral Health Community Partners include:

           Ranee tuscano
           State of Arizona Bureau of Oral Health
           1740 West Adams, Room 205
           Phoenix, AZ 85007
           Phone: 602-542-2945
           tuscanr@azdhs.gov
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   23




  Dr. Robert Birdwell
  Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System
  801 e. Jefferson, MD-4200
  Phoenix, AZ 85034
  Phone: 602-417-4198
  Robert.birdwell@azahcccs.gov


  Dr. Wayne Cottam
  Instructor, A.t. Still university
  5850 east Still Circle
  Mesa, AZ 85206
  wcottam@atsu.edu


Additional Information

Arizona continues to face a provider shortage in rural areas outside of Phoenix, Tucson, and Flagstaff. There is
particular need for pediatric providers who specialize in the examination and treatment of young children.

Some Head Start providers have found confusing the semantics between examinations and screenings as they
relate to oral health. The HSA recommends that the Head Start Program Performance Standards, PIR guid-
ance, and secondary supporting agencies such as Maternal and Child Health Bureau use common language to
eliminate confusion. The HSA is also seeking guidance on the use of dental hygienists for initial screenings/
exams. The HSA has received conflicting information on this, with the most recent message on how to ef-
fectively use dental hygienists in Head Start programs seeming to contradict previous guidance—they request
further clarity on this issue.

Efforts that are underway to address these issues include:

♦ A new oral health guidebook was funded by the HSSCO, developed by the AHSA, and released to Head
  Start programs and supporting agencies.

♦ A position paper was submitted to AHCCCS (Arizona’s Medicaid agency) regarding the need for ad-
  ditional clarification regarding reimbursement for dental hygienists.

♦ A second position paper was produced, recommending the reimbursement of medical providers for fluo-
  ride varnish applications during well-child visits.

♦ With funding through the State ECCS Grant, oral health training has been provided through T-3 (Train
  the Trainer) Institute at the University of Arizona.

♦ First Things First has identified “first oral health visit” as one of the program goals/benchmarks for this
  new statewide, multimillion-dollar initiative, and is working in collaboration with the American Academy
  of Pediatrics, AHCCCS, and the oral health community to recommend that pediatricians be able to con-
  duct this oral health visit since families have better access to pediatricians than to pediatric dentists.

♦ Oral health remains a focus of the First Things First Health Committee, which is working to develop
  strategies to assure that good oral health is part of early childhood development. Staff has met with dental
  hygienist educators who they believe are in the best position to influence dental practices.
24   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         ♦ Arizona has a robust child care health consultation system, which includes an emphasis on oral health.
           Once the Quality Improvement and Rating System is launched, ten additional health consultants will be
           deployed across the State to continue to improve oral health in child care settings.

         Welfare
         ♦ The HSSCO Director serves on the Governor’s Task Force on Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which
           is charged with increasing opportunities for low-income families to access the EITC, other tax credits,
           and free tax filing assistance via Volunteer Income Tax Assistance sites. The EITC is one of the largest
           anti-poverty programs in the country and, when coupled with proven financial educational strategies, has
           been credited with lifting more children out of poverty than any other Federal aid program. In 2007, 471
           trained tax preparers at Vita Sites prepared 57,861 tax returns, a 198 percent increase over 2003.

         ♦ The 2006 AHSA Annual Report and 2006 AHSA Fact Sheet were distributed beginning July 27. The 2007
           AHSA Fact Sheet was distributed at the end of the year.

         Child Care
         ♦ The HSSCO participated in the Arizona State Team of the National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initia-
           tive at ZERO TO THREE/Child Care Bureau. The HSSCO worked with CCDF administrators in the
           DES Child Care Office and other partners to move forward system initiatives to improve the quality and
           supply of infant and toddler child care. The group was tasked with developing deeper knowledge about
           specific elements of the early care and education system that support quality infant and toddler child care.
           Arizona’s project activities focused on supporting professional development; increasing staff involvement
           in system improvement efforts related to infants and toddlers; and developing deeper knowledge in order
           to support efforts in the areas of Quality Rating Systems and Infant/Toddler Credentials.

         ♦ The AHSA Director and the Region IX Local TA Specialist completed the assigned project for the
           PRISM-NAEYC crosswalk. The project is a comparison between the NAEYC standards and the Head
           Start Program Performance Standards; Head Start teachers/teacher assistants and program administrators;
           and the NAEYC Program Administrator and the Head Start director positions. The project was com-
           pleted in May 2006. Head Start maintains that the monitoring process and the Performance Standards
           are part of programs accreditation process and as such are similar to other child development program
           accreditation processes and instruments.

         Education
         ♦ In partnership with the Piper Trust Foundation, all Early Head Start staff across Arizona had the op-
           portunity to participate in training on the use of the widely popular Arizona Parent Kits. Use of these kits
           in Early Head Start programs is expected to provide a stronger foundation for new parents to support
           children’s growth and to help parents gain understanding of child development. With the support of the
           HSSCO, AHSA purchased additional kits for Early Head Start programs.

         ♦ Statewide Child Care and Early Education Development System (SUCCEEDS) is the educational
           registry system for child care and early education practitioners in Arizona. Practitioners include child care
           providers, teachers, assistant teachers, directors, Head Start teachers, public school preschool teachers,
           elementary teachers, school-age care teachers, or anyone involved with the care and education of young
           children. This registry maintains current information regarding the training and education of each prac-
           titioner. Currently there are 1,602 Head Start staff on the SUCCEEDS registry; this has increased from
           1,553 in one quarter. One of the objectives in the HSSCO work plan is to reduce the number of Head
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   25




    Start staff on the SUCCEEDS inactive list by 5 percent. Through the support of AHSA there was a 14.6
    percent reduction in the inactive list.

Community Services
♦ In 2007, the Governor’s Office for Children, Youth and Families participated in ongoing discussions with
  the Buffett Foundation and the Bounce Early Learning Network about bringing Educare to Arizona.
  These discussions have included several Head Start grantees, as well as elementary school districts, univer-
  sities, nonprofits and philanthropy. The Educare funders released a RFP in Fall 2007 in order to identify
  the strongest potential partnership.

Family Literacy Services
♦ For the fourth consecutive year, Gov. Napolitano has provided every first-grade student in Arizona with a
  book. The program was expanded to include a book for each fourth-grader last year. In February the excess
  books were donated for distribution to children and families through AHSA. Approximately 2,185 books
  were distributed to Head Start agencies.

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ Arizona’s Early Childhood Inclusion Coalition (ECIC). Work continues on this statewide initiative to coor-
  dinate and integrate the services for children with disabilities, age birth to 5, and their families. The group
  has established a Web site, completed a public awareness campaign plan, and mapped strategies for fiscal
  support and implementation for the upcoming year. The focus of the ECIC will be on Professional De-
  velopment and more specifically to create a professional development module that will provide the needed
  training and skills to staff on the issues of inclusion.

♦ Arizona Early Intervention Program (AZEIP). The HSSCO Director met with the AZEIP Director and
  several grantee representatives, as a group, to work through the current plans for the AZEIP reorgani-
  zation and the work with Head Start programs. The HSSCO has served as a resource for facilitating
  individual grantee meetings to address particular issues and concerns of rural, urban, transition, case work,
  contractors, and other issues as needed.

♦ With the planned redesign of the Part C delivery system in Arizona, plans to amend the prior Part C
  Statewide MOU became moot. The delivery design will look different across the State and thus, a state-
  wide agreement is not possible at this time. A draft Letter of Agreement was prepared. This draft can be
  adapted to address the local needs of the Early Head Start agency. A list of key players within a given
  service area who should sign the Letter of Agreement was developed.

♦ NACOG Head Start took the lead in development of a list of questions regarding the new Arizona Early
  Intervention system and how to navigate it. The HSSCO Director contacted the staffs within the ap-
  propriate agency and set up the communication channel for the questions to be heard. A meeting was
  scheduled and attended. The questions were answered, and direction was given for how to proceed with
  development of local MOU and/or Letters of Agreement.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ The purpose of the Interagency and Community Council (ICCH) is to guide the development and imple-
  mentation of a state-level plan to end homelessness for Arizonans, with a focus on homeless families. The
26   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




            ICCH identifies policy, practice, and funding actions that can be taken at the state level to prevent and
            end homelessness through support, involvement, and coordination among multiple state agencies and the
            private sector. The ICCH is comprised of representatives from the Departments of Commerce, Correc-
            tions, Economic Security, Education, Health Services, Housing, Juvenile Corrections, Veterans Services,
            and the Office of the Courts, the Government Technology Agency, the Governor’s Office for Children,
            Youth and Families, and the Arizona Heath Care Cost Containment System. In addition, the Governor
            has appointed private sector representatives to the Council.

         ♦ The development and implementation of the Arizona State Plan to End Homelessness is being achieved
           through a project structure that includes the ICCH, the State Homelessness Work Group, and community
           input and involvement. The HSSCO Director has attended these meetings. In 2007, the ICCH discussed
           a budget request for services for homeless school-age children, but in light of Arizona’s financial state this
           budget request did not move forward. It is hoped that this issue will be revisited in future years since many
           homeless families with school-age children also have younger children.


         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
         The HSSCO continues to be a key player in the development of plans as Arizona moves into the new phase
         influenced by establishment of the new Early Childhood Development and Health Board (First Things First).
         The HSSCO is participating in the work groups and planning committees, and is facilitating the involvement
         of Head Start in the local partnerships leading to the program roll-out in 2009. The work groups included
         State Agency Directors who are working on quality improvement, health, and professional development
         systems for children, birth to 5.


         Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
         English Language Learners — Preliminary Report Committee: HSSCO worked with the lead agencies Chil-
         dren’s Action Alliance-Penelope Jacks, Arizona State University, Chicanos Por La Causa, Southwest Human
         Development, and Child and Family Resources on a study of English Language Learners in Arizona in Early
         Childhood Ages and Early Education Settings.


         Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
         families in your State.
         Every effort is made to address language barriers for Arizona families whose primary language is Spanish.
         However, beyond the basic issue of considering language with regard to publications and activities, specific
         efforts have not focused solely on Hispanic children. Efforts on the part of the HSSCO during this year
         remained broad and addressed all children and families. The population of Arizona’s Hispanic/Latino children
         birth through five has increased 5 percent while the total children identified as White dropped by 4 percent in
         2006 compared to 2000.


         How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
         upcoming year?
         No activities reported.
                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 27




                             Arkansas


Collaboration Director       Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                             areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Ann Patterson
                             plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
1400 West Markham
Suite 406                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
little Rock, AR 72201        services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 501-371-0740          are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 501-370-9109            at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
ann@arheadstart.org
                             in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
                             Goal 1
Lead Agency Contact
                             To support a collaborative system of quality early childhood educa-
tonya Russell, Director      tion options to include Arkansas Head Start and the Arkansas Bet-
Division of Child Care and   ter Chance for School Success state pre-kindergarten program
early Childhood education    for three and four-year-old children.
Arkansas Department of
Human Services               The Arkansas Better Chance for School Success (ABCSS)
Phone: 501-682-0494          funding increased to $100 million through state general rev-
fax: 501-683-6060            enue in the 2007 State Legislative Session. The Head Start-
                             State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) continued to work with
tonya.russell@arkansas.gov
                             the Arkansas Head Start Association (HSA), Arkansas Advo-
                             cates for Children & Families, Arkansas Kids Count Coalition,
ACF Regional Contact         Arkansas Early Childhood Association, Invest Early Coalition,
                             and other early childhood advocates to support and enhance
Susan Johnston               collaborative efforts. The increase in state funding provided for
ACf Region VI                more than 22,000 3- and 4-year-old children from families of
                             up to 200 percent of Federal poverty to be served in state-
1301 Young Street
                             funded pre-kindergarten programs in 2007 along with 9,950
Room 937                     Head Start children being served throughout the State.
Dallas, tX 75202
Phone: 214-767-8844          Participated in the Governor’s press conference on January 25,
                             which released results of a preliminary report of the longitudi-
fax: 214-767-2038
                             nal study of Arkansas Better Chance for School Success. Gov.
susan.johnston@acf.hhs.gov   Mike Beebe stressed that his long-standing commitment for
                             quality early childhood education included quality Head Start
                             programs and that state funding for additional pre-kindergar-
                             ten slots was to supplement, not supplant, Federal funding for
                             Head Start in Arkansas.

                             Worked in partnership with Division of Child Care & Early
28   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Childhood Education and Invest Early in Education in sponsoring Early Education Community Collabo-
         ration roundtable discussions across the State. The forums were held throughout June in Hope, Batesville,
         Harrison, and Fort Smith. They provided an opportunity for Head Start, Community Action Agencies, ABC
         providers, and other early childhood programs to take an objective look at the current status of early education
         in the community and link all stakeholders who have an interest in the success of the State’s youngest citizens.
         Common needs/expectations and issues were discussed in the forums, as well as related opportunities and
         potential solutions. Three areas were identified as a common thread in all locations: collaboration, enrollment,
         and a perceived uneven playing field. The summary report was shared and discussed with various organiza-
         tions, stakeholders, and public officials. It was also made available through the HSSCO. The HSSCO is work-
         ing on implementation of potential solutions identified through these community forums.

         In preparation for the Early Education Community Collaboration Roundtables, three Head Start directors
         took part in a videotaping for an early education collaborative showcase of Arkansas programs involved in in-
         novative partnerships at the local level. This video was a part of the Roundtable Forums held in June.

         The HSSCO participated in National Head Start Association, Office of Head Start, Pre-K Now, and regional
         conference calls and meetings focusing on pre-k partnerships, including specific issues in Arkansas. Pre-K
         Now hosted a conference call “Leadership Matters: Governor’s Pre-K Proposals” in April. The Policy Director
         for Gov. Beebe was a presenter on the conference call and spoke of the collaborative efforts between Arkansas
         Better Chance for School Success and Head Start programs.

         Participated in National Head Start-State Collaboration meeting in Washington, D.C., in January in con-
         junction with the National Forum on Pre-K and Head Start. Other participants from Arkansas included
         representatives from Department of Education, Department of Human Services Division of Child Care &
         Early Childhood Education, Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families, and HSA.


         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
         your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.

         The following goals are cross-cutting across the eight priority areas for the HSSCO.


         Goal 2: To support a sustainable system for young children’s social-emotional health to include consultation, education,
         and early intervention for children, families, teachers, and caregivers.

         Goal 3: To increase the number of Head Start and Early Head Start centers who attain and maintain State Quality
         Approval.

         Goal 4: To assist in building early childhood systems and access to comprehensive services and support for all low-
         income children.

         Goal 5: To promote widespread collaboration among Head Start and other programs, services, and initiatives.

         Goal 6: To facilitate the involvement of Head Start in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions affecting the Head
         Start population and other low-income families.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   29




Health Care
The HSSCO Director continued to serve on Arkansas System of Care Stakeholders Planning Committee, in-
cluding Medicaid workgroup, Special Language task force, and committee on Cultural Competency. Recom-
mendations presented to the newly appointed Governor’s Behavioral Health Commission in August to assist
in the reform of delivering appropriate services to children and families in need of mental health intervention
and treatment.

The HSSCO continued leadership role in collaborative effort with Division of Child Care & Early Child-
hood Education and Division of Behavioral Health Services in the Arkansas Early Childhood Mental Health
Initiative. The HSSCO participated in routine conference calls and meetings with sponsoring organizations,
pilot sites, and evaluation team.

The HSSCO Director served as member of the team for curricula review of proposed training for child care
and early childhood educators in the area of pre-kindergarten social and emotional foundations.

The HSSCO Director was selected to serve on ABCD (Assuring Better Child Health Development)
Stakeholders Group. Arkansas was selected by National Academy for State Health Policy to participate in
the ABCD Screening Academy, a multi-state learning project focusing on preventive care of children whose
health care is covered by Medicaid. This project supports efforts to improve early identification of young chil-
dren with developmental problems.

Information was disseminated to local Head Start programs about an educational initiative on “Living Well
with Sickle Cell,” a program through Partners for Inclusive Communities. The Head Start community has
become involved in assisting with getting the message to the target population.

Oral Health
The first Arkansas Mission of Mercy (ArMOM) held in Little Rock in May provided 1,542 patients, includ-
ing children, in desperate need of dental services in excess of $630,000 in donated dental care. The event was
sponsored by Arkansas State Dental Association and Delta Dental of Arkansas. The Arkansas Oral Health
Coalition and the Arkansas Homeless Coalition (the HSSCO is active in both) volunteered in this effort.

The HSSCO Director completed a two-year term as chair of the Arkansas Oral Health Coalition. The Direc-
tor participated in planning a retreat held in March to discuss the future direction of Oral Health Coalition.
Fluoridation brochures and posters were disseminated to Arkansas Head Start programs.

The HSSCO Director served as member of Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors (ASTDD)-
HSSCO Planning Team and participated in various conference calls and webinars pertaining to oral health
and Head Start.

State-level
  Arkansas Oral Health Coalition
  Contact: lynn Mouden, DDS, MPH
  Director, Office of Oral Health
  Arkansas Department of Health
  4815 West Markham, Slot 41
  little Rock, AR 72205
  Phone: (501) 661-2595 • lynn.mouden@arkansas.gov
30   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Local-level
         Two Arkansas Head Start programs have Oral Health Initiative grants:

           Contact: Child Development, Inc.
           Jo Ann Williams, Executive Director
           P.O. Box 2110
           Russellville, AR 72811
           Phone: (479) 968-6493
           jwilliams@childdevinc.org

           UAMS Head Start – Early Head Start
           Mary K. McKinney, Director
           7415 Colonel Glen
           little Rock, AR 72204
           Phone: (501) 570-5000
           mckinneymaryk@uams.edu


         Other local partnerships include:
         Child Development, Inc.

         The Oral Health Initiative (OHI) dental partners provide classroom education to children, as well as educa-
         tion to parents at parent meetings. Topics for children include: tooth brushing, flossing, visiting the dentist,
         and good food choices. Parent meeting topics include oral hygiene, early childhood caries, nutrition, HIPPA,
         and fluoride. Head Start home visitors and center-based teachers in OHI sites are utilizing “Head Start Les-
         son Plans: a Teachers Guide for Creating Healthy Smiles.”

           Contact: lisa Miller
           Oral Health Resource Specialist
           lmiller@childdevinc.org


         Arkansas Human Development Corporation (AHDC) Early Head Start

         Dr. Russ Gorman was named as a Public Health Hero by the Arkansas Department of Health. Dr. Gorman
         assists the AHDC Early Head Start program by reviewing practices and policies related to the promotion
         of positive oral health development. Education for the children is incorporated into the daily curriculum. Dr.
         Gorman provides each child at the center with two free dental screenings per year by coming to the center to
         screen the children in their familiar environment. He also provides educational discussions and materials for
         parents.
           Contact: Arkansas Human Development Corporation
           early Head Start Program
           Kim Qualls, Director
           102 College Drive
           Hot Springs, AR 71913
           Phone: 501-620-4323
           kqualls@arkansasbabies.com
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   31




Additional Information

As mentioned above, the HSSCO is involved in the annual Arkansas Mission of Mercy (ArMOM) that was
held for the second year in 2008 in Little Rock. Plans are being made for outside the central Arkansas area for
2009.

Welfare
The HSSCO Director participated in Alliance meetings with Division of Child Care & Early Childhood
Education and Division of Children & Family Services to discuss potential partnerships and collaborative
efforts between child welfare and child care organizations.

The HSSCO, in coordination with the HSA, is active in Arkansas Coalition for Economic Security (ACES)
and assisted with activities for an economic security fact sheet that was a part of the packet of information for
attendees at the Family Security Conference held in Pine Bluff in November. ACES’ mission is to promote
economic security of all Arkansans through public education, advocacy, and collaboration.

Additionally, there was a TANF transfer to the Division of Child Care & Early Childhood Education of $7.5
million to support quality preschool education and child care for low-income working families.

Child Care
The HSA, in cooperation with the HSSCO, set a goal to increase the number of State Quality Approved
child care programs, and consequently, comprise 30 percent of the quality centers in the State. Sixty-six per-
cent of the Head Start centers in Arkansas are State Quality Approved or have NAEYC accreditation. Work
continues in cooperation with the Arkansas TA Specialists to support Head Start programs and centers that
want to achieve state quality approval, and several have developed plans to move in that direction.

The HSSCO Director continued involvement with Arkansas Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems
(ECCS) Planning Initiative and served as an active member of the Social Emotional/Medical Homes
committee.

The HSSCO actively participated, in coordination with Arkansas Head Start programs, in Arkansas Chil-
dren’s Week activities held April 22-28, 2007 throughout the State.

The HSSCO worked with Division of Child Care & Early Childhood Education and Strengthening Families
Arkansas in identifying Early Head Start partners in the State Partnership for Prevention Project, a ZERO
TO THREE Initiative to strengthen states’ child abuse and neglect prevention initiatives, focusing on sup-
porting the capacity of child care providers to help prevent child maltreatment in families with very young
children.

The HSSCO Director participates in the Arkansas Out of School Network; state conference held in Little
Rock in September.

Education
The HSSCO is working with Arkansas legislative representatives, Department of Education, Division of
Child Care & Early Childhood Education, HSA, and the early childhood community in proposing a “Birth to
Five” licensure for Arkansas. This effort is in response to an Interim Study of the State Legislature.
32   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Served on panel “Pre-K Effects on Rural Children’s Education in Arkansas” at the 2007 Arkansas Rural
         Development Conference in Hot Springs in May. Panel members included HSSCO Director, Division of
         Child Care & Early Childhood Education Director, Early Childhood Advocate, Superintendent of Schools,
         State Legislative Representative, and Mark K. Shriver, Vice President and Managing Director of Save the
         Children’s U.S. Programs.

         Assisted Arkansas Parent Education Network (APEN) and Department of Education in state conference on
         family involvement held in October in Hot Springs. The HSSCO Director serves on Parent Education and
         Involvement Task Force.

         Community Services
         The HSSCO and the Arkansas Commission on Child Abuse, Rape & Domestic Violence sponsored Endan-
         gered Children in Arkansas forums in Russellville in May and in Searcy in October. Topics included informa-
         tion on the Oklahoma Head Start Domestic Violence Initiative, new child abuse legislation and mandated
         reporting, and substance abuse issues, including effective and efficient identification and protection of children
         endangered by methamphetamines and other drugs.

         Collaborating partner for Arkansas Governor’s Family Friendly Employer Awards Luncheon held in April,
         sponsored and funded by Department of Human Services, Division of Child Care & Early Childhood Edu-
         cation. The Arkansas Family Friendly Initiative recognizes Arkansas employers for establishing and providing
         resources that support employees in balancing the needs of both work and family.

         The HSSCO Director facilitated Mental Health Protocol Committee for Arkansas Crisis Response Team
         (AR-CRT). Protocol adopted by AR-CRT Board of Directors in July. The HSSCO Director serves as co-
         chair of the Education and Training Committee. Participant in Arkansas Crisis Response Training held in
         December at new Arkansas Department of Emergency Management located at Camp Robinson in North
         Little Rock.

         The HSSCO assisted with Little Rock cooling station, hosted by Arkansas Homeless Coalition and other
         volunteer and faith-based organizations, in coordination with the cities of Little Rock and North Little Rock,
         to assist people who were homeless, disabled, or elderly during the summer heat wave.

         Family Literacy Services
         The HSSCO is working with the Department of Education and Division of Child Care & Early Childhood
         Education in developing materials showcasing quality early childhood opportunities in Arkansas for use with
         “Reach Out & Read,” a project of the Arkansas Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

         Participant in focus group sponsored by Department of Education to discuss coordination of early childhood
         services, including family literacy and transition.

         Services to Children with Disabilities
         HSSCO Director continued work with partners in ECHO (Early Childhood Hearing Outreach) project
         through Arkansas Children’s Hospital, in coordination with the National Center for Hearing Assessment
         and Management, Utah State University. The State ECHO team trained Region VI TA Network personnel
         in May. The HSSCO Director participated in panel presentation at IPP meeting held in Washington, D.C.
         in July to discuss Arkansas activities and potential expansion throughout the State and region. Through the
         effort of the Arkansas TA Specialists and the HSSCO, all Early Head Start programs, as well as Migrant and
         Seasonal Head Start programs, should be involved in the ECHO project within the next year.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   33




Arkansas was accepted as state team for Special Quest training held in August in North Carolina. The
HSSCO Director served as team coordinator; other members include the Division of Child Care & Early
Childhood Education, Partners of Inclusive Communities, Child Care Resource & Referral, and a parent of a
young child with a disability.

The HSSCO Director served as a member of Arkansas Coalition for Education of Students who are Deaf or
Hard of Hearing (ACED); State Summit on Early Intervention and Education held in September.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The HSSCO Director served on the conference planning committee for state homeless conference, “Chil-
dren, The Forgotten Homeless” held in Little Rock in October. The HSSCO assisted with a children’s art and
poetry contest on “What a Home Means to Me,” with recognition of children’s art and poetry displayed at a
reception prior to the conference at a local art gallery.

The HSSCO Director serves on Arkansas Homeless Coalition and Arkansas Homeless Policy Academy.
Volunteered at Thanksgiving Outreach Dinner held in November; assisted with children’s activities and dis-
tribution of backpacks to children. Participation in Holiday Caravan in December; distributed gifts, clothing,
blankets, and food to children, families, and individuals who were homeless.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
The HSSCO Director and the Arkansas HSA President met and shared information with the Governor’s
staff in the area of state pre-kindergarten and Head Start collaborative efforts, Head Start reauthorization
updates, and other items pertinent to services for low-income children and families.

In coordination with Arkansas Coalition for Economic Security, a Beans & Cornbread Reception for Arkan-
sas legislators was held in March to share information about agencies working with low-income families and
children. Numerous state legislators and constitutional officers attended, including the Governor and Lieuten-
ant Governor.

The HSSCO Director serves on the Arkansas Kids Count Steering Committee. Various activities included
Arkansas Kids Count Day at the Capitol in March, Post-Legislative Conference held in May, and planning
retreat in November to set public policy priorities for the next two years.

The HSSCO Director was an invited participant in Leadership Workshop on EPSDT: Advancing a Collab-
orative Action Agenda to Improve Child Health held in November. The workshop was hosted by the Arkan-
sas Department of Human Services, Division of Medical Services, and the Arkansas Department of Health,
Family Health Branch. The Maternal & Child Health Bureau, HRSA, DHHS, was a co-sponsor of this
event. The purpose of the workshop was to provide key child health leaders, including senior state officials,
pediatric providers, families, and advocates, as opportunity to discuss important topics relating to child health.
The structured and facilitated discussions gave participants an opportunity to advance potential strategies for
improving child health services in Arkansas, as well as opportunities for collaboration.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The HSSCO Director served as member of Arkansas Coalition for Children of Incarcerated Parents. Link-
ages made with local Head Start programs to support families and children of incarcerated parents.

The HSSCO Director selected to participate on Advisory Committee for Evaluation, which is looking at pro-
34   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         grams in Arkansas that are addressing childhood obesity. Developed on-line survey tool to gather information
         on the types of groups and what they are doing to address the issues of childhood obesity. Shared information
         on I Am Moving, I Am Learning and Arkansas Head Start programs that are implementing this initiative.

         Selected as board member for the Arkansas State Parent Information and Resource Center, a collaborative
         project of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, and the Jones Cen-
         ter for Families.


         Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
         families in your State.
         The HSSCO Director serves on the Advisory Committee for Welcome the Children, a project funded by the
         Division of Child Care & Early Childhood Education and administered by Partners for Inclusive Commu-
         nities. Using research-based training materials, the primary goal is to provide T/TA to help early childhood
         providers, including Head Start, understand various cultural issues and enhance techniques for supporting
         Hispanic children and families.

         The HSSCO co-sponsored Welcome the Children “Celebrating Cultural Harmony” second annual training
         conference held in May. The focus of the training was to enhance understanding of cultural issues, teach strat-
         egies to support Hispanic children, and make appropriate referrals of children who exhibit possible develop-
         mental delays.


         How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
         upcoming year?
         The HSSCO is pleased with progress achieved in 2007. Work continues in addressing the challenges and op-
         portunities of local collaboration between Head Start and Arkansas Better Chance for School Success. Due
         to rich collaborative partnerships at the state level, tremendous positive interaction occurs routinely. Flexibility
         affords the HSSCO the strength to enhance linkages and integration of policies and services, although it is
         a struggle to continue the current work, as well as new directions defined by the Improving Head Start for
         School Readiness Act of 2007, with flat funding.
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 35




                                     California


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
nancy Remley
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
California Department of education
1430 north Street                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Suite 3410                           services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Sacramento, CA 95814                 are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 916-446-7349                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 916-323-6853
                                     in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
nremley@cde.ca.gov                   California’s subsidized early education system serves hundreds
                                     of thousands of preschool-aged children through state and
Lead Agency                          Federally-funded institutions.

Michael Zito                         Through annual contracts to school districts, county offices
California Department of education   of education, proprietary and nonprofit organizations, county
                                     welfare departments, colleges and universities, and cities, the
Address same as above
                                     California Department of Education (CDE) administers
Phone: 916-323-9727                  2,000 contracts to more than 800 agencies serving more than
fax: 916-323-6853                    161,000 children aged birth to five.
mzito@cde.ca.gov
                                     California’s Head Start system, the nation’s largest, serves over
                                     104,000 children and their families through a system of over
ACF Regional Contact                 200 grantee and delegate agencies. More than half of Califor-
                                     nia’s Head Start grantees and delegate agencies are also CDE
Kristen Hayes
                                     early care and education program contractors. Even given the
ACf Region IX                        enormous number of California’s children and families in sub-
90 7th Street                        sidized early education programs, less than half of the State’s
9th floor
                                     eligible low-income children are currently being served.

San francisco, CA 94103
                                     The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) has
Phone: 415-437-8440                  developed strong partnerships with the Region IX Office staff
fax: 415-437-8336                    and Technical Assistance Network, the California Head Start
khayes@acf.hhs.govº                  Association (CHSA), and the State Departments of Educa-
                                     tion, Health Services, Social Services and Developmental
                                     Services, First 5 California, and others to assist in collaborative
                                     efforts.

                                     Over the last year, the HSSCO has done the following to sup-
                                     port full-day, full-year partnerships between Head Start and
                                     state pre-kindergarten programs:
36   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         ♦ Worked with the California Department of Education to revise regulations which will closely align state
           preschool child selection criteria with Head Start. A waiver process for state selection criteria is also being
           used.

         ♦ Worked with the CHSA, CDE, and Region IX Office fiscal, program, and TA staff on a matrix of relevant
           state and Federal fiscal reporting requirements for partnerships.

         ♦ Worked with the developers of the Desired Results Developmental Profile Access (the State assessment
           tool for preschool-aged children with disabilities) to ensure alignment with the Head Start Child Out-
           comes Framework.

         The HSSCO has also worked closely during the past year with the Early Childhood Comprehensive Sys-
         tems (ECCS) grantee at the California Department of Public Health. The HSSCO is on the ECCS steering
         committee and is currently sharing best practice information in early childhood screening with Head Start
         programs as part of this partnership.


         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
         your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
         Health Care
         Improve access to health care services.

         ♦ Currently planning three statewide child safety trainings for grantees with CCL, Regional Office, and
           the CHSA.

         ♦ Facilitated development of a California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Child Health and Dis-
           ability Program/Head Start MOU, including statewide training for Head Start staff and partner agencies.

         ♦ Working with the CDPH ECCS project on identification of best practices in developmental/mental
           health screening.

         Oral Health
         The HSSCO is a member of the National Head Start Oral Health Work Group and has assisted in planning
         for nationwide oral health initiatives.

         A listing of local oral health partnerships in the State can be found at the end of this report.

         Welfare
         No activities reported.

         Child Care
         Improve accessibility and availability of quality child care.

         ♦ Development of a Federal/state programs fiscal matrix to assist grantees braiding various funding streams.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   37




♦ Region IX/First 5/CDE fiscal guidance to counties with “Power of Preschool” Universal Pre-k activities.

♦ Initiated changes to child enrollment priorities for state pre-k full-day partnerships with Head Start.

               ♦ Waiver process for general child care contractors

               ♦ Regulations package for state preschool contractors

♦ Facilitating a Community Care Licensing (CCL) – Head Start work group, comprised of Head Start
  directors, CCL staff, and CHSA.

               ♦ Developed “Head Start 101” training for licensing analysts.

               ♦ Currently identifying grantee licensing issues and barriers via a program survey.

               ♦ Advocating for licensing/regional office waivers for homeless, other populations.

Education
Expand and improve education opportunities in early childhood programs

♦ Published Bridges Journal higher education issue (Summer 2007).

♦ Coordinating technical assistance to Head Start and state preschool program teaching staff as member
  of the California Department of Education’s Preschool Instructional Network advisory committee.

♦ Collaboration with First 5 and CDE on an upcoming statewide workforce development project.

Community Services
No activities reported.

Family Literacy Services
No activities reported.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Improve opportunities for children with disabilities.

♦ Facilitating “Head Start Inclusion Project” with Regional Office Developmental Disabilities TA Specialist,
  CDE Special Education Division representatives, and grantees. This group is planning several statewide
  roundtable events for grantees and special education partners.

♦ Facilitating Desired Results Developmental Profile Access (California’s assessment tool for children with
  disabilities) crosswalk with the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework.
38   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Services to Homeless Children and Families
         Improve services to homeless children.

         ♦ Via CCL – Head Start work group: discussing licensing issues around homeless children:

                       ♦ Possible development of one license for birth-to-5-year-old children to better serve
                         homeless population.

                       ♦ Possible Federal/state waivers (i.e. allow programs to serve over 20 children if one or
                         more are homeless).

                       ♦ Work with CHSA to identify model homeless programs in the State.


         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
         The activities listed above provide ample evidence of Head Start involvement in planning with the California
         Department of Education, Child Development and Special Education divisions, the Department of Develop-
         mental Services, Department of Social Services Community Care Licensing Division, Department of Public
         Health Services, as well as other important state partners such as First 5 California. While many of these col-
         laborative activities were initiated by the HSSCO, the CHSA was an important catalyst in others.


         Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
         families in your State.
         The CHSA and the HSSCO are both on the State Advisory Committee for the California Preschool In-
         structional Network (CPIN), which is funded by the CDE to impart best-practice information and resources
         to the field. CPIN regionally based staff include English language lead staff located across the State. These
         staff train Head Start, as well as state pre-kindergarten providers in ELL best practices and have had a special
         focus this year on the newly released California Preschool Learning Foundations, which have a section on
         English-language development foundations specifically designed for children entering preschool with a home
         language other than English.
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 39




                                Colorado


Collaboration Director          Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Darcy Allen-Young
                                plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Office of the lt. Governor
130 State Capitol               Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Denver, CO 80203                services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 303-866-3390             are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 303-866-2525               at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
darcy.allen-young@state.co.us
                                in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
                                Upon taking office in January 2007, Gov. Ritter asked Lt. Gov.
Lead Agency Contact             O’Brien to assume leadership for early childhood issues. Her
                                commitment to Head Start and early childhood education is
Bruce n. Atchison               evidenced by the strategic decision to bring together – in the
Phone: 303-866-2526             Lieutenant Governor’s Office – a number of key early child-
                                hood staff positions including the Head Start-State Collabora-
fax: 303-866-5469
                                tion Office (HSSCO) Director; the Early Childhood Compre-
bruce.atchison@state.co.us      hensive Systems (ECCS) grant manager; the creation of a new
                                position, the Early Childhood/P-3 Policy Director; and the
ACF Regional Contact            Early Childhood Councils Advisory Team Coordinator. The
                                hiring of these positions was completed in October 2007, with
Debbie Hedin                    the HSSCO position filled in July 2007.
ACf Region VIII
                                At the end of the legislative session in May 2007, legislation
1961 Stout Street
                                was enacted that expanded the number of local early childhood
federal Building                councils to 31, representing 56 of the State’s 64 counties. The
9th floor                       work of the councils is focused on creating a local compre-
Denver, CO 80294-3538           hensive early childhood system that includes quality care and
                                education, family support, health, and mental health programs.
Phone: 303-844-3100
                                Head Start grantees are encouraged to participate in these
debra.hedin@acf.hhs.gov         councils to collaborate on problem-solving issues relating to
                                children and families as they arise. (Work plan:1,c,2)

                                From July through December 2007, the HSSCO work focused
                                on building early childhood systems through the following
                                activities:

                                ♦ Participated in Lt. Governor early childhood forums in
                                  seven communities around the State. Met with local Head
                                  Start leaders to determine successes and challenges. (Work
                                  plan: 1, D, 5)
40   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         ♦ Convened a Head Start Policy Forum in conjunction with the Colorado Head Start Association (HSA)
           in November during the Region VIII Head Start Governance meeting. (Work plan: 1k, c,3) Participants
           identified the following issues:

                      ♦ Challenges associated with braided funding.

                      ♦ Challenges associated with different state and Federal licensing regulations.

                      ♦ Struggles of dealing with children with challenging behaviors.

                      ♦ Need for more full-day care for families.

                      ♦ Strategies to address issues included:

                         ♦ Convening meetings with the Department of Human Services (DHS),
                           Division of Child Care, to determine which licensing standards need to
                           be changed to support Head Start grantees.
                         ♦ Participating as a member of the Center on the Social and Emotional
                           Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) State Leadership Team
                           promoting training and implementation of the Teaching Pyramid
                           model.
                         ♦ Disseminating information to Head Start grantees regarding use of
                           state-funded preschool slots to increase the number of available full-
                           day options for families. (Work plan: 1, c, 1)


         ♦ Participated in various meetings with the State ECCS team to lay a foundation for developing a Theory of
           Change associated with state-level work across the four domains: early learning, family support and parent
           education, social, emotional, and mental health, and health. (Work plan: 1,c,1)

         The HSSCO, as a member of the Lt. Governor’s Early Childhood Team, is supporting Head Start/child care/
         pre-kindergarten collaborations in various capacities.

         ♦ Developed a comparison of Head Start Program Performance Standards and the standards for the Colorado
           Preschool Program (CPP), state-funded preschool. Posted these on the HSA Web site. (Work plan: 1, b, 3)

         ♦ The P-3 subcommittee of the Governor’s P-20 Commission proposed the following initiatives in 2007
           (which were subsequently passed into law in May 2008):

                      ♦ Expand the CPP program for 2008-09 by 6,254 slots.

                      ♦ Expand full-day kindergarten slots by allocating $30 million.

                      ♦ Align preschool to post-secondary educational standards and
                        creating a definition of school readiness.

         ♦ Participation on various subcommittees to address recommended changes to the childcare licensing
           standards regarding teacher qualifications and background check. (Work plan: 1, b, 2)
                                                                                             AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS   |   41




Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
Goal: Head Start and all low-income families will have access to high quality services and programs for their
children in the area of Health Care, which includes insurance, medical homes, mental health, and oral health.

♦ Serve as a member of the CSEFEL State Partnership Team.

Goal: To provide professional development to staff in local programs regarding the Teaching Pyramid to sup-
port work with children with challenging behavior.

♦ Work with state department partners to create a sustainability model for this initiative.

♦ Planned advanced coach training May 2008; facilitated roundtable with Linda Broyles from
  SEK-CAP Head Start (in Kansas) regarding program-wide implementation.

♦ Participated in mental health strand/focus group at the Region VIII conference, October 2007, as an
  initial step in creating regional mental health technical assistance.

♦ Participated in several Region VIII mental health conference calls to disseminate information regarding
  Colorado’s mental health initiatives.

♦ Attended Blue Ribbon Policy Council meetings (12/07 – 5/08) assisting in the development of a state-
  wide mental health strategic plan.

♦ Attended Cavity Free at Three training at the invitation of the Regional Office.

Oral Health
State-level

State Oral Health Coalition

  Contact: tracy Anselmo, RDH, BS
  Registered Dental Hygienist
  Chair of Oral Health Awareness Colorado!
  Oral Health Coalition
  Colorado Department of Public Health and environment
  Phone: 303- 692-2569
  fax: 303-782-5576
  theresa.anselmo@state.co.us
  http://www.beasmartmouth.com/


  Head Start Activities Page under construction for http://www.beasmartmouth.com/programresources.php
  Additional oral health coalition postings at: http://www.smartstartcolorado.org/family/health_safety.html
42   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Local-level

         There are too many local oral health partnerships to list. Nearly every one of the 40 Colorado Head Start
         programs has dental partnerships in one form or another. Additionally, the Denver Head Start Programs Oral
         Health Council meets quarterly, and is led jointly by Rocky Mountain SER (RMSER) and City and County
         of Denver grantees.


         Additional Information

         ♦ Region VIII Head Start Oral Health Project Task Force/Work Group

         ♦ Early Childhood MCH State Systems Team includes oral health

         Welfare
         Goal: Head Start and all low-income families will be appropriately supported as they move toward self-
         sufficiency.

         Child Care
         Goal: Head Start and all low-income families will have access to high-quality child care services and programs
         for their children.

         ♦ EC summit co-chair. The Summit is a coalition of statewide leaders in early care and education who work
           to improve services and systems in ECE through discussion issues providing information and collabora-
           tion on policy issues.

                       ♦ Assisted in revising the Guiding Principles to improve group advocacy efforts.

                       ♦ Development of a 2008-09 Strategic Plan.

         ♦ Presentation to Colorado Child Care Conference, 10/25/07.

         ♦ Child Care Licensing Standards work group.

         Education
         Goal: Head Start and all low-income families will have access to high-quality services and programs for their
         children in the area of education.

         ♦ Head Start site visits: RMSER Western Slope Craig, City of Lakewood, RMSER Pueblo, Durango Tri-
           County, Adams County, Boulder, Salida, Fremont County, Creative Options Denver.

         ♦ Sent all grantees the articulation agreement between community colleges and Colorado State Univer-
           sity, which outlines required course content for early childhood associate’s degree leading to a Bachelor’s
           degree.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   43




♦ Community Services

Goal: Head Start and all low-income families will have sufficient and meaningful volunteer opportunities in
their communities.

♦ Collaborate with the Governor’s Commission on Community Service to connect Head Start families with
  two annual statewide volunteer projects: Colorado Cares Day, July 2007, and Martin Luther King Day of
  Service, January 2008.

Family Literacy Services
Goal: Head Start and all low-income families will have access to high-quality family literacy programs and
activities as they move toward self-sufficiency.

♦ Attended National Center for Family Literacy training September 2007, CHSA meeting.

♦ Investigating the use of the Johnson and Johnson Family Healthcare Literacy initiative to promote fami-
  lies’ role in their children’s health care and reduce the impact of Medicaid.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Goal: Head Start and all low-income families will have access to high-quality services for their children with
disabilities.

♦ Colorado Part C agency, Early Childhood Connections (ECC)/Lt. Governor EC Team collaborative
  meeting 9/24/07.

♦ Supported the ECC in gathering EHS-ECC MOUs.

♦ Coordinated submission of Special Quest State Leadership application 1/15/07 which was subsequently
  awarded to Colorado as one of 10 states.

♦ Co-facilitate 17 member Special Quest State Leadership Team focusing on professional development to
  promote the inclusion of children with special needs.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
Goal: Head Start and all low-income families should have access to affordable and adequate housing.


♦ Distributed OHS PowerPoint on homelessness to local grantees.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO Director attended CHSA meetings regularly to provide updates from the Office of the Lt. Gov-
ernor regarding policy development and state legislation. Additionally, this participation affords the HSSCO
Director the opportunity to hear about successes, challenges, and questions from local grantees, which con-
tributed to the scope of the HSSCO’s work. The Director also contributed to the CHSA bimonthly newslet-
ter, keeping programs abreast of state policy developments.
44   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         The CHSA has a seat on the Early Childhood Summit, which is a coalition of statewide leaders in early care
         and education which works to improve services and systems in early care and education through discussing
         issues, providing information and collaborating on policy issues. As such, they provide the Head Start voice
         as they join other organizations in giving input to legislators on issues impacting low-income children and
         families.


         Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
         families in your State.
         No activities reported.


         How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
         upcoming year?
         Many of the activities described are tied to the work plan for the current year and are noted in parentheses in
         this report.
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 45




                                   Connecticut


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Grace Whitney
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Ct Department of Social Services
25 Sigourney Street                Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Hartford, Ct 06106                 services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 860-424-5066                are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 860-424-4960                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
grace.whitney@po.state.ct.us
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.

                                   Goal
Lead Agency Contact
                                   Low-income children will receive quality early care and educa-
Michael Starkowski
                                   tion in a variety of settings linked with comprehensive services
Commissioner                       through a statewide multidisciplinary system of consultation
Phone: 860-424-5008                and on-site technical assistance that supports the unique needs
fax: 860-424-4960                  of each child, that ensures access to the multiple disciplines re-
                                   quired to insure healthy development and inclusion: education/
michael.starkowski@ct.gov          special education, physical/oral/mental health, nutrition, social
                                   services/family support/family engagement, that reflects the
ACF Regional Contact               lessons learned from Head Start, and that includes all Head
                                   Start component coordinators.
tom Killmurray
ACf Region I
                                   Accomplishments
JfK federal Building
Room 2000                          Through a collaboration with the CT Nurses’ Association,
                                   Healthy Child Care New England, and ZERO TO THREE,
Government Center
                                   developed and piloted three training modules related to infant
Boston, MA 02203                   and toddler development and learning to complement the
Phone: 617-565-1104                UNC National Training Institute’s Child Care Consultant
fax: 617-565-2493                  Training, thus promoting comprehensive services and supports
                                   to infants and toddlers in early care settings. More than 40
tom.killmurray@acf.hhs.gov         child care consultants, Early Head Start managers/coordina-
                                   tors, and program directors participated in the 5-day training.
                                   Participants included seven interdisciplinary teams who re-
                                   ceived program improvement stipends to implement activities
                                   resulting from training participation.

                                   This year, Head Start and CT’s Child Welfare Agency, De-
                                   partment of Children and Families (DCF), embarked on a
                                   long-term statewide partnership based on a model developed,
46   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         piloted, and evaluated from 1999 to 2001 in the northwest region of the State. It is aimed at better alignment
         of Head Start and DCF resources. The initiative is based on the research of John W. Fantuzzo, Ph.D., at the
         University of Pennsylvania.

         Utilizing the administrative supports of the HSSCO, Office of Head Start, and DCF, statewide quarterly
         meetings are held for shared learning, structured team building, and collaborative policy development. Local
         community meetings occur monthly, some utilizing state level support. Data collection includes monitoring of
         cross-training events, partnership meetings, referrals to Head Start and Early Head Start and joint treatment
         planning. The goals of the initiative include creating systematic access to comprehensive early care and educa-
         tion for children in the child welfare system, enhancing stability and supports for young children and families,
         and preventing family disruptions and foster care placements. Seven communities are being targeted with one
         community serving as a pilot for specific innovations.


         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
         your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
         Health Care
         Goal: All children in early childhood programs have access to the full range of health services and are cared for
         in healthy and safe early care settings that are connected with and supported by community health professionals.

         Accomplishments

         ♦ Local focus groups on prenatal oral health funded by the Association of State and Territorial Dental
           Directors (ASTDD) completed and will be highlighted in an upcoming publication: Head Start in CT
           Program Profile 2007-08.

         ♦ Worked with the Department of Social Services to achieve 100 percent Head Start participation as Quali-
           fied Entities to determine Presumptive Eligibility for SCHIP (HUSKY).

         ♦ Convened a meeting with the Department of Social Services and Head Start to explore feasibility of
           Medicaid reimbursement for health services in Head Start and Early Head Start programs.

         ♦ Promoted comprehensive health supports for all children in early care settings have continued through a
           collaboration with the CT Nurses’ Association for the annual consultant training, engagement of Head
           Start Health Managers as training participants, and funding to create a side-by-side comparison of health-
           related standards and requirements in the various early care and education programs.

         ♦ Participated on the Early Childhood Education Cabinet’s Health Systems and Interdisciplinary Consulta-
           tion work groups, CT’s mental health systems transformation grant children’s mental health work group,
           the Department of Public Health’s “Home by One” oral health advisory group.

         ♦ Continued to support the adoption of recommended changes to state child care regulations to further
           align state regulations with the best practices contained in Caring for Our Children, National Standards for
           Health and Safety in Early Care Settings.

         ♦ Supported the work of neighboring and partner state, Massachusetts, by providing keynote addresses at
           its January and October roundtables on health in early care settings. Additionally, promoted the shared
           goal of the New England states working together to ensure the continued implementation of the Healthy
           Child Care America campaign in the six New England states.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   47




Oral Health
State-level

Department of Public Health grant project entitled “Home By One” which aims to ensure a dental home and
a healthy smile for all children by their first birthday.
   Contact: linda.ferraro@ct.gov


Connecticut Oral Health Initiative, an advocacy and policy organization promoting better and more compre-
hensive oral heath resources and practices in the State.
   Contact: www.ctoralhealth.org


Local-level

♦ New Haven Oral Health Initiative
   Contact: Claudia.mcneil@new-haven.k12.ct.us


♦ Opportunity Knocks’ Miles of Smiles Initiative in Middletown

♦ Enfield Public Schools Head Start collaboration with the Community Health Center
   Contact: dbennett@enfieldpublicschools.org


♦ Easter Seals Head Start collaboration with the Community Health Center in Meriden
   Contact: cbelli@eastersealsct.org


♦ TVCCA Head Start in Norwich—Smiles Across Southeastern Connecticut in New London County
   Contact: dbarrett@tvcca.org


♦ HRA Head Start in New Britain—Start Smiling Collaborative/Community Health Center; and recipient
  of a Delta Dental grant
   Contact: etrueworthy@hranbct.org


Additional Information

Advisory Committee for the grant “Home By One.”

Welfare

Goal: Head Start parents who experience barriers to stable employment will be able to receive services and
supports in Head Start that lead to successful employment through partnerships with the Departments of
Social Services and Labor.


Accomplishments

♦ Continued to obtain and share state TANF data with grantees for local community assessments.
48   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         ♦ Worked with several grantees and the Department of Social Services to distribute recruitment fliers
           through the Department’s direct mailings to TANF recipients.

         Child Care
         Goal: All Head Start children needing full-day, full-year child care will have access to a child care option that
         meets their needs for quality and consistency. Low-income children will be more likely to receive quality child
         care linked to comprehensive services.

         Accomplishments

         ♦ Collaborated with State Child Care Administrator to build capacity for quality infant toddler care
           through development and piloting of the infant toddler train modules and by providing program improve-
           ment and training stipends to seven interdisciplinary consultant teams — five from state-funded child care
           centers.

         ♦ Supported the CT Head Start Association in convening the Early Care and Education Providers’ Sum-
           mit on October 23 to bring together directors of Head Start, child care, and pre-k programs to hear from
           Federal and state leaders and to strengthen local partnerships.

         Education
         Goal: Head Start and School Readiness (state pre-kindergarten) work collaboratively at both the state and
         local levels to provide quality early care and education programs, linked with the full array of comprehensive
         services that meet the range of needs of low-income children, reimbursed at a rate sufficient to cover the cost
         of providing quality care.


         Accomplishments

         ♦ Continued to regularly attend, as an observer, the meetings of the State Department of Education Head
           Start Advisory Council and the CT Early Childhood Education Cabinet to provide policy analysis and
           information as needed.

         ♦ See last bullet under “Child Care.”

         Community Services
         Goal: National and community services activities reflect collaboration with early care and education, including
         Head Start.


         Accomplishments

         ♦ Continued to support the CT Head Start Association in their Memorandum of Understanding with the
           CT Association of Community Action Agencies (CAFCA).

         ♦ Continued to support the full integration of Head Start into the Department of Social Services’ network
           of Human Service Infrastructure (HSI) one-front-door system of social services access, which is imple-
           mented through local Community Action Agencies.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   49




Family Literacy Services
Goal: Children and families will have a range of resources available to them for the development of literacy
skills and attainment of early childhood education.

Accomplishments

♦ No specific activities in this priority area though some preliminary discussion of hosting a statewide family
  literacy conference in the future.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Goal: A statewide multidisciplinary system of consultation and on-site technical assistance is available to
early care and education programs that supports the unique needs of each child. The system will ensure access
to the multiple disciplines required to insure healthy development and inclusion: education/special educa-
tion, physical/oral/mental health, social services/family support/ family engagement, that reflects the lessons
learned from Head Start, and that includes all Head Start component coordinators.


Accomplishments

♦ Worked with the New England collaborative and ZERO TO THREE to strengthen the education con-
  sultation track of the annual consultant training with three new modules focused on infant toddler devel-
  opment and learning and then piloted the first implementation. The modules highlight early identification
  and referral Part C referrals and the needs of infants and toddlers receiving Part C services and supports.

♦ Continued to serve on Early Childhood Education Cabinet work group on interdisciplinary consultation
  and health supports to early care settings.

♦ Began a statewide initiative to systemically connect child welfare services through the Department of
  Children and Families with Head Start and Early Head Start to ensure that children receiving child
  welfare services or those at risk will be enrolled in Head Start and Early Head Start programs. In addition
  to those services, families will receive the family supports Head Start can provide, including foster parents
  and grandparents. Working more closely with the child welfare agency has resulted in better alignment of
  early childhood mental health services with the needs of Head Start children and families and better early
  identification and engagement of children with special needs.

♦ Worked with partners to build capacity in early childhood mental health through participation on work
  groups of the CT Association for Infant Mental Health and Building Blocks, a SAMHSA-funded project
  aimed at building work force capacity, and provided scholarships for a statewide Infant Toddler DECA
  training.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
Goal: Young children who are homeless have access to health, early care and education, and any special ser-
vices they may need.

Accomplishments

♦ Continued competitive small grant project for Head Start and Early Head Start grantees to enhance Head
  Start access for children in shelters. Three grantees received grants totaling $14,000 in HSSCO funds.
  Projects resulted in increased enrollment and provided models for state policy consideration.
50   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         ♦ In partnership with McKinney-Vento State Liaison, State Child Care Administrator, and Office of School
           Nutrition/Child and Adult Care Food Program, a presentation on the results of a collaborative survey
           project completed in Year 1 was developed to better understand young children in shelters and their fami-
           lies. Shared results at the 2nd National Conference on Young Children Without Homes in April 2007 and
           at CT Children in Shelters Workshop in June 2007.

         ♦ In partnership with the Department of Social Services, contracted with CT Coalition to End Homeless-
           ness for a staff position to coordinate activities related to homeless children and convene trainings and
           forums with shelter staff, Head Start, McKinney-Vento Liaisons, and others. The HSSCO contributed
           $15,000.

         ♦ Provided stipends for Head Start managers to attend and present their work at the 2nd National Confer-
           ence on Children Without Homes in Newton, MA, in April 2007.

         ♦ Continued to collaborate with national colleagues in homeless education and Congressional aides on
           issues and policies impacting young children.

         ♦ Invited to serve on the Steering Committee for the April 2008 Young Children Without Homes National
           Conference sponsored by Horizons for Homeless Children in Boston, MA.

         ♦ Continued to work on state work group to increase supports for children without homes – this year the
           state legislature allocated $500,000 in each of the next two state fiscal years for pilot projects.


         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
         Goals: Head Start and Early Head Start are seen as valuable partners in state policy. Head Start and Early
         Head Start are seen as valuable partners in state policy making and in planning efforts at the state and com-
         munity levels, and are effective advocates for the needs of low-income children and their families. Head Start,
         as a system of services in the State, provides high-quality effective services and serves as a model comprehen-
         sive child development program for children birth to five, pregnant women, and their families in Connecticut.


         Accomplishments

         ♦ Connected Head Start with state and local planning efforts by e-mailing event announcements; sharing
           information on initiatives and activities at CT Head Start Association meetings; nominating Head Start
           staff for work group participation; and providing contract information for Head Start (e.g., mental health
           transformation grant town hall meeting, care coordination work group, local oral health coalitions, state-
           wide nutrition training, Parenting Education Credential and CT Parents Plus, DPH child care regulations
           hearings, Early Childhood Education Cabinet local forums, Help Me Grow networking meetings, etc.).

         ♦ Attended Early Childhood Education Cabinet meetings and provided support to the HSA representative
           serving on the Cabinet (e.g., data sharing, policy analysis, assistance with development of Results Based
           Accountability report to the legislature); and continued to attend the State Department of Education’s
           Head Start Advisory meetings, providing information as requested.

         ♦ Continued to attend monthly meetings of the HSA to report on HSSCO activities and to participate in
           planning meetings as needed. Provide materials to HSA members and leadership as needs arise, and share
           state policy information as it becomes available to the HSSCO.
                                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS    |   51




♦ Shared information on E-Rate with grantees and coordinated a workshop in July 2007 for grantees given
  by Human Resources Agency, the Head Start grantee in New Britain, on its success with E-Rate and how
  to access E-Rate.

♦ Coordinated and funded the CT Early Care and Education Providers’ Summit on October 23, 2007, to
  promote Head Start leadership and partnership at the state and local levels and to complete the objectives
  of the Head Start/pre-kindergartnen partnership supplemental grant.

♦ Supported Early Head Start programs to begin meeting quarterly for cross-program sharing and support
  and to strengthen community relationships. Community partners attend for updates and joint planning.

♦ Continue to make copies of the Head Start in CT Program Profile and the Side-By-Side of State Early Care
  and Education Regulations and Requirements available to share with policy makers, including copies to each
  member of the Education and Human Services Committees of the State Legislature.

♦ Working with HSA to publish Head Start in CT Program Profile 2007-08 to provide information about
  Head Start and to showcase model initiatives.

♦ Working with HSA to establish an active Web site for Head Start in CT.

♦ Continued to share information on Head Start and Early Head Start as requested, including mailing
  labels, PIR data, etc.

♦ Attended New England Head Start Association events and continued to serve on the New England
  Board as representative for HSSCOs in the New England states.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
Helping to build statewide early care and education professional development system

Goal: Head Start works with state partners to build a professional development system capable of providing a
quality work force for early care and education programs in the state.


Accomplishments

♦ Participated on the state’s team at the NAEYC Professional Development Conference pre-conference ses-
  sion on state systems development in Pittsburgh in June.

♦ Participated in several meetings hosted by the state early care and education professional development
  system, CT Charts-A-Course, in development of work force centralized registry specifically regarding the
  inclusion of the Head Start/Early Head Start work force and early care and education consultants and
  Head Start managers in its central database.

♦ Participated on Early Childhood Education Cabinet’s work group on work force development.

♦ Worked with Healthy Child Care New England and ZERO TO THREE to create a track in the an-
  nual consultant training for early care education consultants and Early Head Start Education Managers
  focused on infant toddler development and learning and piloted the first implementation
52   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
         families in your State.
         ♦ The HSSCO continued to support the State’s early childhood professional development system, CT
           Charts-A-Course, in its implementation of a five-year Head Start professional development grant that
           aims to provide concurrent ELL and early childhood education to Hispanic staff in Early Head Start pro-
           grams. This would increase employment opportunities for parents and community residents and increase
           the capacity for staffing classrooms with providers of children’s own language and culture.

         ♦ Worked closely with Head Start grantees to collect and report data on the number of Hispanic families
           being served by Head Start and the professional development needs of staff in Head Start programs for
           use by the State Legislature’s Higher Education Task Force in its development of a state plan for the Gov-
           ernor’s Early Childhood Education Cabinet.

         ♦ Funded printing of a Spanish version of a child development text for distribution in Early Head Start
           programs in the State.


         How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
         upcoming year?
         The current work plan for the HSSCO, for the period 2/1/06 through 1/31/11, is formatted to address the
         items listed above. The work plan includes goal statements, objectives, activities, and anticipated outcomes
         in each of the eight priority areas and in each of the additional HSSCO focus areas, e.g., collaboration with
         Regional Office on national and regional priorities, facilitating the involvement of Head Start in the develop-
         ment of state policies, plans, processes and decisions, and helping to build early childhood systems and access
         to comprehensive services for all low-income children. The work plan was developed in collaboration with
         the HSA and key community partners using results obtained from an evaluation of the HSSCO in 2005.
         Progress is reported annually in the HSSCO grant continuation application and notations are made that
         document any changes needing to be made to the five-year plan. A selection of HSSCO activities aimed at
         attaining the goals and objectives in the five-year plan are shared with the Region I Office at least quarterly
         and are presented annually in the HSSCO Annual State Profile Report. At this time no major changes have
         been made to the plan.
                                                                       AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 53




                              Delaware


Lead Agency Contact           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                              areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Martha toomey
                              plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Phone: 302-735-4210
fax: 302-730-2388             Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
mtoomey@doe.k12.de.us         services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
                              are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
ACF Regional Contact          at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
                              in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
ed Vreeswyk
ACf Region III                Mental Health
150 South Independence Mall
Suite 864                     Priority Area: Health
Philadelphia, PA 19106
                              This initiative began in 2003 when Delaware was chosen by
Phone: 215-862-4040           the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for
fax: 215-861-4070             Early Learning (CSEFEL) to serve as one of six pilot pro-
evreeswyk@acf.hhs.gov         grams across the nation. The charge of this program was to
                              promote social competence to prevent behavior problems in
                              early care and education settings. During the pilot stage, the
                              initiative was led by the Head Start-State Collaboration Office
                              (HSSCO) with guidance from a state advisory team. Over 32
                              early care and education centers participated in professional
                              development activities and a formal assessment process. As the
                              project was ending, technical assistance was being added.


                              Current Status

                              In 2006, Nemours Health and Prevention Services (NHPS)
                              agreed to continue supporting the program since mental health
                              had been identified as a critical-need area during its assessment
                              and planning processes. NHPS adopted the PIE advisory
                              group for continuity. Current full-model support is limited to
                              three pilot sites, with professional development and assessment
                              continuing for the remainder of the original sites. In 2007, the
                              HSSCO introduced PIE to schools participating in Positive
                              Behavior Support (PBS). To date, seven schools are extending
                              PIE to preschool populations as part of their PBS project.
54   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Partners

         NHPS, DDOE, Devereux, CSEFEL, State Core PIE team, ECCS Steering Committee


         Comprehensive Professional Development System Planning

         Priority Area: Education Opportunities


         Professional Development

         The creation of a cross-sector integrated professional development system focused on developing and expand-
         ing the range of knowledge, skills, and abilities of adults working with young children in order to increase
         their effectiveness in facilitating children’s learning and development. The system seeks to provide skill devel-
         opment for Head Start service area managers and non-education staff.


         Current Status

         In 2006, Head Start, ECAP programs, and state partners participated in a forum sponsored by the HSSCO
         and Delaware First...Again (DE First), which is the state’s professional development system for child care, to
         consider an integrated professional-development system. As a result, the community supported the overall
         concept, and work began on creating competencies for non-teaching staff.

         The official planning process to build a cross-sector comprehensive professional-development system began
         in Fall 2007 and was conducted under the leadership of DE First and the Office of Early Care and Educa-
         tion (OECE). The planning team was a subcommittee of the Delaware P-20 Council, established in 2003
         by Gov. Ruth Ann Minner’s Executive Order 47 and placed in statute in 2005. The Council is an inclusive
         organization designed to align Delaware’s education efforts across all grade levels. Its main goal is to establish
         a logical progression of learning from early childhood to post-secondary education while reducing the need
         for remediation.

         The planning process included state agencies and their contractors. The HSSCO Director and ECAP Direc-
         tor served on the team. Recommendations were reviewed on March 31, 2008, and will move forward to the
         DDOE Cabinet.

         The current system design is focused primarily on education and meeting minimum licensing requirements.
         The leadership component and connections to learning component of the k-12 system has not been addressed
         at this time.


         Partners

         DE First, DDOE and Connection to Learning Team, Head Start/ECAP grantees, Nemours, Delaware State
         University
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   55




Oral Health
Priority Area: Health

Creating the Infrastructure to Move the Oral Heath Agenda

Delaware’s Oral Health Steering Committee was developed in 2006 and became the Delaware Oral Health
Coalition (DOHC). This group will become a nonprofit entity whose mission is to build systems that improve
oral health and support a coordinated approach, including service delivery of oral-health services in the com-
munity for Head Start and low-income young families. System development includes establishing a formal
mechanism for addressing community-wide issues outlined in a state plan, inclusive of key recommendations
from the Head Start Oral Health Forum hosted by the HSSCO in 2005. Preliminary focus includes mobile
dentistry (due to a shortage of dentists in Sussex County) and developing oral health education programs for
schools and preschools. In 2007, the Head Start community expressed an interest in exploring the creation of
a universal dental form.


Current Status

The coalition has been formed into a board. The board includes a position for one member of Head Start,
which is currently vacant due to staff attrition. An awareness committee is working with DDOE to develop
curricula for k-12. The preschool curriculum has been delayed due to loss of a Head Start preschool represen-
tative, temporary absence of the HSSCO Director, and loss of public health staff. A recommendation has been
made to create a work group to include more early childhood representatives to complete the development of
curricula. The Department of Public Health (DPH) has received partial funding for a mobile unit.


Partners

DPH, MCH, Delaware Chapter of American Academy of Pediatricians (AAP), Head Start/ECAP, DDOE


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
A coalition was formed that brought together representatives from Medicaid, APP, Medical Society of Dela-
ware (MSD), DPH, State Head Start Association members, and Head Start Health Coordinators. The goal
was to disseminate a policy statement to the medical community in regard to billing parents for the process of
completing the physical form; creating public awareness to support the usage and completion of the universal
form; and creating an ongoing process to maintain the universal nature of an accepted physical form. Activi-
ties for this initiative included coordinating a roundtable discussion to address the issue of parents billed to
complete an incomplete physical form; support the revision of the universal physical form within the Head
Start community; and serve as stakeholders for activities to infuse developmental/behavioral health screenings
in medical practices.


Current Status

The HSSCO worked with Head Start representatives to conduct a brief survey of programs to determine the
prevalence of the problem with parent billing. It was concluded this procedure was prevalent throughout and
was therefore, a system issue. A meeting was arranged between a Medicaid official and a DHSA representa-
56   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         tive to discuss the issue as it relates to Medicaid contractors. The meeting resulted in an agreement that Early
         Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) results should be completed if the physical form
         required it with no further cost to parents. A second recommendation was to consider granting Head Start
         programs access to a database similar to school access. The universal physical form is being addressed by a
         DPH physician.


         Partners

         DPH, MSD, AAP, DHSA, Health Advisory Committee

         Oral Health
         In addition to the state-level oral health activities listed above, below are contact information for additional
         oral health activities:

           Contact: Dr. Greg McClure
           Dental Director
           Department of Health and Social Services
           Division of Public Health
           Blue Hen Corporate Center
           Dover, De 19901
           Phone: 302-741-2960


           Gina Perez
           Advances in Management, Inc.
           Phone: 302-645-1490
           gina@aim2bbest.com



         Welfare
         The provision of full-working day, full-calendar year services is a major requirement for attracting categori-
         cally eligible program participants from the Delaware’s TANF program.


         Current Status

         Outreach efforts were conducted in 2006 and 2007 to TANF families. Partnering with the Department of
         Health and Social Services (DHSS), all TANF recipients were notified of potential opportunities to partici-
         pate in Head Start. Many parents inquired about services as a result of the outreach efforts but continued to
         state that the lack of full-working day services is a barrier. Based on the 2006 Program Information Report
         (PIR), 13.5 percent of Head Start families receive TANF.


         Partners

         DHSS, Head Start/ECAP
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   57




Child Care
No activities reported.

Education
Delaware State University (DSU) created the Head Start Scholars Project (HSSP). This project is aimed at
increasing the opportunities for teachers to meet Head Start teaching requirements and provided scholarships
for Head Start staff to participate in higher education opportunities at the Associate’s degree (AA) and Bach-
elor’s degree (BA) level. DSU will be closing out Phase II of the HSSP this summer. Twenty-four participants
from three grantees have benefited from Phase II of the project, with six teachers receiving AAs. The HSSCO
and all Head Start grantees serve on the Head Start Scholars Advisory Committee.


Partners

HSSCO, HS/ECAP grantees, DSU, DDOE

Community Services
Building partnerships and serve as an advocate, liaison, and advisor to local agencies and corporations and
facilitate the implementation of the Community Service Agreement.


Current Status

The state-level Community Action/DHSA agreement was completed and signed in 2006. Telamon-Sussex
volunteered to be the first program to enter into a local agreement. The HSSCO facilitated the work plan and
provided support for implementation. June 2008 will mark the end of the first year of implementation at one
site, with expansion to other sites after June.


Partners

FSCAA and contractors, DHSA, PNC Foundation, PNC-Delaware

Literacy Services
No activities reported.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Coordination, support, and promotion of linkages between Head Start programs, ECAP, child care partners,
and local school districts have taken place along with the development of policies to meet the needs of chil-
dren with disabilities. Program initiatives are inclusive of aligning program standards with the reauthorization
changes of IDEA, reviewing and updating the state-level intergovernmental agreements, monitoring of early
screening assessment, and supporting the work plans of the Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC).


Current Status

Delaware was selected to participate in the national initiative Expanding Opportunities, focused on promoting
inclusion. The HSSCO served on the state team in North Carolina. This team was charged to return home to
58   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         promote best practices related to inclusion. An in-state team was organized and focused on awareness, profes-
         sional development, and updating the Head Start interagency agreement. Head Start is a member of the team.
         The HSSCO leads the interagency effort with technical support from the disabilities specialist of Interna-
         tional Consulting Firm (ICF).

         A one-day session was held for work groups in each of the above-mentioned areas. The interagency work
         group made recommendations for updating the agreement. Though a subgroup charged with crafting the
         agreement was formed, there were delays in completing the update due to anticipated changes in the Improv-
         ing Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 that would impact language. It is anticipated that Draft I
         will be available in Fall 2008 for the Expanding Opportunities Team to review.

         Services to Homeless Children and Families

         Enhance policies to meet the needs of homeless children as required by the McKinney-Vento Act. McKin-
         ney-Vento is legislation that protects the rights of homeless children in the education system and has been
         written into the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007. It is now a requirement of Head
         Start to abide by the provisions of this Act by providing services to homeless preschool children and their
         families.


         Current Status

         All Head Start /ECAP grantees were extended invitations to participate in quarterly meetings with shelter
         and school district liaisons to the homeless. The HSSCO hosted a policy session on the McKinney-Vento Act
         for Head Start grantees to educate and prepare them for the Act’s requirements under the new reauthorization.


         Partners

         DDOE, National Center on the Education of the Homeless, Head Start /ECAP grantees, HSSCO


         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
         Head Start was represented in the following state plans and processes throughout the year:
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   59




  Major Head Start Involvement (2007) * New

 System Building Activity                     Key Agency         Head Start           HSSCO             Both

  Delaware early Care
  and education Council                          DOe                  X


  Wilmington early Care                 City of Wilmington            X
  and education Council


  Coordinated Professional
  Development System                             DOe                                    X                 X


  eCCS                                          DHSS                                    X


  Community Action
  Planning Activities                           fSCAA                                                     X


  *Oral Health Coalition                         DPH                  X


  StARS Quality
  Rating System                                  DOe                  X




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
No activities reported.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
Collaboration is a process. This report describes status of work. All work cited is part of the five-year plan.
Beginning October 2007, the HSSCO Director’s aggressive approach to meeting project goals was impacted
by family illness that resulted in extended leave.
60   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 61




                                     District of Columbia


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Barbara ferguson Kamara and
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Beverly Roberson
Beverly.jackson@dc.gov               Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Office of the State Superintendent   services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
of education                         are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
early Care and education             at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Administration
                                     in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
717 14th Street nW
Washington, D.C.                     School Readiness Focus: Unified School Readiness Approach
Phone: 202-727-1839
                                     Objective 2.1
fax: 202-724-7229
http://www.osse.dc.gov               To ensure Head Start collaboration and participation in plan-
                                     ning and implementation of all District of Columbia school
Lead Agency Contact                  readiness initiatives, particularly those related to alignment of
                                     Early Learning Standards, NAEYC accreditation, and high-
ellen Yung-fatah                     quality environments in all pre-kindergarten classrooms.
Office of the State Superintendent
of education                         ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO)
early Care and education               Director convened the quarterly meeting of the Mayor’s
Administration                         Advisory Committee on Early Childhood Development
                                       (MACECD) Health Promotions Subcommittee during
Same address as above
                                       2007. The agenda included setting and implementing pri-
Phone: 202-727-1839                    orities for the coming year and building on the work being
fax: 202-478-5720                      done by other agencies and organizations, such as the Early
ellen.fatah@dc.gov                     Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Grant and
                                       the Universal School Readiness (USR) Stakeholders 2007
                                       Focus on Health Readiness. Projected outcomes included a
ACF Regional Contact                   list of action items and priorities for 2007-08 and involve-
                                       ment of the ECCS Steering Committee in planning for
nancy elmore                           the 2008 USR Annual Citywide Conference.
150 South Independence Mall West
#844                                 ♦ Several phases of planning have been completed for the
Philadelphia, PA 19106                 Head Start Hot Topic Series on Marketing, Recruitment
                                       and pre-kindergarten and Head Start partnerships. The
Phone: 215-861-4048
                                       HSSCO Director met with stakeholders in order to gauge
fax: 215-861-4070                      the level of interest and understanding of what partnerships
nancy.elmore@acf.hhs.gov               between Head Start and pre-kindergarten could look like
                                       and how they could benefit the community. The Director
62   |       Head Start State Collaboration Offices




              conferred with the ACF Region III Office, as well as the DC Technical Assistance Specialist in order to
              begin to flesh out an agenda for the meeting. In FY07, the HSSCO played an active role in the design and
              promotion of D.C.’s Universal Pre-kindergarten Legislation.

         ♦    The HSSCO has been working with each grantee and delegate to carve out the unique services offered
              by each of the Head Start programs. The HSSCO has worked to format the resulting information into an
              appealing marketing tool for families and to develop a city map of Head Start program locations.

         ♦ The HSSCO put forth a goal to the Deputy Mayor for Education to prioritize the Head Start First policy
           in the 100 Days document (a response to Mayor Adrian Fenty’s 100 Days and Beyond plan for D.C.), and
           ensuring that all Head Start slots are filled before placing children into other funding streams. This Head
           Start First policy was incorporated into the D.C. Universal Pre-kindergarten Legislation.

         ♦ The HSSCO represents ECEA on the planning committee for the Annual Universal School Readiness
           Conference. Working together with a host of agencies and organizations, the planning committee de-
           signed the workshops session layout, promoted public awareness about the event, and brought partners
           and stakeholders to the process.

         Comprehensive Services Focus
         Objective 1.2

         To increase services and access to services that will improve early childhood mental health.

         ♦ HSSCO staff and the MACECD Health Promotions Subcommittee’s Early Childhood Mental Health
           Task Force have been meeting monthly to work on the development of a white paper on young children’s
           mental health. The work has been co-facilitated by the Georgetown National Technical Assistance Center
           for Children’s Mental Health. The task force worked to generate a white paper to define current gaps in
           the system of care, objectives, and recommendations for action.

         ♦ Training — Children with Challenging Behaviors: Where Do We Begin? In partnership with Family
           Communications, the HSSCO provided training on how to work with children who exhibit challenging
           behaviors. Participants identified challenges, shared best practices, and created solutions.


         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
         your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.

         Health Care
         ♦ The HSSCO, in collaboration with the D.C. Department of Health, Department of Mental Health, Child
           and Family Services Agency, all Head Start programs, the EHS National Resource Center, and local men-
           tal health advocates formed a Task Force related to the MACECD and developed a white paper to detail
           the direction for the District in regard to an early childhood mental health system of care.

         ♦ The HSSCO Director has been working closely with the ECCS coordinator to review the recently sub-
           mitted DC (DOH) implementation plan for ECCS. The plan includes several of the outcomes discussed
           at the January 2007 partners meeting, including the development of a child care health and mental health
           consultant corps, as well as collaborating with the Medicaid office to increase billable services for mental
           health services for young children.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   63




♦ The HSSCO developed a summer calendar for pedestrian safety training for Head Start Program Intake
  and Family Services staff. Collaborating committee members went to Head Start centers to work with
  children and their parents on pedestrian safety for the upcoming school year.

♦ In collaboration with the ECEA/Program Quality Division, the HSSCO has been working with the
  DOH and DCPS immunization programs to assure compliance by the early care and education com-
  munity. Fliers and other info have been disseminated, and workshops are being delivered to providers
  throughout the District.

♦ The HSSCO, in cooperation with the MACECD Health Promotion Subcommittee, initiated a research
  project on the information needs of Head Start parents relative to immunization to be conducted by
  Georgetown University School of Medicine students.

♦ I Am Moving, I Am Learning (IMIL): A strong partnership has been forged among the D.C. Early Child-
  hood Obesity Collaborative (led by Summit Institute for Research and Education, Inc.) and the HSSCO,
  Region III Head Start, and the TA Network. The Collaborative is planning to adopt IMIL strategies in
  the “Start Right for Healthy Living: A Community Campaign to Prevent Obesity Among Young Chil-
  dren and Caring Adults in Ward 8 of the District of Columbia,” by training family child care providers in
  the strategies.

Oral Health

Comprehensive Services Focus

Objective 1.1

Oral Health: Collaboration with the Small Smiles Dental Clinic and follow-up to ensure that Head Start
families are served. Provision of assistance to this clinic to help it to become a full fledged dental home.

♦ The Forum on Systemic Access to Oral Health Services (funded by the Association of State and Ter-
  ritorial Dental Directors) was held in February 2007. Over 25 participants from Head Start and pre-
  kindergarten programs throughout the city attended. A tour of the Georgia Avenue Small Smiles facility
  was provided, as well as presentations by the director of the clinic, the District’s Dental Director, and the
  HSSCO Director. A discussion was facilitated concerning the needs of the Head Start community relat-
  ing to oral health, and avenues to better serve children and their families. The event was a great starting
  point to enhance the relationship between Small Smiles and the early care and education community.

♦ The State Dental Director’s Office received a grant to host a forum on oral health for Children with
  Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN). The event provided an overview of oral health issues affecting
  CSHCN, generated recommendations for increasing access, and addressed barriers to oral health services
  for CSHCN. The outcome was an implementation strategy for recommendations.

♦ The Director of Small Smiles, the clinic partner, provided workshops to early care and education provid-
  ers at the 5th annual USR citywide school readiness conference. The director of the pediatric dental clinic
  focused on how providers can help families to access care, and how to provide preventative dental ap-
  proaches within the context of a child care or school environment.

♦ After a series of problems with the proposed dental home, Small Smiles, in the last quarter of the year, the
  D.C. Dental Program Director hired a Promatoras to work with Head Start Family Service Workers to
  ensure that each family understood all dental instructions and the important role of follow-up dental care.
64   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Welfare
         D.C. Head Start programs and the Department of Parks and Recreation are participating in a large-scale
         child welfare project related to the National Prevent Institute and the local Children’s Trust Fund to build on
         child maltreatment protective factors through its parent involvement program. The Children’s Trust will help
         present information on the following parenting protective factors at a wide range of Head Start parent events:

                      ♦ Understand what is typical behavior for children at different ages.

                      ♦ Identify, respond to, and advocate for their children’s needs.

                      ♦ Communicate calmly and clearly with children.

                      ♦ Set clear and realistic boundaries for children.

                      ♦ Correct and redirect children without losing control.

                      ♦ Handle stress in positive ways, including reaching out to friends, family,
                        and community resources for support.

                      ♦ Develop positive bonds with their children and enjoy spending time together.

                      ♦ Have confidence in their abilities as parents.

         Child Care

         Promising practices supported by the D.C. HSSCO:

         ♦ Several Head Start programs are grantees of the Pre-kindergarten Incentive program (public school fund-
           ing for pre-k in community-based settings) that models “best practice” in pre-kindergarten classroom and
           curriculum.

         ♦ Dual Head Start enrollment has been secured with selected D.C. Public Charter Schools.

         ♦ Slot purchase options/agreements have increased in 2007 to provide full-day/full-year Head Start services
           located with center-based providers.

         ♦ Emerging collaborative structure has been crafted between the United Planning Organization and the
           D.C. Public Schools to reduce competition and encourage collaboration and the use of Head Start First
           funding strategies in programs that serve 3-to-5-year-old children (Head Start and pre-kindergarten).

         Education
         ♦ The HSSCO has worked tirelessly with Pre-k for All and the Deputy Mayor for Education’s Office to
           incorporate Head Start principles into the District’s Universal Pre-kindergarten Legislation.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   65




Community Services

Community Services Focus

Conducting an analysis to increase the efficiency of community programming, and continuing to publicize
Head Start and Early Head Start programs and services in community and governmental organizations.


Objective 6.1

To ensure the knowledge and best use of community resources connected with the local Community Action
Agency.

♦ The HSSCO provided Earned Income Tax Credit information to families.

♦ The HSSCO organized a series of “Hot Topic Luncheons,” the purpose of which was to provide the
  D.C. Head Start community with an opportunity to address critical policy and system issues and
  establish specific measurable outcomes for achieving quality comprehensive services to children with
  disabilities and their families. Three work groups were formed to move forward a citywide agenda for
  services to children with disabilities.


Family Literacy Services
Family Literacy Focus: Increasing collaboration with family literacy programs and building D.C. Head Start
Association’s Web site to increase computer literacy and awareness of family literacy activities.


Objective 5.1

To build the capacity of family literacy coaches, mentors, and volunteer readers throughout the District of
Columbia.

♦ A HSSCO staff member has been working closely with the Early Readers Now! Program (ERN) to
  identify barriers to meeting goals. Through these meetings, they have resolved an issue regarding ECEA’s
  background check policy, set realistic goals for the upcoming year, and developed plans for an Early Lit-
  eracy Capacity Building Institute to help early education organizations create the necessary conditions to
  take full advantage of volunteers.

♦ The HSSCO convened a meeting between Early Readers Now! and the Family Book Club to discuss a
  number of entry points for collaboration.

♦ The HSSCO has supported the PNC Bank demonstration project (Grow Up Great), facilitated by the
  United Planning Organization, through supplemental grants. UPO has been facilitating a family literacy
  project to increase language and literacy in infant, toddler, and preschool environments.


Objective 5.2

To build the literacy skills and family and center libraries of Head Start and other low-income families
throughout the city.

♦ An HSSCO member served on the First Book Local Advisory Board.
66   |       Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Objective 5.3

         To increase the capacity of D.C. families in computer literacy and to provide an accessible central resource
         listing and links for family literacy activities and resources.

         ♦ The HSSCO has been working in conjunction with the Head Start TA Content Specialist to conduct a
           community-wide needs assessment of family literacy. The survey polled Head Start programs, the State
           Education Agency, the Even Start Family Literacy Program and the Early Literacy Office at ECEA to
           determine the direction that forthcoming training should take in order to maximize effectiveness.

         ♦ The HSSCO project assistant works to scan the community for family literacy events and resources, and
           posts them on the D.C. Head Start Association Web site.

         ♦ Through a partnership with the D.C. Public Library and Reach Out and Read, the HSSCO has estab-
           lished a pilot program for the upcoming year, which would establish a 21-day lending program at four
           Early Literacy Stations to enhance computer technology and software programs for child care profession-
           als and the children they serve.

         Services to Children with Disabilities
         ♦ The Head Start Hot Topic Series and the Early Head Start Partnership have held multiple sessions fo-
           cused on access to disability services. Sessions were developed in partnership with the Infants and Toddlers
           with Disabilities Program (IDEA. Part C), the D.C. Public Schools, the D.C. Developmental Disabilities
           Council, and the Region III Technical Assistance Network.

         ♦ The HSSCO will continue to partner with the Department of Health and the Part C (ECEA) Program in
           the provision of developmental screening and certification training on the Denver II screening instrument
           for early care and education staff who request it. However, DOH Community Services Administration is
           in the process of moving to the ASQ SE tool for screening that has been identified through D.C.’s ABCD
           Academy as best practice for pediatricians and is currently in use at all Early Head Start sites.

         ♦ The HSSCO white paper on mental health is being developed to detail the direction for the District in
           regard to an early childhood mental health system of care. It has been used to make informed recommen-
           dations to the Mayor and other stakeholders.

         Services to Homeless Children and Families
         The HSSCO has spent considerable time in planning and convening meetings with a result of the following
         agreed upon D.C. Head Start tasks:

         ♦ Upcoming joint visits to homeless shelters and other joint planning activities in coordination with the
           Director of the D.C. McKinney-Vento Homeless Services Project.

         ♦ The Early Head Start Partnership agreed to help the D.C. Bright Beginnings Program reduce the number
           of homeless families on its waiting list.

         ♦     UPO Early Head Start staff agreed to provide Early Head Start services to identified pregnant women on
              the McKinney-Vento and Bright Beginnings waiting lists.

         ♦ Formal Memoranda of Agreement will be developed to solidify the planning itemized above.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   67




Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
No activities reported.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Much of the focus of the HSSCO related to Hispanic families has centered on family literacy. A non-Head
Start site, which is a primary Head Start/Child Care partner in many District of Columbia ventures, serves
as a hub for the joint HSSCO/ECEA Family Book Club early literacy project and community-based literacy
projects for Head Start and non-Head Start families in heavily Latino-populated Ward One. Staff from this
site played an important role in the HSSCO co-sponsored infant and toddler citywide training during the
third quarter of FY07. The training included a presentation on “Language Development at Home: Encourag-
ing English and English Language Learners” by CentroNia’s Family Book Club.

The Family Book Club is working with the HSSCO to develop a relationship with Head Start and Early
Head Start providers throughout the District. This site has been awarded free books through the HSSCO
association with First Books and a variety of joint literacy and health outreach projects.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
Responses to the questions in this profile have served as a reflection and summative evaluation exercise that
will benefit the planning for the coming year. The development of this document helps to sharpen the focus
of planning tasks for the MACECD HSSCO Subcommittee and illuminate the gaps in the past year’s per-
formance.
68   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 69




                                 Florida


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
lilli J. Copp
university of north florida
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
florida Institute of education   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
600 South Calhoun Street         services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 202                        are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
tallahassee, fl 32399            at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 850-921-3467              in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 850-488-7099                ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) con-
lilli.copp@flaawi.com              tinued to be integrally involved in planning efforts around
www.floridaheadstart.org           the implementation of the Voluntary Pre-kindergarten
                                   (VPK) program in Florida. The HSSCO convened a meet-
                                   ing with representatives of the pre-kindergarten governing
Lead Agency Contact                agency, the Agency for Workforce Innovation/Office of
                                   Early Learning, the Florida Head Start Association, and
Cheryl fountain
                                   Early Learning Coalitions to draft a Memorandum of
Phone: 904-620-2496                Understanding for the State’s VPK. The outcome of this
fax: 904-620-2454                  agreement was to identify opportunities for communica-
                                   tion, collaboration, and integration of state pre-kindergar-
cfountai@unf.edu
                                   ten with Head Start and enable Head Start programs to
                                   provide full-day services. This agreement will be revisited
ACF Regional Contact               annually. (Goal 1.1 — Full-day Services and Pre-kinder-
                                   garten Partnerships)
Betty Carroll
ACf Region IV                    ♦ The HSSCO worked with the Florida Head Start Associa-
Atlanta federal Center             tion (FHSA) to coordinate a training session comprised of
                                   Head Start directors who have successfully incorporated
61 forsyth Street, SW
                                   Florida’s VPK program and other child care programs
Suite 4M60                         into their Head Start program. This session resulted in an
Atlanta, GA 30303-8909             increase of Head Start programs offering VPK. (Goal 1.2 –
Phone: 404-562-2866                Expanding services)
fax: 404-562-2982
                                 ♦ Monthly meetings between the HSSCO and Florida’s
betty.carroll@acf.hhs.gov
                                   Office of Early Learning staff continued despite a new
                                   state Child Care Administrator. In fact, the new Admin-
                                   istrator invited the HSSCO to attend weekly executive
                                   staff meetings, which furthered communication between
                                   the HSSCO, state pre-kindergarten, and child care. These
                                   meetings resulted in opportunities for shared professional
70   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




            development and identification of common data points between Head Start and the Office of Early
            Learning. These efforts address the goals of improving child outcomes and quality of child care through
            highly qualified staff. (Goal 1.4 – Quality Initiatives)

         ♦ Collaborated with FHSA on a display booth for Children’s Day at the Capitol to highlight Head Start
           initiatives in Florida. (Goal 1.4 – Quality & Outreach)


         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
         your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.

         Health Care
         ♦ As a result of the pre-kindergarten partners meeting in January 2007, the HSSCO began meeting with
           Florida’s Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) planning grant coordinator. These meetings
           have resulted in improved communication in the areas of early childhood mental health and oral health,
           and through this partnership, over ten Head Start health staff received training as child care health consul-
           tants. (Goal 3.2 – Improving Health Component)

         ♦ Collaborated with the ECCS Coordinator and met with the State of Florida American Academy of Pedi-
           atrics Child Care Consultant Physician to discuss plans to establish better communication with pediatri-
           cians on issues around early care and education health services. (Goal 3.2 – Improving ECE Health)

         ♦ Worked with Infant Mental Health advocates to facilitate access to Infant Mental Health services by
           children and families in Florida. (Goal 3.4 – Infant & Toddler Mental Health Resources)

         ♦ Collaborated with FHSA to facilitate a Health Forum. Sponsored Mental Health Consultant, Florida’s
           Kid Care (SCHIP) representative, the Region IV Oral Health Consultant, and other oral health partners
           to present strategies and solutions for Head Start grantees. (Goal 3.2 – Health Access)

         ♦ Developed with the FHSA a Head Start Oral Health Plan. (Goal 3.3 – Oral Health Access)

         Oral Health
         ♦ Served as a member of the work group that produced Florida’s State Oral Health Improvement Plan
           (SOHIP) to address the oral health needs of a broad spectrum of Florida’s population. Also served on the
           Early Childhood Caries sub-committee of the SOHIP and sponsored participation from a Head Start
           grantee representative to serve on the committee. (Goal 3.3 – Oral Health Access)

         ♦ Established a Migrant Oral Health sub-committee of the SOHIP ECC committee to address the special
           needs of Migrant Head Start families and children. (Goal 3.3 – Oral Health Access)

         ♦ Developed with the FHSA a Head Start Oral Health Plan. (Goal 3.3 – Oral Health Access)

         The State’s many state-level coalitions and local oral health partnerships can be found at the end of this
         report.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   71




Welfare
♦ Distributed information on the Earned Income Tax Credit, E-Rate, and information learned at the
  Welfare Self-sufficiency Network meeting. (Goal 2.2 — Improved Family Outcomes)

♦ Supported the FHSA’s Research Committee to identify, pilot, and adopt a statewide needs assessment
  tool for measuring Family Outcomes. (Goal 2.2 — Improved Family Outcomes)

♦ Presented with representative from the AWI/Office of Early Learning at the Florida Association for
  Community Action (FACA) conference on Head Start Child Outcomes. (Goal 2.3 — Family Self-
  sufficiency)

Child Care
♦ Continued participation in the implementation of the Voluntary Pre-kindergarten (VPK) program,
  as discussed above, has resulted in additional children receiving high quality early childhood education
  services and many of them being served for a full day. (Goal 1.1 — Full-day Services)

♦ Met with staff from the Office of Early Learning Child Care Resource and Referral and disseminated
  information to Head Start grantees on the child care referral process.

♦ Presented with NCCIC representative at the state AWI/Office of Early Learning Early Childhood
  Symposium. (Goal 1.2 — Expanding services)

♦ Attended and monitored bi-monthly meetings of the State Early Learning Coalition Advisory Commit-
  tee. (Goal 1.1 — Full-day Services)

Education
♦ Participated and shared information on the bi-weekly conference calls with the Department of Education
  regarding the implementation of VPK. (Goal 4.1 – Shared expectations)

♦ Disseminated information to the Head Start grantees on the Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screening
  tool (FLKRS). (Goal 4.2 — Transitions)

♦ Participated on the Transitions Project for children with disabilities transitioning from Part C to Part B
  and into K-12. (Goal 4.2 — Transitions)

Community Services
♦ Worked to support the Memorandum of Understanding in support of Florida’s Strengthening Families
  Initiative. Served to improve the collaborations between signatories and enhance relationships and mar-
  riages. (Goal 5.1 — Strengthening Families)

Family Literacy Services
♦ The HSSCO Director provided information on and facilitated collaborations between Head Start grantees
  and Even Start programs. (Goal 6.1 — Collaborations for Family Literacy)
72   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         ♦ Facilitated a presentation at the FHSA directors’ meeting about the Building Better Readers parenting
           curriculum. (Goal 6.3 — Enhance training system)

         ♦ Promoted the Sonoma State Family Literacy training through the TA Network. (Goal 6.3 — Enhance
           training system)

         ♦ Invited to represent Head Start and provide input to the creation of Volunteer USA’s (formerly the Gov-
           ernor’s Family Literacy Initiative) Love to Learn Family Literacy curriculum for parents. (Goal 6.3 —
           Enhance training system)

         ♦ Disseminated family literacy information on the HSSCO listserv. (Goal 6.2 — Increase awareness)

         Services to Children with Disabilities
         ♦ The HSSCO Director served on the Advisory Group for the Technical Assistance and Training Services
           (TATS) grant to the University of Central Florida, and worked as part of a team that focused on inclusion
           of young children with disabilities with their non-disabled peers. The team, comprised of representatives
           from the Department of Health, the Department of Education, the Agency for Workforce Innovation,
           Federally funded Technical Assistance and Training Services project, and others, looked at three areas
           around inclusion: family involvement, professional preparation, and program implementation. This com-
           mittee also applied for but was unsuccessful in obtaining the CSEFEL grant. (Goal 7.1 — Joint training
           opportunities)

         ♦ The HSSCO arranged for a Head Start representative to be appointed by the Governor to the Florida
           Interagency Coordinating Council for Infants and Toddlers, the IDEA, Part C interagency council.
           (Goal 7.3 — Influence state policies)

         ♦ Presented an informative session on inclusion in Head Start for the 31 Early Learning Coalition inclusion
           specialists. (Goal 7.2 — Facilitate Inclusion)

         ♦ The HSSCO arranged for a training session at the FHSA annual institute to spotlight successful inclusion
           models in Head Start. This resulted in active interest in one of the models presented. (Goal 7.2 — Facili-
           tate Inclusion)

         Services to Homeless Children and Families
         ♦ Represented Head Start on the Florida Department of Education Homeless Education Needs Assess-
           ment committee to meet the objectives of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Act. This committee
           met three times over the year to assist in identifying state priorities for homeless children and their fami-
           lies. The committee’s number one priority was to improve communication between school district McKin-
           ney-Vento liaisons and local Early Learning Coalition Childcare Resource and Referral staff. The HSSCO
           has facilitated these partnerships, including Head Start programs. (Goal 8.1 – Increase understanding)

         ♦ Shared information obtained from a listserv on homeless services with the Head Start programs in
           Florida. (Goal 8.1 — Increase understanding)


         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
         Through the involvement of the HSSCO, Head Start’s collective voice was heard in many policy and planning
         discussions such as the following:
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   73




♦ Participated and represented Head Start on the Statewide Committee for the revision of Florida’s Early
  Learning Standards. (Goal 1.2 — Improving Quality)

♦ Represented Head Start on the statewide steering committee to build Florida’s professional development
  career ladder. (Goal 9.4 — System building)

♦ Represented Head Start on Florida’s Professional Development team at NAEYC’s professional develop-
  ment day. (Goal 9.4 — System-building)

♦ Presented at Florida Community College Early Childhood Education Network meeting on proposed
  Head Start reauthorization professional development requirements. (Goal 9.1 — Work with partners)

♦ The HSSCO Director was a key participant in a series of meetings of the Policy Matters workgroup.
  Over a series of meetings, using Dr. Sharon Lynn Kagan’s policy framework, assessed Florida’s systems for
  children’s services in eight key areas. The exercise culminated with a presentation by Dr. Kagan to Florida’s
  new Children and Youth Cabinet. (Goal 10.1 — Unified planning)

♦ The HSSCO attended and monitored school readiness governance and advisory structures including
  the Early Learning Advisory Committee meetings and the Children and Youth Cabinet meetings.
  (Goal 1.4 —EC Systems)

♦ The HSSCO continued to serve as an advisor to the Healthy Families Florida program, ensuring that
  Head Start is seen as a partner in primary child abuse prevention and family support efforts in Florida.
  (Goal 2.3 — Self-sufficiency)

♦ Prepared for the inaugural meeting of the Head Start State Collaboration Advisory Committee. (Goal
  10.1 — Unified planning)


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ The HSSCO Director was appointed by the Governor to serve on the first Child Abuse Prevention and
  Permanency Advisory Council. This council is tasked with promoting new solutions to child abuse preven-
  tion and adoption and reviewing local Child Abuse Prevention and Permanency plans.

             ♦ Participated and represented Head Start on the Steering Committee for AWI/Of-
               fice of Early Learning’s development of a statewide online Early Learning Informa-
               tion System. This data collection system will replace the current statewide database
               for early childhood services. This will be a first for Head Start grantees to contribute
               demographic and assessment data into a statewide early childhood database.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Most activities undertaken by this office include coordination of services for Hispanic families as part of
the regular work plan. The needs of Hispanic children and families are central to all discussions in the State.
Other language groups are also a consideration, such as the Haitian Creole and Central American dialectics.

A partnership with the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) Collaboration Director to address MSHS
oral health issues resulted in a series of conference calls with the North Carolina MSHS representative. Oral
74   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Health treatment access and low Medicaid reimbursement rates in Florida seriously impacted the MSHS
         programs in North Carolina. The results of this collaboration include a communication plan between Florida
         and North Carolina MSHS programs and the establishment of a Migrant Oral Health Committee, which
         will renew services for MSHS families within Community Health Centers and to explore Medicaid portabil-
         ity between Florida and North Carolina.


         How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
         upcoming year?
         Many of the activities begun in 2007 will continue far into the future. The work of the Migrant Early Child-
         hood Caries group in Oral Health, Healthy Families Florida, exploring Family Outcomes in conjunction with
         the FHSA Research Committee, working with the Florida Department of Education to facilitate inclusive
         activities for children with disabilities, planning for professional development, revised early childhood stan-
         dards, collaboration with community action, and early childhood systems building will continue to be in the
         work plan for the coming year.

         Many of these activities provided a foundation for future work. The plan to guide the work of the HSSCO
         reflects these solid plans and includes additional objectives for collaboration with the Office of Early Learning
         especially in the areas of data collection, data analysis, and outcomes for children and family self-sufficiency.
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 75




                                  Georgia


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Janice M. Haker
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Bright from the Start: GA DeCAl
10 Park Place South               Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Suite 200                         services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Atlanta, GA 30303                 are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 404-651-7425               at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 707-342-3138
                                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
janice.haker@decal.state.ga.gov   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehen-
www.decal.state.ga.us             sive services for all low-income children.


Lead Agency Contact               Served as a member of Georgia’s Early Childhood Compre-
                                  hensive Systems (ECCS) grant implementation committee.
Justine Strickland                (Goal 1, 2, & 3). Participated in two meetings, a conference
                                  call, and responded to numerous e-mails in 2007. Results were:
Assistant Commissioner
Phone: 404-463-4309               ♦ Expanded understanding of each partner agency program:
fax: 404-656-0651
Justine.Strickland@decal.ga.gov         ♦ Department of Human Resources
                                        ♦ Department of Public Health
ACF Regional Contact
                                        ♦ Infant and Child Health Services
Bobby Griffin
                                        ♦ Department of Children and Parent Services
ACf Region IV                             (formerly DFCS)
60 forsyth Street
                                        ♦ Bright from the Start:
Suite 4M60
                                                  ♦ GA Department of Early Care and
Atlanta, GA 30303
                                                    Learning
Phone: 404-652-2874
fax: 404-562-2983                                 ♦ Head Start-State Collaboration
Bobby.Griffin@acf.hhs.gov                           Office

                                        ♦ Family Connection Partnership
                                        ♦ Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention grantees
                                        ♦ Promoting Safe and Stable Families grantees
                                        ♦ State Child Care Administrators
76   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




              ♦ State Children’s Mental Health Directors
              ♦ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration State Systems of Care grantees
              ♦ Women, Children, and Family Treatment Program grantees
              ♦ State Substance Abuse Program Representatives
         ♦ Improved coordination among partner organizations (same as above).

         Worked on the ECCS Subcommittee Workgroup that implemented Parent Education strategies and ex-
         panded training opportunities across the state (Goal 1 & 2). Although there were no meetings scheduled this
         quarter, members maintained communication through e-mail and responded to requests as needed. Results
         were three new partners:

         ♦ Parent to Parent of GA

         ♦ Parent Teacher Institute (PTI)

         ♦ The Marcus Institute

         Worked with the statewide Georgia Professional Development and Training Approval System Committee
         and made presentations to local communities and groups to support professionalizing the early education and
         care workforce (Goal 1, 2 & 3). One advisory committee and one work meeting. Results were:

         ♦ New registry participants = 1,608

         ♦ Approved trainers = 907

         ♦ Approved training sessions = 6,582

         Facilitated/worked with the Blended Services Work Group to develop crosswalk tools and an agreement that
         strives to expand programmatic knowledge and training opportunities across providers (Goal 10, Objective
         10.2, Tasks 1 – 5). Results were:

         ♦ Task 1— Scheduled HSSCO program evaluation for May – August 2008.

         ♦ Task 2 — Obtained partner participants for Blended Services Work Group (HS, PK, CC, BOE,
           and private providers).

         ♦ Task 3 — Held quarterly meetings throughout 2007.

         ♦ Task 4 — Shared results with GHSA and other partners through meeting updates.

         ♦ Task 5 — Developed and scheduled MOA for signature in October 2007. However, appointment of the
           new Commissioner delayed signing.

         Completed and distributed Crosswalk for all early education and care providers in October 2007.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   77




Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
No activities reported.

Welfare
Met with the Department of Human Resources, Child Care and Parent Services (CAPS), formerly Depart-
ment of Family and Children’s Services, regularly to collaborate on how to best serve low-income families.
One meeting of the Blended Services Workgroup was held on October 10, 2007; January and March 2008
meetings were canceled while Head Start reauthorization activities have led to review and refocus of future
activities and strategies. Results were:

♦ Continued and improved cooperation with other state agencies.

Child Care
Attended quarterly meetings with child care provider associations and groups to address concerns, issues, and
challenges in local communities. One meeting each with Minority Alliance for Child Care Development
Advocates, Child Care Association, and with Georgia Head Start Association. Results were:

♦ Continued and improved cooperation and coordination.

Education
Attended meetings with local boards of education, public school systems, and open forums to discuss local
community education issues. Three meetings: Pittulloch Foundation and Early Learning Property Manage-
ment, Inc.; Early Learning Partnership Meeting with community partners and one Georgia State Represen-
tative (Fulton County); and Coweta County Partnership meeting. Worked with foundations and other groups
to assist local Head Start grantees in attaining facility licensure. Results were:

♦ Continued talks with community entities; some talk of foundation funding (private) to assist with
  licensing of Head Start centers.

Community Services
Bright from the Start manages the Georgia CCR&R agencies, which provide direct support to the Navigator
Teams (ECCS grant system that expands access to community resources). Results were:

♦ Navigator Teams are now in 37 counties and link with Head Start advocates/Family Services Workers and
  the CCR&R agencies.

Family Literacy Services
One meeting with Georgia Public Broadcasting. Results were:

♦ Increased communication with Georgia Public Radio and the local Head Start programs whereby they
  share events activities and services with other community representatives.
78   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Services to Children with Disabilities
         Five meetings with Parent Leadership Coalition with emphasis on children with disabilities. Results were:

         ♦ Discussed implementation, linking, and sharing information with Navigator Teams, which are part of
           ECCS Initiative; the HSSCO participated in four annual training conference and assisting in the devel-
           opment of a Speaker’s Bureau.

         Services to Homeless Children and Families
         HSSCO participated in one meeting with internal BFTS agency departments and one external group that
         includes services to the homeless. Results were:

         ♦ Improve understanding among the Homeless Coalition, Bright from the Start, and the HSSCO.


         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
         Member of many major advisory groups in Georgia working on policies related to early care and education,
         including Executive Management Team (Bright from the Start: Georgia Department of Early Care and
         Learning) five meetings with the Georgia Head Start Association (bi-monthly Board meetings), Region IV
         Head Start Association Board of Directors, (three Board meetings). Results were:

         ♦ Improved coordination and cooperation on Head Start related issues.

         ♦ Attended quarterly meetings with multiple early education and care providers: pre-kindergarten, private
           child care (profit and not-for-profit), public schools, Head Start, and combinations of the groups. One
           meeting each with Minority Alliance for Child Care Development Advocates, Child Care Association,
           and Georgia Head Start Association.


         Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
         Facilitated/hosted Blended Services Work Group that offered Georgia the opportunity to establish success-
         ful partnerships for sharing resources while maximizing services under an agreement between Head Start,
         pre-kindergarten, private child care, school system providers, and the Child Care and Parent Services (CAPS).
         Proposed MOA with the Blended Services Work Group, scheduled to be signed in early October by State
         Superintendent of Schools and other partners, but was postponed pending consideration and approval by new
         Commissioner.

         The HSSCO hosted regular meetings between the GHSA Executive Committee, Bright from the Start: GA
         Department of Early Care & Learning, and key early care and education leaders in the State that offered
         opportunities for Head Start and its partners to share priorities, resolve programmatic issues, and set strategic
         goals (3 meetings — MACCDA, GA CCA, and GHSA).

         The Region IV ACF Office, with its Office of Head Start and Child Care Bureau offices, provided leadership
         and support to benefit Georgia programs. Both offices participated in joint early education and care events,
         particularly the Blended Services Work Group.

         Joint presentations at early care and education conferences and meetings, included the Georgia Head Start
         Association Spring Conference and various training sessions at multiple sites which enabled the HSSCO to
         expand understanding and improve communication among the early education and care partners in Georgia.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   79




Will schedule throughout the State with all Georgia Pre-K Directors as annual and ongoing training.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Provided contacts from Georgia Public Broadcasting (Carol Veatch) and Georgia Department of Techni-
cal and Adult Education (Carla DeBose) to Telamon Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Director (Dinitra
Coates) that may enable Telamon to improve services and information to Hispanic families through one of its
programs (Lee y, Serás). Applied for a mini-grant from the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Collaboration
Office to expand efforts in Georgia.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The coming year offers many opportunities to strive for a full-scale, statewide effort to partner with all early
education and care providers. The proposed State Advisory Council addressed in the Improving Head Start
for School Readiness Act of 2007 is important to the continued efforts on which the Blended Services Work
Group was working. This work group finalized the following crosswalk documents:

♦ Alignment of Early Learning Standards (Birth to Grade 3 and beyond) with the Head Start Child
  Outcomes Framework and Pre-K Guidelines. Completed May 1, 2007, and approved at October 10, 2007
  meeting.

♦ Expanding the Side-By-Side Comparison of Federal and State Requirements for Early Childhood Edu-
  cation Services to include those covered by the Public School System (in progress).

Still pending is the alignment of the Proposed Quality System Indicators Crosswalk with existing program
standards for all early education and care providers in Georgia that is in progress. (A separate work group is
working on these indicators and a large number of partner agencies is represented.)

The Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 calls for:

♦ An expanded role of the HSSCO Director in coordinating with Head Start grantees to increase partner-
  ships with their local community entities.

♦ The Governor to provide a new, or re-designate an existing, group to perform the activities of the legis-
  lated state-advisory council.

♦ Expanding the requirement for teachers and other staff to pursue additional college degrees or credential-
  ing. These are significant challenges for grantees to address. There is much work to accomplish.

The coming year offers many opportunities to strive for a full-scale, statewide effort to partner with all early
education and care providers. The proposed State Advisory Council addressed in the Improving Head Start
for School Readiness Act of 2007 is important to the continued efforts of the Blended Services Work Group.
This work group finalized the following crosswalk documents:

♦ Alignment of Early Learning Standards (Birth to Grade 3 and beyond) with the Head Start Child
  Outcomes Framework and Pre-K Guidelines. Completed May 1, 2007, and approved at October 10, 2007
  meeting.
80   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         ♦ Expanding the Side-By-Side Comparison of Federal and State Requirements for Early Childhood
           Education Services to include those covered by the Public School System (in progress).

         Still pending is the alignment of the Proposed Quality System Indicators Crosswalk with existing program
         standards for all early education and care providers in Georgia that is in progress. (A separate work group is
         working on these indicators and a large number of partner agencies is represented.)

         The Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 calls for:

         ♦ An expanded role of the HSSCO Director in coordinating with Head Start grantees to increase
           partnerships with their local community entities.

         ♦ The Governor to provide a new, or re-designate an existing, group to perform the activities of the
           legislated state-advisory council.

         ♦ Expanding the requirement for teachers and other staff to pursue additional college degrees or cre-
           dentialing. These are significant challenges for grantees to address. There is much work to accomplish.
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 81




                                 Hawaii


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Christine Jackson
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
DHS/BeSSD
820 Mililani Street              Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Suite 606                        services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Honolulu, HI 96813               are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 808-586-5240              at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 808-586-5180
                                 in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
cjackson@dhs.hawaii.gov          Goal 1

Lead Agency Contact              To increase understanding of the public to see early childhood
                                 education, health, and school readiness as major contributors
Pankaj Bhanot                    of academic success and economic growth.
DHS/BeSSD
Acting Assistant Administrator   Objective #1
Phone: 808-586-7054
                                 Improve and increase an awareness and understanding of
fax: 808-586-5229                what is being achieved through Head Start/Early Head Start
pbhanot@dhs.hawaii.gov           programs in the State.

ACF Regional Contact             Desired Outcomes

Shirley Karrer                   ♦ Increased knowledge and recognition of Head Start.
ACf Region IX
90 7th Street                    ♦ Fact sheet is distributed to legislators, Head Start grantees
                                   and partners.
9th floor
San francisco, CA 94103          ♦ Increased public awareness through business partnerships.
Phone: 415-437-8068
fax: 415-437-8438                Actual Outcomes
Shirley.karrer@acf.hhs.gov
                                 ♦ Compiled data on Head Start staff qualifications for Act
                                   259 Task Force.

                                 ♦ Worked with a printing company to produce a 2007 Head
                                   Start fact sheet.
82   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         ♦ Participated on the Act 259 Inter-Departmental Resources Sub-committee.

         ♦ Participated in two meetings with a representative from the National Economic Development and Law
           Center.

         ♦ Facilitated the submittal of two articles on Head Start to Gannett News and the Good Beginnings Alli-
           ance (GBA) newsletter.

         Objective #2

         Partner with Good Beginnings Alliance (GBA) in its efforts to build public and political will for increased
         resources toward early childhood education, health, and school readiness that will include Head Start.

         Desired Outcomes

         ♦ Increased Head Start participation in GBA policy decisions and activities at community and state level.

         ♦ Increased state investment to Head Start.

         Actual Outcomes

         ♦ Participated on GBA Senior Advisory Group and attended quarterly Board meetings. Participated in the
           summer Board Retreat to engage in state strategic planning discussions.

         ♦ Two Head Start directors also sit on the GBA Board (one represents the Head Start Association, and one
           is the Maui County representative). These directors also participated in state strategic planning discussions
           at the Board Retreat in the summer.

         ♦ At least half of the Head Start directors are actively involved in GBA County Council meetings and com-
           munity events planned by these Councils within their respective service areas.

         ♦ The HSSCO and Head Start Association of Hawaii (HSAH) participated in planning meetings towards
           the Champions for Children annual breakfast event scheduled for January 2008, a venue to educate legis-
           lators, their staff, and others about the important work Head Start is doing and the resources Head Start
           makes available to its families through its comprehensive program model.

         ♦ Participated with HSAH and the community to request continuation of state funds to Head Start grantee
           agencies through the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations/Office of Community Services to
           expand slots for Head Start children. Monies were not allocated by the State Legislature.

         ♦ Partnered with GBA, Aloha United Way (AUW), Hawaii Association for the Education of Young Chil-
           dren (HAEYC), the Department of Health/Early Childhood Comprehensive Services (ECCS) Grant
           Coordinator, the Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture (INPEACE), Kamehameha Schools,
           and Punahou School to bring to Hawaii a mainland consultant to provide TA to AUW around a national
           campaign (“Born Learning”). The consultant also discussed strengthening family strategies, funding, and
           the sharing of two public education campaigns and related materials (“Mind in the Making” and “Born
           Learning”) through several public and private venues.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   83




Goal #2

To increase Head Start involvement in state planning efforts to develop Hawaii’s Early Learning System with
the incorporation of Head Start.

Objective #1

Facilitate Head Start participation in development of Hawaii’s early learning system.

Desired Outcomes

♦ Increased participation of Head Start in state and community efforts in order to integrate services to
  young children and families.

♦ Sustain linkage to Free-To-Grow state teams.

Actual Outcomes

♦ Participated on Act 259 Task Force (Inter-Departmental Resources Sub-Committee). Work activities
  resulted in a report to the Legislature regarding the cost-implementation plan for developing and sustain-
  ing a comprehensive, coordinated early learning system.

♦ Attended a “Strengthening State Systems to Promote Early Childhood Development” in Washington,
  D.C., with a state team of early childhood partners. Goals of the meeting were to strengthen the state
  inter-agency team; enhance collaboration among child care, Head Start, and Maternal & Child Health;
  and explore strategies for institutionalizing state-level partnerships. The state team’s plan, upon returning
  to Hawaii, was to submit a grant proposal in response to a National Governors Association RFP to spon-
  sor an Early Childhood summit in Hawaii. The grant proposal was never submitted.

Objective #2

Collaborate with Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) grant planning sponsored by the
Department of Health.

Desired Outcomes

♦ Coordinated planning and implementation efforts of HSSCO and ECCS.

♦ Engage new partners in system-building efforts.

Actual Outcomes

♦ The HSSCO Director worked closely with the ECCS Coordinator, Strategic Management Team, and
  other related groups to coordinate efforts and leverage resources to accomplish mutual goals and imple-
  ment strategies identified in both the HSSCO and ECCS work plans.

♦ Secured approval from the Regional Office to use roll-over funds to contract a report on local Head Start/
  Child Care partnerships and to research national exemplary models for possible replication in Hawaii
84   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




            (April). This contract was never executed, but a similar report will be developed by the current HSSCO
            Director.


         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
         your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
         Health Care
         ♦ Assisted with statewide planning efforts for a coordinated delivery of social and emotional curriculum and
           support service linkages through the Social Emotional work group of the ECCS Strategic Management
           Team.

         ♦ Facilitated contacts between Head Start grantees and two resource developers who subsequently produced
           a Family Stories DVD on social and emotional development.

         ♦ Facilitated a group of Hawaii staff to attend a Second Step training of trainers in Seattle. Group members
           expressed an interest in developing a cultural adaptation of the Second Step curriculum.

         Oral Health
         ♦ Convened three meetings of the Oral Health Head Start state team (Head Start directors and/or health
           specialist, community partners) for networking, sharing of program updates, and discussions around oral
           health needs/concerns. One of these meetings served as a strategic planning session to identify program
           changes, current needs, and priorities and potential strategies to address oral health issues.

         ♦ Coordinated bringing a resource speaker to the HSAH meeting to discuss oral health services offered
           through the Community Case Management Corporation.

         ♦ Secured funds from the Hawaii Dental Services Foundation and coordinated two two-day training of
           trainers workshops on the “Cavity Free Kids” curriculum to which Head Start staff and community part-
           ners were invited.


         State-level

         A complete listing of Hawaiian Islands Oral Health Task Force members can be found at the end of this
         report.


         Local-level

         Head Start programs in the State have a variety of local dental partnerships. A listing of these partnerships
         can be found at the end of this report.


         Additional Information

         One of the goals listed in the 2008-09 refunding application is to reactivate the Head Start State Oral Health
         Teams, which formerly consisted of Head Start directors or their designees, Head Start health specialists, and
         community oral health partners. The teams met quarterly to share information and resources, and network,
         discuss, and help problem-solve challenges, and support grantee efforts around oral health. The last meeting
         was held in August 2007, just before the previous HSSCO Director left this position.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   85




Welfare

Attended a “Strengthening Families Leadership Conference” in San Diego in May to pursue state implemen-
tation planning between Head Start and state partners.

Child Care

♦ DHS Program Specialist during interim period secured TANF information needed by Head Start
  grantees to send bulk mailing of intake applications for the new school year.

♦ Secured approval for the balance of supplemental funds received to be rolled over to contract with a
  consultant to produce a report on Head Start/Child Care Partnerships in Hawaii. A contract was never
  awarded, but the report will be produced by the current HSSCO Director.

♦ Worked with a printing company to produce a Head Start fact sheet that was distributed to child care
  partners, legislators, and community stakeholders.

♦ Advocated for the continuation of state funds through the Office of Community Services for Head Start
  grantees to expand child care slots. (Monies were not allocated by the Legislature.)

Education

♦ Provided shared leadership for the Hawaii Careers for Young Children and co-convened meetings to
  support the development of a professional development system for care providers in Hawaii.

♦ Participated in the planning of the P-3 (Provisions for Early Learning through Grade 3) Summit, which
  brought principals and early childhood leaders together to form new partnerships to support child out-
  comes.

♦ Presented an overview of the Pre-Plus Program in Hawaii (partnership between the Departments of
  Education and Human Services) as breakout session at the P-3 Summit.

♦ Facilitated bringing a resource speaker from the Committee for Children to conduct a breakout session
  on the “Social/Emotional Foundations for Literacy” at the P-3 Summit.

Community Services
No activities reported.

Family Literacy Services
Facilitated a “meet-and-greet” session with a representative from the Committee for Children (CFC) after
the P-3 Summit for individuals interested in learning more about curricula developed by CFC, including
“Woven Word,” which reinforces social and emotional concepts through literacy.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Maintained communication with the State 619 Preschool Coordinator with regard to the DOE/Head Start
integrated classrooms and the resolving of challenges in program delivery statewide.
86   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Services to Homeless Children and Families
         No activities reported.


         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
         See responses under Goal #1, Objective #2, and Goal #2; Objectives #1 & #2.


         Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
         ♦ The HSSCO Director enrolled in the Master’s degree program in Early Childhood Education at the Uni-
           versity of Hawaii for professional development purposes.

         ♦ The HSSCO Director applied for, and was accepted into, the Office of Head Start/Head Start Fellows
           Program.


         Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
         families in your State.
         No activities reported.


         How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
         upcoming year?
         N/A: The HSSCO Director who developed the work plan is no longer in this position.
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 87




                                 Idaho


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Carolyn f. Kiefer
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Idaho Department of Health and
Welfare
                                 Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
P.O. Box 83720                   services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
450 West State Street            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
5th floor                        at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Boise, ID 83720                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 208-334-4919
                                 The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO)’s Five
fax: 208-332-7330                Year Grant is closely aligned with the goals and activities of
kieferc@dhw.idaho.gov            the Governor’s Early Care and Learning Initiative (Early
                                 Childhood Comprehensive Systems Grant). The identified sys-
Lead Agency Contact              tem’s changes are key to improving and strengthening the lives
                                 of Idaho’s young children and their families. In this, the second
Mary Jones                       year of the HSSCO’s Five Year Grant, work has built on
                                 shared priorities and strengthening working relationships. The
Phone: 208-334-5523
                                 Early Childhood Coordinating Council (EC3), appointed by
fax: 208-332-7330                the Governor, brings together major stakeholders and partners
jonesm@dhw.idaho.gov             to advise and develop the systems changes which impact early
                                 childhood policy. The HSSCO Director serves on the Execu-
                                 tive Committee and chairs the Public Policy Committee. The
ACF Regional Contact             Early Childhood Partners Meeting held in Washington, D.C.,
                                 in January, helped focus and drive the work in 2007.
Julianne Crevatin
ACf Region X                     The major effort of 2007 was launching Idaho’s Early Learning
2201 6th Avenue                  Guidelines (ELG) development, building on 2006 groundwork
MS-70                            with partners and stakeholders. The work was anticipated to
                                 take 12-18 months, but has been extended due to the scope
Seattle, WA 98121
                                 and process work embedded in such a project.
Phone: 206-615-2615
jcrevatin@acf.hhs.gov            The Sponsors Team is guiding and leading the ELG work. The
                                 team is comprised of the Part C Coordinator (Department of
                                 Health and Welfare), Part B-619 Coordinator (State Depart-
                                 ment of Education), Early Care and Learning Director (De-
                                 partment of Health and Welfare), and the HSSCO Director.

                                 The ELG Interagency Stakeholders Group is comprised of
                                 representatives from universities and colleges (public and pri-
                                 vate), public agencies, Head Start, Early Head Start, Migrant
88   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         and Seasonal Head Start, public schools, early intervention specialists, private preschools, child care, early
         childhood specialists, and consultants. A neutral facilitator supported the ELG work. The group met twice for
         two-day work sessions in 2007.

         The initial kickoff meeting, March 3-4, 2007, included technical assistance from national and regional Na-
         tional Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center consultants in cooperation with the Idaho
         Child Care Administrator. Building on the work of other states, particularly Washington, the group developed
         guiding principles, values, scope, and committees:

         ♦ Organized around five Domains:

              ♦ Approaches to Learning and Cognition
              ♦ Physical Health, Well-Being, and Motor Development
              ♦ Social and Emotional Development
              ♦ General Knowledge
              ♦ Communication, Language, and Literacy Development


         ♦ Developed guidelines for birth to school age, with birth through primary grades for Social and Emotional
           Development and Approaches to Learning

         ♦ Assured alignment with the Idaho K-12 Standards and the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework

         ♦ Is culturally responsive

         ♦ Is family-centered

         The scope of the Guidelines work expanded and evolved over the year. Based on the expertise of members,
         other state’s experiences and recommendations from national groups, the group added more age-specific
         information to the infant toddler segments. The target audience was expanded from parents and caregivers to
         a wider more systems-oriented view. The group is now building a foundational, or “mother” document to:

         ♦ Serve as the information base for early childhood program quality, pre-service and in-service professional
           development

         ♦ Be the content source for parent and caregiver materials

         ♦ Be assessment aligned

         ♦ Help guide the development of curriculums

         This will be primarily an electronic body of knowledge, accessible from many points and linked to ongoing
         research and best practice.

         The ELGs will impact or influence the majority of priority areas. They are a critical element and reference
         point for high-quality early childhood programs and will guide the practice of adults who work with young
         children. The ELGs will realign the current 3-4-year-old Standards with the revised Idaho K-12 Standards,
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   89




and will provide the foundation for public pre-kindergarten programs when Idaho implements such programs
in schools. As the ELGs are being carefully designed to align and enhance the Head Start Child Outcomes
framework, they will have the capacity to enhance pre-kindergarten/Head Start collaboration when Idaho
communities provide pre-kindergarten programs. Quality child care will be strengthened by caregivers with
information about the healthy development of children and access to ongoing professional development and
information. The ELGs will enhance early intervention programs, particularly when supporting services in
natural environments that include typically developing children.

The extension of social and emotional development curriculum through the primary grades is a response to
requests by early intervention programs in public schools. They need standards for writing Individual Educa-
tion Plans for children who require services for emotional and mental health disabilities. These Guidelines
also support the HSSCO’s mental health goals of promoting health development, preventing difficulties, early
intervention, and treatment. They are a solid first step to addressing a notable service gap for 3 to 8-year-old
children.

The HSSCO continues to work with partners in the State Department of Education on the ELGs, Inter-
agency Agreements, Early Childhood Mental Health, and other shared projects.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.

Health Care
Infant and early childhood mental health continues to be a priority for the HSSCO. Meeting a priority in
the State Plan, the HSSCO contracted with Boise State University for an Early Childhood Mental Health
Symposium to develop professional capacity for early intervention and treatment. The three-day Symposium
was focused on the DC 0-3R, a diagnostic classification, with training conducted by staff from ZERO TO
THREE. A cadre of 45 professionals from around the State will continue to receive training. Ongoing work,
including the development of a white paper of priorities, has been developed for the State Team.

The HSSCO Director wrote an early childhood mental health article for the Northwest Bulletin for MCH at
the request of the Division of Health.

The HSSCO Director attended quarterly meeting of the Covering Kids program working for access to health
care for low income families and enrollment of eligible children in medical homes and Medicaid.

Oral Health

State-level

Oral health was a top priority in 2007. The HSSCO was a key partner in the organization and facilitation
of the Idaho Oral Health Summit. Idaho Head Start information was presented in a panel discussion, and
South Central Head Start’s Oral Heath Grant Program was featured. In addition, the HSSCO and Region X
Health TA Specialist presented a pre-summit day for all Idaho Head Start/Early Head Start Health Coordi-
nators. The Summit featured presentations by WIC and Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors
(ASTDD). A new state Oral Health Plan is being developed from the priorities identified at the Summit.

Idaho is medically underserved, with 93.9 percent of the State classified as Health Professional Shortage
Areas (HPSA) for dental care. Of 44 counties, nine are classified as urban (a town with more than 20,000
people), 19 as rural, and 16 classified as frontier.
90   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         While oral health benefits are comprehensive (including preventative, restorative, and emergency services) un-
         der Medicaid’s Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment Program, the majority of Medicaid
         enrolled young children in Idaho did not receive these services. Children ages 1-5 were three times less likely
         to receive any dental services as those aged 6-10 in FY 2005.

         ♦ Bureau of Community and Environmental Health. Idaho does not have a State Dental Director; the
           Oral Health Program Manager in the Bureau of Community and Environmental Health retired in 2007.
           The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare is currently seeking a replacement.

            Contact: elke Shaw-tulloch
            Bureau Chief
            Community & environmental Health


         ♦ Idaho Oral Health Alliance. The Idaho Oral Health Alliance (IOHA), a nonprofit agency with wide
           representation and a growing membership, is the primary group addressing oral health issues in the State.
           The IOHA includes dentists, dental hygienists, dental technicians, health organizations, health founda-
           tions, insurers, Public Health Districts, Community Health Centers, state and regional agencies, and the
           HSSCO.

            On November 9, 2007, the IOHA sponsored an Oral Health Summit, with technical assistance from
            Alterum, a national health contractor and the ASTDD. The Summit attracted a capacity crowd of 250. An
            Idaho Oral Health Plan is the primary outcome of the Summit, and is in its final review. The final report is
            expected by July 2008.

            Contact: Dan Watt, DDS, fAGD
            terry Reilly Health Services
            Canyon Dental Clinic
            11136 Moss lane
            nampa, ID 83687
            Phone: 208-466-0515


         The HSSCO was a part of the Summit Planning Committee and played a major role in the organization,
         registration, content, and facilitation of sessions. A Pre-Conference Day, November 8, was organized by the
         HSSCO and the Region X TA for Head Start Health Coordinators, which included presentations from the
         Idaho WIC Coordinator, Region X TA Health Coordinator, and Dr. Reginald Louie, an ASTDD national
         oral health consultant. Eleven of the 13 (including Tribal and Migrant Seasonal) Head Start programs par-
         ticipated.

         In past years the HSSCO has partnered with the Oral Health Program Manager to provide additional
         preventative supplies and educational materials to the Health Districts. In addition in 2006, the HSSCO pur-
         chased copies of Bright Futures Oral Health booklet for distribution to all primary care physicians to increase
         their involvement with oral health and to promote efforts to include fluoride varnish as a part of well-child
         care.


         Local-level

         Head Start programs maintain good working relationships with the dental hygienist in all of seven public
         health districts as they are key partners for the application of fluoride varnish and preventative services.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   91




Additional information

The HSSCO Director is currently part of the team to review and comment on the Idaho Oral Health Plan
before it is printed and distributed.

Welfare
The HSSCO continues to support the TANF contract for additional Head Start slots for eligible children.
The contract is between the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and the Idaho Head Start Association
(IHSA) and received legislative support for continued funding.

Child Care
The HSSCO continued to support systems issues of quality child care in Idaho. Idaho Association for the
Education of Young Children (IAEYC) is the contractor for the quality child care initiative and IdahoSTARS
program. The IAEYC Director and the Child Care Administrator serve on the Collaboration Council. Close
working relationships enabled the ECL Director, the IAEYC Executive Director, the Child Care Adminis-
trator, Part C and B Coordinators, and the HSSCO Director to serve as a team for the Inclusion Conference,
ECCS Partners Conference, and the NAEYC Professional Development Conference.

Education
The HSSCO is a member of the Consortium for the Preparation of Early Childhood Professionals. This
provided the HSSCO with bi-annual meetings with all Idaho institutions of Higher Education. Issues of
articulation, transferring of credits, early childhood curriculum, and degrees/certification requirements were
addressed by this group. The support of the Consortium and generous participation in the work by its mem-
bers has helped strengthen Early Learning Guidelines work. Engagement with the Consortium is also an
important link to promote higher education opportunities for Head Start staff.

Community Services
The HSSCO supported the Early Childhood Coordinating Council in an application for four VISTA staff to
start in July 2008. Three will be assigned to work on child care licensing and quality issues in selected com-
munities. The fourth will be assigned to work on early childhood mental health issues. This priority will be
expanding in the 2008 grant year to include the braiding of funding to support these projects.

Family Literacy Services
This priority was addressed by Head Start programs at the local level. The HSSCO participated in Region X TA
conference calls about family literacy and helped distribute materials to enhance and support grantees’ efforts.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The Interagency Agreement between Part C, Part B-619, Head Start and Early Head Start on both the state
program levels received considerable attention during 2007. Most Idaho Head Start grantees work with a
number of local school districts, many of which are small and rural. Distances and limited resources test Head
Start and local schools’ ability to serve children with special needs. In response to local needs, the HSSCO
Part B-619 Coordinator and the Region X TA Disabilities Coordinator convened three cluster meetings
around Idaho with school district representatives and Head Start programs. The meetings clarified responsi-
bilities, built communication, and gathered input and recommendations for a model Interagency Agreement
at local levels.
92   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         The information was taken to a state team working on the State Interagency Agreement to strengthen the
         state agreement and suggested protocols for referral and service at the local level. The initial work has been
         completed, and the team is continuing its work into 2008 with a goal of having new materials ready for the
         2008-09 school year.

         Services to Homeless Children and Families
         This remains the most difficult priority to address. Staff transitions within the Department of Education have
         resulted in missed opportunities to connect with the McKinney-Vento liaison.


         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
         The HSSCO Director was actively involved in the planning, development, and implementation of goals for
         the following:

         ♦ Early Childhood Coordinating Council, Executive Committee, Public Policy

         ♦ Early Learning Guidelines, Sponsors Team, Team lead on Domain content

         ♦ Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health State Team

         ♦ Idaho Oral Health Alliance

         ♦ Consortium for the Preparation of Early Childhood Professionals

         ♦ Interagency Agreement Work Group

         ♦ State Inclusion Team


         Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
         The HSSCO Director:

         ♦ Served as the community representative for Boise State University Early Childhood Faculty Search
           Committee.

         ♦ Attended the Easter Seal Autism Conference for professional development.

         ♦ Served on the Idaho Team attending the NAEYC Professional Development Conference and the
           Pre-Conference Partners meeting facilitated by NCCIC.

         ♦ Served on the National Professional Development Center for Inclusion Advisory Board.

         ♦ Distributed the very successful early childhood mental health booklet, Secure Beginnings, which
           required a third printing in two years—30,000 copies above expectations.

         ♦ Worked with Region X and key Department of Health and Welfare managers to facilitate several confer-
           ence calls and a visit from Region X Administrator James Whitfield, who was personally concerned about
           Head Start (TANF funding) and early childhood issues in Idaho.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   93




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
The Idaho Community Council Migrant Seasonal Head Start serves more children than any other grantee
in Idaho. They are key partners, serving on the Collaboration Advisory Council and invited to participate in
all projects including the content of the Early Learning Guidelines. They are also represented on the Early
Childhood Coordinating Council (EC3).


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The HSSCO’s work plan builds on the successes and priorities of the past year and the five-year grant plan.
The plan for the 2008-09 grant year has been expanded by the Improving Head Start Act for School Readi-
ness Act of 2007 and its additional priorities.

Work plan priorities:

♦ Early Learning Guidelines: Complete and review the content and plan for the secondary materials.

♦ Early Years 2008 Conference: This large statewide conference is held in even numbered years to support
  professional development, share current research and best practice, and enhance early childhood systems
  in Idaho. The HSSCO is the convener and primary sponsor.

♦ Infant Early Childhood Mental Health: Continue to address state plan priorities, especially in the area of
  professional development.

♦ HSSCO Needs Assessment: As mandated by Reauthorization, the HSSCO will develop and conduct a state-
  wide assessment. The HSSCO will develop an assessment that enhances and supports the EC3 County
  Assessment currently undergoing a regional pilot.

♦ Interagency Agreement: Continue to work with the Infant Toddler Program (Part C), Part B 619, and Head
  Start/Early Head Start programs to develop Interagency Agreements on the state and local levels that
  meet Federal requirements, best serve children and families, and facilitate positive working relationships.

♦ Consolidate the Head Start Collaboration Council with the EC3 to meet the Reauthorization mandate
  for the State Early Learning Council.

♦ Address additional Reauthorization issues as they arise.
94   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 95




                                  Illinois


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Gina Ruther
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Il Department of Human Services
(DHS)
                                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
10 Collinsville Avenue            services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 203                         are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
east St. louis, Il 62201          at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 618-583-2083               in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 618-583-2091
gina.ruther@illinois.gov          Goal 1

                                  To facilitate improvement and well-planned expansion of a
Lead Agency Contact               quality system for IL early care and education services to low-
                                  income families with young children.
linda Saterfield
DHS Child Care Bureau Chief       ♦ Conducted two statewide Collaboration Forums in
Phone: 217-785-2559                 September 2007 in conjunction with the National Child
fax: 217-524-6030                   Care Information Center and the Illinois Good Start, Grow
                                    Smart (GSGS) team. The final report from these forums is
linda.saterfield@illinois.gov
                                    posted on the IL Early Childhood Collaboration Web site
                                    (www.ilearlychildhoodcollab.org).
ACF Regional Contact
                                  ♦ Met with Early Learning Council and Head Start leader-
Susan Markko                        ship in January 2007 to resolve Head Start community
ACf Region V                        issues with the expansion of state pre-kindergarten and the
233 north Michigan Avenue           development of the Preschool for All program. Head Start
                                    gained representation on all Early Learning Council com-
Suite 400
                                    mittees and on the Council in 2007 for the first time since
Chicago, Il 60601                   the Council’s inception in 2003.
Phone: 312-353-9695
fax: 312-353-2629                 ♦ The DHS Child Care Advisory Council finalized its
                                    recommendation to DHS from the Collaboration &
sue.markko@acf.hhs.gov
                                    Integration Committee on how to expand and improve
                                    family child care home networks. The Head Start-State
                                    Collaboration Office (HSSCO) had been working with the
                                    Committee for almost a year on this recommendation.

                                  ♦ Worked with the GSGS state/Federal team on a variety of
                                    topics and issues including: Strengthening Families initia-
                                    tive, cost allocation vs. non-supplantation, statewide early
96   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




            childhood quality assurance, coordination of “slot” data and under-served counties, and PreK/Preschool for
            All expansion/RFP/bidders conference.

         ♦ Completed the GSGS sections of the Illinois Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) State Plan.

         Goal 2

         To enhance and expand IL Early Head Start/early care and education partnerships and promote model
         strategies.

         ♦ Completed an evaluation of the DHS Child Care Collaboration Program, also posted on the IL Early
           Childhood Collaboration Web site. Presented the issues and recommendations from this report and the
           Collaboration Forums report to the Illinois GSGS team for its agenda. Added five new providers to the
           program and updated the collaboration slots of one provider.

         ♦ Added community coalition information and profiles to the IL EC Collaboration Web site.

         ♦ Completed more than 150 contacts to provide information and technical assistance to more than 100
           agencies or organizations, 88 percent within 48 hours of the request.


         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
         your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
         Goal 3

         To support, improve, and ensure Head Start/Early Head Start’s role in IL health and social service delivery
         system service delivery and planning at state and local levels.

         Goal 4

         To support, improve, and ensure Head Start/Early Head Start’s role in literacy and education service delivery
         and planning at state and local levels.

         Health Care
         ♦ Served on the statewide leadership team of the Early Childhood Hearing Outreach (ECHO) project and
           four Early Head Start grantees, including the City of Chicago and the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start
           grantee received their otoacoustic emissions (OAE) training and equipment.

         ♦ Provided an IL Early/Head Start display at the March 2007 Nutrition Awareness Month event at the
           State Capitol at which a Head Start grantee received a statewide award for its implementation of I Am
           Moving, I Am Learning. The Interagency Nutrition Council sponsored this event, on which the HSSCO
           serves.

         ♦ Developed and distributed a chart explaining how Illinois administers its public health insurance pro-
           grams and how to count them on the Federal Program Information Report.

         ♦ Continued service on the Community Based Child Abuse Prevention Statewide Advisory Committee and
           the Prevention Resource Development Management Committee for the State Child Welfare Agency.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   97




Oral Health

State-level

♦ Worked with the IL Department of Public Health’s Oral Health Division on two projects, both completed
  in 2007: Head Start Smiles — data collection on the oral health status of Head Start children — and a
  Health Resources and Services Administration grant, which Illinois received.

Welfare
♦ Assisted in finalizing guidance for child welfare caseworkers in choosing quality early childhood
  settings and distributed. Completed a “Head Start 101” training presentation and materials for use
  with child welfare caseworkers.

♦ Served on the Strengthening Families Illinois leadership team and participated in an evaluation of
  the project.

♦ Surveyed Head Start/Early Head Start directors statewide about local implementation of the joint
  agreements between Head Start and the State Child Welfare Agency. The statewide model was
  developed and signed in a prior year.

Child Care
No activities reported.

Education
♦ Worked with and linked the statewide McKinney-Vento Coordinator with the Illinois Head Start
  Association (IHSA) to provide training to grantees.

♦ Facilitated the state team that applied for the National Professional Development Center for Inclusion
  (NPDCI) project from the Frank Porter Graham Institute. Illinois was successful in its bid and will be
  one of eight states that will receive technical assistance in planning and meeting facilitation to strengthen
  cross-sector early childhood professional development systems, especially as they relate to inclusive settings.

Community Services
See activities listed above.

Family Literacy Services
♦ Continued service on the IL Community College Board’s statewide Adult Education and Family
  Literacy Advisory Board.

♦ Worked with the State Technical Assistance Network on the Strengthening Partnerships and Resources in
  Communities (SPARC) literacy training project.
98   |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Services to Children with Disabilities
         No activities reported.

         Services to Homeless Children and Families
         No activities reported.


         Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
         In addition to Early Learning and other Council work described elsewhere in this report, the HSSCO
         worked with:

         ♦ DHS Early Intervention Bureau and the IHSA to ensure a Head Start appointee to the Interagency
           Coordinating Council of IL, who was confirmed in 2007.

         ♦ DHS Child Care Bureau on Head Start inclusion in the Quality Rating System, implemented in 2007.


         Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
         families in your State.
         Consistently about 27 percent of the Head Start/Early Head Start and Migrant Head Start children served
         by Illinois grantees are of Latino origin. The HSSCO continues its inclusive approach to all projects, support-
         ing the collaboration with IL Head Start/Early Head Start and Migrant Head Start services to children and
         families of all racial and ethnic groups. The HSSCO worked closely with the IL Latino Coalition for Preven-
         tion to ensure informational and issues links between the Coalition and Head Start/Early Head Start and
         Migrant Head Start, including working with the Governor’s Office on New Americans to develop:

               ♦ Statewide resource directory and the sharing of
                 information with all grantees about citizenship workshops
               ♦ IL Latino speakers bureau
               ♦ Latino student scholarships
               ♦ bilingual training resources
               ♦ Hispanic Health Fairs


         Information about meetings of the IL Association of Agencies and Community Organizations for Migrant
         Advocacy was also shared with all grantees. The HSSCO also worked with the State Child Care Bureau on
         citizenship issues in child care.


         How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
         upcoming year?
         Work plan objectives and activities in the 2008-09 grant application were adjusted according to progress made
         in 2007, changing landscape/environment issues, and the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of
         2007.
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               | 99




                               Indiana


Collaboration Director         Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                               areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Susan lightle
                               plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Division of family Resources
family and Social Services     Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Administration                 services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
402 West Washington Street     are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Room W386, Mail Stop 02        at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Indianapolis, In 46204         in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 317-233-6837
                               The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) Direc-
fax: 317-233-6093              tor has worked with and encouraged alignment and informa-
susan.lightle@fssa.in.gov      tion exchanges among the following agencies and stakeholders
                               to build a consistent approach to early childhood and to ensure
                               ongoing communications:
Lead Agency Contact

Zach Main, Director                  ♦ Bureau of Child Care
Division of family Resources         ♦ Bureau of Child Care, Early Childhood Legislative
family and Social Services             Liaison
Administration
                                     ♦ Commission on Hispanic/Latino Affairs
402 West Washington Street
Indianapolis, In 46204
                                     ♦ Division of Disability & Rehabilitative Services,
                                       Bureau of Child Development Services, First Steps
Phone: 317-233-4450
zach.main@fssa.in.gov                ♦ Governor’s Interagency Coordinating Council
                                       on Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities

ACF Regional Contact                 ♦ Indiana Association for the Education of Young
                                       Children
Katie Williams
                                     ♦ Indiana Coalition on Housing & Homeless Issues
ACf Region V
                                     ♦ Indiana Community Action Association
233 north Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Il 60601                    ♦ Indiana Department of Child Services: Community
                                       Partners, Healthy Families, Programs & Services,
Phone: 312-886-7272
                                       Grants & Outreach (Child Support Bureau)
fax: 312-886-5373
kwilliams@acf.hhs.gov
                                     ♦ Indiana Department of Education: Division of Adult
                                       Education, Division of Exceptional Learners, Divi-
                                       sion of PrimeTime/Reading First, Title 1, Student
                                       Learning Choices (McKinney-Vento)
                                     ♦ Indiana Department of Environmental Management,
100   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




               Children’s Environmental Health
            ♦ Indiana Department of Housing & Community Services
            ♦ Indiana Department of Health: Dental Division, Maternal and Children’s
              Special Health Care Services
            ♦ Indiana Department of Mental Health and Addiction, Children’s Services
            ♦ Indiana Disabilities Determination Bureau
            ♦ Indian Head Start Association
            ♦ Indiana University School of Medicine, Early Childhood Intervention Projects
            ♦ The Office of Medicaid Policy and Planning, Children’s Health Insurance Program


      The HSSCO Multi-Agency Advisory met twice during the year involving representatives of the various state
      governmental agencies that impact Head Start families. The Indiana Head Start Association (IHSA) and a
      local Head Start program have representation.

      The ISHA prepared an annual report. The HSSCO mailed monthly information packets and newsletters
      as scheduled. Content has been well received and is growing. Share relevant information to the Head Start
      community on a daily basis. A question was raised as to amount of information sent, and directors opted to
      continue receiving all information that was available. They felt there was never too much information. The
      HSSCO also provided funding for IHSA via contracted services.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      Goal: Expand and increase availability to assist families to secure health care services for low-income children
      and families.

      Objective: Increase program ability to assist families to secure health care services for pregnant women and
      children birth to 5.

      Outcome: Head Start staff will have opportunities to increase their knowledge, skills, and abilities of health
      issues in order to aid, identify, and/or reduce health problems of enrolled children and/or families.

      ♦ Developed partnership with Indiana Department of Health to expand the Governor’s INShape Indiana
        to include INShape for Kids focusing on childhood obesity, good nutrition, and physical activity. Puppet
        shows and a “petting zoo” filled with healthy food products children can touch, taste, and smell will be pro-
        vided to Head Start programs around the State. The curriculum was developed specifically for Head Start.

      ♦ Continued to serve as a member of the Indiana Joint Asthma Children and Youth Committee and the
        Lead Elimination Children and Youth Advisory.

      ♦ Served on the Transition Team Social/Emotional Committee for Infant & Children mental health.

      ♦ Served pregnant women through the Happiest Baby program, a collaborative effort with Lilly & Com-
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   101




   pany and Clarion Health. This was the second offering of Happiest Baby. Program will continue to be
   offered when available.

♦ Disseminated information relating to health care through the quarterly Headlines newsletter and monthly
  information packets.

Oral Health
State-level

♦ Ongoing communication with Karen Yoder, Region V Oral Health Contractor, regarding the oral health
  needs of Head Start children.

♦ Participated in Oral Health conference calls.

♦ Collaborating with the Indiana Dental Association (IDA) on Give Head Start Kids A Smile, working to-
  ward a pilot project to serve 16 counties and seven cities in seven additional counties. Children with severe
  needs to be prioritized.

♦ Developing a pilot program with the Indiana dental school that will partner dental students with Head
  Start children ages 1 to 5 for all four years of their schooling. Implementation depends upon the award of
  grant funds to the IDA.

Welfare
Goal: Establish sustainable early education linkages with the state’s public assistance services and welfare
reform.

Objective: The HSSCO continues to promote and build linkages between Head Start/ Early Head Start pro-
grams and state public assistance agencies.

Outcome: Encourage members of state agencies and other stakeholders to increase their knowledge of early
education and understanding of the viability of partnerships with the programs.

♦ Four quarterly newsletters, eight information packet mailings, and daily e-mails to local programs pro-
  vided information on agencies and activities impacting families, including fatherhood issues and housing.

♦ Contracted with IHSA to provide newsletters, Web site maintenance, and communication.

♦ Collaborated with sitting judges and the Office of the Indiana Attorney General to offer a legal roundta-
  ble discussion on issues faced by Head Start families at both the spring and fall Institute for Strengthening
  Families and the IHSA Conference.

♦ Published updated edition of booklet containing statewide legal aide information originally researched
  and published in 2006. Content includes contact information, intake days and hours, financial guidelines,
  type of cases taken, etc.

♦ New Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was established between the Indiana Department of Health
  (Women, Infants & Children program), the Department of Child Services Healthy Families, First Steps,
102   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          and the HSSCO.

      Child Care
      ♦ Served on the Executive Committee of the Indiana Bureau of Childcare statewide Quality Rating System
        (QRS) for licensed child care programs. Currently two pilot programs running. Full roll-out will begin
        January 2008 and will take one year.

      ♦ Funded keynote speaker for the Fall 2007 Institute for Strengthening Families.

      ♦ Disseminated information relating to child care through the quarterly Headlines newsletter and monthly
        information packets.

      ♦ Collaborated with Bureau of Child Care, Healthy Families, and other stakeholders to write (and win)
        grant request from ZERO TO THREE’s State Partnerships for Prevention Project. Five Indiana Head
        Start program participants were trained in Reducing the Risk of Maltreatment of Very Young Children
        and will share this information with other Head Start programs around the State.

      ♦ Serve on the Transition Team for school readiness. This collaborative committee is comprised of represen-
        tatives from the following agencies:

                    ♦ Indiana Department of Education: Division of Exceptional Learners,
                      Education of Homeless Children & Youth, Prime Time/Reading First

                    ♦ Indiana Department of Health, Maternal & Children’s Health Care Services

                    ♦ Indiana Family & Social Services Administration, First Steps

                    ♦ Indiana Head Start Association

                    ♦ Indiana HSSCO

                    ♦ Indiana Association of Child Care Resource & Referral (IACCRR)

                    ♦ Indiana University School of Medicine, Early Intervention Projects

      Education
      Goal: Through focus on quality, quantity, and professionalism, improve and increase early childhood education
      services for young children.

      Objective: Promote and support state and local efforts to set in place professional standards for persons in the
      early child education professions.

      Outcome: Head Start staff have increased opportunities to improve their knowledge, skills and abilities.

      ♦ Meeting monthly with the Department of Education: Early Childhood Comprehensive System (ECCS),
        Sunny Start, and Good Start, Grow Smart to promote alignment and collaboration.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   103




♦ Director serves on Healthy Families Think Tank, which is the underlying committee for the Healthy
  Families Institute.

♦ Fund keynote speaker of the Institute for Strengthening Families.

♦ Publish best practice segments monthly from the Early Learning Foundations to foster support of chil-
  dren by adults through encouragement of their development.

♦ With information provided by the Indiana Department of Education, developed a brochure on ISTAR
  (Indiana Standards Tool for Alternate Reporting of Kindergarten Readiness), the new Early Childhood
  Assessment, which featured the most common questions and answers on ISTAR. Brochure was sent to
  Head Start programs, partners, and stakeholders.

♦ Offered MusikGarten music, movement, and learning program to staff for use in their programs.

♦ Promoted Infant Mental Health Summer Training Institute offered by Sunny Start.

♦ Met with IAEYC Director to discuss partnering on new initiatives.

♦ Appointed to IAEYC Committee on Articulation.

♦ Requested, received, and published article on Infant/Toddler Mental Health in quarterly newsletter. Ar-
  ticle was written by Darlene Kardatzke, M.D., Lynne Sturm, Ph.D., and Angela Tomlin, Ph.D., who are
  Infant/Toddler Mental Health specialists in Indiana.

♦ Published education resources in monthly information packets and quarterly newsletters sent to local
  programs.

♦ Professional development information and research received via e-mail is forwarded to programs as re-
  ceived.

Community Services
Goal: Head Start programs continue to increase their involvement with community service activities.

Objective: Support and promote Head Start programs utilization and involvement with local, state, and Fed-
eral community service resources and activities.

Outcome: Information regarding community service resources is consistently distributed to local programs.

♦ Published updated edition of booklet containing statewide legal aide information originally researched
  and published in 2006. Content includes contact information, intake days and hours, financial guidelines,
  type of cases taken, etc.

♦ Monthly information packets and Headlines newsletters include financial assistance information from
  various sources including oral health care and housing.

♦ Parenting resources and education articles are included in the monthly information packets for dissemina-
104   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          tion to parents.

      Family Literacy Services
      Goal: Build a systemic approach for statewide awareness of and access to family literacy.

      Objective: To encourage full implementation of family literacy including child development, adult education,
      parent education, and interactive opportunities for parents and children together.

      Outcome: Early childhood education programs receive information and professional development opportuni-
      ties regarding family literacy.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director participated in the ten Regional Transition Summits given by the Indiana Transi-
        tion Initiative team for programs, agencies, and early childhood stakeholders around Indiana. Presenta-
        tions were made by McKinney-Vento, First Steps, Head Start, Department of Education Division of
        Exceptional Learners, Department of Education READY SCHOOLS, Children Special Health Care
        Services, Indiana Association for Child Care Resource and Referral, and included updates on policy and
        procedures and information on state projects and initiatives. There was also an opportunity to ask ques-
        tions and share issues and concerns.

      ♦ In collaboration with the Transition Team, provided funding for family literacy bags to be distributed to
        Head Start programs. The project was so successful that libraries and schools are contracting to purchase
        the bags for their own use.

      ♦ Materials contained in the bags are in both English and Spanish. It is hoped that these bags will be made
        available in more shelters in the future.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      Goal: Continue and sustain efforts to ensure that children with disabilities will have opportunities to develop
      to their potential.

      Objective: Promote inclusive programming for children with disabilities.

      Outcome: Early education child and family needs are represented at the state level.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director served on Transition Team (see Child Care for list of participating programs and
        agencies), which has as a focus, the smooth transitioning of children with disabilities. The goal being to
        meet the needs of both the children and their parents.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director serves as Governor’s appointee to the Interagency Coordinating Council on Infants
        and Toddlers with Disabilities.

      ♦ The HSSCO serves on the Early Childhood Comprehensive System committee on infant and toddler
        social and emotional mental health.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      Goal: Strengthen and improve conditions for homeless families through coalition building.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   105




Objective: Ensure homeless children receive needed services as a result of coalitions.

Outcome: Head Start programs will increase the number of homeless children served.

♦ As member of the homeless committee, Building Brighter Futures, hosted symposium Educating Home-
  less Children: Challenges and Opportunities. Ninety people attended from various types of programs and
  agencies including: children and youth agencies, community action agencies, community centers, commu-
  nity services, Head Start programs, health services, higher education, local government offices and office
  holders, missions and shelters, schools and education services. Participants requested that this be an annual
  event.

♦ Began working on symposium for 2008.

♦ Disseminated information on issues surrounding homelessness through monthly and quarterly mailings.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ The HSSCO Director is keeping the Governor’s Office and other state officials informed on Federal
  efforts toward reauthorization.

♦ Prepared and hand-delivered district-specific packets to each of Indiana’s 150 State Legislators on the
  Head Start programs in their district, as well as state and national information on the children served.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The HSSCO Director was appointed by the Governor to be his early childhood liaison to the National Gov-
ernors Association (NGA). Responsibilities of this ongoing position will include conference calls, surveys, and
sharing information on early childhood issues in the State of Indiana. The Director also had the opportunity
to give input on the NGA’s position on the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Monthly information packets and the quarterly Headlines newsletter contain parent resources and children’s
pages that can be disseminated to program participants. These resources are produced in both English and
Spanish when translation and/or content is available.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
Programs, events, and activities that have worked or are working well will be continued and expanded. In ad-
dition to those goals, objectives and outcomes planned for funding year three in the grant will continue.
106   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 107




                                  Iowa


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
tom Rendon
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Iowa Department of education
Grimes State Office Building      Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
400 east 14th Street              services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Des Moines, IA 50319              are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 515-242-6024               at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 515-242-6019
                                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
tom.rendon@iowa.gov               Iowa’s main goal in this area was to support Early Childhood
http://www.iowa.gov/educate/      Iowa (ECI), an early childhood system development effort
content/view/634/598/             supported by the State’s Early Childhood Comprehensive Sys-
                                  tems Grant. The five goal areas of ECI comprehensive services
Lead Agency Contact               include health, education, family support, community services,
                                  and child care. During 2007, the Head Start-State Collabo-
lauraBelle Sherman-Proehl         ration Office (HSSCO) Director served as co-chair of the
                                  Governance, Planning and Administration Component Group.
Phone: 515-242-6018
                                  The HSSCO Director also served on the Resources and Fund-
fax: 515-242-6019                 ing, and Professional Development component groups and on
lauraBelle.Sherman-proehl@iowa.   ECI’s leadership team.
gov
                                  Accomplishments this year include the Governance group’s
ACF Regional Contact              efforts to expand the diversity of the state’s early childhood
                                  system development efforts. In collaboration with the Iowa
lynda Bitner                      Department of Human Rights, the Child and Family Policy
                                  Center, and Drake University, ECI sponsored a one-day, first-
ACf Region VII
                                  ever early childhood diversity symposium that addressed racial
federal Office Building           and ethnic disparities in the areas of early care and education,
Room 276                          health, family support, child welfare, professional development,
2601 east 12th Street             and infant/toddler cultural identity. The Governor served as
                                  the keynote. Outcomes include increased diversity in stake-
Kansas City, MO 64106
                                  holder meeting participants, ongoing partnership between ECI
Phone: 816-426-2235               and state commissions addressing diversity (e.g., Iowa Com-
fax: 816-426-2888                 mission on the Status of African Americans, Commission on
                                  Latino Affairs, etc.) and a commitment for more ECI-based
lynda.bitner@acf.hhs.gov
                                  trainings on diversity.

                                  The Governance group sponsored a one-day retreat to study
                                  alternative governance structures to better position ECI for
                                  long-term stability and effectiveness. The proposals crafted at
108   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      the retreat were vetted through ECI committees and leadership and eventually became part of formal legisla-
      tion establishing ECI within state code during the 2008 legislative session.

      ECI is also the planner and host of the annual Early Childhood Iowa Congress. The HSSCO serves as a co-
      chair of this effort. The 15th annual conference took place on November 13-14 and featured a keynote address
      by Karen Ponder, CEO of the North Carolina Partnership for Children, and Luis Hernandez, a Head Start
      T/TA Professional Development specialist. The conference focused on system development leadership and
      provided a wide range of breakout sessions addressing health, curriculum, social services, disabilities inclu-
      sion, parent education, and networking with state department heads from education, and health and human
      services. The conference remains an important tool for broad-level state collaboration across health, education,
      and human services.

      Collaboration with pre-kindergarten took on new urgency as the State launched the first year of a four-year
      ramp-up to provide universal access to preschool for all 4-year-olds. The first year began with 68 (of 364)
      districts in September 2007. Before the Bill was signed into law, the HSSCO participated in discussions with
      stakeholders. The HSSCO provided input for administrative rules, application procedures, and guidelines. The
      Bill requires that the district preschool proposal be collaborative and involve community partners, specifically
      mentioning Head Start among the partners. The administrative rules require that the program collaborate
      with parents and community partners, specifically mentioning Head Start. Applications must include letters
      of support, including one from Head Start and declares Head Start Program Performance Standards one of
      three acceptable standards to ensure program quality.

      The HSSCO collaborated with Iowa Area Education Agencies to host six regional summits between Head
      Start programs and school district officials considering applying for round-one funding. In collaboration with
      the Iowa Association of School Boards Foundation, the HSSCO co-produced a 20-minute video showcas-
      ing how collaboration can lead to high-quality preschool programs and featuring a number of positive Head
      Start/LEA collaborations. The video debuted at a summit for newly awarded districts, was provided to grant-
      ees, and made available online.

      To assist districts in developing a collaborative program proposal for round-two of funding, the HSSCO
      helped Iowa Department of Education (IDE) personnel to offer technical assistance and host summits on
      community collaboration. Two of six scheduled summits took place in 2007.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      The HSSCO sought to develop partnerships between Head Start and the nutrition/physical activity initia-
      tives under the direction of the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH). In addition to serving on the
      Iowans Fit For Life early childhood committee and participating in the Shaping America’s Youth conference,
      the HSSCO developed and executed a Memorandum of Agreement among the Iowa Head Start Associa-
      tion (IHSA), the HSSCO, and IDPH on collaborative planning and implementation of Iowa’s State Nutri-
      tion Action Plan. The HSSCO encouraged Head Start programs to apply for nutrition mini-grants available
      through the Child and Adult Care Food Programs to fund local nutrition activities to promote healthy eating
      and physical activity.

      The HSSCO deepened its partnership with the IPDH by providing modest support for its Governor’s Con-
      ference on Public Health, “Barn Raising VI: Celebrating Healthy Communities” in August 2007. The confer-
      ence sponsorship helped signal Head Start’s role in health promotion and connect Head Start grantees with
      new state initiatives to address children’s health.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   109




Working with IHSA, the HSSCO co-hosted a networking session on mental health that featured awareness
training on the Maternal Depression screening tool. The session also focused on Iowa’s First Five Healthy
Mental Development Initiative, an effort to engage medical practices to provide a comprehensive devel-
opmental surveillance during well-baby checks. The effort is expanding to five new counties. The HSSCO
worked to develop local partnership with Early Head Start in existing counties where services are currently
available.

The HSSCO continued its involvement in the third annual “Off to a Good Start: Framing Policy for Early
Childhood Health Systems Integration” symposium in September 2007, focusing on child health policy. The
group celebrated four legislative successes in the past year that will impact Head Start children:

     ♦ funding for the I-Smile Program
     ♦ funding increases in Hawk-I (state SCHP) to serve 13,000 more children
     ♦ funding to expand First Five to impact 42,000 children
     ♦ continued use of Medical Home as an organizing principle to assure all Early and
       Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) required health services are
       available to families connected to a medical home

Oral Health

State-level

In 2007, the SCO continued to convene the Head Start/Early Head Start Oral Health Work Group. Among
the leading members are the State Dental Director, a Head Start Liaison with the Oral Health Bureau, Iowa
Department of Public Health, a representative from the Iowa Dental Hygienists Association, and a represen-
tative from Delta Dental of Iowa.

  Contacts:
  Heather Miller, RDH
  Iowa Department of Public Health
  Oral Health Bureau
  321 e. 12th Street
  Des Moines, IA 50319
  Phone: 515-281-7779
  fax: 515-242-6384
  hmiller@idph.state.ia.us


  Dr. Bob Russell
  Iowa Department of Public Health
  Oral Health Bureau
  321 e. 12th Street
  Des Moines IA 50319
  Phone: 515-281-7779
  fax: 515-242-6384
  brussell@idph.state.ia.us
110   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          Suzanne Heckenlaible
          Manager, Community Relations
          Delta Dental Plan of Iowa
          2401 Se tones Drive, Suite 13
          Ankeny, IA 50021
          Phone: 515-261-5559
          fax: 515-261-5573
          sheckenlaible@deltadentalia.com


          Mary Kelly, RDH
          Des Moines Health Center
          1111 9th Street
          Des Moines, IA 50314
          Phone: 515-255-5048
          marykellyrdh@msn.com


      The Head Start/Early Head Start Oral Health Work Group developed four goals for 2007:

      ♦ Plan and conduct a networking session for both Head Start and the new Title V dental hygienists. The
        session will begin with a conversation about how I-Smile can support Head Start oral health needs; how
        the two can collaborate on parent education and other community efforts; and how to place the new
        hygienists on programs’ Health Services Advisory Councils. (The networking session was held with strong
        participation from both Head Start and the new I-Smile coordinators. Many areas for collaboration at a
        local level were identified, and some initial communication and coordination has already taken place.)

      ♦ Work with Delta Dental to produce a video version of the oral health flip charts. (Initial research into
        costs and viability has been explored for the Delta Dental video. Funding has not been sought.)

      ♦ Work on a revision of the flip charts to make them compatible with the new I-Smile manual. (The
        HSSCO is awaiting further demand (from the I-Smile Coordinators who will use Healthy Smiles for
        their community education program) before investing in printing the flip charts.)

      ♦ Support and explore future coordination with pediatricians to provide oral health screening. (Funding was
        secured last year for the pediatrician training, but it is becoming clear that this will do little to address the
        need for more oral health screening providers.)


      Local-level

      There are many local partnerships in Iowa. A sample of programs with close partnerships with dentists is
      provided here:

          Contact: Mid-Iowa Community Action
          1001 S. 18th Avenue
          Marshalltown, IA 50158
          Phone: (641) 752-7162
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   111




  upper Des Moines Opportunity
  P.O. Box 519
  101 Robins Avenue
  Graettinger, IA 51342-0519
  Phone: (712) 859-3885


Additional Information

The HSSCO has been working closely with the Oral Health Bureau to develop public awareness materials.
The Oral Health Bureau plans to conduct research and focus groups in the coming year. Head Start will be
asked to help organize parent participation in these events.

The HSSCO promoted state support for oral health services to Head Start programs and children though the
State’s new I-Smile program. The effort, now supported by state funding, has placed at least a half-time dental
hygienist at almost every Title V agency. The HSSCO ensured that the new I-Smile handbook contains
Head Start contact information since one of its functions is to help secure oral health services for Head Start
children.

The HSSCO worked with the State Oral Health Director to clarify language regarding oral health exams,
screenings, and assessments in the State’s EPSDT. The proposed language changes now await letters of sup-
port from the Iowa chapter of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentists. The HSSCO also organized a
meeting with health coordinators and the oral health director to discuss the screening and referral protocols
for I-Smile coordinators.

Welfare
The HSSCO’s goal in the 2006-07 plan was to strengthen partnerships between Head Start and Iowa’s
Family Development and Self-Sufficiency (FaDSS), a TANF and state-funded program that provides in-
tensive support for families at risk of welfare dependency. The HSSCO continued to serve on the statewide
FaDSS council, encouraging a new strategic orientation for the program by designing a retreat. The retreat
gave council members the opportunity to make a strong commitment to supporting low income families and
improving services. The HSSCO promoted and saw new legislative language to move FaDSS to the Iowa
Department of Human Rights and drafted new language to update and clarify the purpose of the Council
and its role in strengthening the FaDSS program. Some of those recommendations, amended in part by the
council, were approved and will move forward.

Child Care
Collaboration with Child Care focused on working through the State Child Care Advisory Council (SC-
CAC) to promote access to high-quality child care for low-income children by increasing the quality and
quantity of providers accepting child care assistance. Those efforts involved increasing timeliness of payments,
increasing state funding for Child Care Assistance, increasing rates, promoting Head Start participation in
wrap-around funding, promoting the Quality Rating System, and pressing for mandatory registration. Ac-
complishments in 2007 include:

♦ The council pressed for and saw legislation that would require Child Care Assistance payments to pro-
  viders be made within 10 business days of submitting an invoice. Slow payments, some as long as three
  months, have discouraged providers from taking children on Child Care Assistance. By November 2007,
  98.5% of all payments were made within the 10-day period.
112   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ The council pressed for and saw increases Child Care Assistance rates effective January 1, 2007. Additional
        effort was made to reconsider how to establish special needs rates, which were not affected by rate increase.

      ♦ The HSSCO promoted Head Start participation in wrap-around grants to provide full-day care for Head
        Start children. In the 2006-07 grant year, the total number of grants to Head Start increased 15% and
        served 20% more children (1,881) over the previous year.

      ♦ The HSSCO continued to promote Head Start involvement in the Quality Rating System. Currently, 38
        classrooms serving Head Start children have been rated, from zero in 2006. The first center to earn the
        top rating of five stars was Murray Preschool, a collaborative effort between Head Start and a local school
        district. Overall, 585 child development homes and 266 centers (82 or 14% of child development homes,
        and 83 or 31% of centers at Level 3 (of 5) and above) received a rating as of November 2007. Only about
        8% of homes receiving a Level 3 or higher and 7% of centers at a Level 3 or higher currently had children
        funded through Child Care Assistance.

      ♦ The HSSCO supported a process by which council members could communicate recommendations and
        rationale for mandatory home registration for a legislative study committee on home registration.

      The SCCAC has worked to develop a leadership agenda that reflects collaboration priorities and is connected
      the ECI Strategic plan. The agenda’s strategies include:

      ♦ Increasing the number of regulated child care slots

      ♦ Increasing the number at QRS levels 2 and higher

      ♦ Increasing percent of eligible children served through Child Care Assistance

      ♦ Decreasing the number of confirmed abuse and neglect providers in child care

      ♦ Increasing the number of accredited child care providers

      Outside of SCCAC, the HSSCO implemented a new Early Head Start pilot project with support from the
      Child Care and Development Fund, using a home-based model that supports home-based child care provid-
      ers. The program finished its first year in September 2007 and secured funding for year two using state dollars.
      The program reached 49 families and 68 children.

      Education

      In July 2007, the Early Learning Work Team became a new bureau within the IDE called the Bureau of Ear-
      ly Childhood Services. The HSSCO is now part of the new bureau. The HSSCO goal for 2006-07 was to seek
      adoption of and full verification of meeting Iowa Quality Preschool Program Standards (IQPPS) by Iowa
      preschools. The number of programs in the State adopting the Iowa Quality Preschool Program Standards in-
      creased substantially in 2006-07. The HSSCO encouraged participation because it allows Head Start agencies
      to be active in local collaboration initiatives around quality and to access funding and training opportunities.
      See also goals and accomplishments discussed above under Head Start/pre-kindergarten partnerships.

      Community Services
      The HSSCO’s goal in 2006-07 was to foster positive partnership between Head Start and Community Action
      by launching a Resource Bank and encouraging a joint legislative agenda. The HSSCO supported the annual
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   113




Iowa Community Action Association (ICAA) conference. Both ICAA and IHSA hired the same individual
as a state lobbyist, creating a unified legislative presence.

Family Literacy Services
The HSSCO’s goal in 2006-07 was to support the state Head Start TA system to offer Steps to Success
training and support the book club project through Iowa Public Television (IPTV). The HSSCO worked
with IHSA to host a Steps to Success training and encouraged Head Start programs to attend state-funded
Every Child Reads (ECR) literacy training supported by the State. The HSSCO supported IPTV’s book club
project, which included five Head Start programs. SCO also promoted collaboration between Head Start and
Even Start.

The HSSCO also promoted family literacy at the Early Childhood Iowa Congress, showcasing efforts by a
Head Start Parents as Teachers Program, an Even Start program, and IPTV’s Book Clubs.

As a member of the ECR state team, the HSSCO encouraged broader use of the literacy material, including
training of more than 200 Iowans and fostering collaborations with WIC clinics across Iowa. WIC clinics
distribute 74,000 books per month, including many to Head Start families. Collaborations will include train-
ing and providing information to parents to combine the book distribution effort with training in effective
dialogic reading strategies.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Building on success in 2006 from the launch of a Program-Wide Positive Behavior Support (PW-PBS), the
HSSCO continued its collaboration with IDE in 2007. A first group of 10 Head Start programs completed
training and a year of implementation. The HSSCO secured state funding for a second group, including five
Head Start programs. By mid-2008, 15 of Iowa’s 18 Head Start programs will have been trained in PW-PBS
supported primarily with non-Head Start funds. The HSSCO co-led an effort to secure a 3-year agreement
with the Center on the Social Emotional Foundations for Early Learning and Iowa, allowing the State to be
one of three states to pilot statewide implementation of preschool PBS.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
No activities reported.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO goals in 2007 were to foster communication between Head Start agencies, IHSA, and early
childhood entities in the State, and to support IHSA. The HSSCO expanded or maintained Head Start
representation among all the major early childhood advisory groups and facilitated Head Start’s presence at
discussions around the new state-funded preschool. The HSSCO also provided support to the IHSA, which
had one of its most active program years in 2007 and hired its first-ever executive director in May.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The HSSCO successfully applied for a new 5-year grant from the Office of Head Start. The HSSCO also
worked to coordinate Head Start participation in new efforts to coordinate family support programs that are
underway through the Iowa Office of Empowerment. The group began to develop new standards and a com-
mon evaluation methodology to promote more integrated, high-quality family support services.
114   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      The HSSCO made available certified and “refreshed” National Reporting System Spanish language assessors.
      Many programs have only a small number of Spanish-speaking children and have difficulty finding Spanish-
      speaking staff or volunteers who are certified as assessors.

      The HSSCO collaborated and co-sponsored a symposium on early childhood diversity that addressed the
      need to diversify the early childhood workforce including those from the Latino community. The HSSCO
      also provided information to grantees about services, activities, and information relevant to their Latino fami-
      lies through its involvement with Latino Unidos of Iowa and the New Iowan Centers.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      Small accomplishments can lead to large changes or be utterly inconsequential, making it difficult to
      determine where to invest the most time and energy. With a new grant year, the HSSCO hopes to be more
      strategic in emphasizing a finite set of goals and working across multiple fronts to effect positive change.
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 115




                                       Kansas


Collaboration Director                 Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                       areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Carrie Hastings
                                       plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Social and Rehabilita-
tion Services
                                       Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
915 SW Harrison                        services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 580 W                            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
topeka, KS 66612                       at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 785-368-6354                    in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 785-296-0146
                                       The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) has
carrie.hastings@srs.ks.gov             been an active member of the Early Learning Coordinating
                                       Council, which developed the Kansas Early Childhood Com-
Lead Agency Contact                    prehensive Systems Plan (KECCS). The HSSCO participates
                                       in quarterly meetings for the KECCS plan and has incorpo-
Karen Beckerman                        rated the same five goals in the HSSCO priority areas:
Phone: 785-296-4717
fax: 785-296-0146                      Goal 1
karen.beckerman@srs.ks.gov
                                       To ensure that all Kansas children have access to health insur-
                                       ance and medical homes (medical home = regular source of
ACF Regional Contact                   health care).

Markie Crabtree
ACf Region VII                         Goal 2
601 east 12th St. Rm. 276              To fully integrate mental health and social and emotional de-
Kansas City, MO 64106                  velopment into the early childhood system in Kansas (mental
Phone: 816-426-2284                    health and social and emotional development).
fax: 816-426-2888
Markie.crabtree@acf.hhs.gov            Goal 3

                                       To develop a comprehensive and coordinated early childhood
                                       care and education system in Kansas encompassing birth to 5
                                       (early care and education services).


                                       Goal 4

                                       To educate and mentor parents about childhood health, devel-
                                       opment, and education (parent education).
116   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Goal 5

      To promote a system that helps families develop and utilize both intellectual and material resources to prepare
      their children for school and life (family supports).


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      ♦ Continue to partner with the Kansas Head Start Association (KHSA) on the Health Literacy Project,
        using the book What To Do When Your Child Gets Sick. This project is modeled after UCLA Johnson and
        Johnson and is supported by Medicaid match dollars. This project will be expanded in 2008 to include
        five pilot sites, health departments, and/or clinics. A different curriculum has been developed through a
        partnership with KHSA.

      ♦ Continue to participate on the Early Childhood Mental Health Advisory Council. Nine professionals
        in Kansas have been endorsed from the Michigan Association of Infant Mental Health to expand infant
        mental health access in Kansas. The HSSCO helped to fund seven infant/toddler mini-conferences in
        2007 for professionals and parents in Kansas.

      ♦ Continue participating with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment Healthy Homes to
        promote education regarding lead and asthma.

      Welfare
      ♦ Collaborate with the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services (SRS), Children and
        Families Services. All foster care contractors are required to use a social and emotional pre-screening tool
        (SEST). Statewide training was provided in 2006. In addition, Head Start programs were encouraged to
        write MOUs with foster care contractors in order to increase the number of foster children served in Head
        Start/Early Head Start.

      ♦ Mail all Head Start programs quarterly lists of families on cash assistance and food stamps, and children
        in foster care. This is used for recruiting purposes.

      ♦ Participated with SRS TANF Program Manager and two Head Start sites to promote work readiness.

      Child Care
      The HSSCO is located within the SRS Economic and Employment Support Division, along with the SRS
      Child Care Subsidy Manager and the State Child Care Administrator. This promotes collaborative opportu-
      nities within the development of the agency’s TANF State Plan and the Child Care State Plan. The HSSCO
      participated in the writing of the 2007 State Child Care Plan. The HSSCO collaborates with the SRS Special
      Initiatives Manager and the Kansas Child Care Resource and Referral Agency to promote availability and
      quality initiatives for child care in Kansas.

      Education
      The HSSCO participated with several entities to fund the 7th annual Parent Leadership Conference, October
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   117




26-27, 2007. Participants included the Kansas Children Cabinet and Trust Fund, Kansas Parent Information
Resource Center (KPIRC), Kansas State Department of Education Migrant Services, Kansas Children’s Ser-
vice League, Kansas Association of Child Care Resource and Referral, and KHSA. Approximately 90 parents
participated in this 1½ day conference. Parents were introduced to public speaking, advocacy, and current
issues.

Community Services
The HSSCO participates on the Kansas Fatherhood Coalition and was on the planning committee for the
2007 statewide Kansas Fatherhood Summit. In 2007, 150 people attended the Fatherhood Summit. This is a
collaborative planning approach with several entities including SRS, KPIRC, and KHSA.

Family Literacy Services
The HSSCO has participated in the last several years with the N.E. Kansas Public Broadcasting Station
(PBS) to promote free books to Head Start/Early Head Start children. The PBS program called Ready To
Learn, trains Head Start and Early Head Start Education Managers and home visitors on the importance
of teaching families appropriate educational TV and of reading to children. More than 10,000 books were
distributed to Head Start children in 2007.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO participates on a statewide team selected by the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance
Center (NECTAC) to promote inclusion for all children. Technical assistance is provided to Kansas, and a
state plan is being developed for this approach.

The HSSCO helped fund a statewide Head Start/Children with Disabilities Conference in 2007 to promote
collaboration and coordination at the local community level between infant/toddler Part C and school district
Part B 619 services.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The HSSCO promoted collaboration between Head Start programs and homeless shelters in their service
area. Head Start programs were encouraged to provide flyers and brochures to all shelter directors in their
service area.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO is located within the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services, which is re-
sponsible for state and Federal policies regarding TANF, Child Care, and Food Stamps. The HSSCO Direc-
tor attends monthly policy meetings with program staff and managers relating to planning and policies. The
HSSCO also participates on the Early Learning Coordinating Council. The focus in 2007 was around creat-
ing an Office of Early Childhood.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The HSSCO Director is an Ex-Officio non-voting KHSA board member. In 2007, the board members sup-
ported KHSA’s decision to apply for a statewide home visitation training. KHSA was awarded the grant to
provide training to all direct support staff including Head Start.
118   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      The HSSCO funded the printing of written materials in Spanish at the Kansas Fatherhood Summit and the
      Parent Leadership Conference. Spanish interpreters were provided for the Parent Leadership Conference. The
      HSSCO assisted the PBS Ready To Learn project coordinator in choosing appropriate books to dual language
      learner children and their families.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      In 2007, the Kansas Legislature approved the move of the Pre-K Pilots from the Kansas Children’s Cabinet
      and Trust Fund to the Kansas Department of Education (KSDE). The HSSCO will work closely with KSDE
      on an advisory council in 2008 to coordinate services with Head Start and child care.
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 119




                                   Kentucky


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
earl trevor
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Kentucky Department of education
500 Mero Street                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
frankfort, KY 40601                services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 502-564-8341                are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 502-564-1984                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
earl.trevor@education.ky.gov
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
                                   ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) and
Lead Agency Contact                  several Head Start leaders participated in the Strong Start
                                     initiative, sponsored by the Prichard Committee. Ken-
Annette Bridges, Director            tucky’s Strong Start has as its goal making high-quality
Division of early Childhood          preschool available to every Kentucky child. At the time of
Development                          this report the Strong Start initiative is ongoing.
Kentucky Department of education
                                   ♦ Sponsored three forums to elicit parent input into the
500 Mero Street
                                     Kentucky’s Strong Start initiative.
Capital Plaza tower Room 1710
frankfort, KY 40601                ♦ Participated in the distribution of Kentucky’s Early Child-
Annette.Bridges@education.ky.gov     hood Continuous Assessment Guide, which provides guide-
                                     lines and practices in all areas of assessment. This voluntary
                                     guide provides a mechanism for early care and education
ACF Regional Contact
                                     programs to measure and document child outcomes.
Bobby Griffin
                                   ♦ Participated in the distribution of the Kentucky Early
ACf Region IV
                                     Childhood Quality Self Study, which is designed to assist
60 forsyth Street                    classrooms and programs in self-assessing and planning for
Suite 4M60                           continuous improvement.
Atlanta, GA 30303
Phone: 404-652-2874
                                   ♦ Participated in the distribution of Kentucky Early Childhood
                                     Standards, designed to assist parents, early care and educa-
fax: 404-562-2983                    tion professionals, administrators, and others in under-
Bobby.Griffin@acf.hhs.gov            standing what children are able to know and do from birth
                                     through four.

                                   ♦ Continue to assist state and local efforts to efforts to fully
                                     enroll and use Head Start programs. At present, 170 of
                                     Kentucky’s 174 school districts fully utilize Head Start
                                     4-year-old enrollments.
120   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Participated in the review of the Kentucky Interagency Agreement for Providing Programs and Services
        to All Children.

      ♦ Gathered December 1 enrollment data from Head Start grantees using the same format as Kentucky De-
        partment of Education state-funded preschool. This allows the state to monitor local enrollment outcomes.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      ♦ Continue to support a partnership between Jefferson County Public Schools Early Childhood Program,
        Anderson County Early Childhood Regional Training Center, and the University of Louisville, Kent
        School of Social Work, which works to foster the social and emotional development of children enrolled
        in the Jefferson County Public Schools Early Childhood Program. Intensive training to classroom and
        support staff continues with strong emphasis on program sustainability.

      ♦ Participate in the Partnership for a Fit Kentucky, a public/private partnership, which supports the Ken-
        tucky Department for Public Health’s CDC Obesity Prevention Grant. The focus is on promoting
        nutrition and physical active communities. The HSSCO Director attended Fall 2007 Partnership for a Fit
        Kentucky Training Institute and distributed Head Start materials including I Am Moving, I am Learning
        materials.

      ♦ Continue to support the statewide adoption of I Am Moving, I am Learning.

      Oral Health

      State-level

      In 2008, Kentucky enacted House Bill 186, which requires all children entering public school, including
      state-funded preschool to have a dental exam. The exam can be performed “by a qualified dental professional,
      physician, registered nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician assistant.” If evidence of dental
      disease is found, the child must be referred to a dentist.

          Contact:
          Julie W. McKee
          State Dental Director
          275 east Main Street
          frankfort, KY 40621
          (502) 564-3246
          juliew.mckee@ky.gov


      Local-level

      The HSSCO has participated in Kentucky’s Oral Health Strategic Planning Committee.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   121




Additional Information

♦ The HSSCO continues to participate in Kentucky’s Oral Health Strategic Planning Committee.

♦ LKLP Head Start has partnered with U.K. Rural Dental Health Center and the Ronald McDonald Care
  Mobile to provide dental exams, sealants and family oral health education.

  Contact:
  nikki Stone, DMD
  Dental Program Director
  uK north fork Valley Community Health Center
  uK Center for Rural health
  750 Morton Boulevard
  Hazard, KY 41701
  (606) 439-3357


♦ OVEC Head Start partners with PASSPORT Health Plan (Medicaid). Contact person Marcelline Coots,
  is an active member of the OVEC Head Start Health Services Advisory Committee. As an advocate for
  Head Start, Ms. Coots has helped bring the Colgate Dental Van to OVEC Head Start, allowing Head
  Start and Early Head Start children in Henry and Shelby counties to participate in the Colgate Bright
  Smiles, Bright Futures Program®.

  Contact:
  Marcelline Coots
  Coordinator of Corporate Initiatives
  Community Affairs Supervisor
  PASSPORt Health Plan (Medicaid)
  (502) 585-7955
  marcelline.coots@amerihealthmercy.org


♦ Lincoln County Head Start partners with Dr. Shea Lair, who has been a strong advocate for Head Start
  for several years. Dr. Lair provides parent training, serves on the Head Start advisory council, visits class-
  rooms, provides literature, toothbrushes and dental floss, provides dental care for children who do not have
  a dental home, and works closely with the program staff to provide services to families.

  Contact:
  Dr. Shea lair
  603 lancaster Street
  Stanford, KY 40484
  (606) 365-7803


♦ Williamstown Head Start/Preschool partners with the Northern Kentucky Independent District Health
  Department to offer preventative dental fluoride varnishing to all Head Start applicants. The child receives
  a dental kit with instructions for post-application care, a toothbrush, and toothpaste. Parents receive dental
122   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          education. During February, Children’s Dental Health Month, all classes received a dental education
          lesson presented by a Healthy Start consultant from the health department. The children received a new
          toothbrush and dental education materials for their families.

          Contact:
          northern Kentucky Independent District Health Department
          610 Medical Village Dr.
          edgewood, KY 41017
          (859) 341-4264
          fax: (859) 578-3689


      Welfare
      ♦ Participated in the continuing series of meetings in which the Cabinet for Health and Family Services,
        Department for Community Based Services, began the development of a strategic plan (Title IV-B State
        plan) to provide services designed to help children safely and appropriately return to families from which
        they have been removed.

      ♦ Worked with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services to refine the system by which Kentucky Head
        Start and Early Head Start programs access TANF and Food Stamp lists to assist with recruitment efforts.
        All 32 Head Start grantees accessed the system as part of their recruitment efforts.

      Child Care
      ♦ Supports the Head Start/Early Head Start-Commonwealth of Kentucky partnership in which seven
        Head Start programs have used state child care subsidy dollars to serve Head Start/Early Head Start
        children beyond the regular half-day of services.

      ♦ Supports Head Start’s involvement in STARS for KIDS NOW, Kentucky’s voluntary quality rating
        system for licensed child care centers. Seventeen of Kentucky’s 32 grantees participate in STARS for
        KIDS NOW.

      Education
      ♦ In Spring 2007, the HSSCO presented at a series of Early Childhood Regional Training Center Preschool
        Leadership meetings.

      ♦ The HSSCO regularly attends Kentucky Department of Education preschool branch meetings to discuss
        local collaboration issues.

      ♦ In conjunction with Kentucky Department of Education, the HSSCO regularly consults with and visits
        communities struggling with collaborative issues.

      ♦ The HSSCO, in cooperation with the Kentucky Early Childhood Transition Project, began planning for
        a model early childhood to primary transition project.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   123




Community Services
♦ The HSSCO has assisted in the development of Kentucky’s system of Community Early Childhood
  Council (CECC), which brings communities together to support issues of importance to children and
  families. The HSSCO supported the highly successful CECC council retreat. The HSSCO and the CEEC
  coordinator developed a tool kit to provide council members with technical assistance in conducting effec-
  tive meetings, gaining community support and writing effective grants.

Family Literacy Services
♦ The HSSCO presented on local collaboration at the Kentucky Even Start Coordinators meeting.

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ The HSSCO regularly attends Kentucky Head Start Association disabilities committee meetings.

♦ HSSCO fosters the coordination of local disability services through completion of the disabilities section
  of the Local Agreement For Cooperation On Full Utilization Of Head Start.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
During 2007, the HSSCO issued email reminders to Head Start grantees of the provisions of the McKinney-
Vento Homeless Education Assistance Improvement Act of 2001, which requires that agencies adopt policies
and practices to ensure enrollment.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ The HSSCO ensured Head Start participation in the development of the Kentucky Interagency Agreement
  for Providing Programs and Services to All Children.

♦ The HSSCO has continued the application of the 2006-07 Partnership Agreement between the Kentucky
  Department of Education and Region IV ACF.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Maintained its partnership with Mountain Mission Development Corporation, an interdenominational,
  nonprofit, 501(c)(3) corporation that works in cooperation with all entities and resources for the benefit of
  the people of Eastern Kentucky.

♦ Supported a training partnership between Kentucky’s T/TA Network and the five Early Childhood Re-
  gional Training centers.

♦ Attends quarterly planning meetings between the representatives of the Kentucky T/TA network and the
  executive director of the Kentucky Head Start Association.

♦ Attends Kentucky Head Start Association meetings and serves on KHSA executive committee.
124   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      The HSSCO attended the Kentucky Department of Education Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Work-
      group. Over the past 4-5 years Kentucky has experienced growth in the LEP population. Kentucky has a sig-
      nificant number of schools with low incidence (less than 10 per school district) of LEP students, ethical and
      legal precepts protect the rights of these children. However, Federal legislation, includes the No Child Left
      Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), which includes children aged 3-21. In 2007 the Kentucky Head Start Associa-
      tion held a series of trainings dealing with the acquisition of Spanish language skills by Head Start staff.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      ♦ Continue support for fatherhood initiatives across the State. At present, Northern Kentucky, OVEC,
        Jefferson County, and Middle Kentucky River Head Starts have strong fatherhood initiatives from
        which the Head Start community might draw expertise.

      ♦ More strongly support local efforts to coordinate services to Hispanic children and families.

      ♦ Enhance partnerships with faith-based organizations.

      ♦ Work to reconnect with Kentucky’s Oral Health Strategic Planning Committee. With the retirement
        of Dr. James Cecil, a longtime advocate for children’s oral health and the passage of House Bill 186, Ken-
        tucky stands at a crossroads. New champions are needed to advocate for the oral health needs of
        Kentucky’s children.
                                                                       AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 125




                                Louisiana


Collaboration Director          Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Kahree A. Wahid
                                plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Social Services
627 north 4th Street            Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Baton Rouge, lA 70802           services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 225-342-1292             are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 225-219-4248               at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
kwahid@dss.state.la.us
                                in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
                                The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) is now
Lead Agency Contact             located in the Division of Child Care and Early Childhood
                                Education, along with several other state child care and early
Adren Wilson                    childhood service providers (Child Care Licensing, Bright
Assistant Secretary             Start, Quality Rating System, Child Care, and Residential
                                Licensing). The Division of Child Care and Early Childhood
Department of Social Services
                                Education has embarked on an initiative to establish an Early
627 north 4th Street            Childhood Comprehensive System (ECCS), Bright Start, in
Baton Rouge, lA 70804           Louisiana that addresses the following priority areas:
Phone: 225-342-3950
fax: 225-219-9399
                                      ♦ Access to Health Insurance and Medical Homes
                                      ♦ Mental Health and Social and Emotional
ACF Regional Contact                    Development
                                      ♦ Early Care and Education
Susan Johnston
ACf Region VI                         ♦ Parent Education
1301 Young Street                     ♦ Family Support
Room 937
                                      ♦ Financing
Dallas, tX 75202
Phone: 214-767-8844
                                The results of this unique partnership has facilitated the de-
fax: 214-767-2038               velopment of ECCS in Louisiana that will eventually design
sjohnston@acf.hhs.gov           collaboration models for policymakers; pre-kindergarten
                                expansion in Louisiana; the appropriation of state funding for
                                pre-kindergarten services; and future collaboration between
                                education, child care; and Head Start through a newly devel-
                                oped Quality Rating System (QRS).

                                The HSSCO continues to work with the Department of Edu-
                                cation State Pre-kindergarten Administrator and the Depart-
126   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ment of Social Services Child Care and Early Childhood Education Division Director, as well as Head Start
      entities to encourage further collaboration, utilization of efforts, and resources. Collaboration efforts include:

      Greater Advantage Plan. Ongoing participation on the Greater Advantage Plan (GAP) committee that is
      aggressively working on a plan to develop a Family Learning Center model in New Orleans and eventu-
      ally across the State. The HSSCO is instrumental in facilitating the planning and strategizing necessary to
      accomplish this endeavor. Partners include: Department of Social Services (Secretary, Assistant Secretary,
      Division Director), state pre-kindergarten partners, Head Start directors, local School Board representatives,
      and numerous other supporters from within the State, as well as outside of Louisiana. Weekly meetings are
      held in New Orleans; however, when participants are unable to attend meetings face-to-face, they participate
      via conference calls. Projected date for opening the center has been moved to January 2008.

      Children’s Cabinet. Continue to serve on the Louisiana Children’s Cabinet Advisory Board and participate in
      monthly meetings. The HSSCO Director represents the HSSCO, as well as the Louisiana Head Start Associ-
      ation (LHSA) on the Advisory Board. The Advisory Board was established by statute and is appointed by the
      Governor. The Board meets monthly in an effort to seek, encourage, and develop ways in which to collabora-
      tively address issues and needs of children receiving services from the multiple state departments. The focus:

            ♦ LaCHIP — Health insurance, for previously uninsured children.
            ♦ LA-4 — Developmentally appropriate quality early childhood education program.
            ♦ Nurse Home Visitations — Nurses provide ongoing pre-natal services to first-time mothers.
            ♦ School-Based Health Clinics — Primary and preventive physical and mental health services for
              school-aged children at their schools.
            ♦ Early Childhood Supports and Services — Community-based mental health services for at-risk
              youth focusing on early intervention and prevention.
      Quality Rating Steering Committee and Bright Start. Continue to be a part of the Department of Social Ser-
      vices Quality Rating Steering Committee and Bright Start meetings as discussions become necessary. The
      Steering Committee’s aim is to develop a Quality Rating System for Early Childhood programs in Louisiana.
      The Steering Committee works toward developing a system that assesses, supports improvement of, and com-
      municates the level of quality in the early care education programs in Louisiana. Participated in work group
      sessions particularly focusing on the Early Child Care staff qualifications work group. Facilitated discussions
      with Head Start and T/TA Specialists to encourage Head Start programs to participate in the ECRS training.

      Head Start/pre-kindergarten/child care collaboration. Continue to provide Head Start programs with informa-
      tion, through LHSA meetings and by way of TA Network, regarding Head Start/pre-kindergarten/child care
      collaboration initiatives. Extended invitations to child care providers to participate in meetings, workshops,
      and seminars related to child care initiatives. Participated in meetings and serve on committees concerned
      with improving and enhancing Head Start/pre-kindergarten/child care collaboration.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care

      ♦ Continue to serve on the State Interagency Coordinating Council for the Early Steps Programs, the Part
        C Provider. This is the Louisiana program for identifying children from birth to three with potential
        developmental delays. The Council works to establish systems to address identification and needed services
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   127




   that can be delivered in the natural environment. The Council is comprised of representatives from State
   Department Services, Child Care Resources and Referral agencies, child care providers, and parents of
   children with delays. Worked with the Child Care Information Center and Center on Social and Emo-
   tional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL). The Council developed a birth to three training session
   that was cancelled due to Hurricane Katrina.

♦ Pursuing strategies geared toward connecting with local colleges and universities for the purpose of devel-
  oping collaborative efforts that would engage student interns, dental students, and health care students to
  assist in efforts to provide some health care services to Head Start children at minimal cost.

♦ Participated in National Child Care Partnership meeting in Washington, D.C. Provided travel arrange-
  ments for state partners (Pre-kindergarten and LHSA President) to attend and participate in National
  Strengthening State Systems Meeting.

Oral Health
♦ As stated above under “Health,” the HSSCO is pursuing strategies to build collaborations with local col-
  leges and universities intended to engage dental students to assist in providing oral health care services to
  Head Start children at minimal cost.

Welfare
♦ Continue to support the Governor’s Solutions to Poverty directed by Drew Murray, with outreach to the
  Head Start community on initiatives sponsored by Solutions to Poverty. One initiative is outreach for the
  Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).

♦ Continue facilitating the presence of state agency staff during Head Start meetings, trainings, and con-
  ferences. Identify and make training opportunities available through the Office of Family Support, the
  Department of Social Services. Head Start initiatives are ongoing.

Child Care
      ♦ See National Child Care Partnership meeting under “Health Care.”
      ♦ See Quality Rating Steering Committee and Bright Start above.
      ♦ See Head Start-pre-kindergarten-child care collaboration above.

Education
♦ As stated above, the HSSCO continues to work with the Department of Education State Pre-kindergar-
  ten Administrator and the Department of Social Services Child Care and Early Childhood Education
  Division Director, as well as Head Start entities to encourage further collaboration, utilization of efforts
  and resources.

Community Services
      ♦ See “Welfare” section above.
      ♦ Serve Children’s Cabinet above.
128   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Family Literacy Services
      ♦ Continue to partner with the Department of Education on statewide literacy initiatives.

      ♦ Continue to encourage ongoing relationships with Head Start and state and local libraries with the devel-
        opment of partnership agreements. Also support participation with and collaboration on services offered
        by the State Library System.

      ♦ Continue to support and encourage Head Start participation in financial literacy initiatives sponsored by
        Solutions to Poverty.

      ♦ Continue to encourage and promote quality family reading initiatives through the distribution reading
        materials.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      ♦ Convened an interdepartmental committee meeting for the purpose of developing a Memorandum of
        Understanding/Interagency Agreement for services to children in early child care/education/Head Start
        with disabilities. Committee met to discuss strategies aimed at reaching and serving these children with
        disabilities in a comprehensive manner. Committee is comprised of various health care professionals, in-
        cluding mental health professionals, pediatricians, social workers, and counselors. Meetings are structured
        with solution-oriented discussions aimed at the formulation of plans to better reach and serve all low-
        income families with children.

      ♦ Continue to address the needs of children and families with disabilities from a state perspective by serving
        on the Children’s Cabinet Advisory Board with a focus on the need for additional resources and services.

      ♦ Continue to attend and provide reports on Head Start and child-related issues for the Developmental
        Disabilities Council during regularly scheduled meetings.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      ♦ Continue to participate in the Statewide Homeless Coalition by attending quarterly meetings and assist-
        ing the coalition with identifying homeless children and families. Addressing the needs and developing
        strategies for the reduction or eradication of homelessness.

      ♦ Assist with identifying homeless Head Start children and educating service providers, particularly the
        Head Start community by prioritizing enrollment in Head Start.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      ♦ Serving on the Governor’s Children Cabinet Advisory Board sharing information and making recommen-
        dation to the Governor and legislature for adequate funding, policies, and support for programs vital to the
        success of Louisiana’s children and families.

      ♦ Serving on Bright Start Steering Committee and addressing ideas for the expansion of pre-kindergarten
        and collaboration with Head Start and child care through possible legislation during the next legislative
        session.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   129




♦ Serving on the Quality Rating Steering Committee assisting with the development of a Quality Rating
  System (QRS) that is inclusive of Head Start and Child Care in the expansion of pre-kindergarten and
  improving the quality of services to children and families in Louisiana.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Continue to serve on the Louisiana Children’s Cabinet Advisory Board and participate in monthly
  meetings.

♦ Attended the National Forum on Head Start and Pre-kindergarten in Washington D.C., January 16-19,
  2007.

♦ Attended the ACF Region VI 2007 Mid-Winter Leadership Training Conference in Dallas, TX,
  January 22-25, 2007.

♦ Participated in Region VI conference calls with Shannon Hills and other Region VI HSSCO Directors.

♦ On-site visit to the Iberville Head Start grantee in February 2007.

♦ On-site visit to the following grantees in March 2007: West Feliciana Head Start, Assumption Parish
  School Board, St. Mary CAA, and Sabine Parish School Board.

♦ Attended LHSA Mini Conference and Board Meeting in Baton Rouge, March 21-23, 2007.

♦ Presenter at the Office of Family Support Regional Administrators’ Meeting March 28-29, 2007, in
  Cypress Bend.

♦ Presented workshop at the Food and Nutrition Conference in Baton Rouge, March 30, 2007.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ Louisiana has seen an increase in the Hispanic population. However, there have not been significant in-
  creases in Head Start enrollment throughout the State. This unique situation necessitates the need for the
  HSSCO availability to facilitate collaborations between grantees and state and Federal agencies providing
  services to the Hispanic children and families in Louisiana.

♦ The HSSCO maintains a close relationship with grantees providing services to Hispanic children and
  families in the State. This relationship is vital to assessing the needs of Hispanic children and families,
  while giving special attention to any trends or findings which necessitate the need for providing particular
  resources and services. Immunization and proper documentation are just a few of the essentials needed to
  connect families with services, including Head Start.

♦ Louisiana has a unique arrangement with a Migrant and Seasonal Head Start program that is based in
  Arkansas. Louisiana Migrant and Seasonal Head Start families are becoming permanent residents once
  they move into Louisiana’s farming communities. The HSSCO offers support and maintains a close work-
  ing relationship with local programs providing services to the State’s Hispanic and migrant communities.
  The HSSCO also keeps in regular phone contact and attends meetings with the regional LA CAP and
  LHSA.
130   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      The expansion of Louisiana’s pre-kindergarten programs will be a major focus for the coming year. This ex-
      pansion will bring new and difficult challenges for the HSSCO and stakeholders as attempts are made to cre-
      ate a new collaborative environment within the State. Pre-kindergarten, Head Start, and child care must now
      collectively design a state-based system that will allow early childhood services to be delivered from a diverse
      delivery system that includes: child care, Head Start, and the Department of Education. While pre-kinder-
      garten expansion in Louisiana has both public and governmental support, the success of this expansion will be
      determined by collaborative partnerships between child care, Head Start, and the Department of Education.
      Flexibility and the blending of resources and services will be required to maximize this collaborative effort.
      Stakeholders are currently working on diverse delivery systems, which will have a set of child care standards
      developed through QRS and professional development opportunities through agencies such as Louisiana
      Pathways.
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 131




                                 Maine


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Carolyn Drugge
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Health and Human
Services
                                 Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
2 Anthony Avenue                 services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
11 State House Station           are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Augusta, Maine 04333             at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 207-624-7957              in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 207-287-6156
                                 ♦ Published and distributed a Funding Collaborations Guide
Carolyn.drugge@maine.gov           for Early Care and Education Partnerships in Maine.
                                   www.maine.gov/dhhs/ocfs/publications.shtml
Lead Agency Contact
                                 ♦ Organized an interagency task force that included members
Brenda Harvey                      from the Office of Child and Family Services, Office of
DHHS Commissioner                  Integrated Access and Support, Department of Health and
                                   Human Services; Department of Education; Head Start
Phone: 207-287-4223
                                   directors and child care directors to develop guidelines for
fax: 207-287-3005                  developing pre-kindergarten and Head Start or child care
Brenda.harvey@maine.gov            partnerships. A statement of commitment to partnerships
                                   for early care and education signed by the Commissioners
                                   of the Departments of Education (DOE) and Health and
ACF Regional Contact
                                   Human Services is included in the guide.
tom Killmurray
                                 ♦ Supported the partnership between the early care and
ACf Region I
                                   education professional development system and the
JfK federal Building               pre-kindergarten system that resulted in two accredita-
Government Center                  tion cohorts to provide technical assistance to Head Start
                                   and pre-kindergarten programs as they work through the
Boston, MA 02203
                                   process of becoming accredited by the National Association
Phone: 617-565-1104                for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
fax: 617-565-2493
tkillmurray@acf.hhs.gov          ♦ Served on the Pre-kindergarten Resource Group that
                                   developed standards for public pre-kindergarten programs.
                                   Other members included Head Start directors, child care
                                   licensing, public school principals and others. The standards
                                   include indicators from Head Start performance stan-
                                   dards, licensing, NAEYC accreditation standards and other
                                   sources. The standards will go through the rule-making
                                   process in Fall 2008.
132   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Using the Wisconsin model as a guide, worked with the pre-kindergarten specialist at DOE, a Head
        Start director and others to develop a model that provides a “collaboration coach” to communities who are
        interested in developing a public pre-k program in collaboration with Head Start and child care programs
        in the area. Maine law requires that public schools planning to open a pre-kindergarten program must
        include community agencies in their planning process.

      ♦ Continue coordination with the early care and education professional development system to facilitate
        Head Start access to training on the Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines. The Guidelines are
        being implemented in public pre-kindergarten programs, Head Start, and child care programs across the
        State. Training of a percentage of staff on the use of the Guidelines is required for a program to reach the
        top level of the Maine Quality Rating Scale.

      ♦ The Head Start Blue and Gold Certificates are used as part of the criteria for the top step of the Maine
        Child Care Quality Rating Scale. Head Start is well integrated into the Quality Rating System.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care

      Objective 1

      Continue to expand Head Start/child care health partnerships in order to improve children’s and families’ ac-
      cess to health, educational, nutritional, social, and other services while maximizing resources.


      Outcomes

      Coordinated with the Maine Oral Health Director and the Maine Chapter of the American Academy of
      Pediatrics to apply for a Friends of Children Fund grant through the American Academy of Pediatrics. The
      grant would to focus on training pediatricians and providing outreach and offering training to Early Head
      Start personnel in early oral health risk assessment through lunch-time training sessions.

      Oral Health

      State-level

      ♦ Coordinated with the Maine Oral Health Director and the Maine chapter of the American Academy of
        Pediatrics to apply for a Friends of Children Fund grant through the American Academy of Pediatrics.
        The grant would to focus on training pediatricians and providing outreach and offering training to Early
        Head Start personnel in early oral health risk assessment through lunch-time training sessions.

      ♦ A more intensive training opportunity working with four pediatric practices in diverse geographic loca-
        tions throughout Maine will be developed. This project will support the work of the Maine Oral Health
        Program (OHP) in connecting pediatric practices with dental hygienists in order to create “dental spe-
        cialists” within the pediatric practice. This connection will facilitate accessible oral health assessments for
        infants and toddlers within the pediatric practice. Additionally, through collaboration with the OHP, this
        service will be offered in other settings such as Early Head Start centers. The lunch-time learning sessions
        will consist of one-hour presentations on oral health risk, prevention and intervention strategies, and refer-
        ral resources. It will be based on the AAP Oral Health Risk Assessment Training.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   133




♦ A modified and shortened Institute for Health Improvement (IHI) Learning Collaborative will be used to
  further develop a successful model for oral health risk assessment training within four pediatric practices
  in diverse areas of the State. The funding was received, and the organizations will work together to recruit
  Head Start programs and physicians

♦ The Maine Dental Access Coalition developed the Maine Oral Health Improvement Plan, published in
  November 2007. The Plan can be accessed at www.maine.gov/dhhs/bohdcfh/odh/news.htm

  Contact:
  Judy feinstein
  Oral Health Program
  Maine Center for Disease Control, DHHS
  11 SHS, 286 Water Street
  5th floor
  Augusta, Me 04330-0011
  (207) 287-3267
  Judith.A.feinstein@maine.gov



♦ The Governor’s Oral Health Task Force was created in September 2007 to develop recommendations for
  short and long-term solutions to expand access to high-quality oral health care programs for all Maine
  citizens, particularly children, the elderly, underinsured, and the uninsured. The Commissioner of the De-
  partment of Professional and Financial Regulation serves as Chair.

  Contact:
  Judy feinstein
  (See contact information above.)


♦ In May 2008, Gov. Baldacci signed LD 2277, An Act Regarding the Sunrise Review of Oral Health Care
  Issues. The law allows dental hygienists to operate an independent practice without supervision by a den-
  tist. The independent practitioner must be a licensed hygienist, meet additional educational requirements,
  and provide a patient with a referral plan to a dentist for any necessary dental care.


Local-level

The Maine Oral Health Program compiled a directory to assist health and social services professionals likely
to assist clients who do not have a regular dentist in obtaining the dental care they need. The publication,
Dental Clinics and Services for Low Income Persons in Maine is available at www.maine.gov/dhhs/bohdcfh/odh/
news.htm.


Additional Information

A staff member is part of the Maine Dental Access Coalition. Work continues on the implementation of the
Maine Head Start Oral Health Plan.
134   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Welfare
      The HSSCO is located within the Office of Child and Family Services, which includes Child Welfare, Chil-
      dren’s Behavioral Health, and Early Childhood Divisions. This DHHS re-organization has created opportu-
      nities for linkages with the Child Welfare Division and Children’s Behavioral Health including grant applica-
      tions, mandated reporter training, and a focus on the impact of expulsions from early childhood programs on
      young children.

      Child Care
      See previous activities.

      Education

      See previous activities.

      Community Services

      Objective 1

      To develop and strengthen the Head Start and AmeriCorps linkage.


      Outcome

      The HSSCO has had an AmeriCorps VISTA staff member since September. Her work has focused on chil-
      dren without homes and the role of Head Start. See below.

      Family Literacy Services

      Objective 1

      To support and increase effective literacy partnerships with the Maine Humanities Council “Born to Read”
      program, Even Start, and other literacy programs.


      Outcomes

      ♦ The HSSCO and the Child Care Program both provide funding to the Maine Humanities Council’s Born
        to Read Program, which provides books to classrooms and trains volunteers to read to children at Head
        Start programs.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director serves on the Maine Family Literacy Council, which coordinates many early lit-
        eracy programs.

      ♦ The HSSCO provided a list of books that supported standards in the Early Childhood Learning Guidelines
        to all Maine libraries. This will encourage family learning related to the Guidelines and support child care
        and Head Start programs as they implement the Guidelines.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   135




Services to Children with Disabilities

Objective 1

To support and increase effective partnerships to meet the needs of families with children with special needs
by continuing and expanding Head Start/child care special needs partnerships.


Outcomes

Developed an early childhood mental health consultation model in collaboration with the Children’s Behav-
ioral Health Program. This program was funded by THRIVE, a Systems of Care Grant from the Substance
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Mental health consultants receive training on working
within an early childhood setting, including Head Start. Additional funding was provided to expand the
mental health consultation model and to support coordination between the mental health consultants serving
in this role.

Services to Homeless Children and Families

Objective 1

Strengthen and link resources for Head Start programs serving preschool children experiencing homelessness
and migrant children as appropriate.


Outcomes

♦ A survey of Maine’s homeless and domestic violence shelters was conducted to learn whether homeless
  shelters with children are aware of and connected to the community services available, including Head
  Start. The survey, adapted from a survey administered by the Connecticut HSSCO, included general ques-
  tions such as the number of children ages birth to 5 served yearly by the shelter, as well as more specific
  questions such as barriers to Head Start services. The surveys were conducted onsite at the homeless
  shelters. Surveys of domestic violence shelters were mailed to the shelters to protect confidentiality. When
  surveys were conducted at the homeless shelters, a local Head Start staff member would join the Depart-
  ment of Health and Human Services (DHHS)-Early Childhood Division AmeriCorps VISTA member
  to administer the survey and to distribute materials about the Head Start programs in the area, as well as
  publications about other early childhood community services. Often, the relationship between the shelter
  and the Head Start program was either inconsistent or nonexistent; the shelter visits helped bridge that
  gap. In one instance, a Memorandum of Understanding was created between the shelter and the local
  Head Start to strengthen their relationship.

♦ An Advisory Group to the Homeless Survey Project was created to advise on the project and to increase
  collaboration between various state agencies that deal with homeless children. This group consists of two
  Head Start directors, the HSSCO Director, the Department of Education Homeless Services Coordina-
  tor, Maine State Housing Authority’s Director of Homeless Initiatives, and the DHHS- Early Childhood
  Division VISTA member. In addition to the work with the shelter survey, the main focus of that group
  has been planning a conference, scheduled for November 2008, to increase awareness of the issues facing
  homeless children. The conference would to bring together Head Start programs, Department of Educa-
  tion McKinney-Vento homeless liaisons, and homeless and domestic violence shelter staff. The conference
  will include information about the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, presented
  by the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth’s policy director Barbara
136   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          Duffield, and provide time for Head Start staff, homeless liaisons, and shelter staff to meet by region. Ide-
          ally, a follow-up conference encouraging cooperation on early childhood homeless issues will be held in
          each region.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      ♦ Head Start directors serve on the Child Care Advisory Council, the Maine Advisory Council on Special
        Education, and the Stakeholders Group for EduCare Projects in Maine, and participate in the develop-
        ment of the Collaboration Coaches Model and the Early Childhood Task Force (SECCS Grant).

      ♦ Head Start directors made presentations to the Commission on Early Childhood created by the Legisla-
        ture. The Commission met during Summer 2007 and developed a report and legislation to support Early
        Care and Education in Maine, including Head Start with a special emphasis on Early Head Start.

      ♦ Head Start directors participated in the Governor’s Summit on Early Childhood, held November 2007.
        Business leaders and philanthropists were introduced to the Invest Early concept by national leaders such
        as George Kaiser.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      The Healthy Maine Partnerships regional groups made up of community medical personnel, families, and
      others who work with state agencies to improve the health of Maine Citizens, are collaborating with Maine
      Head Start programs to implement the I Am Moving, I Am Learning curriculum and other programs to reduce
      early childhood obesity. The Partnerships provided funding for Head Start agencies to implement the IMIL
      Curriculum and set up research to measure changes.

      The Harvard Prevention Research Project conducted a survey of Head Start home visitors, classroom teachers,
      and parents to gather baseline information related to physical activities and nutrition. The survey asked about
      classroom physical activities, classroom nutrition activities, and staff knowledge related to nutrition, physical
      activities, and barriers to discussing these issues with parents. The parent survey focused on food being served,
      physical activities, TV time, and openness to Head Start staff discussing these issues with them. The report on
      the survey included opportunities for change related to all the topics. The information gained will be used to
      inform training needs and support staff on these topics.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      The Maine Humanities Council, in collaboration with the HSSCO, offered the training, Many Eyes, Many
      Voices, to Head Start and child care staff statewide. This training is part of the Maine Roads to Quality Core
      Knowledge Training. The HSSCO provided training to increase awareness of multi-cultural issues.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      Work plan for next year will be expanded to include new opportunities for collaboration that have been devel-
      oped during the year.
                                                                       AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 137




                                Maryland


Collaboration Director          Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
linda Zang
                                plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Maryland State Department
of education
                                Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
200 West Baltimore Street       services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
10th floor                      are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Baltimore, MD 21201             at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 410-767-0140             in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 410-333-6226
                                The overarching goal of the Head Start-State Collaboration
lzang@msde.state.md.us          Office (HSSCO) is to establish partnerships and collaborative
                                efforts to build an effective early care and education system
Lead Agency Contact             and achieve positive outcomes and results for children. State
                                and community early care and education needs are examined,
Same as above                   gaps in services identified, issues raised, and linkages created to
                                provide resources and services for children in Head Start, Early
                                Head Start (EHS), and other children from low-income fami-
ACF Regional Contact
                                lies through the efforts of many early childhood stakeholders.
nancy elmore
                                Two Statewide agreements, one between the Maryland
AfC Region III
                                State Department of Education (MSDE) and the Maryland
150 S. Independence Mall West   Head Start Association (MHSA) and the other between the
Suite 864                       HSSCO, MHSA, the Infants and Toddlers Program and
Philadelphia, PA 19106-3499     Preschool Special Education Services in MSDE, Migrant and
                                Seasonal Head Start, and the Region III Office continue to
Phone: 215-861-1000             improve school readiness for all Head Start children, including
fax: 215-861-4071               those with disabilities.
nelmore@acf.hhs.gov
                                ♦ Local agreements based on the State model address com-
                                  mon areas that Head Start and public schools work on col-
                                  laboratively, including strategies for joint planning, parent
                                  involvement, articulation (curriculum and transition), and
                                  professional development.

                                ♦ Local facilitation by the HSSCO Director continues to
                                  renew and further local partnerships, including the assigna-
                                  tion of some Head Start programs as public pre-kindergar-
                                  ten programs.

                                The consolidation of many child and family services in MSDE
138   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      brought together HSSCO, pre-kindergarten/kindergarten policy, program accreditation, Judith P. Hoyer
      Partnerships, credentialing, early childhood professional development, child care licensing and subsidy, home
      visiting, special education, and the contracts for Maryland’s family support centers and resource and referral
      centers. As a result, opportunities in many arenas are created and shared that improve access to services and
      program quality, including partnerships for full-day, year-round services.

      A Head Start Collaboration and Judy Center Partnerships Advisory Council was formed from two separate
      committees to address Head Start/pre-kindergarten/child care issues, share information, and work collabora-
      tively to improve early childhood systems. The president of the MHSA, the selected Judy Center co-chair, and
      the HSSCO Director staff the Council.

      The HSSCO Director participated on the Federal Partners team to design a collaboration action plan to
      deliver quality pre-kindergarten/Head Start/child care services in Maryland.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      The HSSCO Director works with the Coordinator of the Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Grant
      at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on several projects, including early childhood
      mental health, early childhood health consultation, and a survey on the oral health of Head Start children in
      Maryland that is currently underway.

      The HSSCO is a part of the planning and implementation of the Pyramid Model Training Model for Sup-
      porting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children. Twice in 2008, Head Start and child care
      educators will receive training, and demonstration sites will be established to improve the ability of programs
      to address the social and emotional health of young children, birth to five.

      The HSSCO Director is a member of the Early Childhood Mental Health Steering Committee that provides
      advice to the MSDE Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Network that provides early childhood
      mental health consultation to Head Start and child care programs.

      Oral Health
      Information on Maryland’s state- and local-level partnerships can be found at the end of this report.


      Welfare

      ♦ The HSSCO Director participates in reviewing and advising Judy Center Partnerships that include the
        local department of social services representative along with Head Start and other community repre-
        sentatives to create and ensure productive relationships between all partners to benefit children in those
        programs.

      ♦ Finding Words is a national forensic interviewing course for law enforcement officers to learn how to talk
        with typical young children. The HSSCO facilitated the participation of Head Start at an event for officers
        to prepare for applying appropriate interviewing techniques for children in crisis.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director worked with the State subsidy program to develop a simplified application process
        for Head Start parents, improve policies at local departments of social services, and facilitate local subsidy
        agreements.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   139




Child Care
♦ The HSSCO connects Head Start/Early Head Start programs with child care licensing offices. Informa-
  tion is shared with grantees, and facilitation has been provided to assist local grantees and licensing offices
  address barriers and streamline licensing processes.

♦ The HSSCO Director, an Early Head Start Coordinator, and a Head Start Director serve on the Office
  of Child Care Advisory Council to explore collaboration issues and develop opportunities with public and
  private interest stakeholders.

♦ Information is disseminated on MSDE funding opportunities that require partnerships between Head
  Start/Early Head Start, pre-kindergarten, and child care.

♦ The HSSCO Director manages a Head Start State Supplemental grant for expanding hours and days of
  services, often in partnership with child care.

♦ The MHSA, HSSCO, and family child care and child care center associations began developing an agree-
  ment to work together on school readiness.

Education
♦ The HSSCO worked with MSDE and resource and referral centers to expand the availability of profes-
  sional development on the Maryland Model for School Readiness, the Ounce Scale, or other approved
  frameworks and assessments.

♦ Information is shared on the MSDE Credentialing Program whereby training costs are reimbursed, bo-
  nuses provided, and tuition is partially reimbursed. The Career and Professional Development Fund pays
  for college tuition for eligible applicants.

♦ The HSSCO Director worked with Head Start programs and community colleges to allow Head Start/
  Early Head Start staff with a Child Development Associate credential (CDA) to enroll in early childhood
  college courses where a CDA may be accepted for six credits.

Community Services
♦ The HSSCO continues to work with Montgomery County Head Start to offer an annual summer training
  and mentoring course to child care providers to improve the quality of their services through adopting the
  Head Start Program Performance Standards.

♦ The HSSCO Director is the liaison between PNC Financial Services and Head Start programs in Mary-
  land. PNC offers volunteer services from bank employees, school readiness materials, and competitive
  funding to improve Head Start program quality.

Family Literacy Services
♦ A series of parent tip sheets produced by the Ready At Five Partnership provides information on child
  development and school readiness. The information is shared with Head Start/Early Head Start programs
  monthly.

♦ The HSSCO Director works with MSDE Adult Education, Even Start, local education agencies, Head
140   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          Start/Early Head Start programs, and Judith P. Hoyer Partnerships to coordinate joint family literacy
          activities.

      ♦ The HSSCO participated with MSDE Office of Library Services and Enoch Pratt Library on book-
        mobile visits to local Head Start programs.

      ♦ Locally, libraries and resource and referral agencies offer literacy activities for Head Start children and
        parents throughout the year.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      ♦ As noted above, a state agreement has influenced Maryland jurisdictions to improve the availability
        and quality of services for children with disabilities and their families.

      ♦ The HSSCO is an active participant in the Tremaine Foundation Early Identification Advisory Com-
        mittee projects.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director assisted in the development of a Memorandum of Agreement that was signed
        between MSDE, MHSA, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, child care associations, and
        other partners to work together on the inclusion of children with disabilities in pre-kindergarten, child
        care, and Head Start classrooms.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      ♦ At the invitation of the Delaware HSSCO Director, Maryland Head Start directors participated in a
        workshop by Barbara Duffield on the McKinney-Vento Act and the Head Start Act in Wilmington.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director and the McKinney-Vento Homeless Liaison in the State Department of Educa-
        tion developed a plan to direct information on the relevant provisions in the McKinney-Vento Act and
        the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 to local education agencies and Head Start
        programs to encourage collaboration. The plan will be completed and implemented in 2008.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      ♦ Through placement in MSDE, the presence of the HSSCO Director and Head Start and Early Head
        Start representatives on relevant early childhood committees, such as the planning committee for the
        Three-year Strategic Plan for the Division of Early Childhood Development and the Universal Preschool Task
        Force, assures Head Start and Early Head Start a place at the early childhood table for planning and devel-
        oping early childhood systems in Maryland.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director manages the 2007 Head Start State Supplemental Grants for all Head Start/Early
        Head Start programs in Maryland. The $4 million in non-competitive grants fund summer or extended-
        day programs and quality improvements, such as career and professional development.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director and several Head Start, Early Head Start, and Community Action Agency (CAA)
        administrators continue to serve on the Early Care and Education Committee, a subcommittee of the
        Governor’s Subcabinet for Children, to oversee the progress of Achieving School Readiness: A Five-Year
        Action Agenda for Maryland. Members represent a wide range of early childhood stakeholders. Through the
        work of the committee, improvements in school readiness all over the state have occurred, as evidenced by
        MSDE school readiness assessment results.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   141




Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ The HSSCO Director worked with the Maryland Child Care Resource Network to offer the Maryland
  Model for School Readiness professional development modules to Head Start and child care educators.

♦ The HSSCO and the MSDE Accreditation Project promote and support Head Start programs to achieve
  state or national accreditation. More than 70 Head Start/Early Head Start programs have been accredited.

♦ Each year, all entering kindergarten children are assessed for school readiness and prior early care and edu-
  cation services data are disaggregated. The largest increase in assessed school readiness skills was achieved
  by Head Start children this past school year. Other prior care data are disaggregated, including child care,
  nursery schools, and public pre-kindergarten programs. The Head Start improvement is attributed to
  improvement in classroom instruction through increased joint professional development and collaboration
  with public schools.

♦ The HSSCO Director served on a state committee with Head Start and Early Head Start, and many
  other early care and education stakeholders to develop a Birth-Three business plan. The plan proposes to
  expand the Early Head Start model statewide through community service hubs.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ With the HSSCO, Ready At Five continues to work with Head Start programs to assist Hispanic parents
  in preparing their children for success in school.

♦ School readiness materials in Spanish are shared with Head Start/Early Head Start programs.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
In FY 2008, the HSSCO will follow the approved work plan for all objectives, with the changes listed below
that respond to changes in legislative and state conditions, including the Improving Head Start for School
Readiness Act of 2007:

♦ Barrier: Insufficient funding for career and professional development.
  Action: Support Head Start and Early Head Start in improving the quality of their programs by coor-
  dinating existing state resources through state agencies and private resources, including the Head Start
  State Supplemental Grants, Judith P. Hoyer Enhancement Grants, Credentialing Program bonuses, tiered
  reimbursement, and other available, applicable funding opportunities.

♦ Barrier: Reluctance of local education agencies to partner with Head Start and child care.
  Action: Facilitate revisions and renewals of state and local school readiness initiatives between public
  schools and Head Start, including outreach to child care programs, infant-toddler programs, preschool
  special education, and English Language Learners (dual language learners).

♦ Barrier: Managing the new provisions of the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007.
  Action: Work with TA specialists to identify program needs and connect programs with appropriate op-
  portunities.
142   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Barrier: Obtaining oral health services.
        Action: Focus on working with new initiatives to promote decay prevention and improve access to
        treatment.

      ♦ Barrier: Obtaining mental health services.
        Action: Work with state partners to coordinate early childhood mental health initiatives, including
        a mental health work force initiative.

      ♦ Barrier: Meeting public school expectations of what a child should be able to do.
        Action: Provide and coordinate professional development (including college) opportunities for Head
        Start and Early Head Start staff and joint opportunities for Head Start and public schools.

      ♦ Barrier: Lack of state and community recognition of the value of Head Start and Early Head Start.
        Action: Work with the MHSA to promote the value of Head Start and Early Head Start to state and
        local agencies, legislators, and the public.

      ♦ Barrier: Difficulty in revising child care licensing regulations to support Head Start operations.
        Action: Facilitate policy interpretation and understandings at the local level between Head Start and
        regional child care licensing offices.

      ♦ Barrier: Reaching families that speak a language other than English to discover family literacy needs.
        Action: Include questions in the Head Start Collaboration needs assessment rather than a separate survey.
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 143




                                     Massachusetts


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Anita Moeller
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
MA Department of early education
and Care
                                     Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
51 Sleeper Street                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
4th floor                            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Boston, MA 02210                     at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 617-988-7817                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 617-988-2451
                                     The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) grant
Anita.Moeller@massmail.state.ma.us   funds were utilized to bring the I Am Moving, I Am Learning
                                     (IMIL) initiative to Massachusetts Head Start programs, child
Lead Agency Contact                  care providers, WIC, and community nutrition staff. A two-
                                     day T/TA session was developed by the Head Start Quality
Amy Kershaw                          Initiative (HSQI) — the Region 1 T/TA system, in partner-
Phone: 617-988-6648                  ship with the Massachusetts Head Start Association (MHSA)
                                     and the Massachusetts Early Childhood Comprehensive Sys-
fax: 617-988-2451
                                     tems Project. Additional funds to underwrite this training were
Amy.Kershaw@massmail.state.ma.us     secured through a competitive grant awarded to MHSA by the
                                     Department of Early Education and Care (EEC). Feedback
ACF Regional Contact                 from the training was overwhelmingly positive. It is notewor-
                                     thy that this was the first time that the Head Start community
tom Killmurray                       took the lead in training the larger Massachusetts early educa-
                                     tion and care community on a Head Start initiative.
ACf Region I
Boston, MA 02203                     Results
Phone: 617-565-1104
fax: 617-565-2493                          ♦ 144 participants registered for the conference in-
tom.Killmurray@acf.hhs.gov                   cluding 112 from Head Start and 32 from partner
                                             organizations.
                                           ♦ On behalf of the HSSCO, the MHSA Executive Di-
                                             rector, who is a member of the MA Nutrition Board
                                             at the MA Department of Public Health, provided an
                                             overview of IMIL for MA Nutrition Board members.
                                     Massachusetts is currently undertaking the development of
                                     a MA Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) as
                                     the framework for its early care and education system. EEC
                                     has developed an internal staff group and hired a team of
                                     consultants to work in conjunction with external stakeholders
144   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      representing all provider types that serve infants, toddlers, preschool, and/or school-age children including
      Head Start. Other stakeholders include Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) organizations, the MA
      Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, institutions of higher education, and other agencies.
      The work groups have conducted an extensive review of standards in other states, as well as NAEYC stan-
      dards, the Head Start Program Performance Standards, and other nationally recognized measures of quality, and
      expect to report their recommendations in summer or fall 2008.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      ♦ Health and Safety. The HSSCO Director and representatives from the MA Head Start Association
        participated on a work group to examine and recommend ways to strengthen health and safety practices in
        early education and care settings in Massachusetts. The project was funded by the Charles H. Hood Foun-
        dation and the Barr Foundation and co-sponsored by the Schott Fellowship in Early Care and Education.
        A report was issued in July 2007 and outlined the key challenges and identified several key recommenda-
        tions that have policy implications as the State is in the process of revising its licensing regulations and
        developing a Quality Rating and Improvement System.

      ♦ Early Childhood Mental Health. In Spring 2007, the Department of Early Education and Care hired
        Glenwood Research to conduct a survey of behavioral and mental health services being provided to early
        education programs in Massachusetts, specifically:

            ♦ level of access to mental and behavioral health services
              provided in early education programs
            ♦ characteristics of mental and behavioral health providers
            ♦ nature of services being provided
            ♦ challenges and conclusions regarding “what works”


      Head Start was represented on the Mental Health Advisory team that helped to develop the survey, which
      was distributed to behavioral/mental health specialists and early childhood program directors. A focus group
      was also held with Head Start directors to solicit their feedback. The findings underscored the need for
      behavioral and mental health care for young children, as well as the need to improve culturally and linguisti-
      cally competent mental heath practices to reflect the diversity of children within Head Start and other early
      education and care programs. The findings of the report were shared with the Head Start Directors of New
      England, Region I.

      The HSSCO Director and the MA Head Start Association are both represented on the Massachusetts Infant
      and Early Childhood Mental Health working group that represents collaboration among agencies within the
      public and private sectors to address early childhood mental health issues.

      The HSSCO Director was part of the Massachusetts state team at the second annual Infant and Early Child-
      hood Mental Health System Development Summit in Milwaukee. The goal of the team is to work toward
      developing a statewide plan for infant and toddler mental health professional development that supports
      promotion, prevention, and intervention.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   145




The HSSCO Director worked with the Massachusetts Early Childhood Comprehensive System Project to
provide information to the legislature regarding the suggested revision of the Act relative to children’s mental
health in the development of a cross administration strategic planning for early childhood mental health
services. The plan was presented to the commissioners of EEC and the Office of Health and Human Services
agencies this spring.

Oral Health
Information on Massachusetts state- and local-level partnerships can be found at the end of this report.

Welfare
In January 2008, after several months of review, EEC released new, streamlined procedures for Child Care
Resource & Referral agencies when issuing vouchers for families referred to temporary emergency shelters by
the MA Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA). These procedures were accompanied by a new parent
fact sheet jointly developed by EEC and DTA with input from the McKinney-Vento Preschool Working
Group, which is attended by the HSSCO Director or MHSA’s Executive Director on behalf of the HSSCO.
Preliminary reports indicate a 300 percent increase in utilization since the implementation of the revised
procedures.

Child Care
Over the past two years EEC has been engaged in a major review and revision of its group child care, fam-
ily child care, and school-age licensing regulations. The HSSCO Director served on the internal work group
that undertook this project, which included a review of regulations and standards from other states, the Head
Start Program Performance Standards, NAEYC, and other nationally recognized measures of quality. The draft
regulations were reported at an MHSA meeting in order to provide an opportunity to members of the Head
Start community along with other provider groups across the state to provide informal and formal comments
on the proposed revisions.

EEC launched an Early Education and Care and Out of School Time Workforce Development Taskforce
through a public, private partnership that included representation from the Head Start community to advise
the agency on the creation of a long-term workforce development plan. The taskforce will issue a report
shortly. Included among its recommendations will be definitions of the core competencies needed by practi-
tioners within the field and the creation of a career lattice with multiple points of entry that awards credit for
prior learning to support Head Start teachers and other early educators to obtain higher education degrees
and credentials.

Head Start played a major role in a legislative priority – the expansion of child care slots for children with
open child protective cases with the MA Department of Social Services (DSS) following a substantiated
report of child abuse and neglect. MHSA’s Executive Director worked with EEC, DSS, and Head Start
program staff to assist programs with existing contracts to expand their capacity and to enable new programs
to develop supportive expansion vouchers for DSS involved families. Following the first wave of this proj-
ect, an additional 1,300 children were enrolled in Head Start programs. The additional children represented
16 percent of the children enrolled in the new category of supportive vouchers and 8.5 percent of the total
expansion in supportive child care across the state.

MHSA’s Executive Director has also assisted the HSSCO Director and other EEC staff in developing a
survey to assess how supportive child care programs and providers utilize the additional funding they receive
in order to provide social service, case management, and transportation to DSS-involved families.
146   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Education
      The HSSCO Director worked in conjunction with other staff at EEC and external stakeholders including
      the Head Start Association to develop the MA Universal Pre-Kindergarten (UPK) program. The MA UPK
      is built upon the existing mix of public and private programs, including Head Start, and is committed to the
      retention and professional development of the existing early education workforce including Head Start early
      educators. EEC has released both Classroom Quality and Assessment Planning grants funds to programs and
      providers who met all of the quality criteria established for these UPK grants.

      The HSSCO supported the development of the first EEC Assessment Institute for MA UPK Classroom
      Quality and Assessment Planning grantees. Head Start staff was among the presenters who shared their
      experiences with the assessment process including the collection of child observations and analysis of child
      outcome data.

      The MHSA’s Executive Director served on the Readiness Project, an initiative launched by the Governor to
      develop a 10-year strategic plan to strengthen educational services in the Commonwealth for students from
      pre-k through the higher education system. A number of subcommittees of the Readiness Council were
      created to study various aspects of a high quality educational system that includes preschool children as well
      as how to implement an effective and efficient accountability system from pre-kindergarten through higher
      education. The HSSCO Director worked with MHSA’s Executive Director who was asked to serve on the
      Accountability and Assistance subcommittee and worked with EEC to incorporate its vision into the recom-
      mendations regarding school readiness.

      The HSSCO is completing work on the release of a cross-walk of the existing Head Start Program Performance
      Standards and the NAEYC accreditation standards.

      Community Services
      Head Start centers were included in the State Employees Responding as Volunteers program (SERV), a new
      initiative by the Governor to allow eligible state employees in the Executive Branch and Higher Education
      Institutions to volunteer up to one day per month at accredited nonprofit organizations and public entities,
      including schools.

      Family Literacy Services
      During the past year, a Head Start director continued to represent MHSA on the MA Family Literacy
      Consortium, a statewide initiative with the mission of forging effective partnerships among state agencies,
      community organizations, and other interested parties to expand and strengthen family literacy and support.

      At the annual MHSA conference in November 2007, a workshop on family literacy was offered to connect
      children’s literacy outcomes at home and school by encouraging parents to talk and read with their child and
      provide hands-on activities to foster positive literacy outcomes.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      In 2007, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs invited the MA IDEA
      Part C and Section 619 coordinators to identify an “Expanding Opportunities” (EO) team to develop a state
      action plan targeted at improving inclusive opportunities for young children with disabilities. Nancy Topping-
      Tailby, MHSA Executive Director represented the HSSCO at the EO meeting in Chapel Hill, North Caro-
      lina, that was scheduled in conjunction with the National Early Childhood Inclusion Institute. The MA EO
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   147




team shared information about each agency’s policies and standards. The team also discussed approaches to
promote inclusive practices across systems and strategies to develop a coordinated clearinghouse for resources
for providers in all settings. In the winter of 2007-08 the EO team submitted an application to expand its
work and become a SpecialQuest Birth-Five State Leadership Team in order to develop a state-level systems
approach to professional development around children with special needs. The team will promote a common
understanding of inclusion and build opportunities for inter-agency professional development to enhance the
confidence of practitioners and parents in responding to the needs of children with special needs.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
See comments in the Welfare section regarding the development of new policies for families experiencing
homelessness.

The HSSCO Director sits on the MA Department of Elementary and Secondary McKinney-Vento Steering
Committee. During the past year, MHSA’s Executive Director has represented the HSSCO on the McKin-
ney-Vento Preschool Working Group.

The HSSCO has co-sponsored $5,000 in support of the operating cost of early education and care and Head
Start programs to attend events related to Child and Family Homeless sponsored by the National Horizons
for Homeless Children program.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO and the MHSA have worked closely together to ensure Head Start’s involvement in the devel-
opment of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.

The HSSCO Director attends monthly Association meetings to keep apprised of issues that impact programs
and Head Start families. The MHSA Executive Director sits on the EEC Advisory Team and other agency
workgroups.

The HSSCO has an interagency Advisory Council that includes Head Start directors, parents, the MHSA
Executive Director, a representative from the MA Association for Community Action, and representatives
from state agencies within the Executive Office of Human Services.

The MHSA Board of Directors, which includes directors and parents, meets periodically with the EEC Com-
missioner and Deputy Commissioner and the HSSCO Director.

Two directors of Head Start agencies serve on the EEC Board, and one is the current Board Chair. Several
Head Start parents are members of the EEC Parent Advisory Team.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The HSSCO Director has been promoted to the role of Acting EEC Deputy Commissioner for programs
while the EEC Board conducts a national search for a new Commissioner and the current Deputy serves as
Acting Commissioner.

EEC has hired a State Head Start Assistant Collaboration Director, with the long-term goal of increasing
responsibilities and a potential goal to assume the leadership of the HSSCO as its director. This individual is
an experienced Federal reviewer with a strong background in the field of early education and care, extensive
148   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      professional experience working with Head Start grantees, delegates, and child care agencies, and extensive
      knowledge in the implementation of Head Start Program Performance Standards and regulations, and visionary
      leadership skills. The Regional Office and the MHSA were involved throughout the hiring process.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      This has not been a focus of HSSCO activities during the past year. One of the future projects of the HSSCO
      is collaboration and partnership with the Massachusetts Office of Refugees and Immigrants in key priority
      areas related to access to early education services and Head Start services.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      It is anticipated that the following activities will be a major focus during the coming year:

      ♦ In conjunction with MHSA and the Region I T/TA system, work with MA grantees and delegate agen-
        cies to implement the state level community needs assessment activities required of the HSSCOs in the
        Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007.

      ♦ Continue involvement and support of UPK-related activities with input from the Head Start community

      ♦ Continue to develop the MA QRIS system with input from the Head Start community

      ♦ Participate on the Advisory Committee of the MA Early Childhood Oral Health Consortium, a grant-
        funded initiative of the MHSA.

      ♦ Provide technical support for the newly hired Assistant Collaboration Director to support increased lead-
        ership in the HSSCO.

      ♦ Assist Head Start agencies in developing linkages with homeless liaisons within state Local Education
        Agencies (LEAs), the Office for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, at the MA Department
        of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE), and staff at DTA shelters and Horizons for Homeless
        Children to ensure that local Head Start programs develop systems to identify homeless children birth to
        age 5 in order to prioritize them for Head Start enrollment.
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 149




                                 Michigan


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Jeremy Reuter
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
c/o early Childhood Investment
Corporation
                                 Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
221 north Pine Street            services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
lansing, MI 48933                are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 517-371-9000 ext. 219     at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 517-371-9080                in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
reuterj@michigan.gov
                                 In February 2005, Gov. Jennifer M. Granholm approved
www.mhsa.ws                      the formation of the Early Childhood Investment Corpora-
                                 tion (ECIC) based on key recommendations from the Early
Lead Agency Contact              Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) grant. The major
                                 functions of the ECIC are to:
lisa Brewer-Walraven
federal liaison                  ♦ Select, fund, support, and monitor local Great Start
                                   Collaboratives (GSCs) to provide universal access to
Department of Human Services
                                   early childhood services and supports.
235 South Grand Avenue
lansing, MI 48909                ♦ Serve as a convener and coordination point for all early
Phone: 517-373-4116                childhood system development.
fax: 517-241-8125
brewer-walravenl@michigan.gov
                                 ♦ Promote early childhood education as an economic
                                   imperative/investment.

ACF Regional Contact             ♦ Provide technical assistance regarding early childhood
                                   system building.
frank Marfia
ACf Region V                     ♦ Leverage public and private sector funds to expand the
Office of family and Child         availability and quality of early childhood services.
Development
233 north Michigan Avenue        ♦ Establish an accountability system to measure achievement
Suite 400                          toward the results, outcomes and performance standards of
                                   the Great Start system.
Chicago, Il 60601-5519
Phone: 312-886-4925
                                 The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) Director
fax: 312-353-2629                has been detailed to operate and function within his priority
fmarfia@acf.hhs.gov              areas as part of the ECIC. This strategic placement is meant to
                                 facilitate continued Head Start participation and connection
                                 to the major early childhood comprehensive system building
150   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      initiative in Michigan. The HSSCO Director serves on the Early Education and Care external advisory com-
      mittee of the Executive Board of the ECIC. This committee is working to develop a system that will address
      pre-kindergarten collaborative efforts in Michigan.

      As detailed to the ECIC, the HSSCO will continue to work closely with Michigan Departments of Educa-
      tion (MDE), Human Services (DHS), Labor and Economic Growth (DLEG), and Community Health
      (DCH), as well as Michigan Community Action Agency Association (MCAAA) and Michigan Head Start
      Association (MHSA). The HSSCO Director consults often with and involves the MHSA executive leader-
      ship team in the many initiatives, future planning, and direction of the HSSCO. The HSSCO Director also
      participates in the MHSA quarterly meetings to gain feedback on the impact of HSSCO initiatives.

      The HSSCO has also been working closely with MDE to undertake efforts at the state level designed to
      increase collaboration between Head Start and state pre-kindergarten programs. Meetings have been held
      with ECIC to coordinate enrollment and recruitment efforts, and give an awareness of the latest research that
      supports the effectiveness of Head Start and state pre-k programs for low-income populations.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      Goal : To improve access to health care services for low-income families.

      Outcome

      The HSSCO Director works in partnership with DCH on vision and hearing screenings for all Early Head
      Start children. A Michigan team that included Head Start staff has been trained in the use of Early Child-
      hood Hearing Outreach (ECHO).

      Oral Health
      State-level

      In 2006, Michigan received the American Association of State Dental Director’s (ASTDD) grant to deliver
      a “Plan of Action for Improving The Oral Health Status of Michigan Residents.” The HSSCO Director col-
      laborated with members of the Michigan Oral Health Coalition to apply for this grant. The HSSCO sup-
      ported regional focus groups throughout Michigan and supported Head Start participation in these focus
      groups. The HSSCO also facilitated meetings with staff from DCH to assist Head Start programs with the
      oral health needs of their children and families.

      As a member of the Michigan Oral Health Coalition, the HSSCO Director has helped support the efforts
      of the Coalition and provided access to Head Start to the work of the Coalition. The HSSCO Director is
      a member of the education workgroup of the Coalition and works closely with the Michigan State Dental
      Director to address the specific needs of Head Start grantees. A grant from Delta Dental to the Michigan
      Department of Community Health resulted in the State Dental Director collaborating with Head Start pro-
      grams to provide fluoride varnish to all Head Start and Early Head Start programs in Michigan that applied
      for grant funding through DCH. The HSSCO was also awarded grant dollars from the ASTDD to partner
      with the Michigan Department of Community Health, Michigan Head Start Association, and the Michi-
      gan Oral Health Coalition on a MHSA Web site link for Michigan Oral Health. Contact information for
      the major partners in the Michigan Oral Health Coalition can be found at the end of this report, along with
      information local-level partnerships.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   151




Welfare
Goal: To improve collaboration with the welfare system.

Outcome

Several Head Start agency staff have participated in wrap-around program training sessions occurring around
the State. These training programs are designed as a collaborative model involving agencies and schools that
seek to provide a safe and nurturing environment for children.

Child Care
Goal: To improve the availability, accessibility, and quality of early education and child care services.

Outcomes

♦ The Michigan School Readiness Program (MSRP) is the state pre-kindergarten program for at-risk
  4-year-old children in Michigan. Each child must meet two of the 25 identified risk factors and more
  than 50 percent of the children must be low- income to participate. Both center-based and home-based
  models are available. The program was designed to serve children who are not Head Start eligible. MSRP
  is funded through the State Aid School Budget based on a formula basis to local school districts and
  General Purpose/General Fund based on a competitive-bid process to non-ISD or public school related
  organizations.

   Many Head Start programs have been awarded competitive grants to run MSRP. Historically, there has
   been difficulty in collaborating on the recruitment and enrollment of children between Head Start and
   MSRP (i.e., Head Start eligible children are being enrolled in MSRP). In addition, there are issues with
   MSRP getting a large number of waivers being signed by Head Start directors as required under the state
   statute. This has created numerous conflicts between Head Start and school districts.

   Two years ago the HSSCO Director along with MHSA Executive Director and the Director of MDE’s
   Office of Early Childhood and Family Services brought together teams that included members from
   Head Start and their Local Education Agency (LEA) to discuss recruitment and enrollment. The desired
   outcome was to begin or enhance discussion at the local level to achieve a joint MSRP and Head Start
   recruitment and enrollment plan that would result in both Head Start and MSRP being able to be fully-
   enrolled. This was successful for some communities and less so for other communities. The HSSCO, DHS,
   MDE, and members of several Head Start programs continue to discuss, identify, and create action steps
   toward resolving recruitment and enrollment issues between local Head Start programs and MSRP. These
   meetings have helped with policy changes in the State.

♦ There are articulation agreements between some of Michigan’s two-year and four-year institutions, but
  the effort is very fragmented. Last year, the HSSCO Director served as co-chair with the Director of
  Early Education and Family Support unit from the Michigan Department of Education. A focus group
  continues to meet quarterly with early childhood coordinators at two- and four-year higher education in-
  stitutions to discuss a statewide professional development system for professionals leading to a Bachelor’s
  degree in early childhood education or child development, including articulation issues and solutions.

♦ The HSSCO Director continues to be directly involved in the work of Dr. Susan B. Neuman from the
  University of Michigan. Dr. Neuman has been awarded numerous grants where the HSSCO Director has
  actively worked with her to use Head Start sites in her research.
152   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ The HSSCO Director formed a collaborative effort with the Michigan Department of Community
        Health to address professional development concerns of Head Start mental health consultants and other
        mental health consultants in Michigan. These concerns were related to the accessibility of services, collabo-
        ration with Head Start mental health staff and other state mental health consultants, professional devel-
        opment and knowledge of the Head Start social and emotional PROTOCOL. A listserv was developed
        to connect all of the consultants. Joint training and networking sessions are held jointly with Head Start
        mental health consultants and DCH’s Child Care Expulsion Prevention Program consultants who have
        assisted Head Start programs with specific grantee needs and statewide professional development.

      Education
      See “Child Care” above.

      Community Services
      Goal: To promote interaction with community service agencies.

      Objectives

      ♦ The HSSCO has worked to link Head Start programs with Service Learning programs from community
        colleges and four-year institutions in Michigan.

      ♦ The HSSCO connected Spanish-speaking college students to assist Head Start programs that have a need
        with their Spanish-speaking children.

      Family Literacy Services
      Goal: To improve access to family literacy services.

      Outcome

      The HSSCO is a part of the Even Start statewide advisory committee, TAG (Technical Assistance Group),
      which meets every other month. The HSSCO Director has helped to complete a Family Centered Practices
      model that is being taught throughout Michigan. The HSSCO also invited a Head Start parent representative
      to join the statewide TAG meetings.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      Goal: To improve opportunities for children with disabilities.

      Outcomes

      ♦ Michigan has had a long history of leading the nation on issues and best practices around infant mental
        health. Unfortunately, the dollars allocated toward infant mental health has steadily decreased. The HSS-
        CO Director has partnered with the Michigan Department of Community Health, Michigan Institute for
        Infant Mental Health, and the Michigan Department of Education to connect mental health consultants
        in Michigan. We have brought together mental health consultants from Head Start and Early Head Start,
        DCH, DHS, MDE, Early On, and LEAs to help identify issues relative to the mental health needs of
        infants and toddlers and provide professional development activities.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   153




♦ The HSSCO Director convened a meeting of stakeholders to begin the revision of the MOU on disabili-
  ties between MDE and Head Start. A final MOU will be endorsed in early 2008.

♦ See last bullet under “Child Care.”

Services to Homeless Children and Families
Goal: To improve opportunities for homeless children.

Objectives: The HSSCO has been promoting linkage between the Michigan State Housing Development
Authority (MSHDA) and Head Start agencies. Moreover, the HSSCO Director has continued to participate
on the Michigan Homeless Assistance Advisory Board (MHAAB). MHAAB, the Statewide Continuum of
Care (COC) planning body, is comprised of representatives from state human service departments, coalitions
of state-wide homeless service providers, nonprofit state housing developers, foundations, and representatives
from the local business community.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ Michigan HSSCO Advisory Committee. A new Michigan Early Learning Council was formed in 2006 to
  replace the current HSSCO advisory committee. The Early Learning Council is comprised of the mem-
  bers of the external workgroups of the Michigan Early Childhood Investment Corporation.

♦ Michigan’s Fatherhood Initiative. The HSSCO continues to support the Michigan Fatherhood Initiatives
  and local Head Start Fatherhood organizations. The HSSCO also supported efforts around fatherhood
  addressed by the Early Childhood Investment Corporation Parent Support External Advisory Committee.

♦ Migrant Services. A large number of migrant farmworkers spend 6 to 11 months working in Michigan.
  While Telamon Migrant Head Start serves a large number of migrant children, some of its programs are
  not located near the growers. Many migrant children have “in-camp” aides that care for them within each
  camp while their parents are working. The use of “in-camp” aides to care for children is unique to Michi-
  gan. The HSSCO has helped to facilitate collaboration between all of the programs that serve migrant
  children and their families. This collaborative effort became the Michigan Migrant Child Task Force, a
  work group of the Michigan Interagency Migrant Services Council. The HSSCO Director has also coor-
  dinated these activities with the National Migrant Head Start Technical Assistance Collaboration Office.
  This team approach was useful as work continues on a strategic plan for Michigan to address the needs
  of migrant children and their families. The strategic planning continues with three outreach visits to visit
  migrant camps and to conduct focus group discussions with migrant child care providers.

♦ Domestic Violence Pilot. In 2005, the HSSCO was awarded a grant from Glenwood Research and the Head
  Start Bureau (now Office of Head Start) to facilitate and collaborate on a Domestic Violence Pilot project
  with the City of Detroit Head Start programs. This professional development opportunity still continues
  in Head Start programs in Michigan. The HSSCO Director has partnered with the Michigan Depart-
  ment of Human Services Domestic Violence unit to assist Head Start grantees with domestic violence
  issues.

Additionally, the HSSCO Director actively serves on numerous state committees such as:

     ♦ Early Childhood Investment Corporation
     ♦ Michigan Department of Education Early Childhood Collaborative Conference
154   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




            ♦ T.E.A.C.H. Michigan Advisory Committee
            ♦ Early On
            ♦ Michigan Housing Development Authority Advisory Committee
            ♦ Michigan Oral Health Coalition
            ♦ Michigan Migrant Services Advisory Committee
            ♦ Michigan Day Care Licensing Advisory Committee


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      The HSSCO was detailed to ECIC by the Michigan DHS to assist in the collaborative work of all of the
      early childhood partners in Michigan including Head Start in the development and implementation of the
      Great Start System for Michigan. The ECIC External Advisory Committees have representatives from Head
      Start on each of the priority areas. ECIC has held a Star Power Rally, Governor’s Early Childhood Summit
      and numerous outreach activities that the HSSCO Director has supported.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      ♦ The HSSCO has worked extensively with the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) programs in
        Michigan. The HSSCO has played a pivotal part in collaborating with Gov. Granholm’s Office of Migrant
        Affairs, which is part of Michigan DHS. The HSSCO Director is a participant of the ad-hoc Early Child-
        hood Committee for Migrant Affairs Interagency Services Council of Michigan. This ad-hoc committee
        is also working with Brenda Coakley from the MSHS HSSCO in Washington D.C. The formation of the
        Michigan Migrant Child Task Force was a direct result of the collaboration of early learning partners that
        affect the lives of migrant children. Implementation of the strategic plan was begun in 2006; it continues
        to be revised as needed.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director is a member of Projecto Escalon through Michigan State University. Projecto Es-
        calon is working to address linguistic and cultural needs of Hispanics, as well as making sure that Hispan-
        ics are represented in all workgroups at the state level.

      ♦ The HSSCO continues to respond to the needs of the Hispanic Head Start families in Michigan, whether
        they are in regular Head Start or in Telamon Migrant and Seasonal Head Start.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      The HSSCO Director meets with the DHS Federal Liaison and the Chief Operating Officer of ECIC to
      develop the HSSCO work plan. This work plan is focused on the HSSCO priorities and how these priorities
      can be meshed with the priorities of the ECIC and the state early childhood system building efforts.
                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          | 155




                                   Migrant & Seasonal
                                   Head Start

                                   Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) programs, original-
Collaboration Director
                                   ly funded in 1969, are currently providing services for 35,657
                                   children, 6 weeks of age to compulsory school age at over 450
Guadalupe Cuesta-tokuno
                                   center sites, 100 family child care homes, in 38 states. MSHS
Academy for educational Develop-   programs are seasonal in nature providing services in some
ment (AeD)
                                   areas for 2 months and other areas for 10 months. Hours of
1875 Connecticut Ave nW            service reflect the needs of the migrant farmworker parents —
Washington, DC 20009               12 hours a day and often 6 days a week. MSHS programs are
gcuesta@aed.org
                                   administered from the national level – Office of Head Start
                                   (OHS)/Migrant and Seasonal Program Branch (MSPB). The
                                   MSHS Collaboration Office, a division of the MSHS Techni-
ACF Regional Contact               cal Assistance Center (TAC-12), continues to be housed in the
                                   Academy for Educational Development (AED). Co-location
Sandra Carton                      supports the efforts of the MSHS Collaboration Office to
Office of Head Start               increase availability of training and technical assistance to the
Portals Building 8th floor         grantee and delegate programs, as well as improves visibility.
                                   The Collaboration Office also benefits from the direct rela-
1250 Maryland Ave, SW
                                   tionship with MSPB and grantee and delegate agencies in the
Washington, DC 20024               Region. These advantages, coupled with AED, a nationally/
Phone: 202-205-8397                internationally recognized incorporated nonprofit, have created
                                   an effective working relationship.
fax: 202-260-9336
scarton@acf.hhs.gov
                                   The role of the MSHS Collaboration Office:

                                        ♦ Focuses on national issues.
                                        ♦ Stimulates Federal, state, and community partner-
                                          ships to strengthen efforts to address critical migrant
                                          child and family issues.
                                        ♦ Provides materials, support, and expertise among
                                          states and MSHS programs to enable migrant farm-
                                          workers and programs to readily and fully
                                          access services.
                                        ♦ Expands Federal-to-state partnerships to strengthen
                                          services for migrant and seasonal farmworkers.
                                        ♦ Supports state and Federal governments to coordinate
                                          services and initiatives.


                                   The MSHS Collaboration Office continues to be engaged
                                   with select states to simulate needed comprehensive systems
                                   changes by:
156   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Bringing leaders and organizations together in regional, state, and national meetings to solve shared
        challenges.

      ♦ Identifying strategies to address needs and priorities through consultation with diverse stakeholders.

      ♦ Contributing to the development of information and communication systems for those working with
        migrant and seasonal farmworker populations.

      ♦ Educating governors, legislators, mental health, health clinic care providers, the education system, policy
        makers, and the Head Start community on the unique needs of early childhood education/migrant and
        seasonal farmworkers.

      ♦ Defining public and private resources and services.

      ♦ Preparing states to plan (through their Head Start-State Collaboration Offices (HSSCOs)), develop, and
        implement collaborations and partnerships to support migrant farmworker families and communities.


      Work Plan Goals and Outcomes

      The administrative location of the MSHS Collaboration Office has resulted in the development of a multi-
      year work plan reflecting aspects of partnership development, as well as technical assistance. The work plan
      also identifies state and local issues critical to strengthening migrant initiatives, partnerships, and opportuni-
      ties for resource development and/or coordination that will support MSHS. The Collaboration Office gives
      recognition to states which have demonstrated promising best collaboration practices (and research) in health
      and early care/education based upon the state’s infrastructure, national recognition, and/or resource commit-
      ment. The state-to-state work with HSSCOs is raising awareness for a coordinated approach to the inclusion
      of MSHS services, maximizing/leveraging funding, and creating living case studies for consideration and
      potential replication. Two examples are the activities occurring in Michigan and Washington and the role of
      their HSSCOs, which are described in Goal II.

      The following work plan goals have been designed to be compatible with the Office of Head Start’s expecta-
      tions and goals for all HSSCOs. The majority of the work being conducted and executed is a result of the
      commitment and dedication coming from the HSSCOs.


      Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from
      your work plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
      Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive services for all low-income children. Include a description of
      how you are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations at the local level, as well as your efforts
      to involve Head Start programs in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.

      Goal 1

      Serve as facilitator to improve and expand services for low-income children in Head Start, child care, and
      state preschool programs.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   157




Outcomes

In 2007, work in this area continued through:

♦ Continuing inter- and intra-agency dialogue with management staff of the Office of Head Start, Child
  Care Bureau, and the Office of Migrant Education (U.S. Department of Education) in raising awareness
  about the unique needs of migrant farmworker children, identifying policies, reducing barriers to, and
  improving the use of child care financial assistance by migrant farmworker families and enrollment in
  Migrant Education pre-kindergarten.

♦ Answering to HSSCOs and MSHS grantee collaboration needs by assessing state and local partnership
  status, fiscal, organizational, and/or political barriers and providing technical assistance.

♦ Serving as a state and national conference presenter, panelist, and facilitator — National Association of
  Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, State Administrator’s Meeting of the Child Care Bureau,
  University of California/Davis Campus Immigration Reform Conference, and Head Start National His-
  panic Institute.

♦ Utilizing various forms of media to bring attention to the issues — Authored articles for professional
  newsletters: Early Childhood Report: Children with Special Needs and Their Families and Michigan Pediatric
  Update Michigan Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics.

♦ Identifying resources, research, and researchers (current and prospective) whose work contributes to the
  core/base knowledge about this population and for which data can be extrapolated to inform policy, such
  as those affiliated with the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, University of North
  Carolina Department of Maternal and Child Health, Case Western Reserve University, Western Michi-
  gan University, and the University of California: Davis Campus Department of Agriculture and Resource
  Economics, Berkley School of Public Health, and San Francisco Department of Growth and Develop-
  ment.

♦ In 2007, the MSHS Collaboration Office submitted a State Child Care Administrator’s meeting (SAM)
  workshop proposal on early childhood systems change — TA joint approach to the Child Care Bureau
  for consideration. The SAM meeting theme was Research, Policy, & Practice with participation limited to
  State & Territory Child Care & Development Fund administrators and their staff.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
Continue to build relationships with key professional, academic, public, and private organizations that may
impact national migrant farmworker priorities, such as: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy
of Pediatric Dentistry, American Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, National Council of Universi-
ties, University of North Carolina, the Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health,
Graduate Schools of Public Health, Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Farmworker
Health, etc.


Outcomes

In 2007, the relationships were continued. In addition:
158   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ The MSHS Collaboration Office scheduled and participated in regular monthly meetings with the Execu-
        tive Director of the National Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Association (NMSHSA). The meetings
        involve discussion of joint activities, i.e.: migrant research forum, presentation and reports, proposed
        development of a partnership agreement such as an MOU to further strengthen the relationship, identify
        mutual goals, and demonstrate mutual interest and support. In late 2007, the first draft of the partnership
        agreement/MOU was completed and sent to the NMSHSA.

      ♦ Dr. Andrea Weathers was accepted for membership on the National Migrant Health Advisory Council on
        Migrant Health, the group that makes recommendations to the Secretary regarding migrant health issues.
        This represents the first time a voice for migrant children has been included in the Council. Her name was
        submitted for recommendation by the NMSHSCO.

      ♦ Members of the Migrant Interagency Committee representing the MSHS Collaboration Office, HRSA/
        Bureau of Primary Health Care/Office of Minority and Special Populations; EPA Office of Pesticide, and
        the USDA/WIC and Child and Adult Care Food Program representatives created an interagency Migrant
        Committee exhibit at the 2007 EPA conference, October 2-4, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, VA.

      Hosted the quarterly Migrant Inter Agency Advisory Committee Meeting. Dr. Andrea Weathers, University
      of North Carolina professor, pediatrician, and migrant child health researcher was the invited speaker. Presen-
      tation entitled: Health and Access to Care Among Children of Agricultural Labor Migrants in the U.S.

      New relationships included:

            ♦ National Head Start Family Literacy Center
            ♦ Physicians for Social Responsibility
            ♦ Farmworker Health Services Incorporated
            ♦ Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America


      Oral Health
      Increase awareness regarding disparities in oral health access to care opportunities, the MSHS Collaboration
      Office will further investigate (and where appropriate become involved in) initiatives, activities, strategies,
      and/or agency support for increasing the pool of dental professionals of Hispanic-origin and/or other dental
      professionals — including college of dentistry students willing to provide services to Migrant Head Start
      programs.


      Outcomes

      The MSHS Collaboration Office participates in Regional Oral Health Conference calls facilitated by the
      OHS/Collaboration Senior Advisor. The MSHS Collaboration Office has been requested to present the
      Region XII perspective on its oral health plan, activities, and partnerships.

      ♦ Medicaid Portability Project. The MSHS Collaboration Office spearheaded the establishment of an Oral
        Health Medicaid Portability planning committee. This committee has been formed in response to grow-
        ing awareness of interstate oral health service and insurance coverage issues. The remaining resources of
        the Maternal and Child Health Bureau’s Memorandum of Agreement with OHS to improve oral health
        conditions of Head Start children are being used to bring attention to this issue. Funding is available
        to address cutting-edge issues. Dr. John Rossetti agreed that the issue of intra-state insurance coverage
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS      |   159




   needed to be addressed now. (East Coast Migrant Head Start programs requested the assistance of the
   MSHS Collaboration Office to help solve the oral health service issues resulting from serious oral health
   screened/diagnosed disease of Florida resident children attending North Carolina MSHS programs.)

A meeting of Medicaid, oral health, MSHS, migrant community health care center, and policy experts is
being planned for late winter/early spring. Bi-weekly meetings occurred with the planning committee which
included Dr. Rossetti, MHSP Branch Chief Sandra Carton, NMSHSA executive director, NMFHS deputy
executive director, and the MCHB contractor Altarum. Committee scheduled to meet March 2008.

                ♦ Michigan and Texas agreed to pilot the network model.

                ♦ One follow-up conference call to Steering Committee.

                ♦ MSHS Collaboration Office mapping of MSHS sites electronic and migrant
                  health center sites in six states. Texas completed (hard copy only) Cost: 0.

                ♦ Committee will continue to meet until September and monthly conference calls.

                ♦ MSHS Collaboration Office and National Farmworker Health will distribute
                  directories to its program sites. Logistics being finalized. Cost: Booklets: $280
                  (p/1000); Mailing: $100

                ♦ Ongoing Steering Committee and full work group conference calls.

Funding ends September 2008. Work will take two to three years to complete.

  Contacts:
  naomi tein
  Altarum Institute
  1200 18th Street, NW • Suite 700
  Washington, D.C. 20036
  Phone: 202-828-5100


  Dr. John Rossetti
  Oral Health Consultant
  jrossetti@hrsa.gov


  Bobbi Ryder
  former Director
  national Center for farmer Health
  ryder@ncfh.org


♦ Inter/Intra State Oral Health Services. Florida and North Carolina (Inter/Intra State Oral Health
  Services.) Early in 2007, ECMHS Child and Family Services health manager requested assistance from
  the MSHS Collaboration Office to resolve inter/intra-state oral health service challenges and program
  expenditures resulting from uninsured children arriving from Florida, enrolling in NC MSHS programs.
160   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          Resulting from outreach with the HSSCO and the State Early Childhood Comprehensive grants man-
          ager, a migrant child oral health subcommittee of the Florida Early Childhood Cares Work Group was
          established and is chaired by the Florida HSSCO Director, Lilli Copp. The MSHS Collaboration Office
          continues to participate in the monthly Early Childhood Caries Work Group of Florida’s Public Health
          Dental Program and the migrant child oral health subcommittee conference calls.

          Contacts:
          Brenda Jones, Rn
          east Coast Migrant Head Start
          Child and family Services Health Manager


          lilli Copp
          florida HSSCO


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      Goal 2

      Build best possible linkages between local, community-based Head Start programs and State early childhood
      initiatives and policies.

      State-to-state work with identifying/recognizing opportunities for intervention and catalyst for organizational
      change, i.e. fiscal, administrative, or structural.


      Outcomes

      Continued to represent MSHS at statewide events such as:

             ♦ National Migrant Health Advisory Council in Maryland
             ♦ Migrant Even Start Family Literacy Grantee Meeting in Virginia
             ♦ Interagency Migrant Advisory Committee Meeting in Washington, D.C.
             ♦ South Carolina Head Start and Community Action Agency annual training
             ♦ Eastern Stream Farmworker Health Forum in New Mexico.


      In addition to participating in these events, the MSHS Collaboration Office participated on the Head
      Start, Regional State Collaboration Directors and State Dental Directors Oral Health Conference Calls for
      Regions VII and VIII. The MSHS Collaboration Office also conducted site visits to various states such as
      Maryland, Tennessee, North Carolina, Michigan, Washington, South Carolina, and Florida. These visits to the
      various states involved participating in task force and advisory council meetings related to oral health, migrant
      child specific issues, and professional development.

      Florida: Resulting from outreach with the HSSCO and the State Early Childhood Comprehensive grants
      manager, a migrant child oral health subcommittee of the Florida Early Childhood Cares Work Group has
      been established and will be chaired by the Florida HSSCO Director Lilli Copp. The MSHS Collabora-
      tion Office continues to participate in the monthly Early Childhood Caries Work Group of Florida’s Public
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   161




Health Dental Program and the migrant child oral health subcommittee conference calls.

Michigan: Migrant Child Task Force Meeting in Lansing, MI: Continue to use outreach to migrant farm
worker camps and Head Start parent group focus meetings as a critical element in raising awareness, recruit-
ing additional partners, and implementing its multi-year strategic plan. New members include a representa-
tive from the association of community health care clinics and the Michigan Medicaid director. The MSHS
Collaboration Office donated First Aid kits to this year’s outreach. Despite the changes in administrative loca-
tion, reporting responsibility and state contracting procedures, the Michigan HSSCO continues to annually
provide grant funding support for the work of the Michigan Migrant Child Task Force.

Washington: In 2007, as part of a joint effort with the MSHS TAC-12 and the American Indian Technical
Assistance Network, local community early childhood education partners met to form the Rivers of Culture/
Rios de Cultural Coalition in the Yakima Valley in Washington. The Coalition focuses on advocating for
comprehensive, streamlined, culturally appropriate early childhood care and education services throughout
the community. In September 2007, the MSHS Collaboration Office utilized funding from its office and the
American Indian and HSSCOs to engage a facilitator to support the growth and development of Coalition.
The Coalition has continued to grow and now includes the Washington HSSCO Director who has included
funding for her work with Rivers of Culture in her grant application, members of the higher institutions of
education, six school districts, the local ESD, the regional child care managers, community action programs,
Child Care Resource and Referral, plus the American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) Head Start program,
MSHS, and local Head Start T/A providers for AIAN and MSHS programs. The MSHS Collaboration Of-
fice is continuing to support the efforts of this Coalition since this kind of community collaboration directly
benefits MSHS programs by:

♦ Providing a voice for MSHS in influencing the character of early childhood activities within the broader
  community (local and state level).

♦ Promoting the exchange of resources, thus avoiding duplication of services

♦ Allowing the MSHS programs to participate with a larger group in applying for additional funding/diver-
  sifying funding sources to increase quality programming/training

Region X (Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Alaska) and Region XI: Met with the Washington HSSCO Director
in Kelso, WA, to exchange resources and discuss strategies for working together. The MSHS Collaboration
Office worked with her to arrange and conduct a conference call between the Region XII, Region XI, and
Region X HSSCO directors to provide TA and support for their efforts in working with MSHS programs
and AIAN programs in their states.

Work through the HSSCOs in states where MSHS programs operate, encouraging partnerships with state child care
administrators, migrant education, SECCS grantees, child care resource and referrals, and others.

Conducted a survey of all 38 states to determine how MSHS programs were involved in State Early Child-
hood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) planning grants. Received 30 results and determined that MSHS pro-
grams were minimally involved if at all. Contacted Dr. Jane Knitzer, National Center for Children in Poverty
(NCCP) at Columbia University, and Kay Johnson, NCCP Project THRIVE. The MSHS Collaboration Of-
fice was invited to participate on the monthly national webinar with Project THRIVE staff and state ECCS
grants project managers to familiarize the audience with MSHS and the MSHS population and to highlight
states (MI, NC, WI) that have incorporated the needs of the MSHS population into state ECCS plans or are
in a formative partnership stage of development. The MSHS Collaboration Office developed a webinar called:
Young Migrant Farmworker Children: An invisible Population and Systems Reform.
162   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Continue to create a vehicle for an annual communication, assessment of partnership relationships, and shar-
      ing of MSHS TAC-12 resources with state child care administrators.

      The MSHS Collaboration Office continues to distribute all publications to all HSSCO and state Child Care
      Subsidy administrators including the MSHS Center Locator Directory and the TAC-12 Bilingual Infant/Tod-
      dler Environments: Supporting Language & Learning in Our Youngest Children (English and Spanish versions).


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      Goal 3

      Facilitate a more coordinated approach to planning and service delivery.

      ♦ Add features to the design of the MSHS Center Locator Directory which improves the effective transi-
        tioning of MSHS families.

               Corrections/revisions to the MSHS Locator Directory (first published in 2005) were completed
               November 2007. The 2005 version of the Directory won the Sappi Fine Print Competition award,
               which came with financial resources that allowed for the updating and printing of additional copies.
               The 2007 Directory was updated and enhanced to include toll-free telephone numbers for migrant
               education, migrant health clinics, substance abuse, mental health, food bank, legal aid, and other vital
               social and education services

      ♦ Continue to promote and develop strategies and tools for establishing sustainable collaborative partner-
        ships and stimulate such activities through the award of mini-grants to select states.

               In late 2007, the Collaboration Office drafted a Request for Proposal (RFP) and all relevant forms
               and systems to facilitate the release of $5,000 in Collaboration Partnership Support Mini Grants
               for competition. The purpose of the grants is to provide financial support to state or local agencies
               in their efforts to engage in collaboration activities with MSHS programs in their area. The RFP
               was sent to states that have demonstrated substantial (over 200%) increases in Latino populations as
               identified in the article “Pre-K and Latinos: The Foundation for America’s Future.” The targeted states
               with the requisite percentages of increases are:

                       ♦ North Carolina (394%)
                       ♦ Georgia (300%)
                       ♦ South Carolina (211%)
                       ♦ Arkansas (337%)
                       ♦ Tennessee (278%)
                       ♦ Alabama (208%)


      The RFP was also sent to the new MSHS expansion states – Nevada, Iowa, and Oklahoma in addition to
      Delaware, Florida, and Michigan. States have been working with the MSHS Collaboration Office with very
      limited funds. The RFP was sent out the first week in January 2008. The Collaboration Office is extremely
      excited about these proposals and looks forward to collecting best practices; supporting ongoing collaboration
      among grant recipients, MSHS programs, and communities; and sharing information about these projects
      nationally.
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 163




                                     Minnesota


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Mary Vanderwert
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
early learning Services
Minnesota Department of education    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
1500 Highway 36 West                 services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Roseville, Mn 55113                  are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 651-582-8463                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 651-797-1610
                                     in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Mary.vanderwert@state.mn.us          ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO)
http://education.state.mn.us/html/     served on the professional development planning commit-
intro_early_learning.htm               tee (Change Process Leadership Team) which resulted in a
                                       design for a comprehensive system for tracking, approving,
Lead Agency Contact                    and communicating training opportunities for all who serve
                                       young children and their families.
Barbara O’Sullivan
                                     ♦ Supported the inclusion and registration of Head Start
Phone: 651-582-8422
                                       programs in the State’s new Pre-K Exploratory projects
fax: 651-582-8494                      which are being piloted in three areas of the State. These
Barbara.osullivan@state.mn.us          projects will allot $4,000 per family who qualify, to use
                                       in approved child care programs in their area. Head Start
ACF Regional Contact
                                       and school-based programs were automatically eligible for
                                       accepting the allowances. Child care and other preschool
leonard norberg                        programs are rated using the Parent Aware Quality Rating
                                       System. Those with a 3 or 4 star rating are eligible for the
ACf Region V                           allowances. Child Trends is conducting the evaluation for
233 north Michigan Avenue              Parent Aware and will work collaboratively with SRI who
fourth floor                           will be evaluating the Pre-K Exploratory allowances and
                                       Minnesota Early Learning Foundation (MELF) scholar-
Chicago, Il 60601
                                       ships.
Phone: 312-353-5205
fax: 312-353-2629                    ♦ Co-sponsored the Summer Institute on Children’s Mental
lnorberg@acf.hhs.gov                   Health held at the College of St. Benedict in June 2007.
                                       Mental health consultants, health care plan representa-
                                       tives, disabilities and health component staff from Head
                                       Start, and others participated in this two-day event to share
                                       promising practices, hear what was learned in the statewide
                                       assessment of the use of mental health consultants in Head
                                       Start, and to plan for further initiatives.
164   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ The HSSCO continues to serve on the Interagency Early Childhood Screening Taskforce which approves
        developmental screening instruments and recommends policy for the Early Childhood Screening Program
        in Minnesota. This group has completed the approval process for developmental instruments and is mov-
        ing forward to examine those tools that also include a screening for social and emotional development.
        Head Start programs collaborate with their LEA and Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment
        (EPSDT) providers to ensure all children are screened.

      ♦ Participated in the development of a grant to the Center for Disease Control to prevent obesity in our
        state. The grant could provide additional resources and collaboration opportunities for Head Start and lo-
        cal public health programs.

      ♦ The HSSCO serves on the Steering Committee for the expanded family home visiting program admin-
        istered by the Minnesota Department of Health. Additional funding from the Minnesota Legislature al-
        lows for nearly double the home visiting opportunities for families in the State and requires that the local
        public health program submit a plan for delivering services with their collaborating partners.

      ♦ The HSSCO is a regular participant in the Minnesota Tribal Resources for Early Childhood and Care
        group that meets in northern Minnesota. The five Tribal grantees and other state child care resource and
        referral representatives come together to share information and coordinate activities to advance Tribal
        early childhood programs.

      ♦ The HSSCO answers questions, emails, etc. from community members, other government employees, and
        initiatives to promote a better understanding of Head Start in Minnesota.

      ♦ The HSSCO served on the planning committee and presented two workshops on Emotional Intelligence
        and Leadership at the Region V Head Start conference held in St. Paul, MN in October 2007. This
        conference brought Region V staff, programs from all over Region V, and others to network with other
        programs, build skills and knowledge, and celebrate Head Start success stories.

      ♦ The HSSCO served in an advisory and resource capacity to the University of Minnesota Humphrey
        Institute’s project to examine issues of child welfare in new American communities in seven Minnesota
        counties.

      ♦ The HSSCO participated in the National Conference of State Legislatures-Immigrant Policy Project
        Meeting in July 2007 to explore the needs of very young children who are immigrants or are children of
        immigrants in Minnesota.

      ♦ Head Start staff employed by the Minnesota Department of Education meet quarterly with staff from the
        Office of Economic Opportunity to discuss issues common to both agencies and to coordinate activities to
        support Head Start and early childhood programs in the State.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      ♦ Served as member of the Interagency Screening Work Group which is developing a Web-based training on
        using the Quality Indicators Framework for establishing high quality screening programs in communities.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   165




♦ Participated in the ABCD II grant to promote social and emotional screening in pediatric practices,
  increase the knowledge and skills of mental health practitioners in the DSM 0-3 criteria, and increase
  awareness of the importance of mental health in Early Childhood.

♦ Facilitated the annual health coordinators networking meeting during the quarterly Head Start Associa-
  tion meetings. Topics included screening, dental health strategies, playgrounds, etc.

♦ Met with staff from the Minnesota Department of Health to create strategies to include in a grant to the
  Centers for Disease Control regarding the prevention of obesity. Head Start will be one of the programs
  that will benefit from this grant.

♦ Established a relationship with the lead prevention team at the Minnesota Department of Health to sup-
  port Head Start in assuring that all children receive lead level testing during their physical exams. This has
  resulted in provision of information pieces to programs and some technical assistance to programs.

♦ Participated in initial planning meeting for Minnesota’s Child Health Improvement Plan

Oral Health

State-level

♦ Supported the development of a model of dental screening and triage that involves the use of calibrated
  dental hygienists in collaborative practice who perform dental screening for Head Start children with
  referrals for any follow-up to their collaborating dentists. This has significantly increased the number of
  children in Head Start who have completed their dental requirements. The HSSCO also participated in an
  orientation of this new concept to the regional and national Head Start dental directors.


Local-level

♦ Head Start programs are now allowed to apply fluoride varnish on children’s teeth and bill for reimburse-
  ment of the costs. Several programs considered this strategy for preventing tooth decay but most decided
  not to proceed.

♦ Supported the implementation of the collaborative practice model for dental services. This model allows
  specially calibrated dental hygienists to perform dental exams for Head Start children when in partnership
  with a dentist. Hygienists refer those children needing further exam and treatment to their collaborating
  dentist.

Welfare
♦ Co-sponsored a training for Head Start staff on the use of the Four Cornerstones of Financial Literacy.
  Staff who attended will work with parents in utilizing the concepts.

♦ Met with Head Start staff and staff from Department of Human Services to explore reasons that families
  would not access the services available to them through the Minnesota Family Investment Program and
  the Child Care Assistance Program. Stigma, lack of knowledge, not seeming to be worth the effort, and
  citizenship status were some of the reasons discussed.

♦ Wrote Early Head Start description for the MNParentsKnow Web site (www.MNParentsKnow.info)
  sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Education in collaboration with others. This Web site is a
166   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          comprehensive resource for parents and those who work with parents of young children. Sections relating
          to newborns up to age 5 are complete, with work on the school age sections in the future. The HSSCO
          will promote the Web site where ever and when ever possible.

      Child Care
      ♦ Worked with a group of colleagues in the Department of Human Services to look at the barriers that keep
        Head Start and child care partnerships from using child care assistance funds to support their work. The
        group has looked at models, examined contracts, developed a rationale document, compared regulations
        and will soon be ready to schedule meetings with Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) county staff
        and Head Start to support their understanding of the regulations and of each other.

      ♦ Participated on both the Minnesota Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems grant Leadership Team
        and Outreach Work Group to carry out the goals of the grant. This group continues to struggle with pur-
        pose and producing outcomes. The coordinator has resigned and so there is some reorganizing being done.

      ♦ Participated in the planning for the partners’ meeting held in Washington, D.C. in January 2007. Changes
        to personnel and administration of the MECCS grant have made follow-up very difficult.

      ♦ Participated on the training work group for the family home visiting program through the Minnesota De-
        partment of Health. The training committee will develop a plan for supporting the professional develop-
        ment of the staff.

      ♦ Facilitated the participation of Head Start programs in the pre-kindergarten exploratory projects in three
        target areas of the State. Head Start is automatically eligible to serve children receiving the $4,000 allow-
        ances. Consulted with one of the programs in the development of their program.

      ♦ Participated in the planning and implementation of the 3rd annual Strong Foundations Conference for
        people who work with families who have infants and toddlers and live with low-income. This conference
        was attended by 450 staff from Early Head Start, public health, child care, child welfare, and other provid-
        ers. The HSSCO served as one of the core committee and chair of the hospitality committee and served
        many other functions.

      ♦ Helped to organize and facilitate a networking meeting for Head Start programs involved in child care
        partnerships.

      Education
      ♦ Served as member of the Change Process Leadership team to redesign the professional development
        system for child care in Minnesota. This work resulted in an RFP and subsequent grant to Metro State
        University to develop the Minnesota Center for Professional Development, which includes a training
        registry, training and trainer standards for approval, and a career lattice.

      ♦ Led the organizing of a large conference for program administrators of all the school-based early child-
        hood programs in the State. The conference focused on leadership. The conference was attended by about
        350 leaders and was very well-received.

      ♦ Served on the advisory committee for the new Minnesota Parent Information and Resource Center and
        the United Way Success By Six programs.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   167




♦ Participated in the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Professional
  Development day in Pittsburgh as a member of the Minnesota delegation in June 2007.

Community Services
♦ Met with staff from the MacPhail Center for Music to explore ways to connect their programs to Head
  Start programs. Their use of music in teaching social skills and in classroom management was of particular
  interest. They will be invited to present at the 2008 Summer Institute on Mental Health and upcoming
  conferences.

♦ Solicited the support of the Minnesota Children’s Museum for the Early Childhood Administrators’ Con-
  ference. Their sponsorship provided a reception for conference participants and the opportunity to connect
  with Head Start staff. The Minnesota Children’s Museum offers for loan to Head Start programs, learning
  trunks with activities and supplies to support math and science learning.

Family Literacy Services
♦ Planned and carried out a conference for Family Literacy programs in the State. This was attended by
  about 160 staff. The HSSCO facilitated a session on outreach and marketing for participants.

♦ Developed request for proposals and evaluated the applications for a $1,000,000 allocation by the State
  Legislature to Head Start programs to implement the Words Work! literacy curriculum in their programs.
  Four programs received the grants – three of programs will introduce the curriculum to their program

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ Participated in the planning of the grant to the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion
  and the planning meetings that have been held since receiving the grant. This group will work on ways to
  support Head Start and other staff in programming for children with disabilities. This effort will dovetail
  with the professional development system being established for child care professionals in the State.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ Developed and delivered a presentation about the McKinney-Vento Act for school district personnel with
  the effects of homelessness on young children and strategies for serving them in the classroom in a south-
  ern Minnesota community.

♦ Convened a group of stakeholders in a large urban community to develop a support system for young
  children living in the county’s emergency shelters. This group developed a plan to create a child care center
  within the 30-day shelter. Work continues on this.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ Participated in the development of legislation that encourages development of collaborations with child
  care or the development of Head Start administered programs that would provide full-day, full-year ser-
  vices for families with low-income. The statute requires that “by fiscal year 2013, a minimum of 50 percent
  of the total state-funded enrollment throughout the state must be provided in full-day services.” A review
  of Head Start and CCAP regulations was conducted to communicate to county CCAP administrators to
  ensure that appropriate blending of funding can be done.
168   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ The HSSCO served on the Child Care Assistance Rule Advisory Committee to review proposed amend-
        ments to the CCAP policy. Subsequent changes were submitted to an Administrative Law Judge for
        approval.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      ♦ Provided technical assistance and support for resolving conflict in a Tribal program struggling with public
        school referrals and services mandated for children with disabilities.

      ♦ Successfully wrote the plan for the 5-year grant for the HSSCO with the support and guidance of an ad-
        visory committee, the Minnesota Head Start Association and Minnesota Department of Education staff.
        The advisory committee worked through a mini needs assessment of the State’s early childhood care and
        education systems which helped to shape goals and activities.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director has developed many strong relationships with staff in other departments, in the
        Head Start community, the advocates and others in the field of Early Childhood Education.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      ♦ Materials on the Minnesota Parents Know Web site have been developed in Spanish as well as several
        other languages.

      ♦ Workshops at the Family Literacy Conference and Strong Foundations conferences focused on serving
        families of color and some were delivered in Spanish.

      ♦ Supported the research that looked at child welfare issues in seven rural Minnesota counties among com-
        munities of color/new Americans.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      There are many initiatives the HSSCO is currently involved in and will continue.
      Activities to be emphasized in next year:

      ♦ Continue work with the Minnesota Department of Human Services on promoting child care/Head Start
        partnerships

      ♦ Participate on the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) work group to
        enhance the opportunities for inclusion of children with disabilities in the State.

      ♦ Expand scope of work on including children experiencing homelessness in state Head Start programs.

      ♦ Support the development of collaborative relationships between Head Start, school-based programs, and
        other initiatives including written agreements for transition and Early Childhood Special Education
        (ECSE).

      ♦ Evaluate involvement in the Minnesota Early Childhood Comprehensive Screening Systems (MECCSS)
        effort.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   169




♦ Continue to participate on the Family Home Visiting initiatives, PIRC Advisory Council, Interagency
  Screening Task Force and BUILD.

♦ Ensure the relevance to and the involvement of Head Start in professional development system.

♦ Increase participation in activities that promote the skill and knowledge of family, friend and neighbor
  caregivers.

♦ Monitor the changes in the health care system in providing services to children with mental health needs.

♦ Promote the use of mental health/behavior teaching curriculums in Head Start including the Positive
  Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS).

♦ Support efforts to increase financial literacy skills in Head Start families.

♦ Meet with staff in child welfare agencies to explore possibilities for collaborating in serving children in
  foster care or in danger of being abused.

♦ Utilize the expertise and passion of the planning committee for the Collaboration grant in order to satisfy
  the requirements of the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007.
170   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                       AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 171




                                Mississippi


Collaboration Director          Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
laura Beth Hebbler
                                plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Office of the Governor
P.O. Box 139                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Jackson, MS 39205-0771          services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 601-576-2021             are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 601-359-3741               at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
lhebbler@governor.state.ms.us
                                in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
                                The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) Director
Lead Agency Contact             also serves as the Governor’s Early Care and Policy Advisor.
                                This dual function makes it possible to facilitate (1) communi-
Gina Walker                     cation and coordination between existing early care and educa-
Phone: 601-576-2006             tion programs and the governor’s early childhood agenda; (2)
                                a common understanding of what comprises quality early care
fax: 601-359-3741
                                and education programs; and (3) a coherent and widely shared
dratliff@governor.state.ms.us   state vision for improving quality, accessibility, comprehensive-
                                ness, and child outcomes.
ACF Regional Contact

Paula Oliver                    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
ACf Region IV                   and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
61 forsyth Street               plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Suite 4M60
Atlanta, GA 30303-8909          Health Care
Phone: 404-562-2857             Goal
fax: 404-562-2985
                                To expand health care services to include preventative health
paula.oliver@acf.hhs.gov        activities, and increase and expand access to services available
                                for health initiatives including oral health and obesity.


                                Outcomes

                                ♦ Mississippi Super Health Conference. The HSSCO
                                  Director was a member of the Planning Committee for the
                                  2007 Super Health Conference. The summer conference
                                  addressed the eight components of a coordinated school
                                  health program and the link to academic performance.
                                  Components addressed are Healthy School Environment,
172   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          Health Education, Nutrition, Physical Activity, Health Services, Mental Health and Counseling, Health
          Promotion for Staff, and Parent/Community Involvement. Head Start was an active participant in this
          annual conference. The Office of Healthy Schools, Mississippi Department of Education, is investigating
          various ways in which to support the work of Head Start programs in the State.

      ♦ Obesity. The HSSCO Director is a member of the strategic planning team for the MS POWER (Pre-
        venting Obesity with Every Resource) National Governors Association grant award. The grant is facili-
        tated by the Mississippi Department of Education, Office of Healthy Schools, and the Center for MS
        Health Policy. The Task Force will develop a strategic plan for addressing childhood obesity inclusive of
        the early childhood sector. The first meeting is scheduled for April 2008.

      Oral Health

      State-level

      The HSSCO works closely with the State Dental Director to find creative ways to establish partnerships
      between the dental community and Head Start that ensure dental homes for Head Start Children in Missis-
      sippi. The MS Dental Director has been named by Region IV to help other states accomplish this goal.

      Welfare
      Goal

      To increase potential financial independence of Head Start families through support and coordination of
      existing welfare systems which address employability issues and family oriented services.

      Outcomes

      The HSSCO Director meets frequently with the Delta Alliance. This group has a specific focus on creating
      job/health/education opportunities in the Mississippi Delta where the State’s economic needs are the greatest.
      Early childhood is viewed as an economic strategy, and plans are underway to enhance the quality of services
      in existing early care and education programs. Strategies to increase the education goals of parents will also be
      developed and implemented.

      Child Care
      Goal

      To promote widespread collaboration and partnership between Head Start and other appropriate programs,
      services, and initiatives, including child care and public pre-kindergarten Title I programs, and actively sup-
      port improvement of availability, accessibility, and quality of child care services to low-income families.

      Outcomes

      ♦ Early Childhood Council. In July 2007, the Governor invited a small group of stakeholders to attend an
        early care and education system-building meeting. Representatives from the four state agencies providing
        services to children, birth to five, and Mississippi Head Start attended the meeting. The group recom-
        mended the creation of an early childhood council, by executive order from the Governor, to establish
        policy to strengthen the state system.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   173




♦ Crafting Early Care and Education Policy. The HSSCO Director and the Mississippi Department of
  Human Services, Office for Children, and Youth Director communicate weekly regarding the status of the
  child care certificate program waiting list, as well as TANF and Child Care and Development (CCDF)
  funds and agency priorities such as the MS Child Care Resource and Referral System and the Mississippi
  Child Care Quality Rating System. The HSSCO Director also works closely with the MS Department of
  Human Services legislative liaison in crafting early care and education policy.

♦ Governor’s Early Learning Collaborative Act of 2007. The HSSCO Director was instrumental in craft-
  ing the Governor’s Early Learning Collaborative Act 2007. The Act builds on 2006 legislation that estab-
  lished the MCCQSS and the Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R). The Governor’s 2007 Act is
  comprised of three Initiatives which support quality early care and education for Mississippi’s youngest
  citizens and their families. The first and second initiative supports funding for the implementation of the
  MCCQSS and the MCCR&R, which will offer resources and training to all licensed child care programs
  as well as educational resources for parents. The third initiative called the Early Learning Collaboration
  Grant Program will support all existing programs in their effort to enhance or extend services to four-
  year-old children. Programs must demonstrate a collaborative effort in writing a grant application (with
  local match required) and designate one entity to serve as fiscal agent for the collaboration grant. Imple-
  mentation will be contingent upon funding. The HSSCO Director chaired the Grant Criteria Committee
  whose members were appointed by the governor.

Education
Goal

To facilitate communication and coordination between existing early care and education programs in develop-
ing a common understanding of what comprise a quality program and create a coherent and widely shared
vision for improving quality, accessibility, comprehensiveness, and child outcomes.

Outcomes

The Early Childhood Partners’ Meeting was held January 17-19, 2007, in Washington, D.C. The theme of
the meeting was “Strengthening State Systems to Promote Early Childhood Development: Moving to the
Next Level.” Mississippi partners included representatives from the Mississippi Head Start Association, the
Office for Children and Youth, Mississippi Department of Human Services, the Mississippi State University
Early Childhood Institute, and the Mississippi Department of Education. As a result of this meeting, all part-
ners supported the Governor’s 2007 Early Childhood Agenda throughout the legislative session.

♦ W.K. Kellogg Foundation – SPARK Initiative. The HSSCO Director is a member of the State Steering
  Committee and attended committee meetings of the SPARK Early Childhood Initiative. The committee
  is responsible for cultivating partnerships that ensure that all young children are ready to enter school and
  that all schools are ready for young children.

♦ State Education Board Meetings. The HSSCO Director attended the monthly board meetings of the
  Mississippi Department of Education, the quarterly board meetings of the Mississippi Head Start As-
  sociation, and the quarterly meetings of the State Interagency Coordination Council, Mississippi Depart-
  ment of Health. The HSSCO Director is a member of the MS Head Start Association and the SICC
  Health Board.

♦ EXCEL by FIVE. The HSSCO Director attended meetings of this early childhood initiative, sponsored
  by Mississippi Chevron to establish child friendly neighborhoods with an emphasis on early childhood
  education. The initiative is endorsed by Mississippi’s First Lady, Marsha Barbour.
174   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Mississippi Early Learning Guidelines. The HSSCO contributed to the printing cost of 1,000 copies
        of the Mississippi Early Learning Guidelines for Three Year Old Children and served as a member of the
        Revision Team for the Mississippi Early Learning Guidelines for Four Year Old Children.

      Community Services
      No activities reported.

      Family Literacy Services
      No activities reported.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      Goal

      To facilitate the development of collaborative agreements to utilize early childhood systems and increase ac-
      cess to comprehensive services and support for children with disabilities.

      Outcomes

      The HSSCO Director works with the Bureau Director in the Office of Special Education, Mississippi
      Department of Education, in providing information as needed to early care and education programs. The
      HSSCO Director works with the Director of First Steps Intervention, Mississippi Department of Health,
      Part C, in providing Early Head Start and child care providers with state information relative to intervention
      by teachers and administrators. The HSSCO Director works with the MS State Extension Service in pro-
      viding early intervention education materials to home/family providers in an effort to help the provider and
      parents identify children with developmental delays or other health issues.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      No activities reported.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      Mississippi Head Start serves more than 27, 000 children and is the primary provider of early care and educa-
      tion services, and as a result, Head Start representatives are present at all state level meetings related to these
      issues. Since 2004, Mississippi Head Start grantees and public schools have been successful in collaboration
      efforts to blend resources, professional development training, and braiding of funds. The criteria established
      for the Early Learning Collaboration Grant Program (SB2667) legislation for programs serving 4-year-old
      children to enhance or expand services assures that Head Start enrollment will not be affected by creation of
      new classrooms.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      The most significant success experienced this year was a change in the public’s perception regarding the
      State’s definition of pre-kindergarten. The success came as a result of the intense collaboration and deliberate
      communication at the state and local level. The Governor supports early childhood but does not support an
      “add on” grade to the public school system for 4-year-old children because 80 percent of 4-year-old children
      already attend some type of early care and education program. In Mississippi, pre-kindergarten applies to
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   175




children receiving services from birth to five. The State Legislature has established programs/initiatives to
improve the quality of services for the large number of children attending various types of early care and edu-
cation programs from birth to age five.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Mississippi has a very low percentage of Hispanic children. As programs experience an increase in enrollment
for this population, a strategic plan is being developed and implemented to address the needs of the individual
children and families.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The responses above have been focused on describing activities designed to strengthen the infrastructure of
Mississippi’s Early Childhood System. The Governor of Mississippi will meet the requirement of the Improv-
ing Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 by establishing a State Early Childhood Advisory Council.
This Council will be charged with developing a state plan that is supportive of the Governor’s early childhood
agenda. It is anticipated that the work of the HSSCO will be enhanced through this effort to strengthen the
early care and education system.
176   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 177




                                        Missouri


Collaboration Director                  Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                        areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Stacey Owsley, Director
                                        plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Carolyn Stemmons, Assistant Director
university of Missouri                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Center for family Policy and Research   services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
1400 Rock Quarry Road                   are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Columbia, MO 65211-3280                 at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 573-884-3080
                                        in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 573-884-0598                       Strengthening Partnerships between Head Start and Pre-k: The
owsleys@missouri.edu                    Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) brought
stemmonsc@missouri.edu                  together representatives from the Missouri Departments of
                                        Elementary and Secondary Education, Health, Higher Educa-
                                        tion, Social Services, and Mental Health, the Missouri Head
Lead Agency Contact                     Start Association, and the Region VII TA system to engage
                                        in child care/Head Start/pre-kindergarten regional meetings.
Kathy thornburg, lead Agency            Four regional meetings were held in Cape Girardeau, Trenton,
Contact
                                        Springfield, and Columbia. These meetings were intended to
Center for family Policy and Research   bring local and state representatives from child care, Head
1400 Rock Quarry Road                   Start, and pre-kindergarten together and begin the conver-
                                        sation on why it is important to coordinate and collaborate
Columbia, MO 65211
                                        among entities. Approximately 40 stakeholders representing
Phone: 573-882-9998                     child care, Head Start, school districts, higher education, Com-
fax: 573-884-0598                       munity Action, and technical assistance systems attended each
thornburgk@missouri.edu                 of the four meetings.

                                        Missouri Preschool Exit Assessment. The HSSCO partnered
ACF Regional Contact
                                        with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Educa-
                                        tion (DESE) and Project Construct to extend this assessment
Markie Crabtree
                                        opportunity to Head Start programs. It was the 7th year of the
ACf Region VII                          assessment of Missouri Preschool Project programs, 8th year
601 east 12th Street                    for Title I Preschool programs, and 2nd year for the selected
Room 276                                Head Start programs. DESE staff along with staff from other
                                        state agencies use the results to inform efforts in creating and
Kansas City, MO 64106
                                        implementing policies that support children’s readiness to suc-
Phone: 816-426-2284                     ceed in school.
fax: 816-426-2888
markie.crabtree1@acf.hhs.gov            Missouri Preschool Project Proposals (Missouri’s pre-kindergarten
                                        program). The HSSCO read and ranked proposals for the De-
                                        partment of Elementary and Secondary Education.
178   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Coordinating Board for Early Childhood. As a member of this board, the HSSCO served on the School Readi-
      ness Committee, a work group of the Board. Work on this committee included identifying key policies that
      will guide and impact the growth and development of pre-kindergarten programs in Missouri, developing a
      plan for the creating and implementation of a Missouri Panel on School Readiness that will address policy
      issues and make strategic recommendations for future implementation.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      Objective

      Enhance community awareness regarding the health care needs of children, community challenges affecting
      the health of children, and the resources needed to address health care needs.

      Outcomes

      ♦ The HSSCO is a key player among the collaborative agency network invested in the Bright Futures
        Initiative. Work included:

                    ♦ Three workshops (March, May, and August 2007) reaching approximately 50
                      Missouri Head Start and Early Head Start staff were provided by the Center for
                      Advancement of Mental Health Practices in Schools. The workshops focused on
                      the use of the Bright Futures tools for building children’s resilience, early identifica-
                      tion of children’s mental health issues, and building community capacity to address
                      local needs for the MO Bright Futures initiative.

                    ♦ A series of six additional workshops were offered across the State connecting Early
                      Childhood, Schools, Public Health, and Mental Health in focusing on hands-on
                      tools to promote resilient children, strong families, and health communities.

      ♦ The HSSCO was a co-sponsor of the Missouri Coalition for Oral Health Summit 2007, featuring a
        keynote address by Dr. Michael Helgeson, C.E.O., Apple Tree Dental. The address, “Community Collab-
        orative Practice,” provided information on Apple Tree’s innovative approach at promoting changes to the
        healthcare system by designing and testing new approaches to deliver oral health care services to people
        where they live, work, go to school, or receive other health or social services.

      ♦ The HSSCO partnered with the Department of Health and Senior Services, Missouri Head Start Asso-
        ciation, and Missouri Coalition for Oral Health to educate, develop, and coordinate the Missouri Preven-
        tive Services Program roll-out plan to Missouri Head Start programs. The Preventive Services Program is
        a community-based, systemic approach to population-based prevention of oral disease. The intent of the
        program is to provide an evaluation of the state of oral health disease in the community’s children, provide
        referrals for immediate or emergency dental care, and provide educational and preventive dental services to
        the target population.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   179




Oral Health

State-level

The State has a number of state-level coalitions and partnerships including the Missouri Coalition for Oral
Health, Missouri Department of Health: Oral Health Program, Missouri Preventive Services Program – Oral
Health Program, Missouri Oral Health Network, and the University of Missouri-Kansas City Dental School.
A more detailed list of these partnerships can be found at the end of this report.


Local-level

Due to the limited time frame given to compile the information, the HSSCO is able to report just some of
the partnerships between Head Start and Early Head Start and oral health partners in Missouri. Many of
the partnerships were selected by the grantees for the 2008 Partnership Awards as sponsored by the Missouri
Head Start Association. A list provided at the end of this report represents those partnerships that extend
above and beyond screenings and examinations.


Additional Information

Other oral health activities included collaboration on a first-ever Infant Oral Care Conference that included
Head Start coordinators, health educators, dentists, and dental hygienists. A partnership with the Missouri
Coalition for Oral Health produced a white paper on oral health and an Oral Health Summit. The HSSCO
also worked closely with the Mid Missouri Area Health Education Center to coordinate six community
meetings throughout the State in 2008. These meetings will include presentations showcasing innovative
partnerships and best practices in increasing oral health access. The HSSCO partnered with the Department
of Health and Senior Services, Missouri Head Start Association and Missouri Coalition for Oral Health to
educate and connect the Missouri Preventive Services Program to Missouri Head Start and Early Head Start
programs. A more detailed listing of these activities can be found at the end of this report.

Welfare
Objective

Integrate proactive strategies that will leverage positive change in the service delivery system for low-income
families.

Outcomes

♦ The HSSCO is a member of the Prevention Partners Steering Team. Prevention Partners is a collaboration
  of state stakeholders with a focus on child abuse and neglect prevention. The group has created a vision,
  mission, and stages of creating a statewide framework for child abuse prevention.

♦ The HSSCO served on the Strengthening Families Leadership Team and aided in the development of a
  Strengthening Families strategic plan. The Strengthening Families approach creates a child abuse and ne-
  glect prevention framework that can help program developers, policymakers, and advocates embed effec-
  tive prevention strategies into existing systems. Six state early childhood facilities (four of which are Head
  Start grantees or partners) were selected as pilot sites for the national Strengthening Families Initiative:
  Essential Care (Kansas City), Operation Breakthrough (Kansas City), Early Learning Center, Inc. (Oran),
  Children’s Therapy (Sedalia), Grant Training Center/OACAC Head Start (Springfield), and South Side
  Day Nursery (St. Louis).
180   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Child Care
      Objective

      Streamline and coordinate long-range planning for child care needs and resources throughout the State.

      Outcome

      The HSSCO played a leadership role in the Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) project, serv-
      ing on the Steering Committee and provided ongoing feedback to the development of the local infrastruc-
      ture teams. The HSSCO was a leader in connecting the work at the state level to local Head Start programs
      so they could serve as the first point of contact in bridging the state plan to the local level, and serving as a
      potential “hub” for the ECCS local stakeholder groups.

      Education
      Objective

      Improve and support systems designed to ease or minimize transitions between early care and education
      services and age divisions. Increase teacher qualifications for all early care and education professionals by
      strengthening the state professional development initiative. Support and expand quality early education expe-
      riences for young children regardless of the setting.

      Outcomes

      ♦ The HSSCO and Missouri Head Start Association (MHSA) partnered to support peer-to-peer network-
        ing sessions. These sessions allowed participants to gain knowledge on selected topics that applied directly
        to working within their agencies; create opportunities to discuss “back home strategies” to be implement-
        ed; and provide opportunities for participants to network and develop a system of peer communications.
        Peer-to-peer sessions in 2007 included three director networking sessions, an Emergency/Crisis Prepared-
        ness: Session I random Acts of Violence & Natural Disasters, and a session on Health Children & Fami-
        lies: Obesity Initiative. The HSSCO also supported the annual Missouri Leadership Institute.

      ♦ The HSSCO supported MHSA/MO-AEYC Early Childhood Summit in Fall 2007, “Shaping the Fu-
        ture.” Participants gained information and training on topics relevant to the early childhood community
        including literacy, speech, and language development, disabilities, fine arts, professional development; and
        mental health. They also received information on community and professional resources including those
        for homelessness and information from the Coordination Board for Early Childhood.

      Community Services
      Objective

      Facilitate collaboration between Head Start agencies and local early care and education activities so they
      become an integral part of any efforts to strengthen communities.

      Outcomes

      ♦ The HSSCO provided leadership among a collaborative effort of Federal, state, and association stakeholders
        implementing a statewide Memorandum of Understanding among Head Start, Community Action, Social
        Services, and the Education System. In its first year of implementation, the MOU taskforce remained
        interested in:
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   181




               ♦ Strengthening coordination and maximizing resources among stakeholders at the
                 Federal, state, and association levels by modeling behaviors, adopting strategies, and
                 setting an agenda that is aimed at strengthening partnerships among local, state,
                 and regional organizations concerned with the needs of low-income children and
                 their families.

               ♦ Promoting collaborative efforts among education and social service providers in
                 order to strengthen communities.

♦ Fathers For Life Initiative: Grant is based on statewide collaboration designed to enact statewide systemic
  level changes as well as local collaboration and project implementation. The HSSCO, an influential part-
  ner, aided in coordination, dissemination, and consultation on grant activities, served on the grant manage-
  ment team and state steering team, and participated on regular conference calls with MO Department of
  Social Services (lead agency), University of Missouri Kansas City (evaluation contractor), and the Office of
  Head Start to provide regular updates of project.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Objective

Foster the inclusion of children with disabilities in all activities related to child development, early care and
education, and family life.

Outcomes

♦ The HSSCO collaborated with Region VII T/TA, Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary
  Education, and the Missouri Head Start Association to plan a one-day session at the annual Conference
  of the Young Years. The track, entitled, “Making Inclusion Work,” brought together Head Start and Early
  Head Start programs and their partners and provided information and research on the importance of
  inclusion. Participants developed action plans to take back to their local programs.

♦ The HSSCO led the way in updating a partnership letter among the HSSCO, Missouri Head Start Asso-
  ciation, Region VII TA, and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education-Special Education.
  The letter outlined a vision for collaboration in supporting children with disabilities and their families, and
  shared goals of the entities. The partnership letter was distributed via the State Education Listserv by the
  Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), reaching all school districts. It was posted
  on the Missouri Head Start and Department of Education’s Web sites, distributed at a MHSA council
  meeting and at all four Head Start/child care/pre-kindergarten regional meetings.

♦ The HSSCO participated in regular State Interagency Coordinating Council meetings and made recom-
  mendations to DESE on First Steps (Part C) operations in the State.

Family Literacy Services
Objective

Improve access and availability of family literacy services to low-income participants. Increase awareness of
the importance of literacy activities in the home and early care and education environments for supporting
emergent literacy in young children.
182   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Outcome

      The HSSCO co-sponsored a parent leadership event with the Missouri Head Start Association. Approxi-
      mately 50 parents and staff representing Head Start programs throughout the State attended the two-day
      event. This experience provided participants with an:

      ♦ Understanding of advocacy and how they can be effective advocates for children

      ♦ Opportunity to practice skills necessary to be actively engaged in local, state, and national issues

      ♦ Opportunity to learn about Missouri government, how the legislative process works, and how individuals
        can have a voice in this important process.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      Objective

      Work with programs that serve transient populations to ensure that information on quality early childhood
      programs are available to homeless families. Explore strategies to make sure these families can access Head
      Start of other affordable, quality early care and education services and develop an interagency plan to put
      these strategies in place.

      Outcomes

      ♦ As a member of the Governor’s Committee to End Homelessness dedicated in facilitating the Balance
        of State Continuum of Care process, the HSSCO helped raise awareness of homeless issues in Missouri,
        maintaining and sharing a list of resources throughout the State. The HSSCO helped plan and coordinate
        activities as part of the Governor’s Committee to End Homelessness – 2007 Homeless Awareness Week.

      ♦ The HSSCO convened a panel of representatives from the Governor’s Committee to End Homelessness
        to provide a presentation at the 2007 Early Childhood Summit. Early childhood professionals were pro-
        vided information on homeless resources available to children and families throughout the State and how
        to access the resources.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      During its first full year of operation, the Missouri’s Coordinating Board for Early Childhood has started
      formally integrating the early childhood systems in the State to maximize resources and the quality of all pro-
      grams over this past year. The HSSCO Director is an appointed member of the Board and has been actively
      involved by keeping the Board informed on reauthorization developments, the Missouri Head Start and Early
      Head Start landscape, and Head Start Program Performance Standards and philosophy. Through this education,
      one of the priority areas of the Board during this past year was to promote additional state funding for Early
      Head Start. The Board includes representatives from the governor’s office, the child-serving state departments,
      the judiciary, Head Start, business, civic groups, faith-based organizations, and early childhood service providers.

      The Early Childhood Interagency Team was created to facilitate the sharing of program information that
      guides change within the stakeholder agencies. Members include representatives from the Departments of
      Elementary and Secondary Education, Health, Higher Education, Mental Health, and Social Services, and
      the HSSCO. The team is led by the HSSCO and met every 6-8 weeks over the past year.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   183




Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Diversity of Funding — Since 1997, the Office of Head Start has funded the HSSCO to support the
  development of multi-agency and public/private partnerships at the state level. Since the establishment of
  the HSSCO, select state departments have agreed to contribute state matching funds to support the work
  of the office. One of the success indicators the HSSCO measures, is diversity of funding. During the re-
  porting year period, the State Departments of Education, Social Services, and Health contributed funds to
  match the Federal grant. In addition, the HSSCO has partnered with many state departments and grant
  initiatives.

♦ Enhancement of ECCS State to Local Work — The HSSCO provided financial support to enhance the work
  of the ECCS initiative. The goal of partnership is to improve early childhood outcomes by developing a
  replicable and sustainable infrastructure for local communities to implement the ECCS Plan for Mis-
  souri’s children and families. The funding provided supplemented existing efforts of UMKC-Institute
  for Human Development as they consulted with local communities, provided technical assistance, and
  fostered the development of local infrastructure teams.

♦ Resource Development — The HSSCO partnered with the Missouri Head Start Association to design,
  develop, and disseminate a Missouri Head Start Annual Report. The HSSCO also produced a brochure
  designed to create a statewide public understanding of the purpose of the Office.

♦ Ongoing monitoring of the Strategic Plan — Work continues (2006-2011).


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
In 2007, the HSSCO did not participate in supporting the coordination of services to Hispanic families in
Missouri in any definite manner. It is imperative to mention, however, that the HSSCO continues to support
action that creates opportunities for improving early learning systems and processes that serve to be inclusive
of all populations within the State (i.e., children with disabilities, homeless children, children of incarcerated
parents, children representing all racial and ethnic backgrounds, children in foster care, etc.). As the five-year
goals of the HSSCO are continually assessed within the changing context of the new Improving Head Start
for School Readiness Act of 2007 and the early learning landscape across Missouri in 2008, it is possible that
the specific early learning needs of Hispanic children and families may be more closely addressed through col-
laborative projects or initiatives behind the leadership of the HSSCO.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
As the HSSCO’s evolving role in the Coordinating Board for Early Childhood is more specifically defined
and CBEC, as well as ECCS and Federal strategic priorities are firmly established in 2008, it is anticipated
that new directions will be identified in addition to maintaining some efforts and initiatives currently in mo-
tion. It is fully anticipated the HSSCO will focus on aligning efforts with the ECCS efforts, and the results
from the new Head Start needs assessment process to inform its directions in the coming year and beyond.
Further, the HSSCO will examine its role in promoting action and providing leadership to projects related
to all priority areas — particularly those that may not have been addressed to the extent that others were in
2007. The HSSCO will also continue to maintain its leadership role in. In summary, the HSSCO’s strategic
plan and grant funds for the coming year will be greatly influenced by and aligned with, results of the Head
Start needs assessment ongoing development of the ECCS plan, and existing projects and initiatives.
184   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 185




                                    Montana


Collaboration Director              Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                    areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Mary Jane Standaert
                                    plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
early Childhood Services Bureau –
DPPHS
                                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
P.O. Box 202925                     services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
111 north Jackson Street            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
5th floor                           at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Helena, Mt 59620                    in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 406-444-0589
                                    The Montana Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO)
fax: 406-444-2547                   marked its 11th year in 2007. The HSSCO is involved in every
mjstandaert@mt.gov                  part of the systems that serve young children. The HSSCO
                                    also oversees and implements the Early Childhood Com-
Lead Agency Contact                 prehensive Systems (ECCS) grant from Maternal and Child
                                    Health and is therefore truly involved in the “whole picture.”
Jamie Palagi
                                    One of the most difficult challenges for the HSSCO is the
Bureau Chief
                                    delay that often occurs when administrative state staff change
Phone: 406-444-1828                 jobs and other agendas come to the attention of leadership. It
fax: 406-444-2547                   would be preferable for everyone to always move in the same
jpalagi@mt.gov                      direction at the same time.

                                    Most of the work of the HSSCO is centered on school readi-
ACF Regional Contact
                                    ness. The HSSCO and ECCS work together to further this
                                    purpose for low income and all children in Montana. This past
Debbie Hedin
                                    year, child care has been a focus of this effort. The HSSCO
ACf Region VIII                     Director has traveled to each of the 12 Montana Child Care
federal Office Building             Resource and Referral Network regions to discuss the school
1961 Stout Street                   readiness initiative. It has proved to be an effective way to link
                                    the efforts of Head Start and child care as providers prepare
9th floor
                                    young children for school and life.
Denver, CO 80294
Phone: 303-844-1154                 Most of the formal Head Start/child care partnerships have
fax: 303-844-3642                   been discontinued due to lack of funding. But relationships
                                    between the two programs and other professionals are more
dhedin@acf.hhs.gov
                                    positive and reciprocal when possible. In many communities,
                                    Head Start and child care are represented on Community
                                    School Readiness Teams, share training or promotional events;
                                    and make efforts to communicate about children that they
                                    both serve.
186   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Montana does not have state funded pre-kindergarten. Advocacy efforts are focused on state funding for
      Head Start and increased funding for child care. Creating a third type of program would just not be reason-
      able given the State’s small population. The School Readiness Initiative is the main focus in consolidating
      local and state collaborative efforts to best support young children and their varied needs.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      Objective 2.3

      Health/Mental Health services. Assist in strengthening quality and increasing access to a variety of health
      services for young children and their families.

      ♦ The HSSCO has done considerable research and work on Early Childhood Health and Mental Health
        Consultation. Through ECCS work, the HSSCO has designed a model that includes both types of
        consultation in early childhood programs. The HSSCO has initiated a pilot in one community through a
        community mental health service, provided the health consultation training, and is providing oversight to
        track the outcomes and barriers. This effort began September 1, 2007.

      ♦ The HSSCO is involved on the core team of the ABCD project – Assuring Better Child Development.
        This is a TA grant through the Medicaid Office of DPHHS that will lead to universal, appropriate devel-
        opmental screening for all young children using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire. There has been con-
        siderable time and effort invested in this effort, including national training of the core teams. The initial
        pilot phase was launched September 1, 2007 in two communities and will eventually directly impact Head
        Start and Early Head Start children.

      ♦ The HSSCO worked on the Covering Kids project with Healthy Mothers/Healthy Babies and distributed
        information to Head Start and Early Head Start programs.

      ♦ Throughout the year, the HSSCO met with Head Start and Early Head Start health managers at their
        networking meetings to discuss how the HSSCO is supporting them at the state level and to hear about
        obstacles at the local level. Additionally, the HSSCO met with the Director of DPHHS, the leaders of
        Family and Community Health Bureau, and their advisory council; submitted three published articles
        to the Prevention Connection; presented to the Joint Committee on Healthy Kids; presented on School
        Readiness work at the Spring Public Health Conference; and was actively involved in Systems of Care
        work and the work of the MT Mental Health Association.

      ♦ Oral health has been a priority for many years. This past year the Department of Public Health and Hu-
        man Services has undergone some restructuring. The HSSCO is actively involved in the Oral Health
        Coalition as a member of the Community Based Prevention Committee. The committee has designed a
        new work plan. Through a Food Stamp Bonus, Head Start and Early Head Start programs and School
        Readiness Community Teams were targeted for online health training. The programs were provided with
        all Head Start and Early Head Start children as well as money to spend on local oral health promotion
        efforts.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   187




Oral Health

State-level

The Montana Oral Health Alliance has existed since 1999.

  Contact:
  Maggie Virag
  Oral Health Office
  DPHHS
  1218 e. 6th Ave.
  Helena, Mt 59620
  Phone: 406-444-0276
  mvirag@mt.gov


The HSSCO Director is an active member of the Community Based Prevention Committee, which most
recently produced a statewide message via posters encouraging parents to have their babies receive an oral
health check-up by the age one. The HSSCO accomplished major oral health work nearly every year since
1998. In past years, the HSSCO:

♦ Sent oral health bags filled with information and a Lift the Lip video to each Head Start and Early Head
  Start Program.

♦ Was funded to host the Head Start Oral Health Forum and the follow-up work.

♦ Contributed to the State Oral Health Work Plan

♦ Contributed and assisted on grants applications for the Oral Health Office

♦ Invited representatives of the Oral Health Office to speak times to the MT Head Start Association and
  Head Start Health Managers.

In 2007, Head Start and Early Head Start programs were included in a Food Stamp Bonus project. Tooth-
brushes were provided to each program, as long as one staff member took a free online oral health course
called Open Wide. In addition, since most of the Head Start programs participate on the community school
readiness teams of the Montana School Readiness Initiative, all the programs benefited from a second round
of oral health materials and children’s books. These materials were distributed to programs for their assistance
in the Oral Health Office’s community oral health survey.


Local-level

The HSSCO has requested this information from local programs and will forward the information when
received. Anecdotally, the HSSCO is aware of many oral health partnerships through discussions at Head
Start Association meetings. Programs usually share about dentists performing oral health screenings, donating
exams and follow-up care, setting aside time for Head Start children, conducting training and information
sessions, and donating toothbrushes.
188   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Welfare
      Objective 3.2

      Support through Welfare Reform. Collaborate with families, programs, agencies and organizations to
      strengthen support services for families on TANF.

      Prior to the 2007 legislative session and during the session, the HSSCO researched and clarified specifics of
      the “Bridge the Gap” policy proposals that would have equalized Head Start and child care eligibility. Un-
      fortunately, it did not pass during the 2007 session. Other than this effort, there was no specific work in this
      area. However, most of the HSSCO’s work continues to target improving a variety of services for low-income
      families.

      Child Care
      Objective 2.2

      Access to Child Care services. Assist in developing policies and practices that promote the collaboration and
      coordination necessary to improve child care availability, quality and affordability for all low-income children.

      The HSSCO and Head Start and Early Head Start are members of the MT Early Childhood Advisory
      Council (MECAC). As a member, the HSSCO:

      ♦ Attended and presented at each quarterly meeting.

      ♦ Presented at the Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) Directors’ annual meeting on School
        Readiness and Child Care.

      ♦ Met with the CCR&R trainers about School Readiness training.

      ♦ Presented on School Readiness to the Butte CCR&R mini-conference, the MT Early Childhood Confer-
        ence, and to five different community groups of child care providers.

      ♦ Participated in a local School Readiness event by reading books to groups of child care children, taking an
        active part in the planning.

      ♦ Conducted data gathering for the Economic Impact Study on EC in MT.

      Education
      Objective 2.1

      Education. Support Head Start/Early Head Start programs in their efforts to serve as a central community
      institution to improve education services provided to low-income children and their families.

      The HSSCO is a member of and participates at the quarterly meetings of:

      ♦ MtAEYC

      ♦ Early Childhood Partnership for Professional Development (ECPPD)
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   189




♦ Early Childhood Career Development Advisory Council

♦ School Readiness Task Force.

In addition, the HSSCO also:

♦ Presented twice at the meetings of the Head Start and Early Head Start education managers.

♦ Hosted the follow-up School Readiness Summit in May.

♦ Assisted with hosting the Western States Leadership Network for MtAEYC.

♦ Met weekly with the Education Policy advisor for the Governor.

♦ Met with the Indian Education for All representatives from Office of Public Instruction.

♦ Met with the Early Childhood Higher Ed Consortium.

♦ Met with the MECAC Quality Committee on School Readiness and Touchpoints training.

♦ Assisted with development and dissemination of School Readiness materials and maintained frequent
  contact with Head Start and Early Head Start T/TA providers.

Community Services
Objective 3.3

Support through Community Service. Promote community service, parent involvement and parent training as
strong components of Head Start/Early Head Start and family development.

The HSSCO wrote a letter of support for the Human Resource Development Council application for a grant
on family financial literacy. Other parent-focused work is mentioned in other sections of this report, including
Parent Leadership Training, Fatherhood Initiative, Head Start Day at the Capital, networking with parents at
the Head Start Association meetings, inviting parents to be involved in state level groups, and enlisting one
Head Start parent to share her success story with MECAC.

Family Literacy Services
Objective 3.1

Coordination with Family Literacy. Encourage Head Start/Early Head Start programs to form partnerships
and provide opportunities that focus on the development of family literacy.

Since late 2006, the HSSCO has been working monthly with a group from the private and public sectors on
the Bill of Rights for Children with Incarcerated Parents. This is driven by a TA grant that the HSSCO ap-
plied for on behalf of Head Start and Early Head Start and the Department of Corrections. The HSSCO is
developing a “Tool Kit” of the top ten things parents/caregivers can tell children and do for them as a parent
or family member enters, exits, and goes through the corrections system.
190   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Additional work included:

      ♦ Took part in the Fatherhood Initiative with Head Start and Early Head Start programs as they developed
        their work plans in this area.

      ♦ Conducted research and visited the Salish/Kootenai Head Start and Early Head Start program and com-
        munity to learn about Touchpoints from the Brazelton Institute and how it can be supported in other
        communities.

      ♦ Supported and assisted with Head Start Day at the Capital.

      ♦ Supported and promoted the Literacy project sponsored by Hopa Mountain, targeted to AIAN Head
        Start and Early Head Start programs and communities.

      ♦ Worked with the Family Literacy TA providers that presented at the Head Start Association.

      ♦ Participated in the Parent Information Resource Center (PIRC) Advisory Council and worked with
        grantee, WORD, Inc., to develop Parent Leadership Training.

      ♦ Presented at the Head Start and Early Head Start Family Advocates networking meeting.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      Objective 2.4

      Services to Children with Disabilities. Support Head Start/Early Head Start programs in strengthening
      partnerships that promote the collaboration and coordination of comprehensive and appropriate services to
      children with disabilities and their families.

      2007 Review

      ♦ Completed the state level MOU on disabilities services and are beginning to disseminate to Head Start/
        Early Head Start through the TA providers. Wrote and developed a TA grant on inclusion for the ECP-
        PD, which was not awarded. Head Start/Early Head Start are members of the Family Support Services
        Advisory Council for Part C of DPHHS.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      Objective 3.4

      Support families with young children who are homeless. Ensure that Head Start/Early Head Start programs
      adequately serve homeless families with young children.

      Work in this area is led by the MT Homeless Coalition, which has a detailed work plan and is accomplishing
      much work at the local level. The Coalition has been rather quiet through 2007, but the HSSCO remains a
      member and has submitted articles on Head Start and Early Head Start for the statewide newsletter.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   191




Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
Head Start has a wide variety of partners in state government. The Early Childhood Services Bureau in-
cludes the Head Start Association and the HSSCO in most appropriate decisions and plans. The Head Start
Association and the HSSCO share an office at the Bureau. Head Start parents and staff are often consulted,
surveyed, and asked to take part in meetings when appropriate and time permits. Recently, the CHIP Office
and the Lead Poisoning Office inquired about Head Start and how to access the programs for disseminating
information and surveying. State offices often seek out Head Start as a source of information, to share infor-
mation, and to include Head Start in their plans.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
This is the third year of the School Readiness Initiative. It continues to be successful for all Head Start and
Early Head Start programs, as well as their community partners and partners at the state government.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
There has been no work in this area, since there does not appear to be a need. However, the HSSCO is mak-
ing efforts to work with the Indian Education For All initiative. The Office of Public Instruction partnered
with the HSSCO to engage the assistance of Mid-Continent Education Labs to conduct training in one
American Indian community. The training provided Head Start and elementary school staff with appropriate
practices and expectations for transitions, curriculum, and parent involvement. There are cultural and language
issues and some traditions that need to worked on so that children and families can be more successful in both
programs. If the intervention works for this community, it will be offered in other interested Tribal communi-
ties.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The work plan has already been approved and includes all of the above.
192   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 193




                                   Nebraska


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
eleanor Kirkland
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
nebraska Department of education
301 Centennial Mall South          Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
P.O. Box 94987                     services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
lincoln, ne 68509-4987             are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 402-471-3501                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 402-471-0117
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
eleanor.kirkland@nde.ne.gov        Head Start/Pre-kindergarten partnership development has
                                   been the systems focus. The Head Start-State Collaboration
Lead Agency Contact                Office (HSSCO) has continued to assist in the development
                                   of Head Start pre-kindergarten partnerships. In addition to
Marcia Corr                        helping facilitate local partnership development/meetings, the
                                   HSSCO financially supported school administrators work-
early Childhood Administrator
                                   shops with use of supplemental funding. Workshops were held
Phone: 402-471-0951                in various locations across the State. The focus was on quality
fax: 402-471-0117                  early childhood programs and partnership development, Head
marcia.corr@nde.ne.gov             Start Program Performance Standards, and their basic alignment
                                   with the Nebraska Department of Education Rule 11, regula-
                                   tions for school-administered early childhood programs. Head
ACF Regional Contact               Start directors and school administrators with partnership
                                   experience and successes were contracted as presenters. Over
lynda Bitner                       500 school administrators and Head Start directors and staff
ACf Region VII                     participated between December 2006 and May 2007.
federal Office Building
                                   The HSSCO Director developed a brief questionnaire for
601 east 12th Street
                                   Early Childhood Program Specialists to use on their local
Room 276                           program visits with LEAs and their partners to explore aspects
Kansas City, MO 64106              of partnership development. The information from these
Phone: 816-426-5401 ext. 182       questionnaires will be compiled and used for discussion with a
                                   small stakeholders group, Head Start/Pre-Kindergarten Com-
lbitner@acf.hhs.gov
                                   munity Action Early Childhood Group. This small stakehold-
                                   ers group met twice a year to address the specific challenges
                                   and successes of Head Start partnership development.

                                   Members included the HSSCO Director, DHHS Child Care
                                   Administrator, Community Services Block Grant Administra-
                                   tor, State Office of Community Action Nebraska, Head Start
                                   Association, Head Start directors, Department of Education
                                   Early Childhood Administrator and Program Specialists/
194   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Technical Assistants. Plans are to revise the early childhood grant program RFP to help with increased
      alignment in Head Start Program Performance Standards, cost allocation needs for LEAs and their Head Start
      partners.

      The above outcomes help to also meet the HSSCO work plan goal of “increased communication between
      Head Start and state systems.”


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      The HSSCO supported work on early childhood mental health by coordinating the statewide initiative, Early
      Childhood Positive Behavioral interventions and Support (PBiS). The HSSCO successfully applied for tech-
      nical assistance from the Center for Social Emotional Foundations of Early Learning (CSEFEL). There are
      four demonstration sites, one of which is a Head Start/LEA grantee; the others are in child care. Training of
      trainers will be launched in 2008. The PBiS statewide initiative is the implementation arm of the State’s Be-
      havioral Health State Infrastructure Grant (SIG) targeted at infrastructure development for young children
      and adolescents. SIG has contracted with the HSSCO to provide funds for professional development for the
      CSEFEL training opportunities and Nurturing Healthy Behavior pilot projects (see “Child Care” below).

      The HSSCO participated in Maternal Child Health Strategic Planning and informed the development of
      guidance for “Healthy Weight” for women of child-bearing age and their young children. The HSSCO pro-
      vided input into the development of an environmental scan of numerous healthy weight/obesity prevention
      initiatives, including the launch of Head Start’s I Am Moving, I Am Learning. The HSSCO hopes to expand
      upon that for Head Start and its local community partners as resources allow.

      Oral Health

      State-level

      The HSSCO Director received $2,500 in Head Start Oral Health Forum Follow-Up supplemental funding
      from the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors (ASTDD) in 2007. The goals are to work with
      the University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Dentistry, to develop materials to integrate into the
      dental hygienists program/curriculum as part of their community outreach coursework and requirements. The
      HSSCO meets with the College of Dentistry routinely to plan for the Dental Days programs, offering safety
      net dental services to children who do not have access to dental care. This has become an invaluable support
      to many children across the State with hundreds of thousands of in-kind and clinical services each year. The
      Assistant Dean is engaged in the state Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Initiative (ECCS) project
      for Medical Home (to explore issues around dental home) and has agreed to participate in the ECCS Access
      Work Group as well.

      As part of the ASTDD follow-up, the HSSCO worked with the DHHS Lifespan Health Services to inform
      a State Access Workshop. The HSSCO identified part of the funds to support Head Start Association/Head
      Start program participation in the Workshop. A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats)
      analysis via focus groups was conducted by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau national technical as-
      sistance contractor. After the analysis completes the DHHS vetting process, the goals for Workshop will be
      solidified and scheduled in 2008.

      The ECCS Access/Barriers to Services Workgroup was co-chaired by the HSSCO Director. The focus of this
                                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   195




work group is on oral health in Nebraska. The group is reviewing resources, research, workforce studies, and
local projects/products to inform the development of a white paper to “raise a champion” in oral health for
Nebraska. Nebraska does not currently have a state dental director, and this has created challenges in moving
the system forward. Safety-net programs have been identified and have provided amazing support and ser-
vices, but the ongoing sustainability of these efforts is vulnerable to available local resources and the good will
of volunteers. A local learning collaborative sponsored by the Nebraska Children and Families Foundation
will also help with this work. The goal is to leverage input and leadership from local grassroots and state levels
to potentially charter a statewide oral health coalition.


Local-level

The HSSCO participated in a local Kiwanis effort with a Head Start grantee to bring in Dr. Peter Milgrom,
DDS, a researcher from the University of Washington. Dr. Milgrom was recently involved in a Head Start
Innovation and Improvement Project (IIP) to explore and provide dental services in remote sectors of Alaska.
His research was presented at the Kiwanis event. Dr. Milgrom and a local dentist/advocate from Kearney, NE,
met with DHHS and the College of Dentistry personnel to engage in a dialogue related to potential policy
and practice changes that could benefit Nebraska’s young children living in poverty and who may not have
access to adequate oral health care.

Welfare
The HSSCO continued to share information with Head Start grantees about changes in TANF or other pub-
lic assistance services for children and families living in poverty. With TANF changes, the status of Nebraska’s
plan is pending. Due to broad restructuring in DHHS over the past year, new administrative leadership is
pending. The HSSCO also responded to local grantee questions about access to TANF support and services.

Child Care
Child Care Development Funds were offered to local programs to implement “Nurturing Healthy Behavior”
projects. This initiative is tied to PBiS efforts statewide. Training for licensed providers, due to new legislation,
will be developed and launched to increase knowledge and awareness of Safe Sleep, SIDS, and nutrition.

Education
Focus has been primarily with pre-kindergarten partnership development. The HSSCO has continued to
provide curriculum and assessment training for early childhood teachers in context of Results Matter Ne-
braska. The statewide initiative is aimed at meeting the mandates from the Office of Special Education
Populations for functional child outcomes and family outcomes. This has been implemented in Nebraska for
all LEAs early childhood programs. The HSSCO has also met to explore elements of a quality rating system
for Nebraska. These initiatives have been linked to PBiS and the ECCS goals and strategies to help build a
more comprehensive system. See other special initiatives below for highlights on kindergarten/transition and
Research to Practice plans and initiatives.

Community Services
The HSSCO worked with Community Action to follow up on partnership development and access to quality
early childhood services. The HSSCO formed a partnership with the Nebraska Children & Families Founda-
tion to launch a “sustainability university” based on a model of Nebraska Even Start Sustainability Toolkit.
Efforts will continue by supporting the Harvard Family Research Project, State school-age afterschool care,
and Parent Information Resource Center state initiative.
196   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Family Literacy Services
      The HSSCO worked with Even Start Family Literacy to support Head Start programs administering Even
      Start programs. The project offered opportunities for programs to attend training events and networking ses-
      sions, and gain access to evaluation support.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      See response in the “Education” section for the integration of Results Matter into all early childhood pro-
      gramming, assessment data, evaluation, and training. A state Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for services
      to children with disabilities is a possible template for use in Head Start-Pre-k partnership agreements with
      the hope that the MOA would include all young children and families in their service areas. Plans to revise
      the state MOA are pending due to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 and technical
      assistance contracts for Head Start.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      Title I, McKinney-Vento coordinator, and Homeless Services Administrator in DHHS provide input for
      Early Childhood Interagency Coordinating Council (ECICC- state’s early learning council) about the issues
      of homelessness, gaps in services, and resource development. This information is disseminated to Head Start
      programs. The HSSCO developed a partnership with the Nebraska Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
      Coalition to provide training specific to Head Start grantee needs. The training addresses women, families,
      and young children who may be in shelters and need support from homeless assistance, Head Start, and other
      community resources.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      The HSSCO ensures and leverages Head Start representation on all statewide initiatives, planning groups,
      and policy decisions. Many of those have been mentioned previously. Head Start is represented on the state
      early learning council, including American Indian/Alaska Native Head Start.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      The HSSCO initiated and coordinated an Early Childhood Transportation Task Force in 2007 with mem-
      bers of Head Start, LEAs, DHHS Child Care and Public Service, and Department of Education Pupil
      Transportation programs to address access and barriers to early childhood transportation. This is tied to goals
      of ECICC early learning council and Gaps/Barriers standing committee, as well as strategies of the ECCS
      Access Work Group. The goal is to develop recommendations for key constituents and to design next steps for
      continuing to explore possible policy and regulations changes.

      The HSSCO supported the Nebraska Association for Education of Young Children annual retreat by partici-
      pating and garnering the participation and support of Head Start Association representatives.

      The HSSCO submitted a National Governors Association proposal for an early childhood summit, which
      would have focused on early childhood/kindergarten transition and best practices. Unfortunately, the proposal
      was not funded. However, the decision was to move forward on launch of a kindergarten leadership team to
      revise a 1984 kindergarten position statement that was reissued in 2001. Plans for launching a multi-phase
      Research to Practice Conference were completed by a small work group. Due to weather conditions and dif-
      ficulty accessing conference facilities, the conference will be postponed until early 2008. HSSCO funds were
      identified to support these events.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   197




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Wherever possible, the HSSCO helps to connect with resources for translators and/or bilingual early learning
specialists. The state ECCS project/HSSCO implementation plan addresses cultural linguistic issues as part of
the Access and Barriers to services work group. Translation of health-related information has been augmented
by the ECCS Medical Home and Family Support work groups. The HSSCO provided resources to and drew
upon experience from Even Start Family Literacy to assist families needing access to civics education, Adult
Basic Education, English as Second Language classes, and materials to support interactive literacy activities
between young children and their parents. The HSSCO coordinates Even Start statewide, and some local
programs are administered by Head Start programs.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The HSSCO activities validate the focus and need to continue on the path with the ECCS project by con-
tinuing to adopt the Implementation Plan as the HSSCO work plan. Many of the ECCS work groups now
focus more on the implementation phase of the project. The HSSCO Director co-chairs the Data Group and
the Access Work Group and works very closely with the ECCS project director on all aspects of the plan.
The HSSCO Director has assisted with facilitation for other ECCS work groups. A large part of the activi-
ties for 2008 will be with the PBiS Leadership Team and CSEFEL activities, Head Start-Pre-k partnership,
and early childhood transportation. With the State’s new E-Rate Coordinator, the HSSCO hopes to move
forward to develop new policies for non-school Head Start grantees to access E-Rate.
198   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 199




                                    Nevada


Collaboration Director              Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                    areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Margot Chappel
                                    plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Health and Human
Services (DHHS)
                                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
4126 technology Way                 services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 100                           are support Head Start/Child Care/Prep-kindergarten collaborations at
Carson City, nV 89706               the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs in
Phone: 775-684-4195                 State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 775-684-4010
                                    ♦ Received supplemental grant and provided leadership for
mchappel@dhhs.nv.gov                  the Early Childhood Partners’ meeting jointly sponsored
http://www.dhhs.nv.gov/HeadStart.     by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Head
htm                                   Start, and Pre-K Now. Lead the team in pre- and post-
                                      meetings to develop strategies and action steps to address
Lead Agency Contact                   governance, finance, and provider support in statewide
                                      system of early care and education.
Mary liveratti
DHHS Deputy Director                ♦ Continued to serve on collaboration work group of State-
                                      wide Children’s Behavioral Health Coalition.
Phone: 775-684-4000
fax: 775-684-4010
                                    ♦ Determined that Head Start grantees were eligible ap-
mliveratti@dhhs.nv.gov                plicants for state pre-kindergarten funding from Nevada
                                      Department of Education (NDE) and assured that all
ACF Regional Contact                  grantees received a copy of the RFP. Also served as grant
                                      reviewer for NDE.
Kristine Jackson
ACf Region IX                       ♦ Facilitated discussions between Northeastern Nevada Head
                                      Start (NNHS) and Elko County School District (ECSD)
90 7th Street                         regarding Head Start/pre-kindergarten partnerships. De-
9th floor                             veloped a draft MOU for the two agencies, defining their
San francisco, CA 94102               agreement to provide both Head Start and state-funded
                                      pre-kindergarten at Southside Elementary School in Elko.
Phone: 415-437-8563
                                      Since then, NNHS and state child care licensing inspected
fax: 415-437-8438                     available classrooms and determined that necessary capital
kristine.jackson@acf.hhs.gov          improvements will make the on-site partnership too costly
                                      at this time. However, the two plan to conduct joint recruit-
                                      ment in the coming year to avoid duplication or under-
                                      enrollment. As a result of these discussions, NNHS assisted
                                      the principal of Southside Elementary with playground
                                      design to meet Head Start Program Performance Standards.
200   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Facilitated discussions for the Reno Sparks Indian Colony regarding a full meshing of their child care and
        Head Start programs.

      ♦ Met with Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Coordinator and work groups across
        component areas of comprehensive plan: social and emotional health, health care access, leadership and
        infrastructure development, and child care health consultation.

      ♦ Attended NAEYC public policy forum with team from Nevada.

      ♦ Led state team that attended NAEYC Professional Development Institute pre-conference day co-
        sponsored by OHS, National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center (NCCIC), and
        NAEYC to revise and update professional development plan.

      ♦ Continued to support development of the ECCS plan by inviting the ECCS Coordinator to give an up-
        date during each Partnership Committee meeting and by forwarding emails from the ECCS Coordinator
        to Partnership Committee members.

      ♦ Served on the Commitment to Education Committee for the United Way of Southern Nevada along
        with CDI-Head Start staff. That committee worked on aligning assessment tools across early childhood
        programs in the Las Vegas area to start a common data collection mechanism as an indicator of program
        quality.

      ♦ Attended NAEYC conference sessions about using data from previous research to make the case for
        investing in early childhood education.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      ♦ Worked with the Oral Health Program Manager, OHS, and the Head Start Association (HSA) to de-
        termine whether Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) statutes in Nevada
        could meet needs of PIR (i.e., exam by approved oral health professional, not just dentists).

      ♦ Worked with the Oral Health Program Manager to develop an Oral Health Manual for Head Start
        grantees. A draft manual was presented during the fall meeting of the HSA. Grantees were asked for
        feedback. After few revisions were made, the Oral Health Program Manager distributed manuals to all
        grantees.

      ♦ Assisted with planning 2008 oral health summit to establish statewide and regional goals for oral health.

      ♦ Invited EPSDT program manager from the state Health Division to present to HSSCO Partnership
        Committee about educating parents and accessing benefits for low-children.

      ♦ Met with oral health and mental health work groups of the HSSCO Partnership Committee. Oral health
        will merge with new health access work group in 2008. Mental Health PIR statistics indicate need for
        mental health service development. That work group decided to keep its status as a separate workgroup
        since mental health issues are very specific and Head Start grantees need focus on access to services across
        the State.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   201




Oral Health
A listing of Nevada’s state and local oral health coalitions, as well as information on other oral health activities
can be found at the end of this report.

Welfare
No activities reported.

Child Care
♦ Worked with the HSA, the State Child Care Administrator, and the Child Care Resource and Referral
  (CCR&R) contractor to assure that language regarding Head Start partnerships was integrated through-
  out the 2007 Child Development Plan. Oregon was used as a model.

♦ Met with Children’s Cabinet Early Education and Care manager to discuss issues with wraparound care
  contracts with Head Start grantees. Standards for contracts are being developed as a result of meetings
  with association members.

♦ Developed an approach to strategic planning for more effective and efficient use of child care development
  fund in Nevada.

♦ Assisted with facilitating workgroup meetings for addressing areas of the revised child care regulations
  about which great controversy emerged during last year’s revision process as requested by Melissa Faul,
  Bureau of Services for Child Care Chief.

Education
♦ Sponsored a roundtable discussion of Early Childhood degree program representatives during the Nevada
  Early Childhood Conference. Reviewed strategies to increase the number of Head Start teachers attaining
  Early Childhood degrees. The group decided that there were no strategies that would work universally for
  all colleges and universities. However, all Early Childhood degree representatives agreed to meet with their
  Head Start partners to discuss strategies to increase the number of Head Start teachers graduating with
  degrees by Region.

♦ Facilitated discussions with higher education representatives that resulted in a CDA coursework chart
  representing the six Nevada State Higher Education institutions. The chart lists courses that cover CDA
  competency areas providing nine college credits leading to an AA or BA/BS in ECE, Human Develop-
  ment and Family Studies, or Early Childhood Special Education.

♦ Initiated discussion with the Apprenticeship program about integrating CDA assessment at one year of
  participation in the two-year program to attain a Child Development Specialist Certificate (Nevada’s ap-
  proved state alternative to CDA by Council for Professional Recognition). Also discussed implementation
  of a Child Development Specialist Certificate with an Infant/Toddler emphasis.

♦ Worked with team developing statewide professional development action plan.

♦ Served as member of Truckee Meadows Community College EC degree program advisory board.
202   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Worked with Office of Early Care and Education, NevAEYC, and Washoe County School District on the
        Infant and Toddler Guidelines for Learning work group.

      ♦ Linked NNHS with Great Basin College for a professional development session during which Head Start
        teachers were provided the opportunity to enroll in the Apprenticeship program or the T.E.A.C.H. Early
        Childhood Nevada program, as well as register for fall courses at the college.

      ♦ Facilitated discussions during Partnership Committee and Lead Team meetings about data collected by
        Head Start and state funded pre-kindergarten programs. As a result of this discussion, the Lead Team
        determined that a new work group will form to address Child Outcome measures and data collection in
        2008.

      ♦ University of Nevada-Las Vegas (UNLV) professor, Dr. Catherine Lyons, requested HSSCO support for
        the university’s submission of a National Child Care Professional Development grant. An outline of the
        approach to partnerships, implementation, and evaluation was jointly developed with higher education
        representatives from all Nevada Higher Education institutions and Head Start grantees.

      ♦ Attended meeting to plan integration of Child Care Apprenticeship and T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood
        Nevada programs.

      ♦ Attended meeting to develop trainer criteria as member of Nevada Registry Advisory Board.

      Community Services
      No activities reported.

      Family Literacy Services
      ♦ Invited Nevada State Literacy Office Director to present the statewide strategic plan for literacy to the
        partnership committee. Grantees and the HSSCO were invited to give feedback on the plan.

      ♦ Served on the State Council on Libraries and Literacy. Assisted in ranking literacy grants during state
        Literacy Council meeting, emphasizing importance of programs geared toward early childhood.

      ♦ Met with Northern Nevada Literacy Council in Reno to learn about their adult education programs.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      ♦ Assisted with the development of an MOU for Part B services between Northern Nevada Head Start and
        the Elko County School District, and CDI Clark County Head Start and Clark County School District.

      ♦ Met with Mary Liveratti, DHHS Deputy Director, and Frankie McCabe, NDE Director, Office of Spe-
        cial Education, Elementary and Secondary Education, and School Improvement Programs. Ms. McCabe
        reiterated the DOE’s stance that a statewide Part B MOU is unnecessary, but they are willing to continue
        providing support to get required local MOUs in place.

      ♦ Met with Part B MOU work group of the HSSCO Partnership Committee to determine next steps.
        Region IX T/TA Specialist Rebecca Votaw followed up by asking for a count of the Head Start programs
        without local Part B MOUs in place. The primary issue was that NDE is under the impression that all
        LEAs have local Part B MOUs with all Head Start grantees. This is not so. Ms. Votaw stated that she
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   203




   would forward the list of grantees without MOUs to OSEP. They will then send a letter to NDE explain-
   ing the importance of a statewide MOU and describing the absence of local MOUs. All grantees report
   having good working relationships with LEAs in the absence of MOUs.

♦ Met with Autism Spectrum program from state Health Division to discuss Head Start collaboration. The
  program goals are to screen and provide intervention to all young children in Nevada.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
Planned to develop a work group to address services for homeless children and families in Nevada for 2008.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
♦ Assisted Oral Health Program manager to determine a Head Start representative to sit on the statewide
  Oral Health Advisory Board.

♦ Requested that Jane Hogue and Jean Childs serve on state health division committee to educate Nevada
  parents about EPSDT benefits.

♦ Asked to facilitate the NevAEYC annual 2-day strategic planning retreat. Evaluation results indicated a
  high level of satisfaction among participants. The NevAEYC board invited state child care licensing chief,
  ECCS Coordinator, student chapter officers, UNR Early Head Start Director, and representatives from
  CCR&R agencies to engage in and inform the statewide planning process.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Provided support and increased collaboration with the HSA through sub-grants for meeting support and
  Family Development Matrix data collection.

♦ Purchased the Adobe Connect software through a partnership with the ECCS grant in the Health Divi-
  sion.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ Began discussing the need for coordination and collaboration to increase access to health care for children
  with undocumented citizenship. The HSSCO Partnership Committee will form a new health access work
  group specifically to address this issue among others during 2008.

♦ Distributed bookmarks developed by the Nevada Health Division in both Spanish and English to make
  parents aware of warning signs that children may have autism to all Head Start grantees at the March
  HSA meeting.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
Changes were made to the 2008 work plan based on the work, and results from efforts described throughout
this report. Additional changes were made to the 2008 work plan due to reauthorization and the new grantee
needs assessment required.
204   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 205




                                   New Hampshire


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Debra nelson
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
nH Department of Health and
Human Services
                                   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Division for Children, Youth and   services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
families
                                   are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
129 Pleasant Street
                                   at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Concord, nH 03301
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 603-271-7190
fax: 603-271-7982                  ♦ Early Childhood Unified System Initiative — NH has no
Debra.J.nelson@dhhs.state.nh.us      public pre-kindergarten or statewide public kindergarten
                                     program. This year the State Legislature passed legislation
                                     that requires all school districts to have kindergarten pro-
Lead Agency Contact                  grams, effective September 2009. Approximately 11 public
                                     school districts are still without kindergarten programs.
Maggie Bishop                        The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) and
Director, DCYf                       Head Start Directors Association partnered with Early
nH Department of Health and          Learning NH to launch an Early Childhood Unified Sys-
Human Services                       tem initiative in NH, as described below:
Division for Children, Youth and
families                           ♦ OHS supplemental grant funds were leveraged with those
129 Pleasant Street                  from Delta Dental and the Nellie Mae Education Founda-
                                     tion for a kick-off summit entitled, “Envisioning a Unified
Concord, nH 03301
                                     Early Childhood System in NH.”
Phone: 603-271-4440
fax: 603-271-2749                  ♦ Early Learning NH organized the summit, hosted by the
MBishop@dhhs.state.nh.us             Commissioners of Education, HHS, and Employment
                                     Security.
ACF Regional Contact
                                   ♦ Approximately 120 state and regional leaders discussed
tom Killmurray
                                     their ideas for an early childhood system. Nina Sazer
                                     O’Donnell, director of United Way of America’s “Success
ACf Region I                         by Six” program was the keynote speaker, sharing with
Room 2000                            participants the elements of a unified system as well as
JfK federal Bldg.                    strategies to achieve such a system.
Boston, MA 02203
                                   ♦ Four broad focus areas emerged from the summit:
Phone: 617-565-1104
fax: 617- 565-2493
                                         ♦ Early childhood leadership infrastructure, to include a
tom.killmurray@acf.hhs.gov                 children’s cabinet and state council on early childhood
206   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




                 education and care
             ♦ Funders collaborative to develop a shared agenda and identify strategies to secure adequate, sustain-
               able funding for the system
             ♦ Public education, such as the Born Learning screening initiative
             ♦ Economic impact report, to be undertaken by Employment Security.

      Desired Outcome

      To launch a statewide “early childhood unified system” initiative, securing support from policy makers and a
      key stakeholders.


      Actual Outcome

      The summit generated a great deal of enthusiasm to move forward on this initiative, with its four areas of
      focus. Next steps include monthly stakeholder meetings to move forward with the recommendations from the
      summit. Head Start and the HSSCO are actively involved.

      Maternal and Child Health Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Planning Grant – The HSSCO
      Director participated in the national ECCS meeting at which NH’s team identified focus areas for the
      upcoming year.


      Desired outcome

      Increase the number of children, families, and Head Start programs that benefit from coordinated health,
      child care, and family support initiatives


      Actual outcome

      The ECCS planning team co-authored and received funding for several collaborative grant projects that will
      ultimately result in coordinated health, child care, and family support initiatives.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care

      Goal

      Improve access to health and developmental screening.


      Activity

      “Watch Me Grow” is a collaborative work in progress designed to create statewide access to developmen-
      tal and other screening for young children age birth to five years, and to provide families with information,
      resources, and referrals to help their children grow and learn.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   207




Outcome

Collaborative project was developed and will be implemented in two diverse NH communities in the 2008-
09 program year. It will be co-funded by the NH Department of Education and NH Department of Health
and Human Services (HSSCO, MCH, Child Development Bureau, Behavioral Health, Early Supports and
Services, and Special Medical Services).

Oral Health

State-level

  Oral Health Advisory Board
  Virginia Barunas, RHD, BS, CHeS
  Oral Health Coordinator
  Belknap-Merrimack Head Start
  PO Box 1060
  2 Industrial Park Drive
  Concord, nH 03301
  (603) 225-3295 ext. 1108
  vbarunas@bm-cap.org


Local-level

♦ The Oral Health Advisory Board organized an oral health outreach initiative to examine 660 randomly
  selected children enrolled in Head Start. Dr. Arnie Burdick, who participates on the board, recruited two
  other dentists to collaborate on this effort: Dr. Nilfa Collins and Dr. James Dickerson. All six of NH’s
  Head Start grantees participated. Contact information for these dentists and the Head Start grantees can
  be found at the end of this report.

Welfare

Goal

Improve access to and responsiveness of Head Start and child care for families transitioning from TANF to
self-sufficiency.


Activity

Collaboration between DCYF/Head Start and the Division for Family Assistance regarding TANF extension
to promote stable housing.


Outcome

DCYF and the Division for Family Assistance developed an agreement that states that families whose chil-
dren are in temporary custody of DCYF will receive a time-limited TANF extension so that they have stable
housing when their children can be returned.
208   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Child Care

      Goal

      Improve quality among Head Start programs, as well as licensed and license-exempt child care providers.


      Activity

      Assisted with a grant application to ZERO TO THREE for continued support of the Strengthening Fami-
      lies initiative.


      Outcome

      NH’s grant proposal was accepted; ZERO TO THREE “Strengthening Families through Partnerships with
      Child Care” state project to begin in January 2008.

      Education

      Goal

      Enhance relationships among Head Start programs, early care and education programs, public schools, and
      families.


      Activity

      Supported Head Start State Parent Advisory Council Parent Advocacy Day.


      Outcome

      Parents responding to follow-up survey indicated that they had engaged in new leadership/advocacy activities
      as a result of participating in the event.

      Community Services

      Goal

      Reduce the incidence of child abuse and neglect.


      Activity

      Co-authored a collaborative grant application to document the status of children’s mental health services in
      NH and create a plan to increase access and improve services.


      Outcome

      Funding was received. Project to be implemented 2008-09.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   209




Family Literacy Services

Goal

Improve parents’ ability to make appropriate health care choices for their young children.


Activity

Plan to promote and sustain a childhood obesity initiative in NH (I Am Moving, I Am Learning).


Outcome

Planning was completed for a collaborative, two-part series and follow-up meeting on I Am Moving, I Am
Learning. Initiative to be implemented in 2008-09 in collaboration with the Head Start Quality Initiative
TA system, WIC, Head Start Directors Association and programs, UNH Cooperative Extension, the Child
Development Bureau, and other public and private partners.

Services to Children with Disabilities

Goal

Improve access to screening and mental health services.


Activities

Supported regional infant mental health teams to promote collaboration and disseminate information on
young children’s mental health in their communities.


Outcome

Teams accomplished the majority of their targeted outcomes, such as updating and distributing resource
guides to businesses, health care providers, food pantries, churches, hospitals, and child care providers. Other
accomplishments included physician outreach and consultation.

Services to Homeless Children and Families

Goal

Reduce homelessness for young children and their families.


Activity

Provided seed grants to Head Start grantees for local collaboration to address homelessness.


Outcome

Nearly all grantees sent representatives to a national conference (“Young Children without Homes”) and
disseminated information locally. One grantee has launched a local effort to better coordinate supports and
services for families who are without homes.
210   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      Several initiatives in this area were described previously, including Watch Me Grow, Early Childhood Unified
      System, state-of-the-state on children’s mental health, and Parent Advocacy Day. Additionally, the HSSCO
      Director chairs the statewide NH Interagency Coordinating Council (advisory body to Part C and Part
      B/619 of IDEA), and serves on numerous other state and regional level boards and committees. The Direc-
      tor also supported the state Parent Advisory Council chair’s application to participate in a six-day family
      leadership series sponsored by the University of NH Institute on Disability/University Center for Excellence
      on Disability, which was accepted. His participation promoted increased understanding Head Start among
      participants.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      ♦ Safe Families/Safe Homes — The HSSCO co-authored a grant proposal to the Children’s Trust Fund to
        provide cross-discipline training for early childhood professionals and family representatives using the Safe
        Families/Safe Homes curriculum. The proposal was funded, and training will take place in 2008. The goal
        is to create a collaboratively funded training model to increase capacity to provide ongoing training and
        support to early childhood professionals and family organizations on domestic violence, substance abuse
        and child abuse and neglect. The HSSCO Director serves on the project’s management team.

      ♦ Head Start/NH Department of Education, Preschool Special Education Collaboration.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director convened and facilitated the first of a series of working meetings to increase col-
        laboration between Head Start and preschool special education, including data sharing on child outcomes
        and increased access to preschool special education services for children with challenging behavior. This
        initiative will continue in 2008-09 until data sharing processes have been developed and implemented and
        access to services has been increased.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      Of the 2,001 children actually enrolled in NH Head Start, 233 (11.6%) were Hispanic or of Latino origin. In
      the two population areas with a number of Hispanic families, the Head Start grantee has employed bilingual
      teachers. The Head Start programs serving Hispanic children engage with local family services agencies to
      meet their needs. There have been no collaboration issues or state-level barriers identified regarding services
      for Hispanic children and their families to date. Access to other services will be addressed within each of the
      HSSCO initiatives, such as Watch Me Grow.



      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      NH’s approved plan for 2008-09, which begins July 1, 2008, includes activities and initiatives relative to each
      of the above-named priority areas.
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 211




                                   New Jersey


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Suzanne Burnette
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of education
100 River View Plaza               Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
P.O. Box 500                       services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
trenton, nJ 08625                  are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 609-777-2074                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 609-777-0967
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Suzanne.Burnette@doe.state.nj.us   Ready to Grow — New Jersey received a Ready Set Grow grant
                                   from the National Governors Association for early childhood
Lead Agency Contact                system-building activities. The purpose is to build comprehen-
                                   sive, coordinated early childhood systems for children from
Dr. Jacqueline Jones               birth to age five. The performance goals for Ready Set Grow
                                   include creating a coordinated governance structure through
Phone: 609-777-2074
                                   which to implement a statewide strategic plan, improving ser-
fax: 609-777-0967                  vice delivery for parents and children through increased coor-
jajones@doe.state.nj.us            dination at the state and local levels, and building an integrated
                                   data system and uniform collection requirements to improve
                                   the use of data and communication of results and trends.
ACF Regional Contact

Amanda B. Guarino                  As a result of the SWOT/STEEP analysis (Strengths, Weak-
                                   nesses, Opportunities, & Threats/Sociological, Technological,
ACf Region II
                                   Economic, Environmental, & Political), there are four subcom-
26 federal Plaza                   mittees to assist in accomplishing the performance goals: data,
Room 4114                          funding, governance, and services. Each committee met several
new York, nY 10278                 times over the reporting period. The subcommittees have spe-
                                   cific intermediate and long-term outcomes, which are aligned
Phone: 212-264-2890
                                   with the statewide strategic plan outcomes.
Amanda.Guarino@acf.hhs.gov
                                   The desired outcome is to complete the statewide strategic plan.
                                   The subcommittee is in the process of defining strategic needs
                                   and objectives. The projected date for completion is September
                                   2009. New Jersey Head Start programs and the Head Start-
                                   State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) play a major role in the
                                   development of the strategic plan.

                                   The HSSCO strategic plan objective for 2007 was to facilitate
                                   state pre-kindergarten collaboration between Head Start and
                                   the Department of Education.
212   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Abbott/Head Start Summit — An Abbott/Head Start summit was held on April 5, 2007, at the Burlington
      County Human Services building. Lucille Davy, the Commissioner of Education, and Dr. Jacqueline Jones,
      the Assistant Commissioner of the Division of Early Childhood Education attended the summit to support
      the 2007 objective. The New Jersey Head Start Association President Veronica Ray also attended the summit
      to reaffirm its support that this partnership will truly benefit Head Start children and their families.

      The theme for the summit was “Head Start & Department of Education Together for Children: Let’s Make
      It Work.” The HSSCO Director and the consultant established a vision statement for the summit: Head Start
      and DOE together for children and creating viable Head Start preschool communities. The mission was to
      promote optimal partnerships between Abbott local school districts and Head Start programs through col-
      laborative planning, best practices, and state funding. The summit focused on two priorities:

      ♦ Head Start programs without Abbott classrooms and non-Abbott school districts convened to discuss
        what they would like to see if they were to collaborate to serve preschool children in their communities.

      ♦ Head Start programs with Abbott classrooms convened with Abbott school districts to decide on
        approaches, procedures, and practices that will allow for smooth collaborations.

      As a result, a state action plan for positive outcomes in Abbott preschool communities was created.


      Accomplishments/Outcomes

      ♦ Head Start programs will now have the opportunity to submit per pupil funding (presumptive budget) or
        submit a line item budget to the local school districts. If Head Start programs select the presumptive bud-
        get, they will be able to develop their own budget in accordance with the State pre-kindergarten guidelines
        and use the flexibility to move money from one line item to another. The presumptive budget process is
        a huge success for Head Start programs. The Head Start Association has stated for many years that the
        existing Abbott budget process was burdensome and inept. The HSSCO will continue to monitor/evaluate
        the budget process and make additional recommendations when necessary.

      ♦ The Preschool Expansion/Abbott/Head Start Collaboration strategic plan includes that by September
        2008, all Head Start Abbott classrooms will be fully enrolled, thus resulting in 75 percent of Abbott-
        eligible children participating in the State-funded Head Start/Department of Education partnership. In
        2007, one Head Start program joined the State-funded Head Start/Department of Education partnership,
        bringing total of Head Start grantees located in Abbott districts partnership to 16 out of 18.

      Preschool Quality Enhancement Award — The Governor has made a serious commitment to early childhood
      education. The State of New Jersey has a new preschool expansion initiative to serve additional children liv-
      ing in poverty. The expansion includes partnering with Head Start programs serving children in non-Abbott
      districts. The expansion guidelines stipulate that programs must adhere to Abbott standards, which include:

            ♦ A certified teacher
            ♦ Maximum class size of 15 students
            ♦ Developmentally appropriate curriculum
            ♦ Adequate facilities
            ♦ Transportation, health, and other related services as needed
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   213




Head Start programs viewed this as an opportunity for programs to have certified teachers and to pay them
parity with the local school district teacher’s salary pay scale. The local school districts will supplement Head
Start funds to pay for certified teachers.

The Governor’s preschool initiative, called the Preschool Quality Enhancement Award (PQEA) Grant, is
intended to strengthen early learning for disadvantaged children living in non-Abbott school districts. The
Governor appropriated $8.5 million toward the PQEA initiative. Twelve Head Start programs received the
PQEA award; some Head Start programs received $1.1 million.

Other Activities
♦ The HSSCO Director has played a major role in promoting collaboration with Head Start programs
  statewide. In accordance with the work plan, action included:

♦ Convene summits to build effective linkages with Head Start grantees, local education agencies, and com-
  munity agencies.

♦ The HSSCO Director met with State Department of Education’s Assistant Commissioner in the Division
  of Early Childhood Education to discuss state pre-kindergarten and Head Start issues and successes.

♦ Attended statewide committees to build linkages and support for Head Start programs.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.

Health Care

Nutrition Health

Head Start and Early Head Start representatives serve on the Statewide Health Nutrition committee. The
purposes of the committee are to:

♦ Review activities regarding nutrition and physical activity that have been integrated into the overall daily
  program in child care settings.

♦ Promote best practice standards that support this goal.

The committee will serve as a working group and will provide motivation aimed at getting the message out on
a statewide basis — all of which is intended to implement New Jersey’s Obesity Prevention Action Plan.

Oral Health
Accomplishment: Oral Health Forum


Outcomes

♦ Established a Statewide Pediatric Oral Health Committee (age birth-6), subcommittee to the New Jersey
  Oral Health Coalition. Head Start and Early Head Start representatives serve on the committees.
214   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Established working relationship with the Medicaid HMO Dental Directors and Head Start and Early
        Head Start programs.

      ♦ Collaborating with the New Jersey State Medicaid Office.

      ♦ Established collaboration with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) dental
        school.


      State-level

      ♦ New Jersey has several organizational structures addressing oral health. A more detailed list of these part-
        nerships, including contact information, can be found at the end of this report.

      ♦ The New Jersey Dental Association (NJDA) was founded in 1870 and its mission “The new Jersey Dental
        Association serves and supports its member and fosters the advancement of quality, ethnical oral health-
        care for the public.” The NJDA has 4,700 dentists, or two thirds of all licensed practicing dentists in New
        Jersey as members.

      ♦ The New Jersey Oral Health Coalition’s mission is to foster and promote the equitable access of quality
        oral health care services throughout New Jersey. Coalition members include representatives from Head
        Start and Early Head Start.

      ♦ The New Jersey Pediatric Oral Health Committee was formed to plan the Oral Health Forum in May
        2007. The Committee is a subcommittee of the New Jersey Oral Health Coalition. The Committee’s pri-
        mary purpose is address oral health issues for children under six years old in the State of New Jersey. The
        Committee’s responsibilities are to review specific recommendations identified at the forum to improve
        pediatric oral health and to develop the Pediatric Oral Health Action Plan.

      ♦ Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS) is working with Head Start and Early Head Start to engage
        New Jersey’s five Medicaid Managed Care health plans along with regional partners and stakeholders who
        are committed to improving access to oral health services for young children. The HSSCO Director is on
        the workgroup to develop strategies to directly address access by engaging primary care and dental provid-
        ers to establish dental homes. Several Head Start and Early Head Start programs have been identified to
        pilot this initiative.


      Local-level

      The HSSCO Director has coordinated meetings with local Head Start and Early Head Start grantees and
      local dentists. With the help of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey, dentists are identified by geo-
      graphic locations. A listing of Head Start and Early Head Start partnerships with local dentists can be found
      at the end of this report.


      Additional Information

      The HSSCO Director is currently working with five Medicaid Manage Care Health Plans to provide dentists
      for Head Start and Early Head Start grantees in New Jersey. The goal is to have dentists for all Head Start and
      Early Head Start programs. Once Head Start and Early Head Start families become familiar and build the
      relationship with the local dentists this will lead to establishing a dental home. The HSSCO continued to con-
      vene the Pediatric Oral Health Committee to monitor and evaluate the Pediatric Oral Health Plan document.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   215




Welfare
No activities reported.

Child Care
Accomplishment

Built linkages with Head Start and Early Head Start programs, local Child Care Referral and Resource
Agencies, and the State Child Care Administrator.

Outcome

The old Abbott wrap-around contract stipulated early childhood providers to offer child care services for 245
days (full-calendar year) and ten hours (full-day). Currently, the new Abbott contract omitted specific lan-
guage for child care services. Head Start programs have the flexibility to create their calendar days and hours
services. The flexibility allows programs to offer child care services based on community needs.

Education
One Head Start program is partnering with its local school district to implement state pre-kindergarten. The
Assistant Commissioner of Division of Early Childhood Education and the HSSCO Director met with a
second Head Start program to form a partnership with the local district to provide State pre-kindergarten
services. We are hoping for full implementation of state pre-k and Head Start to begin in September 2009-10.

Community Services
♦ The HSSCO convened meetings with Managed Care Providers, Head Start program directors, State
  Medicaid Administrators, local dentists, and representatives from the Regional Office. The purpose of the
  meetings was to:

♦ Increase knowledge of Medicaid and the Medicaid HMO system.

♦ Better identify of areas of concern that may lead to increase utilization by the population.

♦ Develop more meaningful lines of communication and networking among health care professionals serv-
  ing the underserved.

♦ Provide opportunity for all parties to become better partners in meeting the mandate goal of providing
  quality dental access for all Head Start and Early Head Start children.

Family Literacy Services
No activities reported.

Services to Children with Disabilities
No activities reported.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
No activities reported.
216   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      The HSSCO Director recognizes that the New Jersey Head Start Association and Head Start programs staff
      play a vital role in supporting the HSSCO grant and achieving its goals. Recognizing this, the HSSCO has
      captured this role in the five-year strategic plan, as well as the annual plan. Monthly meetings are scheduled
      with Head Start directors and Head Start and Early Head Start staff. Program staff played a vital role in the
      development of the Pediatric Oral Health plan, and they are members of the Pediatric Oral Health Commit-
      tee and the New Jersey Oral Health Coalition.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      Deferred until 2009-10.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      Family Literacy Services
      Deferred until 2009-10.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      The Division of Early Childhood Education has established a Preschool Intervention Support Team (PIRT)/
      Head Start committee to focus on coordination, articulation, transition process, and cross-sector Professional
      Development for Head Start Disability Coordinators, LEA Special Education Coordinators, and the State
      619 Coordinator. The committee will also address the referral process for children identified for evaluation for
      special education; articulate similarities between Abbott and Head Start programs; and discuss ideas for best
      practice for collaboration between the two systems.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      The Education of Homeless Children and Youth Program Coordinator and the HSSCO Director will
      convene a series of meetings with Head Start and Early Head Start programs, local school district homeless
      coordinators, and community services providers to discuss local planning processes to enhance coordination,
      outreach, and responsibilities for shared families. Meetings will cover the northern, central, and southern parts
      of the state. Meetings are scheduled for September 23-25, 2008.

      Oral Health
      ♦ Continue the collaboration with the Manage Care Dental Directors and Head Start and Early Head Start
        programs. The goal is to ensure that every Head Start and Early Head Start child have a dental home.

      ♦ Continue working with the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS), Inc., is a nonprofit health policy
        resource center dedicated to improving health care quality for low-income children and adults, people with
        chronic illness and disabilities, frail elders, and racially and ethnically diverse populations experiencing
        disparities in care. CHCS works directly with states and Federal agencies, health plans, and providers to
        develop innovative programs that better serve people with complex and high-cost health care needs. The
        HSSCO Director and CHCS are collaborating on a project called New Jersey Smiles: A Medicaid Qual-
        ity Collaborative to improve Oral Health in Young Kids. New Jersey Head Start and Early Head Start
        programs are part of this project and will be part of the NJ Smiles leadership group.
                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 217




                               New Mexico


Collaboration Director         Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                               areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Dan Haggard
                               plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Children, Youth and families
Department of new Mexico
                               Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
P.O. Drawer 5160               services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
1120 Paseo de Peralta          are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Santa fe, nM 87502-5160        at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 505-827-8409            in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 505-476-0490
                               ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO)
dan.haggard@state.nm.us          attended the New Mexico Pre-Kindergarten Collaborative
                                 Meeting held in the capitol building. The HSSCO Direc-
Lead Agency Contact              tor, in partnership with the CYFD NM Pre-kindergarten
                                 Administrator, visited some pre-kindergarten programs,
Dan Haggard                      which included Head Start grantees.
Phone: 505-827-6614
                               ♦ The Early Childhood Professional Development Institute
fax: 505-476-0490
                                 was held in Fall 2007 for Head Start staff and families,
dan.haggard@state.nm.us          as well as NM pre-kindergarten and child care staff and
                                 families. The Institute was supported by the HSSCO and
ACF Regional Contact             provided by the NM Head Start Association.

Shannon Hills                  ♦ The HSSCO Director attended SPARK NM meetings,
ACf Region VI                    which further aspects of transition at all levels, but espe-
                                 cially transitioning to kindergarten. The HSSCO was pres-
1301 Young Street
                                 ent at Early Childhood Alliance meetings and the Early
Room 925 B                       Childhood Action Network (ECAN) “Fall Policy Summit”
Dallas, tX 75202                 state-wide planning session. The HSSCO attended Early
Phone: 214-767-2976              Childhood Interagency Team (ECIAT) meetings. ECIAT
                                 is an avenue for state agency administrative representa-
fax: 214-767-2038
                                 tives to continue the process of building teams and sharing
Shannon.hills@acf.hhs.gov        resources in the area of early childhood care and education.

                               ♦ The HSSCO conducted five early childhood focus groups
                                 around the State in Summer 2007 in order to gather infor-
                                 mation regarding resources and systems available for early
                                 childhood care and education. Information was presented to
                                 appropriate state agency staff in Santa Fe at the fifth meet-
                                 ing. A summary document was developed and distributed.
218   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      Supported the Johnson & Johnson Health Care Institute through UCLA and funded by Pfizer, Inc. The
      Institute is providing health care information and a resource guide to Head Start families across New Mexico
      through a two-year cycle. Head Start staff received training in June 2007, then returned to their programs to
      recruit and work with families, with a follow-up visit for three months. The HSSCO Director attended the
      Health Care Institute two-day training for Head Start Staff training, as well as two agency family training
      events.

      The HSSCO partnered with the Oral Health Office of the New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) in
      securing a mini-grant from the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors. The mini-grant pro-
      vided support to Presbyterian Medical Services, a Head Start grantee in Santa Fe County. Work included oral
      health screening, education for parents and children, and fluoride varnish clinic.

      Oral Health
      Information on New Mexico’s state- and local-level partnerships can be found at the end of this report.

      Welfare
      The HSSCO Director attended meetings addressing early childhood issues, including welfare, through the
      Early Childhood Alliance.

      Child Care
      The HSSCO supported the inclusion of child care providers in the Early Childhood Professional Develop-
      ment Institute, sponsored by the New Mexico Head Start Association.

      The HSSCO invited the Child Care and Education President to participate in the Early Childhood Higher
      Education Task Force subcommittee on Program Administration courses.

      Education
      The HSSCO supported an Early Childhood Higher Education Professional Development Summit, which al-
      lowed faculty from two- and four-year institutions around the State to continue their work on revisions to the
      career lattice, professional development competencies, and courses. The HSSCO Director served on the Early
      Childhood Higher Education committee for Program Administration Courses at the AA and BA levels.

      Community Services
      The HSSCO supported and attended the FLAN (Family Leadership Action Network) conference. The
      HSSCO supported and attended the Family Leadership/Advocacy Institute for Head Start families.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   219




Family Literacy Services
The HSSCO supported the Health Care Institute from UCLA Johnson & Johnson, with funding from
Pfizer Inc., which provides training through health care literacy for families. The HSSCO Director provided
information to the DOH Director of Oral Health regarding an oral health guide for families from the same
authors of the health guide from the Health Care Institute.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO Director serves on the state Transition Steering Committee. The HSSCO Director has contin-
ued working with partners from DOH and the Public Education Department on a Memorandum of Under-
standing for transitioning from Part C to Part B. The HSSCO Director served on the Infant Mental Health
Committee. The HSSCO Director presented Part C and Part B of the Early Intervention System transition
information at state Transition Conference. The HSSCO Director serves on the state team for SpecialQuest.
SpecialQuest provides a system of training for staff and families in the area of inclusion.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
Work continues through meetings for the Early Childhood Alliance and the policy arm, Early Childhood
Action Network, to improve systems for all children, including homeless children and their families.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ The HSSCO is a member of the Early Childhood Alliance, which supports all early childhood related
  aspects within the State, from funding through professional development.

♦ Represents Head Start at the NM Pre-K Collaboration meetings for government agencies.

♦ Presented information about the Health Care Institute at the Child Development Board.

♦ Supports the structure of the Early Childhood Action Network, which supports and suggests policies for
  early childhood care and education.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Supported the development of a Web site to serve Head Start grantees, early childhood stakeholders,
  especially families, and the community.

♦ Supported information on Web maintenance for Head Start grantees, so that their links can be updated as
  needed.

♦ Attended Government to Government meetings, which are held twice each year for Native American
  students’ education systems, including Head Start. The meetings are sponsored through the Public Educa-
  tion Department, Bureau of Indian Education (BIE). The meetings bring together Tribal Leaders, BIE
  officials, Head Start, Native American families, and public school district officials serving Native popula-
  tions to discuss and examine data, current trends in education, and promising research for indigenous
  populations.
220   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      Information regarding bilingual and ESL training has been sent to Head Start grantees.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      ♦ Extend focus to more areas of support for the homeless.

      ♦ Refine and further develop the HSSCO Web site.

      ♦ Develop more support for services to Hispanic children.

      ♦ Continue a focus of providing support for families through community action.
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 221




                                       New York


Collaboration Director                 Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                       areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Robert G. frawley, Director
                                       plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
nYS Council on Children and families
52 Washington Street                   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Suite 99 West Building                 services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Rensselaer, nY 12144                   are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 518-473-8081                    at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 518-473-2570
                                       in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
bob.frawley@ccf.state.ny.us            Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Plan — The
                                       Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) Direc-
ACF Regional Contact                   tor serves as a key member of several initiatives designed to
                                       create a system of high-quality early childhood services. This
Amanda Guarino                         includes serving as co-chair of ECCS. A significant part of the
                                       planning process included developing better linkages between
ACf Region II
                                       Head Start, child care, and pre-kindergarten programs, and
26 federal Plaza                       linking those programs with health care, foster care, mental
Room 4114                              health, substance abuse and other services designed to meet the
new York, nY 10278                     needs of young children and their families.
Phone: 212-264-2890 ext. 123
                                       The plan contains 34 strategies across four focus areas (Healthy
fax: 212-264-4826                      Children, Strong Families, Early Learning, and Supportive
Amanda.guarino@acf.hhs.gov             Communities Coordinated Systems) that lay a foundation for
                                       building a comprehensive early childhood system. A system
                                       comprised of coordinated and responsive services and resources
                                       that support the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive
                                       health and development of all young children and their fami-
                                       lies. Implementation efforts have begun and include:

                                       ♦ Developing a Children’s Cabinet to oversee the planning
                                         and coordination of services for young children and their
                                         families.

                                       ♦ Implementing a comprehensive four-year strategy to enroll
                                         every child in the State in health insurance.

                                       ♦ Establishing a statewide parenting education initiative.

                                       ♦ Developing and implementing an early care and education
                                         trainers’ credential and trainers’ registry.
222   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Developing a comprehensive data report on the health and well-being of young children and families.

      The plan was completed in Spring 2006. In anticipation of the election of a new governor in Fall 2007, the
      plan was put on hold until the new administration took office. The plan is currently being prepared for dis-
      semination.

      The development of a Children’s Cabinet was a major step toward building an early childhood comprehensive
      services system. The Council on Children and Families, including the HSSCO Director, serve as staff to the
      Cabinet. Initial Cabinet priorities include expanding children’s access to health insurance and implementa-
      tion of Universal Pre-kindergarten, as well as the development of a Quality Rating and Improvement System
      (QRIS) to assess, improve, and communicate the level of quality in a given early care and education setting.
      This is important to improve program quality, educate parents and create cross-system alignment.

      It has recently been determined that the Governor will designate the Children’s Cabinet as the Early Learn-
      ing Council, and that the Early Learning Council and the ECCS Initiative will be merged under the Chil-
      dren’s Cabinet. This will provide the highest level of support for these two initiatives.

      Early Childhood Health and Development Data Report — As part of the ECCS Planning Initiative, HSSCO
      staff are developing a special data report on early childhood health and development. The report provides ap-
      proximately 70 indicators of child health and development. Much of this data has never been published.

      Comprehensive Infant and Toddler Services — During the past few years, the HSSCO has worked with several
      groups to ensure that services for infants and toddlers are of the highest quality possible. This has included:

      ♦ Providing support to the New York State Association for the Education of Young Children and others to
        develop and launch the Infant/Toddler Care and Education credential.

      ♦ Working with the New York State Child Care Coordinating Council to organize two statewide infant/
        toddler conferences.

      ♦ Providing funding to reimburse meeting costs and other expenses to seven regional infant/toddler groups
        to support community efforts to build systems of comprehensive infant and toddler services modeled after
        Early Head Start.


      Additionally, the HSSCO worked with NYS Child Care Coordinating Council and New York Network,
      the State’s not-for-profit video production department, to produce broadcasts on building community col-
      laborations. The first, a live 60-minute broadcast, highlighted a successful cross-systems early education and
      intervention initiative in Chemung County. The broadcast reached over 200 people in 17 locations across
      New York State. Participants included representatives of child care programs, colleges and universities, social
      services, early intervention services, child care resource and referral programs, Early Head Start programs, and
      others interested in quality care for infants and toddlers. Facilitators and participants were provided support
      documents, including the Collaborator’s Tool Kit developed by NYS Child Care Coordinating Council and
      the HSSCO, and were asked to discuss ways to stimulate or strengthen the integration of service delivery for
      programs that reach infants, toddlers, and their families.

      A second video conference to be released in Spring 2008 will focus on using data effectively to design,
      develop, and evaluate services. This is a useful tool for guiding Early Head Start programs in completing the
      community needs assessments. A copy of the DVD will be sent to all Early Head Start programs in the State.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   223




Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
♦ Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Plan — One of four focus areas of the ECCS plan is
  Healthy Children, which includes strategies to address prenatal care, breast-feeding support, access to
  health insurance, accessibility of a medical home for all children, children’s social and emotional develop-
  ment and mental health, and child care health and safety. The HSSCO works closely with the ECCS co-
  chair, who is the director of the Bureau of Child and Adolescent Health, to implement these strategies.

♦ Prevention of Childhood Obesity — The Region II T/TA Team invited select Head Start programs, and
  representatives from the HSSCO and the NYS Department of Health to attend a three-day I Am Moving,
  I Am Learning (IMIL) in October 2007. The IMIL sessions resulted in programs committing to making
  staff and program changes that encourage healthier food choices, increased activity for staff and children,
  and educational messages for everyone, including the families of Head Start and Early Head Start children.
  TA specialists have facilitated subsequent meetings of participants across the state. The HSSCO has sup-
  ported these efforts while working to bridge this initiative with others sponsored by the Health Department.

♦ Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders — Recently, the HSSCO facilitated two interagency discussions on how
  to better serve families affected by prenatal alcohol exposure. While there are programs in New York State
  funded to support families affected by prenatal alcohol exposure, there is a statewide need to better under-
  stand existing resources and coordinate screening, prevention, and intervention services. This has led the
  HSSCO to partner with the NYS Office of Children and Family Services and the NYS Office of Alcohol
  and Substance Abuse Services to organize an interdisciplinary work group of nine state agencies. Once
  agreement on how to proceed is established with the state agencies, efforts will begin to involve program
  representatives including Head Start.

♦ Children’s Mental Health Plan — The HSSCO Director was invited to serve on the NYS Office of Mental
  Health Committee to develop a Children’s Mental Health Plan. The Director attempted unsuccessfully to
  get broader Head Start representation in the planning process.

As a member of a work group addressing social and emotional development, the Director successfully per-
suaded members of the group to expand its focus to include young children, despite a legislative mandate to
focus specifically on school-age children. To support the effort to include the social and emotional develop-
ment needs of young children, the Director led a subcommittee charged with drafting a portion of the plan
focused on young children and special populations (i.e., children in foster care and the juvenile justice systems,
and children with disabilities). The report is currently in draft form and is scheduled to be released for review
soon. Forums are being planned to obtain input on the planning document.

Oral Health

State-level

The HSSCO has partnered with the Bureau of Dental Health to address the oral health needs of low-income
children and families. In 2007, the focus of efforts was developing of a statewide oral health coalition, of which
the HSSCO is a member, and conducting a surveillance study of the dental health of children in Head Start.

The NYS Oral Health Coalition is comprised of over 150 individuals and organizations, including several
224   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Head Start programs that are working together to ensure that all children, particularly, low-income children
      have access to dental care services.

      The dental health surveillance study has been completed and will soon be released. Copies will be sent to all
      Head Start and Early Head Start programs. The study included providing dental screening for a stratified
      sample of children in Head Start programs across the state to demonstrate the dental health needs of low-
      income children. An unintended side benefit of the study has been the development of relationships between
      Head Start programs and the dental practitioners supporting the study in areas where dental services are
      scarce.


      Local-level

      Below is a sampling of local partnerships as reported by various Head Start programs in the State. A more
      detailed listing of programs and partnerships is provided at the end of this report.

      Agri-Business Child Development (Migrant Head Start) has partnerships with more than 25 local dentists and
      dental clinics. Some of the participating dentists serve on the programs Health Advisory committee. Some
      dentists visit programs.

      Administration for Children’s Services (ACS) in New York City has several dental partnerships including:

      ♦ New York University’s College of Dentistry, which provides a dental van and offers screenings for children
        as well as dental training for parents and staff. Children who require further intervention are referred to
        the College.

      ♦ Children’s Aid Society dental van, which visits programs twice a year and serves only the borough of Man-
        hattan. Children receive a dental examination. Those children requiring further intervention are referred to
        local dental providers.

      ♦ Brookdale Medical Center Pediatric Dentistry provides a dental van that goes to the Delegate Agencies
        and conducts dental examinations. Children needing further intervention appointments are made at the
        dental clinic. Children are brought to the clinic by the parents.

      Yeled V’ Yalda in New York City is a Grantee and a Delegate of ACS). Yeled V’ Yalda Early Childhood Cen-
      ter’s partnership with Ezra Medical Center is the only Head Start program in New York State to provide a
      fully functional and staffed mobile dental unit that brings dental care directly to the Head Start program. The
      mobile unit is fully staffed with three pediatric dental specialists who are Board Certified or eligible in there
      specialty. A dedicated staff of assistants and coordinators to facilitate care are part of the team. Since 2006, the
      partnership has provided more than 2,500 screenings and followed up with about 1,700 procedures, covering
      all of Yeled V’ Yalda’s Head start programs.

      Other Head Start programs that have partnerships with local dentists and dental clinics include:

          Warren County Head Start
          ABC Head Start and early Head Start
          ulster County Community Action Head Start
          Cattaraugus-Wyoming Head Start
          Opportunities for Chenango Head Start
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   225




  Saratoga County economic Opportunity Head Start
  Holy Cross Head Start-erie County
  Wayne Community Action Head Start
  CAO Head Start-Buffalo


Welfare
In partnership with NYS Office of Child Support, the HSSCO helped to disseminate to Head Start and
Early Head Start programs the Fatherhood Manual, a publication developed by the Office of Child Support
to encourage non-custodial fathers to remain in the lives of their children. The manual provides helpful sug-
gestions for father involvement while encouraging responsibility for the economic welfare of their children.

Child Care
Recognizing the role early educators and child care providers can play in the primary prevention of child
maltreatment, a state team including the HSSCO was accepted for participation in “State Partnerships for
Prevention: Reducing the Risk of Maltreatment of Very Young Children” by the National Center for Infants,
Toddlers, and Families (ZERO TO THREE).

A multi-disciplinary training team was selected to ensure statewide availability of the training in various
programs serving infants, toddlers, and their families. The team consisted of representatives from the HSSCO,
the State Child Care Administrator, the Children and Family Trust Fund, New York City’s Administration
for Children Services, State Education Department, and Prevent Child Abuse New York.

The trainers began training staff and administrators of child care, home visiting, early intervention, public
television, Family Resource Centers, Head Start and Early Head Start programs, Universal Pre-kindergarten,
and New York City’s Community Partnership Initiative and Rethinking Child Care Initiatives. Representa-
tives of the partner organizations, including the HSSCO, serve on a leadership team responsible for working
with ZERO TO THREE and encouraging cross-system training. ZERO TO THREE staff offer continuing
technical assistance, quarterly conference calls, and monthly distance learning experiences for all trainers. By
the end of 2007, 13 trainers had conducted at least one 90-minute session using components from the PCAN
curriculum. The first phase of this initiative ends October 2008.

Education
Universal Pre-kindergarten (UPK) — While Universal Pre-kindergarten was established in 1998, progress
toward full implementation had been very slow until Gov. Spitzer’s 2007 inaugural address in which he de-
clared his intention to fully implement UPK in four years. To initiate this effort, a $146.7 million increase was
included in the 2007 budget and an additional $72 million in the 2008 budget. This new infusion of funding
has had a significant effect on both the quality and availability of early learning programs. However, it has not
occurred without problems.

The HSSCO Director has continued to work closely with the Children’s Cabinet, the State Education
Department, and advocacy organizations to develop and implement strategies to ensure that the expansion
of UPK occurs in a way that maximizes existing early care and education programs. These efforts included
conducting a series of four regional forums for school districts and potential collaborators to provide infor-
mation on UPK, Head Start, and child care. The forums were conducted as a collaborative effort of the State
Education Department, Head Start Region II, Region II TA Network, and the NYS Child Care Coordi-
nating Council. The HSSCO also supported a survey of school superintendents of districts that have as yet
not participated as well as community and statewide early childhood experts to determine the reasons why
226   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      districts have not developed UPK programs. The information obtained through the survey was used to sup-
      port efforts of the Children’s Cabinet and Advisory Board to develop a set of recommendations to change the
      program to address issues identified.

      Parenting Education — As part of an effort to implement strategies that were included in the Early Child-
      hood Comprehensive Systems plan, an interagency group (including the HSSCO Director) applied for and
      was accepted for participation in the University of North Carolina’s PREVENT Institute. Through their
      participation, the group further developed their strategies for strengthening and expanding parenting educa-
      tion services.

      To implement these strategies, the organizing group established a statewide parenting education task force,
      which met for the first time in March 2007. Now called the New York State Parenting Education Partner-
      ship (NYSPEP), the membership of the Steering Committee includes a Head Start program director and the
      HSSCO, as well as representatives from the Children and Family Trust Fund, State Education and Health
      Departments, Prevent Child Abuse New York, NYS Association of Family and Consumer Science Educators,
      Parents as Teachers, Children’s Institute of Rochester, SCO Family Services and Homes for the Homeless,
      both in New York City, and the National Parenting Education Network.

      The NYS Parenting Education Partnership held a second general meeting in September 2007 and established
      five work groups focused on:

            ♦ Assessing the availability of parenting education services.
            ♦ Examining best practices in parenting education programs.
            ♦ Designing methods of evaluating effectiveness in parenting education.
            ♦ Developing methods to increase public understanding of positive parenting practices.
            ♦ Promoting professional development for parent educators.


      The work groups have all developed and are now implementing work plans leading to specific project out-
      comes.

      www.nysfamilyresources.org — In 1986, the Council on Children and Families published the Family Resource
      Book as a tool to help parents gain the education and training they need to deal effectively with the many
      issues they face in raising children. Over the years, this has been the most highly requested publication pro-
      duced by the Council. Because of the success of this document, the HSSCO decided to update the informa-
      tion and make it available as a Web-based resource.

      This led to designing and developing a Web site where parents and professionals can easily search a rich data-
      base of books, magazines, periodicals, and Web-based resources with information related to child and family
      development. The www.nysfamilyresources.org Web site will be launched in Spring 2008. It will include in-
      formation on how to obtain the books and other publications and will eventually serve as a one-stop location
      for related state agency publications.

      Hard copies of the resource will also be made available so that families without access to the Internet will still
      have the opportunity to benefit from the materials. Hard copies will be provided to all Head Start and Early
      Head Start programs as well as libraries and family resource centers.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   227




Community Services
Governance Training Initiative — Using supplemental funding from the Office of Head Start, the HSSCO
completed a project in 2007 to provide governance training to support effective Head Start policy councils
and governing boards of Head Start sponsoring organizations. Implementation initially concentrated on ad-
dressing the governance training needs of Administration for Children Services (ACS) delegate agencies in
New York City prior to their citywide review. This resulted in 25 training sessions serving 400 delegate agency
policy committee members, agency board members and administrative staff of 50 agencies.

In total the project provided over 75 workshops involving over 75 programs and 600 participants. While each
training session was customized to meet the individual needs of the program, the focus of most of the train-
ing sessions was on the roles and responsibilities of Head Start boards of directors, with emphasis on their
legal and fiduciary responsibilities as defined by the Head Start Program Performance Standards and on shared
decision-making with the Delegate Agency Policy Committees (DAPCs) and grantee Policy Councils.

Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services — The HSSCO Director was asked by the Director of the
Bureau of Treatment of the NYS Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) to meet with
treatment and legal staff to address the needs of children of women in residential rehabilitation programs.

OASAS licenses several residential treatment programs for alcohol and substance abusing women. Many of
the women in these programs have children who reside in the centers with them. While services vary by pro-
gram, there are no specific requirements for meeting the developmental needs of the children. The HSSCO
Director advised the staff of OASAS how to connect these children and their families with Head Start, Early
Head Start, and other early childhood programs.

To support facility staff in helping women in their programs meet their child’s developmental needs, the
HSSCO Director developed a report describing New York’s system of early childhood services including how
families can locate and enroll their child in Head Start and Early Head Start.

Family Literacy Services
In recent years, Federal guidance for Even Start Family Literacy programs has emphasized the importance
of family support for children’s early literacy. With this in mind, the HSSCO accepted an invitation from the
State Even Start Director to attend its spring meeting, a symposium designed to emphasize the benefits of
cross systems planning for strong sustainable pre-school programs. The State Education Department’s (SED)
Early Education and Reading Initiatives staff is responsible for administering Even Start, Reading First, and
implementation of Universal Pre-kindergarten.

In addition to SED and HSSCO staff, the planning team also includes representatives of the New York State
chapter of the National Even Start Association, SED’s Director of Educational TV & Public Broadcasting,
and RMC Research, the training and technical assistance contractor for New York’s Even Start Family Lit-
eracy programs. The symposium will bring together community teams from Central New York with a focus
on building early learning collaborations that will maximize Universal Pre-kindergarten and existing early
learning program resources. The first symposium will be held in Syracuse in May 2008.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO has been working with staff of the Region II T/TA Network and the State Education Depart-
ment to revise the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on the Preschool Special Education Program.
The MOU is now in draft form and being reviewed. Once approved and signed, the MOU will be made avail-
228   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      able to all Head Start programs and school districts in the state. At that time, efforts will begin to develop a
      similar agreement with the NYS Health Department regarding the Early Intervention program.

      Also, the HSSCO Director served as a member of the Temporary Task Force on Preschool Special Education.
      The Task Force released its report in November and efforts are underway to implement the report’s recom-
      mendations. Many of the recommendations should make it easier for Head Start programs to effectively serve
      children with disabilities.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      The HSSCO Director serves on the State Education Department’s Committee on Homeless Education. One
      of the goals of the Committee is to facilitate improved linkages between schools and early care and educa-
      tion programs serving homeless children. The HSSCO Director developed a guide to NYS Early Learning
      programs that included descriptions of the eight major early learning programs in New York State with an
      emphasis on Head Start and Early Head Start. The guide will be provided to homeless education liaisons
      across the state to help them meet their responsibilities under the McKinney-Vento Act to support homeless
      families in obtaining high-quality early learning services for their children.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      The HSSCO actively seeks opportunities to involve representatives of the Head Start community in a wide
      variety of state and local initiatives designed to improve services to children and families. To accomplish this,
      the HSSCO Director serves as a key member of several initiatives designed to create a system of high-quality
      early childhood services. This involvement allows him to connect Head Start representatives to these initia-
      tives where appropriate.

      The HSSCO Director is co-chair of the NYS Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Planning Initiative.
      To ensure that Head Start is adequately represented in this planning process, two directors of Head Start and
      Early Head Start programs, as well as two Head Start parents, were included in the planning work group.

      The HSSCO Director also serves as a steering committee member of several other initiatives including: NYS
      Child Care Coordinating Council’s Quality Rating Improvement System Initiative where he facilitated the
      involvement of several Head Start program representatives; Department of Transportation’s United We Ride
      Work Group; NYS Parenting Education (a Head Start program director and a Head Start parent); NYS
      Home Visiting Program Council (an Early Head Start program director); Statewide Home Visiting Program
      Initiative (an Early Head Start program director); NYS Child and Family Trust Fund Advisory Committee;
      NYS Department of Education’s Reading and Literacy Partnership, Homeless Education Committee (two
      Head Start program directors, Region II Office of Head Start and the TA Network), and Universal Pre-kin-
      dergarten External Advisory Committee (Head Start director); and the Temporary Task Force on Preschool
      Special Education.

      The HSSCO continues to work closely with the New York State Head Start Association, Head Start Tech-
      nical Assistance Network, Region II Head Start, and others to develop and implement project activities.
      Maintaining relationships with partners in the Head Start community is crucial for the Collaboration Project
      to stay up to date on issues of importance to Head Start programs.

      The HSSCO will continue to work closely with its Head Start partners and seek alliances with agencies and
      organizations from outside the Head Start community to increase opportunities for successful project devel-
      opment and implementation.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   229




Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Under the E-Rate program, over the past several years, Head Start programs in New York State have ap-
  plied for and received funding for discount bands of up to 90 percent of their commercial costs. This fall,
  further clarification regarding the eligibility of Head Start facilities was requested of the State Education
  Department, specifically to determine if these facilities meet the state definition of a school.

♦ Staff of the Council on Children and Families have worked for months to clarify this issue and convince
  the State Education Department to respond positively to the request for information qualifying Head
  Start programs for this initiative. It was recently announced that Head Start programs in New York State
  are indeed eligible for E-Rate discounts. The HSSCO Director has informed programs of this eligibility
  and will work with the Regional Office and TA Network staff to support program efforts to successfully
  apply for these funds.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
There are over 144 different languages and dialects spoken in New York State. Therefore, attention to non-
English speaking populations is a significant consideration in planning all HSSCO activities. To the extent
possible, all large initiatives carried out by the HSSCO include representatives of language minorities. In
other instances, like the Governance Training project and the dental health surveillance study, where direct
contact with non-English speaking program representatives, children, and families is involved, efforts are
made to have native language speakers present and have documents and forms translated into the appropriate
language.

One project being carried out by the HSSCO that is directly related to non-English speaking minority
populations is the Immigrant Data project. The HSSCO recently received a small grant from the Annie E.
Casey Foundation to study the extent to which immigrant families with young children make use of early care
and education programs including Head Start and Early Head Start. The study will look at enrollment pat-
terns, cultural preferences and socio-economic factors that influence enrollment, community capacity to meet
the needs of children of immigrant families, and how immigrant parents make decisions regarding children’s
participation in early care and education programs. This report should prove useful in developing strategies for
better meeting the early care and education needs of children in immigrant families.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Plan provides a framework for several cross system initia-
tives designed to provide the services and supports that families need to raise healthy children. While Federal
funding of health, education, and human services remains categorical, New York and other states and commu-
nities are working to integrate services to improve our ability to meet the multiple needs of families. Systems
being developed seek to serve the family as a whole and build on their strengths rather than address their
weaknesses. The HSSCO has and will continue to play an important role in the development of these systems.
230   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 231




                                   North Carolina


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Khari M. Garvin
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Public Instruction
Office of School Readiness         Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
2075 Mail Service Center           services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
1110 navaho Drive                  are supporting Head Start/Child Care/ pre-kindergarten collaborations
Suite 301                          at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Raleigh, nC 27699
                                   in State pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 919-431-2005                The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) has
fax: 919-855-6841                  worked diligently to promote access to comprehensive ser-
Khari.Garvin@ncmail.net            vices for all low-income children through state-level and local
                                   partnerships. The HSSCO is situated in the NC Office of
                                   School Readiness and is housed with NC’s pre-kindergarten
Lead Agency Contact                program called More At Four (MAF). In the midst of a $50
                                   million MAF expansion, the HSSCO Director actively worked
John Pruette                       in 2007 to strengthen state-level linkages between Head Start
executive Director, OSR            and MAF by participating on the MAF Expansion task force.
Phone: 919-981-5303                Strategies were identified and implemented by this group to
                                   eliminate barriers to and develop incentives for the collabora-
fax: 919-855-6841
                                   tion of Head Start programs and MAF.
John.Pruette@ncmail.net
                                   Consistent with the goals of the 2007-12 funding application,
ACF Regional Contact               the HSSCO also worked with the MAF Office to convene
                                   regional meetings across the State to generate interest in Head
Bobby Griffin                      Start /pre-kindergarten collaboration. In 2006, Head Start
ACf Region IV                      programs served approximately 11% of those children funded
                                   through MAF. Since the 2007 MAF expansion and the efforts
Sam nunn federal Center
                                   previously mentioned, Head Start programs now account for
61 forsyth Street SW               15% of those children funded through MAF. This statistic is
Suite 4M60                         reflective of solid progress and puts the HSSCO on pace to
                                   achieve one of the stated outcomes in the 2007-12 plan.
Atlanta, GA 30303-8909
Phone: 404-562-2874
                                   The HSSCO has also worked to expand the access of compre-
fax: 404-562-2983                  hensive services to low-income children by working with early
bobby.griffin@acf.hhs.gov          childhood county officials to reduce competition and increase
                                   collaboration, particularly through the implementation of a
                                   “single portal of entry” model of recruitment and enrollment.
                                   This has been done consistently throughout 2007 and is also a
                                   stated goal of the 2007-12 funding application.
232   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      The HSSCO has begun planning efforts in 2007 (in partnership with the State Smart Start Office and the
      Division of Child Development) to create a state-funded Early Head Start pilot project. This effort began in
      October and is still under development. This initiative will expand Early Head Start services to eligible chil-
      dren currently un-served in selected counties throughout the State. It will also strengthen the collaboration
      opportunities between private child care providers and Early Head Start programs, as many of the children
      participating in this initiative will be served in the context of these collaborative partnerships.

      Finally, the HSSCO Director serves on the Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) Advisory Council,
      which informs the scope and direction of child care resources and referral agencies across the State.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      The HSSCO has addressed this priority in 2007 through several initiatives. The first is supporting the work of
      University of North Carolina Chapel Hill’s School of Public Health to secure and administer the Early Head
      Start Oral Health Initiative funded by the Office of Head Start. This initiative helps to raise awareness and
      increase prevention of early childhood caries in infants and toddlers served in Early Head Start programs.

      The second initiative is the convening of several regional trainings for Head Start health service staff on
      effective health and safety practice (inside and outside of the classroom) including: preventing and manag-
      ing illness, children with disabilities, preventive health care, and many other topics. These will be presented
      in collaboration with the Department of Public Health and NC Central University Department of Nursing.
      This effort resulted from the HSSCO’s participation with the Child Care Health Collaboration Group. The
      planning for this initiative began in 2007; the implementation will begin in 2008. Both this goal and the one
      previously mentioned are named in the HSSCO 2007-12 funding application.

      The HSSCO Director began participating with the FutureThink advisory group/think-tank that trouble-
      shoots solutions to health issues facing young children birth to five in the State. Finally, the HSSCO Direc-
      tor serves on the NC Outdoor Learning Environment alliance. This group promotes physical education and
      outdoor learning initiatives for NC’s early care and education system, with a focus on Head Start. This alliance
      has promoted statewide trainings related to this area at Head Start conferences and other early childhood
      meetings in 2007. Furthermore, the alliance has received funding from the Head Start Region IV Office to
      conduct an Outdoor Learning Institute for Head Start programs in 2008. Participation with this alliance is
      also one of the stated goals of the 2007-12 funding application.

      Oral Health
      The HSSCO conducted a dental services needs-assessment among Head Start and Early Head Start pro-
      grams across the State, and created a pilot agreement with a mobile dental unit to increase the availability of
      services to Head Start programs. The agreement ensures that dental screenings and follow-up services will be
      provided to Head Start children with Medicaid, as well as to uninsured children in under-served parts of the
      State. The agreement further provides that Head Start programs will be charged a discounted rate of 20 per-
      cent less than the Medicaid fee schedule for services rendered to uninsured children. A listing of oral health
      partners is provided at the end of this report.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   233




Welfare
The HSSCO purposes to assist Head Start programs with developing strategies to serve all eligible children
and families that are TANF participants. This includes partnering with the Division of Social Services to
the extent that the Division actively promotes Head Start as an option to families with young children who
currently receive welfare benefits. As stated previously, the HSSCO Director serves on the state CCR&R
Advisory Council, which has served to increase Head Start’s visibility to TANF participants in NC. In Year
2, the HSSCO will develop cross-training opportunities for Head Start family support staff and DSS staff in
understanding the potential that exists for the two entities to provide seamless services to consumers.

Child Care
See the section on Head Start/child care/pre-kindergarten collaborations above.

Education
The HSSCO has developed several initiatives in 2007 to address this priority. The first is a joint venture proj-
ect with the HSSCO and the NC Campus Compact civic organization. The “NC-ACTS! – Head Start Proj-
ect” is the initiative in which students pursuing degrees in Early Childhood Education will provide a mini-
mum of 300 volunteer service hours at a local Head Start program. Their volunteer hours will provide “release
time” for Head Start teaching staff who are currently in school to further their own professional development.

In 2007, the HSSCO began planning a similar initiative in collaboration with AmeriCorps and Smart Start.
Once again, “release time” opportunities will be created for Head Start teaching staff who are returning to
school to earn higher levels of education. The planning for this initiative began in 2007 and will be imple-
mented in 2008.

Another 2007 education initiative is a joint effort between the HSSCO, the NC Community College System,
the Head Start T/TA Network, and the Division of Child Development. The effort centers on the develop-
ment of a state equivalent to the national CDA credential. In August 2007, a proposal was sent to Washing-
ton, D.C., to develop both a preschool and infant-toddler state equivalent to the national CDA credential.
Each proposal is based on a collection of six classes offered by the Community College system that, when
completed, will: 1) train students in accordance with CDA competencies, and 2) satisfy about one-third of the
requirements for an AA in early childhood education.

The increased Head Start/MAF collaborations referenced in an earlier section have also helped to raise the
education levels of Head Start teachers in the State. MAF requires lead teachers to have a birth – kindergar-
ten certification and assistant teachers to have an AA degree. The requirements and supplemental funding of
MAF have helped Head Start programs in NC to achieve these goals.

In 2007, the HSSCO partnered with the T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood Scholarship initiative to convene a
series of regional meetings to promote the participation of Head Start and Early Head Start programs. This
program helps support the early care and education workforce by providing compensation incentives intended
to strengthen teacher retention.

The HSSCO Director serves on several advisory boards convened to address the professional development
needs of early care and education staff in the State. These include the Community College system’s Curricu-
lum Improvement Project; the Education and Compensation Advisory Group; and the Center on the Social
and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) Grant Planning Committee. All of the initiatives
named in this section reflect the goals and proposed outcomes of the 2007-12 funding application.
234   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Community Services
      As noted previously, the HSSCO has developed two partnerships with AmeriCorps, consistent with the
      2007-12 refunding application. The HSSCO has also developed a partnership in 2007 with Teach For
      America, Eastern North Carolina as a hub to recruit Head Start teachers consistent with the “Alternative
      Credentialing” provision of the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act 2007.

      The HSSCO has also provided support and resources to the NC Head Start Association (NCHSA) with
      respect to its annual training conference. This was a stated goal of the 2007-12 funding application.

      Family Literacy Services
      The HSSCO worked in 2007 to arrange for an expert researcher on language development in young children
      (Dr. Todd Risley) to present a workshop at the National Smart Start conference targeted to Head Start staff.
      The HSSCO also partnered with the NCHSA to expand its newsletter to a Spanish audience and to increase
      its frequency from a semi-annual to a quarterly publication. The objective was to disseminate information in a
      more timely fashion and to expand readership opportunities to parents and partners in North Carolina who are
      dual language learners. This effort reflects a goal and proposed outcome of the 2007-12 funding application.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      The HSSCO has addressed this priority in 2007 by participating in several activities related to this area. The
      first is involvement with the planning group for the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion.
      The focus of the group was to prepare for a 2008 submission of a grant proposal to Frank Porter Graham
      research institute that will impact the quality of inclusive classrooms across the State. The HSSCO Director
      is a required signatory of the grant. Planning meetings were typically held monthly at the Division of Child
      Development.

      The second activity involved the NC Partnership For Inclusion. Specifically, the HSSCO Director served on
      the advisory committee of this group and helped to guide its direction and planning. As previously referenced,
      the HSSCO was active in the CSEFEL grant planning in 2007. This included an intentional collaboration
      with the Head Start Training and Resource Specialists of NC as stated in the 2007-12 funding application.
      Finally, the HSSCO remains an active member of the NC Interagency Coordinating Council – also the ful-
      fillment of a goal in the 2007-12 funding application.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      Consistent with the goals of the 2007-12 funding application, the HSSCO Director attended the National
      Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth (NAEHCY) in 2007. Since that time, the
      Director has partnered with the National Center on Homeless Education in North Carolina and has begun
      to convene trainings for Head Start programs on the McKinney-Vento Act on homelessness and the impact
      of Head Start reauthorization for services to homeless children. Additional trainings and plans are in develop-
      ment for 2008. The HSSCO has also joined the Wake County Community Conversations group that seeks to
      coordinate services for homeless children and families in Raleigh and the surrounding areas.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      The HSSCO has significant involvement in the development of state policies and decisions. First, the place-
      ment of the HSSCO in the North Carolina Office of School Readiness has helped to build an important
      comprehensive early care and education system for the State into which Head Start has been given the op-
      portunity to contribute. This system includes Title I pre-kindergarten, Even Start Family Literacy, MAF, and
      Exceptional Children pre-kindergarten.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   235




Second, the HSSCO represents the interests of Head Start on nearly 20 state-level advisory boards and
committees in the early care and education field. Some of these have been named in previous sections of this
report, however many are listed below:

     ♦ Early Childhood Data Managers Workgroup
     ♦ National Professional Development Center on Inclusion
     ♦ Leading Early Educator Development Advisory Committee
     ♦ NC Outdoor Learning Environment
     ♦ Early Learning Resource Gallery Advisory Committee
     ♦ Partnerships for Inclusion Advisory Board
     ♦ NC Community College System EC/ED Curriculum Improvement Project
     ♦ North Carolina Institute for Early Childhood Prof Dev
     ♦ CCSA Education & Comp Advisory Committee
     ♦ 2008 Nat’l Smart Start Conference Planning Committee
     ♦ NC Early Childhood System Advisory Council
     ♦ NC T/TA Network
     ♦ NCHSA
     ♦ NC CCR&R Advisory Council
     ♦ EC Collaboration Council
     ♦ TA Provider Standards Planning Group
     ♦ Parents as Teachers Advisory Board


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
In 2007, the HSSCO began extensive work on the development of an international cooperative exchange be-
tween Head Start in North Carolina and England’s comprehensive early childhood program called Sure Start.
The purpose of the exchange was to provide the Sure Start delegation learning experiences with regard to:

     ♦ Head Start family support services
     ♦ Program Governance
     ♦ Blended funding
     ♦ Inclusive classrooms
     ♦ Services to English Language Learners


The HSSCO solicited support from the NCHSA, Head Start T/TA Network, and the Region IV Head Start
Office to create a week-long exchange between Sure Start officials and Head Start “programs of excellence”
across NC in 2008.
236   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      The HSSCO has undertaken three initiatives to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic
      children and families. The first two initiatives are based on partnerships with NCHSA. First, the HSSCO has
      provided funding to translate the NCHSA newsletter into Spanish and to expand its circulation. Second, the
      HSSCO is funding an initiative (that also includes the East Coast Migrant Head Start program) to promote
      better communication between migrant and regional Head Start programs and to promote a better means
      of tracking families that may leave one system but that could be served by the other. The third effort involves
      working with the Curriculum Improvement Project (CIP) of the Community College System to provide
      more course-offerings in ECE for Spanish-speaking students. This will increase the opportunities for Head
      Start programs to hire Latino teachers who can be trained through the community college system.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      The responses given to the questions above inform the current and anticipated work plan for upcoming years.
      Areas from 2007 that were not completed (or are still in development) will become priorities for the next year.
      For example, increased focus will need to be given in the “Welfare” area, as the need in NC continues to grow
      and HSSCO interventions are just beginning to take root. In other areas where great strides have been made
      (e.g. “Education”), it will be critical to maintain the strength of existing alliances and collaborations.
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 237




                                  North Dakota


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
linda Rorman
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
nD Department of Human Services
Children & families Services      Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
600 east Boulevard Avenue         services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Division #325                     are support Head Start/Child Care/Prep-kindergarten collaborations at
Bismarck, nD 58505                the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs in
Phone: 701-328-1711
                                  State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 701-328-3538                 Purpose
lrorman@nd.gov
                                  To assist in building early childhood systems and continue
http://www.nd.gov/dhs/services/
childfamily/headstart/            access to comprehensive services and support for all children
                                  with low-income.

Lead Agency Contact
                                  Goal 1
Carol K. Olson                    Adapted and integrated the appropriate goals from the
Phone: 701-328-2538               HealthyND Early Childhood Alliance (HNDECA) State
fax: 701-328-1545                 Plan into an aligned cross-sector system that coordinates
                                  services and information concerning early care and education;
soolsc@nd.gov
                                  mental health; child care; health insurance; medical and dental
                                  home; parent education; and family support.
ACF Regional Contact
                                  Action Step 1.1
Ross Weaver
ACf Region VIII                   The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) will
1961 Stout Street
                                  continue to participate on the HealthyND Early Childhood
                                  Alliance (HNDECA) State Team, the Steering Committee,
9th floor                         the Early Care and Education Subcommittee, the Family Sup-
Denver, CO 80294                  port Subcommittee, and the Access to Health Insurance and
Phone: 303-844-1154               Medical Home Subcommittee. The HSSCO Director identi-
                                  fied selected goals from the HNDECA State Plan, and then
fax: 303-844-3642
                                  prioritized the activities that address the eight priorities of the
rweaver@acf.hhs.gov               HSSCO with data analysis report from the HSSCO Needs
                                  Assessment, which will be integrated into the HNDECA
                                  Strategic Plan.

                                  Outcome

                                  ♦ The HSSCO supported the state-level alignment of
238   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          systems and helped to build the early childhood systems development for early care and education, fam-
          ily support, parent education, mental health, and social and emotional development, and access to health
          insurance and medical home to promote school readiness.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director will distribute the 2007-08 Head Start and Early Head Start Fact Sheets to other
        state agencies, community partners, and the North Dakota Head Start Association (HSA). In Novem-
        ber, the most current Head Start Fact Sheets were posted on the Department of Human Services Web
        site. The HSSCO Director will share the 2007 Program Information Report (PIR) data with the North
        Dakota Department of Health, the North Dakota Department of Human Services Research Division, the
        North Dakota State University Data Center, and the HSA Governing Board.


      Action Step 1.2

      ♦ The HSSCO Director will continue to participate in the development and design of the North Dakota
        Early Childhood Quality Rating and Improvement Systems and collaboratively implement the “Growing
        Futures” Early Childhood Professional Development Plan addressing the components needed to activate a
        cross-sector systems approach (addresses Head Start/child care partnership).

      ♦ The HSSCO integrated the Early Learning Guidelines and the early implementation phase of the “Grow-
        ing Futures” Early Childhood Professional Development Plan into the North Dakota Early Childhood
        Higher Education Consortium Strategic Plan. This was done to enhance and initiate statewide training
        on the adopted Minnesota Core Knowledge using cross-sector approach throughout the early care and
        education field. The State of Minnesota has given North Dakota permission to adopt the Minnesota Core
        Knowledge document. The initiative is now awaiting approval from the North Dakota Department of
        Human Services.


      Outcome

      ♦ The HSSCO Director co-authored and will disseminate the North Dakota Early Learning Guidelines
        3 through 5. The Early Learning Guidelines may be downloaded in their entirety for printing, copying,
        and distribution at: http://www.nd.gov.dhs/info/pubs/docs/cfs/nd-early-learning-guidelines-for-ages-3-
        thru-5.pdf.

      ♦ North Dakota has received permission from the State of Minnesota to adopt the Minnesota Early Learn-
        ing Guidelines Birth-Three. The Minnesota Early Learning Guidelines will be reformatted and then
        placed on the North Dakota Department of Human Services Web site for public comment once approval
        is given by the department.

      ♦ The HSSCO will begin a crosswalk grid between the Early Learning Guidelines 3 through 5 and the
        Head Start Child Outcomes Framework. The Region VIII and the Region XI Head Start directors have
        been asked to participate in this alignment process. Many local Head Start programs have integrated the
        Early Learning Guidelines and the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework with their curriculum.

      ♦ The Early Learning Guidelines have been integrated into the “Growing Futures” Early Childhood Profes-
        sional Development Plan, enhancing teacher/caregiver preparation in supporting their knowledge and
        skill in school readiness and comprehensive child development. The Child Care Resource and Referral
        (CCR&R) Network will implement the Events Pro Software, which will assist with crafting the profes-
        sional development system components: career categories, core competencies, training registry, career ad-
        vising, curriculum approval process, trainer registry, training clearinghouse, specialized credentials, training
        articulation, incentives and scholarships.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   239




The “Growing Futures” Early Childhood Professional Development system has been implemented. The
HSSCO Director will provide input to the CCR&R State RFP process and the development of the De-
partment of Human Services contract with the two CCR&R nonprofits (addresses Head Start/Child Care
partnership).

The HSSCO will participate in the North Dakota Early Childhood Higher Education Consortium
(ECHEC) meetings to annually review the status of the Early Childhood Articulation Agreement between
the four-year institutions of higher learning, two-year colleges, and Tribal colleges. The North Dakota Uni-
versity System, Office of Articulation and Transfer, is the lead agency for updating and expanding the current
Early Childhood Education Articulation Agreement. The ECHEC will continue to review and update the
Strategic Plan; acknowledge that North Dakota has received permission to utilize Minnesota’s Core Knowl-
edge document; and review the requirements for Early Childhood Education and kindergarten endorsement
in relation to an elementary prepared teacher. All Head Start programs will receive a current listing of all
colleges and universities and the programs/degrees each offers. The ECHEC will be investigating how to al-
low the CDA coursework to be articulated and accepted as transferable credits through the higher education
system.


Action Step 1.3

The HSSCO will continue to review, revise, and/or develop State Interagency Agreements with Part B, Part
C, Title V, and Medicaid partners inclusive of the HSA, HSSCO, and Tribal Nations as signatories when
appropriate.


Outcome

♦ The HSSCO will continue to participate in the development of the first drafted state-level Intra-agency
  Agreement inclusive of input from the Head Start and EHS community, and the North Dakota De-
  partment of Human Services Children and Family Services Division (lead entity for Children’s Mental
  Health, Family Preservation, and the HSSCO), Developmental Disabilities Division (lead agency for Part
  C), Medical Services Division, and Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health. The Intra-agency
  Agreement will address the provisions for screenings, referrals, and delivery of services for children’s men-
  tal health.

♦ The HSSCO will work toward a state-level Inter-agency Agreements with Part B partners, Part C part-
  ners, and inclusive of input from the HSA.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Purpose

To encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs, services and
initiatives and to augment Head Start’s capacity to be a partner in state initiatives on behalf of children and
their families with low incomes.


Goal 3

To create linkages with and a more coordinated approach to planning and service delivery in child care,
welfare, health care, education (include reading readiness programs including such programs offered by public
240   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      and school libraries, services offered by museums, other early childhood education and development for lim-
      ited English proficient children, partnerships to promote inclusion of more books for Head Start classrooms),
      community service activities (include promotion of partnerships between Head Start agencies, schools, law
      enforcement, community-based organizations, and substance abuse and mental health treatment agencies to
      strengthen family and community environments and to reduce the impact on child development of substance
      abuse, child abuse, domestic violence and other high-risk behaviors that compromise healthy development),
      family literacy services, activities related to children with disabilities, and services for children without homes
      in order to strengthen and support North Dakota’s families.

      Health Care

      Action Step 3.1

      The HealthyND Early Childhood Alliance is a component of the Governor’s HealthyND Initiative. For cur-
      rent minutes, reports, activities, HNDECA State Plan, and updates, please see the HealthyND Early Child-
      hood Alliance Web site www.ndhealth.gov/eccs.


      Outcome

      ♦ The HSSCO Advisory Council was assimilated into the HealthyND Early Childhood Alliance (Early
        Childhood Comprehensive Systems) and meets on a quarterly basis, as well as the five subcommittees:
        Early Care and Education, Parent Education, Family Support, Access to Health Insurance and Medical
        Home, and Mental Health and Social Emotional Development. The HSA Governing Board representa-
        tives have been integrated into this structure.

      ♦ Attend national, regional, Tribal, and state conferences and meetings to acquire information and guidance
        for building, strengthening, and extending the network of services on behalf of children and families with
        low incomes.


      Action Step 3.5

      Improve access to Health Care services continuing partnerships with the health community. (See the HN-
      DECA State Plan for the Access to Health Insurance and Medical Home Subcommittee).


      Outcome

      The HSSCO Director will continue to serve on the Governor’s Initiative Healthy North Dakota Coordinat-
      ing Committee, convened every other month by the HealthyND Manager, Melissa Olson, and Dr. Terry
      Dwelle, M.D., MPHTM – North Dakota State Health Officer.


      Action Step 3.6

      Improve access to mental health services by continued participation with state and local partners.


      Outcome

      ♦ The HSSCO Director will continue to support the North Dakota Children’s Social, Emotional, Devel-
        opment Alliance (NDSEDA) through local Head Start and EHS staff representation serving on the
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   241




    NDSEDA. The NDSEDA is the lead entity for the development of the first State Intra-agency Agree-
    ment for Children’s Mental Health.

♦ The HSSCO Director attended the Region VIII Head Start Conference and followed the Mental Health
  Track focusing on the strengths and challenges unique to the Region VIII states. The HSSCO Adminis-
  trator and local Head Start staff participate on the Region VIII Mental Health Conference calls sharing
  information and best practices. Head Start staff will continue to participate on the HNDECA Stakehold-
  ers and the Mental Health and Social Emotional Development Subcommittee.



Oral Health
♦ The HSSCO Director and the HSA representative are represented on the North Dakota Oral Health Co-
  alition and the Oral Health Coalition Prevention and Intervention Subcommittee. Head Start and Early
  Head Start programs will continue to participate locally and through their involvement in the Oral Health
  Coalition for increased access to services. For those not having a “dental home,” matches will be made with
  participating dentists.

♦ The HSSCO Director participated in the statewide P.A.N.D.A. (Prevent Abuse and Neglect through
  Dental Awareness) training sponsored by Delta Dental of Minnesota, North Dakota Dental Associa-
  tion, and the North Dakota Department of Health Oral Health Program. The HSSCO will provide the
  P.A.N.D.A. Workshop training manual to the TA Consultants to extend the training to all of the local
  Head Start programs.

♦    The HSSCO Director will continue to serve on the Oral Health Surveillance System Committee, which
    collects and monitors the statewide oral health data. The HSSCO will continue to monitor and share
    the PIR data with this committee. The local Head Start programs have been invited to participate in the
    statewide oral health assessment and fluoride varnish program, which allows local programs to receive
    Medicaid reimbursement for fluoride varnish application and establishing a baseline for the number of
    Head Start children receiving the fluoride varnish treatment.

A listing of North Dakota local oral health partnerships, along with a complete listing of members of the
ND Oral Health Coalition can be found at the end of this report.

Child Care

Action Step 3.2

Promote Head Start involvement in forming child care partnerships to provide full-year, full-day quality child
care services for Head Start families.


Outcome

The HSSCO Director and the Early Childhood Services Administrator work collaboratively on many of the
Federal and state early care and education initiatives.

The HSSCO will review the informal child care/Head Start/Early Head Start partnership within the Office
of Economic Assistance (OEA), Division of the Department of Human Services to enhance full-year, full-
day quality child care services for the Head Start and Early Head Start families as part of the new TANF
242   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      work requirements. The HSSCO has begun to investigate which TANF Work Options committee to become
      involved with.

      Welfare

      Action Step 3.3

      Collaborate with the Child Welfare systems and the Office of Economic Assistance systems (TANF) to
      increase economic self-sufficiency and employability of families with low incomes. Seek involvement on the
      appropriate state-level committee.


      Outcome

      ♦ The HSSCO will continue to provide TANF and TANF Transition monthly and quarterly distribution
        lists to all Region VIII and Region XI Head Start and Early Head Start programs to enhance recruitment
        efforts.

      ♦ Continue to work with pertinent agencies to extend program eligibility guidelines and/or standards to bet-
        ter meet the needs of the scattered, rural, and Tribal populations within the state.

      ♦ The 2008 version of the “A Connection - Resource Directory for Families and Agencies” will be dis-
        seminated to all the local Head Start and Early Head Start programs, families, public health units, clinics,
        hospitals, and state agencies with the updated Department of Health additions. The feedback from local
        service providers has been very positive. The directory is also available on the Department of Human
        Services Web site.


      Action Step 3.4

      Collaborate with child welfare systems in the program improvement processes when identified areas for con-
      cern effecting children and families with low incomes are addressed through a self-assessment process for the
      North Dakota Department of Human Services to expand collaboration efforts with external partners.


      Outcome

      Improve Access to Health Care Services for children and families with low incomes.

      Education
      Expanding and Improving Education Opportunities in Early Childhood Programs


      Action Step 3.7

      Continue to provide information and expand public-awareness and education reform to inform early child-
      hood education experts, economists, business leaders, and policymakers of the early care and education invest-
      ment returns and benefits — social, educational, and economic — involving Head Start/Early Head Start/
      child care/pre-kindergarten.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   243




Outcome

♦ The HSSCO Director serves on the State PIRC Advisory Committee representing children and families
  with low incomes.

♦ The HSSCO will continue to incorporate the PIR data into the public policy discussions, statewide
  initiatives, strategic planning processes, Pre-K Now Study, the ND KIDS COUNT data publication, and
  NDHSA Policy Brief into the production of the 2008 Annual State Head Start and Early Head Start
  Profile and the Annual Children and Families Statistical Bulletin in 2008 on behalf of children and fami-
  lies with low incomes.

♦ Print and dissemination the “Best Start is a Head Start” (and Early Head Start) brochure to enhance
  statewide public awareness of the Federally-funded comprehensive child development program.

Services to Children with Disabilities

Action Step 3.8

Review and revise statewide agreements to enable Head Start and Early Head Start programs to plan seam-
less services and transition into public school programs.


Outcomes

♦ Facilitate the Interagency Agreement process to enhance services to children with disabilities that affect
  the service delivery systems for children enrolled in Head Start and Early Head Start

♦ Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.


Purpose

To facilitate the involvement of Head Start in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions affecting the Head
Start target population and families with low incomes.


Goal 2

♦ The HSSCO Director will conduct a needs assessment that addresses the needs of Head Start agencies
  (grantees) in the State with respect to collaboration, coordination, and alignment of services, and align-
  ment of curricula and assessments used in Head Start programs with the Head Start Child Outcomes
  Framework and as appropriate, the State Early Learning Guidelines. The assessment will be updated on an
  annual basis and will be made available to the general public within the State.

♦ Also the HSSCO will develop a Strategic Plan based on the results of the needs assessment that will:

♦ Enhance collaboration of Head Start services by Head Start agencies with other entities providing early
  childhood education and development.

♦ Assist Head Start agencies to develop a plan for the provision of full-working day, full-calendar year ser-
  vices of children enrolled in Head Start programs.
244   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Assist Head Start agencies to align curricula and assessments.

      ♦ Enable Head Start agencies to better access professional development opportunities for Head Start staff.

      ♦ Enable the Head Start agencies to better conduct outreach to eligible families.

      ♦ Promote partnerships between Head Start agencies, State and local governments, and the private sector.

      ♦ Consult with the Chief State School Officer, local educational agencies, and providers of early childhood
        education and development, at both the state and local levels.

      ♦ Promote partnerships between Head Start agencies, schools, law enforcement.

      ♦ Promote inclusion of more books in Head Start classrooms.

      ♦ Identify other resources and organizations for the provision of in-kind services.

      ♦ The objectives of the above Goal 2 will be facilitated through the Education Improvement Commission
        Pre-K Subcommittee as described under the Education Priority Action Step 3.7.


      Action Step 2.1

      The HSSCO has contracted with the North Dakota State University Data Center to develop the Needs As-
      sessment instrument addressing the level of cooperation, coordination, and collaboration within local Head
      Start programs and with community partners as indicated in the Improving Head Start for School Readiness
      Act of 2007.


      Outcome

      Prepare to initiate the 2008 Statewide Needs Assessment of the Head Start agencies and to include goals, ob-
      jectives, and activities for developing the needs assessment instrument for conducting and analyzing the needs
      assessment including goals, objectives, and activities for accomplishing the requirements of Section 642B
      (4), C-H. Upon completion, the needs assessment results and the strategic plan will be made available to the
      public on the ND Department of Human Services Web site. The NDSU Data Center will produce a number
      of hard copies for statewide dissemination.


      Action Step 2.2

      The HSSCO will prepare a final draft report detailing the HSSCO Needs Assessment findings. The final
      report and Five Year State Plan will be posted on the Department of Human Services Web site and other
      partners’ Web sites.


      Outcome

      Contact and consult with the appropriate stakeholders and state agencies in the revision of the 2007-08
      HSSCO grant application to reflect the continued involvement in the direction of the HSSCO in the plan-
      ning process and the preparation of the Five Year State Plan reflecting the goals, objectives, outcomes, and
      evaluation of progress. The HSSCO Needs Assessment results provided in the final report will be rolled into
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   245




the ECCS State Plan. The needs assessment will also help identify specific other goals and objectives from
appropriate state agencies and their specific state plans that can maximize efficient and effective cooperation,
coordination, and collaboration across the State.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Continue to participate in the policy changes, programmatic administrative rules process, and public
  information sharing resulting from the 2007 Legislative Session impacting the development of state poli-
  cies, plans, processes, and funding decisions affecting the low income targeted population. Track proposed
  legislation during the 2007 Legislative Session.

♦ Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
  families in your State. All minority populations, including Hispanic children and families, are included in
  the HSSCO work plans and processes.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
Many of the responses and questions are represented in the HSSCO Work Plan and are currently being
addressed based on the goals and priority areas mandated by the Office of Head Start. The HSA guides and
directs the workload. Each of the Head Start directors is assigned the lead on each of the portfolios and work
hand-in-hand with the HSSCO Director.

The North Dakota Head Start directors are responsible for the following portfolios:

     ♦ Pre-K
     ♦ School Nurses
     ♦ Child Welfare
     ♦ Growing Futures/Growing Futures Summits
     ♦ State Chip/Medicaid
     ♦ Oral Health/AAPD Head Start Dental Home Initiative
     ♦ Co-Parenting Bill
     ♦ Child Care Licensing
     ♦ Kindergarten Eligibility
     ♦ State Legislation
     ♦ MOUs
     ♦ Early Childhood Higher Education Consortium
     ♦ State ICC (Interagency Coordinating Council/Committee)
     ♦ Center for Rural Health
     ♦ E-Rate
     ♦ Mental Health
246   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




            ♦ NDAEYC
            ♦ Medicaid/TANF
            ♦ Children and Families without Homes
            ♦ Child Care/CCR&R


      Professional Development
      The HSA Governing Board manages the operations through standing and ad hoc committees. The standing
      committee structure includes the following:

            ♦ Professional Development
            ♦ Public Relations
            ♦ Current Topics
      The HSSCO meets quarterly with the NDHSA and the Region VIII North Dakota Head Start directors, as
      well as the Northern Plains Native American Head Start directors, to assist in the cooperation, coordination,
      and the collaboration with state agencies and various other potential partners and stakeholders.
                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 247




                               Ohio


Collaboration Director         Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                               areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
James A. Scott, Jr.
                               plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Ohio Department of education
25 South front Street          Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Mail Stop 305                  services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Columbus, OH 43215             are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 614-466-0224            at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 614-728-2338
                               in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
james.scott@ode.state.oh.us    The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) is lo-
                               cated in the Ohio Department of Education (ODE), Office of
Lead Agency Contact            Early Learning and School Readiness. ODE collaborates with
                               the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services to fund and
Same as above                  administer the Early Learning Initiative (ELI). ELI consists
                               of 102 contracted agencies (Head Start, Pre-K, and Child
                               Care) and more than 700 sub-providers who provide services
ACF Regional Contact           to 12,000 children ages 3-5. The ELI program is funded with
                               TANF dollars and family eligibility is up to 185 percent of the
Michael Butler
                               Federal Poverty Level.
ACf Region V
233 north Michigan Avenue      In July 2007, the State funded 64 new school districts to pro-
Suite 400                      vide Early Childhood Education (Pre-K) services to eligible
                               children ages 3-5. The funding was awarded to districts based
Chicago, Il 60601
                               upon eligibility for Poverty Based Assistance. Districts could
Phone: 312-353-5165            receive funding for up to two classrooms (20 children per
fax: 312-353-5544              classroom) at a cost per child of $4,987.
Michael.butler@acf.hhs.gov
                               The HSSCO continued to work with ODE staff to provide
                               updates and support for Head Start agencies that are ELI con-
                               tractors or who partner with Pre-K agencies. The HSSCO also
                               attends bi-monthly state Head Start Association meetings to
                               provide updates, and meets with specific local programs when
                               early childhood systems technical assistance is needed.

                               The HSSCO continued to attend regular meetings of state-
                               wide and national committees that conduct planning and
                               implementation of initiatives that support the building of early
                               childhood systems in Ohio. Listed below are some of the com-
                               mittees:
248   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




             ♦ Build Ohio, Administrative Board member
             ♦ Ohio Professional Development Network, Co-Chair
             ♦ Child Care Advisory Council, Ad Hoc member
             ♦ State Early Childhood Comprehensive Services System
             ♦ Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Oral Health Services, Early Childhood Committee
             ♦ Ohio Department of Mental Health, Early Childhood Mental Health Advisory Council
             ♦ Ohio Head Start Association Futures Group

      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      ♦ Contracted with the Ohio Head Start Association (OHSA) to provide five regional early childhood par-
        ent health institutes. The institutes provided participants (56 parents and Head Start health and/or parent
        coordinators) with information about vital health issues in early childhood. The events provided parents
        with information and tools that they can share with other parents at their program.

      ♦ Continued to attend quarterly meetings facilitated by the Ohio Department of Mental Health, Early
        Childhood Mental Health Advisory Council. The Build Administrative Board created a Social-Emotional
        Work Group to maintain a connection between the coordination, planning, and professional development
        activities related to social and emotional development and early childhood mental health. The Social-
        Emotional Work Group is exploring the development of publications that will assist early childhood
        professionals (mainly teachers).

      ♦ Contracted with the OHSA to provide a series of Early Childhood Mental Health sessions at the OHSA
        Leadership and Professional Development Conference in June 2007. The sessions were attended by 85
        early childhood professionals.

      Oral Health
      ♦ Coordinated with the Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Oral Health Services to conduct an Oral
        Health Curriculum Guide professional development session for teachers and health staff at the Ohio
        Head Start Association conference in June 2007. The HSSCO worked with the Office of Early Learning
        and School Readiness (OELSR) to provide guidance to Early Learning Initiatives (ELI) programs to pro-
        vide children with dental screenings within 60 days of the child’s entrance into the program and provide
        referrals when additional services are needed within 90 days of the identification of need. In 2007, the sec-
        ond year of funding for the ELI program, 62% of children who were authorized for ELI services received a
        dental screening, and 10% of those children were referred for additional testing or dental services.

      State-level
          the Ohio Coalition for Oral Health
          Mark D. Siegal, DDS, MPH, Chief
          the Ohio Department of Health
          Bureau of Oral Health Services
          246 n. High Street
          Columbus, OH 43216-0118
          Phone: 614-466- 4180
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   249




Local-level

  Kno-Ho-Co-Ashland CAC Head Start
  laurel etzwiler, Director
  Phone: 740-622-9801


Additional information

      ♦ Ohio Head Start Oral Health Work Group
      ♦ Mark D. Siegal, DDS, MPH, Chief
      ♦ Shannon L. Cole, RDH, BS, Maternal and Child Oral Health Coordinator
      ♦ Carrie Farquhar, RDH, BS, Access Program Administrator
      ♦ The Ohio Department of Health
      ♦ Bureau of Oral Health Services
      ♦ See address and phone above.


Welfare
♦ Continued to serve as an Ad-Hoc member of the Child Care Advisory Council. The Child Care Advisory
  Council is chaired by the Department of Job and Family Services and consists of members represent-
  ing state agencies, community professionals, family child care providers, parents, and not-for-profit and
  proprietary providers. The Council reviews and provides comments on current and pending legislation
  pertaining to child care program licensing, foster care, and child protective services, and provides feed-
  back regarding the implementation of current state funded early care and education grants. The HSSCO
  provides bi-monthly updates to the Head Start community and reviews current and pending legislation
  related to child welfare. The council meets monthly.

Child Care
♦ Contracted with OHSA to conduct an Ohio Early Childhood Forum to facilitate and promote relation-
  ships and participation at the state and local levels to increase collaboration between Head Start and
  pre-kindergarten programs. The forum also served to coordinate the collaboration between Head Start and
  pre-kindergarten with the state School Readiness Solutions Group initiative and the implementation plan.
  The forum occurred at the OHSA conference in June 2007 and included state agencies, child care provid-
  ers, Head Start, pre-kindergarten, the Governor’s Office, and ACF Region V administrators. The two-day
  event was attended by 125 participants.

♦ Continued to collaborate with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and the Ohio Child Care
  and Resource and Referral Association to co-chair the Ohio Professional Development Network. The
  network met bi-monthly to plan for the development of information publications related to an Instruc-
  tor Guide for individuals providing professional development, and a publication that identifies social and
  emotional knowledge and competencies that early childhood professionals need to know and understand.
  The network plans, evaluates, and discusses the progress of the many child care initiatives occurring in the
  State. Some include:

      ♦ T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood Ohio
250   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




            ♦ Step Up to Quality (Quality Rating System)
            ♦ First Steps (Technical assistance for Infant & Toddler Programs)
            ♦ The Professional Development Registry
            ♦ Core Knowledge and Competencies document for early childhood professionals


      Education
      ♦ The Early Learning Initiative (ELI) continued to provide services for children and families. During 2007,
        more accountability data were collected. The HSSCO continued to meet with Office of Early Learning
        and School Readiness (OELSR) administrative team to plan and implement the program. The data below
        include facts related to the ELI program:

            ♦ 102 contracted agencies and over 700 sub-providers provide service to 12,000 children.
            ♦ 681 hours of leadership meetings conducted by OELSR staff; an average of 72 contact
              hours per agency.
            ♦ 102 onsite monitoring visits by OELSR staff.
            ♦ 63% of ELI teachers have an associate’s degree as of June 30, 2007; 23% teacher turnover rate.
            ♦ 15 languages other than English reported as native languages of children.
            ♦ 961 teachers in ELI programs participated in ODE-approved seminars.

      ♦ The HSSCO continued to work with ODE and other committees to implement activities and strategies
        set forth in ODE’s School Readiness Solutions Group report, implementation plan, “Giving Children a
        Chance.”

      Community Services
      ♦ Continued to partner with the Ohio State University, College of Education, Quality Network (Q-net)
        to provide a Parent Information Web Site. The Parent Information Network (www.oh-pin.org) continued
        to maintain the average number of daily hits and provide parents with needed information related to child
        and family development for children ages birth to six.

      ♦ Coordinated a meeting with OHSA and the Ohio Pediatric Association to provide presentations at
        OHSA events to promote community service materials that are available for families and pregnant
        women.

      Family Literacy Services
      ♦ The OELSR and the ELI continued to offer family literacy professional development opportunities for
        ELI staff. Below are data related to seminars, workshops and courses provide by OELSR. All seminars
        are free, and college credit is offered whenever possible.

      ♦ 2,656 teachers participated in one or more of seven unique language and literacy workshops (12 hour
        workshops).

      ♦ 334 participants completed a year-long course in language and literacy delivered by one of 16 Early
        Language and Literacy Specialists.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   251




Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ Coordinated a writing team that completed the document Health and Developmental Services Birth
  through Age 5: Relationships to Support Children with Special Needs. The guide was designed to provide
  all services and educational personnel with information needed to assist families of children with disabili-
  ties ages birth to five. The publication was disseminated throughout the State and is available on the ODE
  and the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Web sites.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ Continued to communicate with the ODE Homeless Coordinator and other local coordinators regarding
  available activities and programs for Head Start agencies serving the homeless population.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
No activities reported.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Coordinated and partnered with OELSR and the Ohio Association for the Education of Young Children
  (OAEYC) to conduct an Excellence Awards luncheon for NAEYC accredited centers and centers receiv-
  ing Step Up to Quality (Quality Rating System) star awards at the annual Early Childhood Conference.

♦ The HSSCO has forged a collaborative partnership with the Governor’s Early Childhood Cabinet. In
  2008, the HSSCO will begin serving on an advisory group that will make policy recommendations to the
  Cabinet.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
The HSSCO includes the Texas Migrant Council (TMC) in the statewide listserv and in HSSCO and
OELSR professional development activities. OELSR Special Education staff entered into a $15,000 contract
to TMC to locate and recruit local agencies to provide summertime special education support and related
services for preschool age children with an IEP.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The HSSCO has submitted an addendum to the current work plan that describes goals, objectives, strategies,
and resources needed to integrate new HSSCO requirements as identified in the Improving Head Start for
School Readiness Act of 2007. The HSSCO will continue to explore and secure special education funding for
the Texas Migrant Council.
252   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 253




                                    Oklahoma


Collaboration Director              Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                    areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Kay C. floyd
                                    plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Oklahoma Association of Community
Action Agencies
                                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
2800 nW 36th Street                 services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 221                           are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Oklahoma City, OK 73112             at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 405-949-1495                 in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 405-949-0955
kfloyd@okacaa.org                   Goal
www.okacaa.org
                                    Serve as facilitator to improve and expand services for low-
                                    income children in Head Start, child care, and state preschool
Lead Agency Contact                 programs.

Vaughn Clark
                                    Desired Outcome # 1, # 2
Office of Community Development
Phone: 405-815-5370                 Collaborative partnerships among Head Start, child care, and
fax: 405-815-5344                   state preschool will be documented; types of Head Start part-
                                    nerships with public schools and child care will be identified
vaughn_clark@odoc.state.ok.us
                                    for each collaboration.

ACF Regional Contact
                                    Actual Outcomes
Susan Johnston
                                    ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) ini-
ACf Region VI
                                      tiated collaboration with Smart Start Oklahoma to use the
1301 Young Street                     National Partners’ Meeting supplemental funds to facili-
Room 937                              tate the work of the Smart Start Oklahoma Collaboration
Dallas, tX 75202                      Team in collecting data on collaborations among Head
                                      Start, state pre-kindergarten, and child care. This team
Phone: 214-767-8844
                                      collected data on the types and locations of Head Start col-
fax: 214-767-2038                     laborations with public schools and child care. The HSSCO
sjohnston@acf.hhs.gov                 Director held an initial meeting with Head Start directors
                                      to identify initial parameters for the collaboration data
                                      collection project that is a follow-up project of the January
                                      2007 Partners Meeting in Washington, D.C.

                                    ♦ The HSSCO Director worked with the State Department
                                      of Education, an American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN)
254   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          Head Start grantee, a local public school district, and the AIAN Head Start TA specialist to work out the
          contractual details of a new collaboration between a local public school and an AIAN Head Start pro-
          gram.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director served on the Smart Start Oklahoma action team working with the State Depart-
        ment of Education and child care on the State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) grant
        strategic plan. The HSSCO Director met regularly with the ECCS “Ready Schools Team” to work on
        implementation of the ECCS plan to encourage and assist schools to be ready for children when they
        enter public schools.


      Desired Outcome #3

      Local Head Start programs will have improved access to health care services and model programs will be
      identified.


      Actual Outcomes

      ♦ The HSSCO Director met with Oklahoma State Department of Health Dental Service staff members
        who are implementing a Dental Services grant to work with a local Head Start program in educating
        Head Start children and parents about good oral health practices. This model can be duplicated in other
        programs.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director edited the final action plans from the Children & Youth with Special Health Care
        Needs Oral Health Forum so that the plans can be implemented by the Children’s Oral Health Coali-
        tion. These action plans have been shared as models for states and local programs to improve oral health
        services to Head Start children. The final report (with action plans) of the Children with Special Health
        Care Needs Oral Health Forum was published and distributed to forum participants and the Children’s
        Oral Health Coalition. The report is posted on the OKACAA Web site: www.okacaa.org.



      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care

      Oral Health

      The HSSCO Director co-chaired the Children’s Oral Health Coalition; served as a member of the Mental
      Health Endorsement System Work Group, the Tobacco Disparities Action Team, the Pregnancy Risk Assess-
      ment Monitoring Survey Advisory Board, the Childhood Lead Poisoning and Prevention Program Advisory
      Board, and the Oklahoma Dental Loan Selection Committee; and was appointed to the Child Health Task
      Force of the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (Medicaid Agency) to address issues related to the Medical
      Home concept, and child health screening and immunization rates.


      Local-level

      Oklahoma Head Start and AIAN Head Start programs have a number of local dental partnerships, includ-
      ing partnerships with dentists who provide services and education. A complete listing of these partnerships is
      provided at the end of this report.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   255




Welfare
The HSSCO Director, representing the low-income disparate population, was appointed to the Tobacco Dis-
parities Action Plan Team to continue work on implementation of the action plan that addresses the effects of
tobacco and cessation efforts on disparate populations.

Child Care
The HSSCO Director participated in the groundbreaking activities of the new Educare Center in Oklahoma
City, developed by a state partners-supported local partnership that includes Early Head Start, Head Start,
the Oklahoma City Public Schools, child care, the local Community Action Agency, and private partners. The
goal of this initiative is to provide a very high-quality, full-day, full working-day collaborative and inclusive
early childhood program.

Education
The HSSCO Director met monthly with the work group developing the Core Competencies for Early Child-
hood Professionals and worked with public school, child care, and higher education partners to improve the
coordination of training and professional development for early childhood practitioners.

Community Services
The HSSCO Director worked with the Oklahoma Association of Community Action Agencies (OKA-
CAA) and the Head Start TA Specialist to include training on Asthma and the Oklahoma Certified Health
Business Program in the OKACAA Summer Conference. The HSSCO staff arranged for sponsorship of a
Webinar on the reauthorization of Head Start during the Winter Conference.

Family Literacy Services
The HSSCO Director met with WGBH (Boston) Public Television Station representatives, the Oklahoma
Indian Head Start Directors Association, and the Oklahoma AIAN T/TA Specialist with regard to a lit-
eracy curriculum (English) designed specifically for AIAN Head Start programs. The HSSCO arranged for a
conference call with the University of Oklahoma Center for Early Childhood Professional Development and
WGBH television with regard to collaborative development of this curriculum in order to share that culture
with all early childhood programs. The HSSCO Director worked with OETA (Oklahoma Public Television
Station) to meet with WGBH, state private foundations, Tribal representatives, state education representa-
tives, and child care partners to explore potential funding availability for development of the curriculum.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO hosted and the director chaired a Disabilities MOU Partners meeting that included: Three
State Department of Education IDEA Parts B and C staff; three Region VI ACF staff members and the
Head Start Disabilities TA Specialist; Head Start local program disabilities coordinator; State Department of
Health Early Intervention coordinator; and the Oklahoma Commission on Children and Youth Interagency
Coordinating Council Coordinator. The HSSCO Director continued throughout the year to follow up with
this workgroup to update and sign the MOU by June 2008.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The HSSCO Director participated in the annual retreat of the Governor’s Interagency Council on Homeless-
256   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ness (GICH), co-chaired the GICH Access to Mainstream Resources Committee, and presented a segment
      on Community Action Agencies and Head Start/pre-k during the State Department of Education statewide
      video conference for school district homeless liaisons and other local partners.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      Desired Outcome #1

      Head Start data will be compiled and analyzed, and the Project report distributed.


      Actual Outcomes

      ♦ The HSSCO compiled and prepared the Head Start Fact Sheet for the 2005-06 Program Year, and
        distributed it to partners including all state legislators and other appropriate officials. Later in the year,
        the HSSCO Director requested the PIR database and funding information necessary to begin compiling
        information for the 2006-07 Program Year Head Start Fact Sheet.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director met with Head Start directors to identify potential parameters for the collabora-
        tion data collection project contracted to the Oklahoma Partnership for School Readiness (Smart Start
        Oklahoma). A workgroup was identified to develop the survey questions used in the collaboration survey
        of Head Start programs, public school pre-k, and child care programs. The data were collected, analyzed,
        and presented in a statewide stakeholders meeting.


      Desired Outcome #2

      The best possible linkages will be made between local and community based Head Start programs and state
      early childhood initiatives and policies.


      Actual Outcomes:

      ♦ The HSSCO Director made a presentation on “Collaborating with Head Start” at the First Annual Early
        Childhood Leadership Conference sponsored by the University of Oklahoma, College of Education –
        Tulsa, K20 Center, and Tulsa Technology Center.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director jointly planned with State Department of Education, University of Central
        Oklahoma, and child care partners the Early Childhood Association of Oklahoma Summer Conference
        focused on “PLAY: Discovering, Exploring, Learning” to be held in July 2008.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      ♦ The HSSCO Director researched the role of the HSSCO in the E-Rate application process, and provided
        information to Head Start grantees. The HSSCO researched Oklahoma law with regard to the definition
        of a “school” and worked with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Oklahoma State
        Department of Education to submit a revised letter to the Universal Service Administration Company
        declaring Head Start programs in Oklahoma eligible to apply for the E-rate.

      ♦ HSSCO Director facilitated the proposal of the University of Oklahoma Center for Early Childhood
        Professional Development to develop the curriculum and evaluation protocol for the American Indian
        Early Literacy Curriculum.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   257




♦   Migrant Head Start services were introduced in Oklahoma, and the HSSCO worked with the Texas
    Migrant Council to facilitate location of the services and coordination with existing Head Start programs.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ The HSSCO disseminated to all Head Start directors and partners information prepared by a Community
  Action Agency with regard to a new state immigration bill affecting access to services in the eight priority
  areas for eligible and undocumented families.

♦ The HSSCO monitored and will continue to monitor emerging issues with regard to the new state im-
  migration law.

♦ The HSSCO Director communicated with the new Oklahoma Migrant Head Start program grantee, and
  added the contact to the Head Start Collaboration electronic communication group.

♦ The HSSCO worked with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Division of Child Care, in
  order to research the numbers of eligible Hispanic children for Head Start and child care subsidy to de-
  termine trends in Hispanic enrollment and utilization of child care subsidy funds with a goal of increasing
  the numbers of eligible children and families served.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The activities of the HSSCO will focus in on completing priorities identified in the work program. These
include:

♦ Completing the collaboration data collection project activities contracted to the Oklahoma Partnership for
  School Readiness.

♦ Convening additional meetings of the HSSCO Advisory Board, the Oklahoma Head Start Early Child-
  hood Collaboration Advisory Board.

♦ Convening a meeting with MOU partners.

♦ Completing and signing the Disability Interagency MOU Agreement.

♦ Focusing on creation of a cross-sector professional development system as well as a state-based Head Start
  system of training and professional development.

♦ Continuing to work with partners on the Oklahoma Core Competencies for Early Childhood Profession-
  als.

♦ Leading the activities surrounding implementation of new requirements of HSSCOs under the Improving
  Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007.
258   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 259




                                   Oregon


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Dell ford
Oregon Department of education
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Public Service Building            Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
255 Capitol Street northeast       services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Salem, OR 97310                    are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 503-947-5810                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 503-378-5156                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
dell.ford@state.or.us
                                   See eight priority areas.

Lead Agency Contact
                                   Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
erinn Kelley-Siel, liaison
                                   and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
Head Start Collaboration
Office of the Governor
                                   plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Phone: 503-378-6549                Health Care
fax: 503-378-6827                  Sustainable System for Children’s Social and Emotional Health
erinn.Kelley-Siel@state.or.us

                                   Objective
nancy Johnson-Dorn, eCe Director
Oregon Department of education     To access on-site mental/behavioral health consultation for
Phone: 503-947-5703                Head Start, child care, and other early childhood staff to
fax: 503-378-5156
                                   improve and promote children’s social and emotional health in
                                   early childhood settings.
nancyJohnson-Dorn@state.or.us

                                   Priority Area
ACF Regional Contact
                                   Health Care, Children with Disabilities
nancy Hutchins
ACf Region X
                                   Activities
Blanchard Plaza
2201 Sixth Avenue                  The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) Direc-
Suite 1330                         tor continues to be the point person for implementation and
Seattle, WA 98121                  support of the Blueprint for Action and the Oregon Model for
                                   Supporting Young Children’s Social and Emotional Develop-
Phone: 206-615-3661
                                   ment. These efforts were led by the HSSCO Director and
fax: 206-615-2575                  supported with HSSCO supplemental funds. Both documents
nhutchins@acf.hhs.gov              are on the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) Web
260   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      site. The HSSCO Director made presentations regarding these efforts at the Foundations Learning Circle
      (a coalition of private foundations) and a statewide conference sponsored by DHS Addiction and Mental
      Health Division. These documents were used by the Early Childhood Council in planning for the Governor’s
      Conference on Early Childhood. Currently, discussions regarding multi-agency and multi-funding strategies
      to support the concepts outlined in the Blueprint for Action and Oregon Model are underway as possible
      legislative packages. Additionally, the community action planning tool kit was developed. In coordination with
      the Oregon Model, the Department of Education provided Positive Behavior Supports training for consul-
      tants on a pilot basis in some Head Start and Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education (EI/
      ECSE) classrooms. A plan to expand these efforts is in process.


      Accomplishments

      Development, completion, and dissemination of two related documents: Blueprint for Action and Oregon
      Model for Supporting Young Children’s Social and Emotional Development. A community action planning
      tool kit to assist with implementing recommendations in the Oregon Model was developed. Training in Posi-
      tive Behavior Supports was implemented.

      Oral Health
      The HSSCO Director participates in conference calls and meetings whenever needed and has consistent on-
      going contact with the Region X Office of Head Start. Through this contact, the HSSCO Director responds
      and assists with national and regional priorities, initiatives and emerging issues, and/or concerns as needed.
      Examples of areas that have been addressed are: the Program Information Report (PIR) results, monitoring
      system, under-enrollment, Head Start and State pre-k collaboration, Head Start/child care collaboration, oral
      health and dental services, and the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007.

      Welfare
      See “Child Care” and “Education.”

      Child Care
      Head Start/Child Care Collaboration


      Objective

      To support and maintain collaboration between Head Start and child care for promotion of full day/year
      service delivery models, shared training, problem-solving and policy development.


      Activities

      The HSSCO Director continues to lead and facilitate ongoing work of the Head Start/Child Care Work
      Group. The purpose of the work group is to support local efforts to integrate and implement best practices for
      comprehensive child development services that address the needs of working parents. The work group pro-
      vides ongoing support and problem-solving for local programs regarding child care contract issues, collabora-
      tive program models, and funding and policy issues. The work of this group supports the requirements in the
      Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 regarding promotion of child care partnerships. The
      work group has identified the need to promote continuity of quality for all children in all settings throughout
      the system as the top priority for its work. As a first step, the work group is creating a cross walk among the
      different early childhood regulations and standards for children including settings such as child care, Head
                                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   261




Start pre-kindergarten, family child care, and private preschool. From this baseline information, the work
group will identify gaps and provide service and policy recommendations. A secondary priority is to address
child care issues related to services for children in foster care such as lack of funding for child care, coordina-
tion of placements in Head Start, and provision of services to foster parents. This is a work in progress.


Accomplishments

Accomplishments of the work group include:

♦ Sponsorship, planning, and implementing of three Head Start/Child Care Summits (“Together We’re
  Better”) to address emerging collaboration issues.

♦ Policy development regarding categorical eligibility for Head Start families participating in programs
  under the authority of TANF.

♦ Development and dissemination of a document that addresses Head Start and Child Care policy and
  other contract issues titled, “Frequently Asked Contract Questions.”

♦ Development of written descriptions of local Child Care/Head Start partnership approaches/models
  titled, “Supporting Low Wage Workers and their Children.”

DHS contracts support comprehensive full day/year Head Start/child care services. The Head Start/child care
partnership model descriptions have been disseminated to local Head Start and child care programs. Trainings
have been provided at the annual Oregon Head Start Coordinators Meeting and other trainings to encourage
more partnership models across the State.

Education

State Pre-kindergarten and Head Start Collaboration

Objective

To support, improve, and maintain a Head Start and State pre-kindergarten collaborative system.


Activities

♦ The HSSCO Director worked with the State/Federal Collaboration Team to revise and update the Region
  X Office of Head Start /Oregon Department of Education Intergovernmental Agreement. The Agree-
  ment was put on hold until the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 was passed to
  ensure relevant requirements were included in the Agreement. The HSSCO Director provides ongoing
  support for implementation of mutually agreed upon responsibilities outlined in the Agreement by partici-
  pation in regularly scheduled meetings, conference calls, and ongoing communication.

♦ The Intergovernmental Agreement includes identification of Federal and state membership on the State/
  Federal collaboration team, articulation of a monitoring process, joint guidance on regulation interpreta-
  tion, coordination of calendar and events, coordination of funding and service areas, coordination and
  sharing of training, joint planning for special initiatives and priorities, and joint problem-solving. Ad-
  ditionally, a state/Federal service area coordination policy and process is included to assist local state
  pre-kindergarten and Head Start programs with coordination and collaboration during expansion and/or
262   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          reductions in funding. Revising and updating the Agreement is a work in progress.


      Accomplishments

      Development and completion of an Agreement template that is updated and renewed each biennium, and
      is signed by the ODE Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Region X Program Manager, Office of
      Head Start. The Agreement is also endorsed by the Oregon Head Start Association, representing state pre-
      kindergarten and Head Start grantees.


      Oregon Head Start Pre-kindergarten Expansion

      Objective

      To expand access to comprehensive services for low-income children and families using the Head Start Pro-
      gram Performance Standards as the standard of quality for all children.


      Activities

      ♦ The HSSCO Director served as a resource person for the Children’s Institute/Ready for School Cam-
        paign, Moving Research to Action, the group that spearheaded the Head Start pre-kindergarten expan-
        sion efforts in 2007. Campaign membership consists of business, philanthropic, and civic leaders and
        organizations. As its first action step, the coalition focused on getting the Legislature to fully fund Head
        Start pre-kindergarten. The HSSCO Director also served as the resource person for other partners sup-
        porting expansion efforts such as Fight Crime, Invest in Kids (law enforcement), private advocacy groups
        and foundations, state agencies, local agencies and advocates, Head Start Association and other early
        childhood associations, Governor’s Office, Region X Office of Head Start, and others. Requested infor-
        mation such as early childhood and Head Start research, statistical data, cost and budget projections, and
        responses to the media were provided. The HSSCO Director participated in overall planning for concept
        development and implementation strategies for expansion.

      ♦ Other expansion activities provided by the HSSCO Director included writing the partnership section
        of the Request for Proposal (RFP). The RFP partnership section provides a definition of collaboration
        and examples of partnerships that could provide the applicant with ten priority points. The January 2007
        publication of the Head Start Collaboration newsletter focused on Oregon’s Plan for Universal Pre-
        kindergarten and features both Gov. Kulongoski and Superintendent Castillo. The newsletter highlights
        support from government, private sector, law enforcement, and the general public. Oregon’s successful
        Head Start and State pre-k partnership and relevant research are included. The Head Start Collaboration
        newsletter was distributed to public schools, the early childhood community, the Oregon Legislature and
        other policy-makers.


      Accomplishments

      The Oregon Legislature approved a $39 million expansion of the Oregon Head Start pre-kindergarten. As a
      result, approximately 3,100 additional children will receive Head Start pre-kindergarten services during the
      2007-09 biennium.


      Early Childhood Systems Development/Early Childhood Council

      Objective
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   263




To develop a statewide responsive, effective, collaborative, and well-articulated early childhood system of
services and supports for young children and their families.


Activities

♦ The HSSCO Director continues as an active participant on the state Early Childhood Team since its
  inception on 1999, currently known as the Early Childhood Council. ODE is formally linked to other
  state agencies through a bill passed by the legislature requiring the Department of Education, Department
  of Human Services, Commission on Children and Families, and Department of Employment/Child Care
  Division to jointly lead in the development of policies necessary for a voluntary statewide early childhood
  system. The cross-agency State Early Childhood Council was developed in response to this legislation and
  continues to work on projects related to early childhood systems development.

♦ Work of the Early Childhood Council has centered around planning and preparing for a Governor’s Sum-
  mit on Early Childhood. Oregon was one of ten states to receive a $10,000 grant from the National Gov-
  ernors Association to support a Governor’s Summit on Early Childhood. The HSSCO provided $3,200
  and the Head Start Association provided $1,000 to support this effort. The Early Childhood Council was
  designated as the planning body for the Governor’s Summit scheduled for March 20, 2008.

♦ Oregon’s Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Plan was used as the foundation to assist with plan-
  ning and materials for the Summit. A framework for a statewide birth through five early childhood system
  was developed, titled “Early Childhood Matters.” The Early Childhood Matters document is divided into
  three sections: Early Learning Matters, Family Matters, Health Matters. Three issue briefs were developed
  as companion documents for the three sections of the Early Childhood Matters document.

♦ The HSSCO Director was designated as Co-Chair with Child Care for the Early Learning Matters
  Committee and served as the lead writer for the Early Learning Matters section of the framework docu-
  ment and the issue brief that was included as a companion piece. The HSSCO Director continues as
  Co-Chair for the Early Learning Matters Committee for Summit follow-up activities, development of the
  final Summit report and other agenda items of the Early Childhood Council.


Accomplishments

Development, completion, and dissemination of Early Childhood Matters and issue briefs in the areas of
early learning, family supports, and health. Additionally, the Early Childhood Council planned and imple-
mented the Governor’s Summit on Early Childhood.


Collaborative Statewide Professional Development System

Objective

To lead partnership efforts in developing a collaborative training and professional develop system, and in-
crease child care quality.


Activities

In 2007, the HSSCO Director resigned as Co-Chair of the Training Quality Committee (TQC), serving
in this capacity from 2002-07. The TQC is responsible for planning and policy recommendations regarding
training and professional development for the Child Care Division. Components of the professional devel-
264   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      opment and training system have been identified and a work plan has been developed. The following work
      groups are actively working to address the various components of a statewide professional development and
      training system:

            ♦ Oregon Registry/Trainer Standards/Mentor Standards
            ♦ Professional Development Data System
            ♦ Articulation
            ♦ Evaluation/Diversity
            ♦ Training Gaps
            ♦ Family, Friends, and Neighbors
            ♦ Training Review Coordination


      The HSSCO Director continues as an active member of TQC. The development of a statewide collaborative
      training database system is under discussion through the TQC Professional Development Data System Sub-
      committee. The HSSCO Director is involved in this effort to ensure that Head Start, state pre-kindergarten
      and special education trainings are included with other early childhood partners.


      Accomplishments

      Accomplishments include the development of a training resources mapping project, modeled after the Finan-
      cial Resources for Training model developed by Wheelock College’s Center for Professional Development.
      The report was published in 2001 titled, “Oregon’s Training Neighborhood Map.” Additionally, the following
      training materials have been developed: Social and Emotional Handbook, Health and Safety Handbook, and
      Infant/Toddler Training. The Oregon Registry has been revised and disseminated. Articulation among Com-
      munity Colleges has been established. Community Colleges have agreed that students can send credits from
      any Community College to a designated Community College that will accept credits for an AA degree in
      Early Childhood Education.


      Early Learning Guidelines for Children Ages Birth to Five: Early Childhood Foundations

      Objective

      To develop research-based state early learning guidelines for children ages birth to five, that align with the
      Head Start Child Outcomes Framework and Oregon’s K-12 standards.


      Activities

      Early learning guidelines are known in Oregon as Early Childhood Foundations (ECF). The Three to Five
      Early Childhood Foundations were completed and posted in the ODE Web site in 2005. During 2006-07,
      the HSSCO Director worked with the ODE Early Childhood Director to develop and finalize the Birth to
      Three Early Childhood Foundations and companion training manual, Born to Learn. The Birth to Three Ear-
      ly Childhood Foundations and the Born to Learn training manual were completed and posted on the ODE
      Web site along with the Three to Five Early Childhood Foundations. The HSSCO Director continues work-
      ing with the ECF Implementation Work Group to develop a statewide plan and approach for implementing
      the Early Childhood Foundations and the training manual, Born to Learn. The implementation plan includes
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   265




a PowerPoint presentation that will be used across the State to send a consistent message about the Early
Childhood Foundations — what they are, how they can be used and how they link with other standards. Each
partner agency will develop its own implementation plans that fit its needs. This is a work in progress.


Accomplishments

Oregon’s Birth to Five Early Childhood Foundations and companion training manual, Born to Learn, were
completed and posted on ODE’s Web site. The Early Childhood Foundations are posted as two documents:
Birth to Three and Three to Five. Summaries of both documents are also on the Web site.

Community Services
See “Education.”

Family Literacy Services
See “Child Care,” “Education,” and “Services to Children with Disabilities.”

Services to Children with Disabilities
Objective

To support, maintain, and promote collaboration between EI/ECSE and Head Start and other placement
sites for provision of quality services to children with disabilities and their families. To provide ongoing sup-
port for emerging disability issues, problem-solving, and policy guidance.


Activities

♦ The HSSCO Director updated and finalized the Oregon Department of Education and DHHS Office of
  Head Start Intergovernmental Agreement for Services to Children with Disabilities Ages Birth to Five.
  The Agreement includes Region X Head Start, Region XI AIAN Head Start, and Region XII Migrant
  and Seasonal Head Start. The Agreement was signed by all parties during Summer 2007 and is effective
  until 2011.

♦ The HSSCO Director works on emerging issues related to services for children with disabilities and their
  families. The Director works with the ODE Early Childhood Team, Head Start Association, and Child
  Care Division to address two critical areas identified in the ODE EI/ECSE State Performance Plan: (1)
  increase the percentage of infants and toddlers referred for Early Intervention services, and (2) increase the
  percentage of preschool age children with IFSP’s served in natural environments. The Head Start Associa-
  tion has identified over-representation of children with disabilities in Head Start classrooms as a related
  concern to be addressed.

♦ In July 2007, the HSSCO Director participated as a member of the cross-agency Oregon Team that
  attended the Expanding Opportunities conference and National Early Childhood Inclusion Institute. Or-
  egon was one of eight states to be selected to receive technical assistance from Expanding Opportunities,
  a national Interagency Inclusion Initiative that assists states with strategic planning focusing on policies
  and operations to increase inclusion opportunities for children with disabilities and their families. Oregon
  was also selected to work with the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion to create a
  cross-sector professional development system for early childhood personnel to support inclusion practices.
266   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          In order to meet these goals, Oregon developed an Early Childhood Inclusion Collaborative. The HSSCO
          Director serves on the Steering Committee and Policy Work Group for this Collaborative. This is a work
          in progress.


      Accomplishments

      The Disabilities Agreement template has been completed and is used on an ongoing basis. The Agreement is
      updated every four years and is signed by representatives from the Office of Head Start for Region X, Ameri-
      can Indian/Alaska Native Head Start, Migrant and Seasonal Head Start, and the Department of Education
      for EI/ECSE. The Agreement is endorsed by Tribal governments that have Head Start grantees, Oregon
      Head Start Association, Head Start and state pre-k grantees, and the Executive Director of the MSHS
      grantee.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families

      Homeless Children

      Objective: To support access to services for children from homeless families.


      Priority Areas

      Children from Homeless Families, Education, Child Care, and Health Care.


      Activities

      ♦ The HSSCO Director surveyed Oregon Head Start pre-kindergarten programs to find out how programs
        are addressing the needs of children from homeless families, focusing on partnership models. Descriptions
        of homeless partnership models were written and sent to all Head Start pre-kindergarten programs to as-
        sist local programs increase partnerships for services to children from homeless families.

      ♦ In November 2007, Oregon’s partnership models were presented at the National Association for the
        Education of Homeless Children and Youth Conference (NAEHCY): Giving Homeless Kids a Head
        Start in Oregon. Oregon partnership models were posted on the NAEHCY Web site as a follow-up to
        the conference. The HSSCO Director included homeless partnership models in the RFP during the recent
        Oregon Head Start pre-kindergarten expansion. Homeless partnerships models were one of the types of
        partnerships that applicants could provide for which they could receive priority points during the expan-
        sion effort.


      Accomplishments

      ♦ Homeless partnership model description were completed and disseminated. Homeless partnerships were
        eligible for priority points during the recent expansion effort.

      ♦ Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.


      Oregon Head Start Association

      Objective
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   267




To ensure the involvement of Head Start in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions effecting the Head
Start population and other low-income children and families, and to provide resources and information as
requested.

Priority Areas: All, as needed


Activities

♦ The HSSCO Director serves as a partner and resource person for the Oregon Head Start Association.
  Primary work with the Head Start Association centered around Head Start pre-kindergarten expansion
  efforts. Refer to the Head Start Pre-kindergarten Expansion section of this report for a description.

♦ On an ongoing basis, the HSSCO Director ensures that Head Start representatives are assigned and ap-
  pointed to state-level advisory boards and committees, commissions, councils, and work groups that have
  an impact on state policy and services for Head Start eligible and other low-income children and families.
  Currently, Head Start Association representatives are active on approximately 20 state-level boards and
  commissions. The former President of the Oregon Head Start Association and the Executive Director
  of the statewide MSHS program are members of the state Early Childhood Council. Additionally, the
  HSSCO Director reviewed legislation, worked with ODE on a Temporary Rule, and drafted a letter for
  the Superintendent to support Oregon as an E-Rate eligible state. This is a work in progress.


Accomplishments

Refer to the Oregon Head Start Pre-kindergarten Expansion section of this report for accomplishments.


Office of the Governor/Department of Education

Objective

To ensure the involvement of Head Start in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions effecting the Head
Start population and other low-income children and families, and to provide resources and information as
requested.

Priority Areas: All, as needed


Activities

Gov. Kulongoski has designated the Oregon Department of Education as a “co-lead partner” with the Of-
fice of the Governor for the HSSCO and has appointed a Governor’s liaison to the Project. The HSSCO is
housed and administered by the Oregon Department of Education. The HSSCO Director meets monthly
with the Governor’s liaison. The HSSCO Director serves as a resource person to the Governor’s Office and
Department of Education on funding and operation of state pre-kindergarten, Head Start, and early child-
hood collaboration projects, initiatives, issues, and concerns. The HSSCO Director provides support for both
during legislative sessions as needed.


Accomplishments

The Universal Head Start Pre-K Initiative, a Federal/state partnership approach, was used as a foundational
268   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      document for the 2007 legislative session. The HSSCO Director provided information and resources for this
      Initiative; developed and kept a legislative notebook during the Session; provided support for legislative ques-
      tions and requests, and was the lead writer for the Oregon Head Start Pre-kindergarten Legislative Report.
      Additionally, she provided expertise and resources as needed on early childhood collaboration initiatives,
      projects, issues and concerns. For expansion, the HSSCO Director wrote the Partnership section of the ODE
      Request for Proposal for the Head Start pre-k. Applicants proposing partnerships meeting the criteria for col-
      laboration were eligible for priority points in the selection process.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      The Children’s Institute/Ready for School Campaign continues as an important private partner that has been
      very successful in bringing state expansion funding for Head Start pre-kindergarten eligible children and
      families and attention to the needs of at-risk children ages birth to five and their families. The HSSCO Direc-
      tor continues to serve as a resource person for the Children’s Institute by providing information and expertise
      about Oregon’s Head Start and state pre-kindergarten programs, the State/Federal collaborative system, ser-
      vice statistics, costs, infrastructure issues, child care partnerships, and the Universal Head Start Pre-K Initia-
      tive, and funding plan. Work with the Children’s Institute continues as the campaign moves forward with next
      steps in building a comprehensive early learning investment strategy for at-risk children ages birth to five and
      their families.

      The Early Childhood Council continues to be an important activity of the HSSCO Director to support cross-
      agency early childhood systems development and the Governor’s Early Childhood agenda.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      In 2007, the HSSCO Director helped with the roll-out of the national report on Hispanic services. The
      Oregon Superintendent of Public Instruction participated in the development of this document. Children
      from the MSHS program came to the State Capitol to sing as part of the “kick-off ” for the report. A video
      of the “kick-off ” was shown at the Oregon Head Start Association, and copies of the report were distributed.
      Dual language was addressed as part of the Early Learning Issue Brief for the Governor’s Early Childhood
      Summit.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      Participation on the Early Childhood Council and Early Learning Co-Chair Committee responsibilities
      will continue. Follow-up activities resulting from the Governor’s Summit on Early Childhood and other
      work of the Council will need to be addressed. Ongoing work with the Oregon Head Start Association and
      Governor’s Office will continue. Additionally, work in the following priority areas will continue: professional
      development, Head Start/child care partnerships, support for children’s social and emotional health, Head
      Start/state pre-kindergarten collaboration, early learning guidelines, and support for children with disabilities.
      Work with the Children’s Institute/Ready for School Campaign will continue as they move forward with next
      steps in developing strategies for supporting at-risk children ages birth to five.

      New work required in the recent Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 for HSSCO Direc-
      tors will need to be added to the work plan, primarily requirements for a needs assessment and strategic plan.
      Additionally, oversight of Even Start grants as required by the ODE will need to be added to the work plan.
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 269




                                  Pennsylvania


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Susan Mitchell
Office of Child Development and
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
early learning
333 Market Street, 6th floor      Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Harrisburg, PA 17126              services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 717-787-7489               are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 717- 783-8230                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
susmitchel@state.pa.us            in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
                                  In 2007, Pennsylvania’s State Legislature approved Gov. Ed-
Collaboration Project Manager     ward Rendell’s budget, which included a $75 million invest-
                                  ment in Pennsylvania Pre-K Counts. This investment funded
tracey Campanini
                                  classroom experiences for 11,000 at-risk children. The primary
PA Key                            eligibility for children’s at-risk determination was living at or
301 Market Street, 9th floor      below 300 percent of the Federal poverty guidelines. Addition-
Harrisburg, PA 17101              al risk factors were eligibility for early intervention, English
Phone: 717-213-2066               language learners, homelessness, and children who live in areas
fax: 717- 213-0584                with a high concentration of poverty.
tracam@berksiu.org
                                  Funds were awarded through a competitive grant process. To be
                                  eligible, programs had to be one of the following: School Dis-
Lead Agency Contact
                                  trict, Child Care, Licensed Academic Preschool, and Head Start
Harriet Dichter
                                  agencies. Thirty-five Head Start agencies applied successfully.
Deputy Secretary
                                  As part of the Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSS-
Office of Child Development and
early learning                    CO), the Early Childhood Project Manager participated on
Phone: 717-346-9320               the PA Pre-K Counts Steering Committee. The committee
                                  drafted program requirements, selected applicants, and provid-
fax: 717-346-9330
                                  ed a forum to refine program policies. The EC Project Manager
hdichter@state.pa.us              provided the Head Start perspective on this committee.

ACF Regional Contact              The HSSCO Director recommended members of the Head
                                  Start community to participate on the PA Pre-K Counts
Debbie Gillan-Shaw
                                  Advisory Committee, which develops and refines policy. Four
ACf Region III                    Head Start directors, the PA Head Start Association Executive
Suite 864                         Director, and the HSSCO Director attend quarterly meetings
150 S. Independence Mall West     of the Advisory Committee.
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Phone: 215-861-4009               In addition to supporting Head Start involvement in PA
dgillan-shaw@acf.hhs.gov          Pre-K Counts, the HSSCO provides feedback to Head Start
270   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      grantees that choose not to apply for PA Pre-K Counts. During the initial set-up, the Head Start community
      expressed a concern over competition for children. In response, the HSSCO distributed a list of all PA Pre-K
      Counts grantees to Head Start directors. The list included contact information for the Local Community
      Engagement Groups (CEG). One CEG is located in each county, and each is charged with coordinating and
      developing collaborations among the members of that county’s early care and education community. CEGs
      provide a forum at the local level for Head Start and PA Pre-K Counts to meet and discuss recruitment,
      enrollment, and referral strategies.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      In 2007, the HSSCO worked in collaboration with the Department of Health, Department of Education,
      Office of Child Development and Early Learning, and Region III staff to align I am Moving, I am Learning
      (IMIL) with the Pennsylvania-sponsored Keystone Color Me Healthy (KCMH) Campaign. At the local
      level, programs reported that they believed that they must choose one approach or the other. The HSSCO
      worked to demonstrate that these two approaches to addressing childhood obesity were complimentary. The
      HSSCO participated on the KCMH Work Group. Through this involvement, the work group updated its
      train-the-trainers workshop, kit materials, and media campaign to reflect the principles of IMIL. The KCMH
      work group connected with Dr. Linda Carson and Amy Requa, who provided input in the materials. Now the
      KCMH trainers are versed in both approaches and provide participants with information on both IMIL and
      KCMH.

      The HSSCO continued its support of Mind in the Making, created by the Family Work Institute. A train-
      the-trainers institute was conducted in July 2007. Ten Head Start program staff attended. They shared strate-
      gies for effective classroom management through a combination of social and emotional development with
      cognitive learning.

      The HSSCO supported the Pennsylvania Head Start Association’s (PHSA) application for an Association
      of State and Territorial Dental Directors grant. This grant allows the PHSA to convene meetings to further
      evaluate the current level of services to Head Start and Early Head Start in Pennsylvania. It is a follow-up
      from the Dental Summit held in Pennsylvania to ascertain the progress made and determine remaining needs
      across the Commonwealth.

      The HSSCO collaborates with the PA Key’s Infant Toddler Mental Health Project. This project was designed
      as a consultative model aimed at bringing providers and specialists together to develop goals and strategies
      to enhance the provider’s ability to promote positive behaviors in young children. A goal for 2007 was to col-
      laborate to increase the number of regions served in the Commonwealth from three to six, which would cover
      all of Pennsylvania. This will be accomplished in FY 2008-09.

      Oral Health
      In 2007, the HSSCO supported the Pennsylvania Head Start Association’s (PHSA) application for an As-
      sociation of State and Territorial Dental Directors grant. This grant allows the PHSA to convene meetings to
      further evaluate the current level of services to Head Start and Early Head Start in Pennsylvania. It is a follow
      up from the Dental Summit held in Pennsylvania to ascertain the progress made and determine remaining
      needs across the State.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   271




Welfare

The HSSCO provided communication to Head Start and Early Head Start administrators regarding a
change to the Pennsylvania Criminal Background Check Policy. Presented at two administrators meetings,
the HSSCO discussed a new requirement effective July 1, 2008, that any person working or volunteering with
significant likelihood of contact with children must obtain FBI fingerprint clearances in addition to other
required background checks.

Child Care
No activities reported.

Education
The HSSCO assisted with the dissemination to the PA Early Learning Standards and the PA Infant Toddler
Standards. The Standards were developed in a committee, facilitated by the HSSCO Director, which also in-
cluded representatives from all provider types in Early Care and Education. The Standards were cross-walked
with NAEYC and Head Start Program Performance Standards. As a companion to the Standards, several
professional development activities were made available to providers across Pennsylvania.

The HSSCO conducted an orientation on the PA Keys Professional Development (PD) Calendar and the
Pennsylvania Quality Assurance System (PQAS). The PD Calendar is an Internet-based tool that can be used
to announce PD events. It also allows participants to register, and complete rosters and training certificates.
The PQAS was developed to assure that trainers providing professional development within Pennsylvania
meet a rigorous standard for content and expertise. Many programs funded through PA state funds, includ-
ing Head Start and Early Head Start, are required to have a minimum number of PQAS-approved training
hours. The HSSCO provided an overview for how Head Start and Early Head Start programs can apply for
“organizational approval” to offer their professional development as PQAS hours for staff and community
partners. More than 25 Head Start and Early Head Start programs have been approved for Organizational
PQAS. Additionally the HSSCO supported the ICF PA TA group in qualifying their technical assistance as
PQAS hours for Head Start programs.

Community Services
No activities reported.

Family Literacy Services
The HSSCO continues to be an active member of the Pennsylvania Family Literacy Consortium. The Con-
sortium is comprised of agencies throughout Pennsylvania that have an interest in promoting interagency
collaboration at the state level with expectations that policy to support family literacy will extend to local
agencies or partners. The Consortium meets quarterly to discuss issues pertinent to the improvement of family
literacy through collaboration and development of quality indicators and performance standards.

The HSSCO also continues to work with the commonwealth libraries to support the continuation of the
“One Book Every Young Child” campaign that originated in Spring 2006. This statewide initiative empha-
sizes the importance of literacy through a series of family-based activities and experiences, including the
widespread distribution of a children’s book by a Pennsylvania author. Head Start and child care centers
throughout the State received the featured book, “A Splendid Friend Indeed,” in Spring 2007.
272   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Services to Children with Disabilities
      The HSSCO EC Project Manager continues to participate in the quarterly meetings of the State Interagency
      Coordinating Council. Participation in the Coordinating Council enables the EC Project Manager to remain
      informed of the ongoing status of programs for children with special needs in the State and to seek new op-
      portunities to promote collaborative inclusive programs involving Head Start.

      The HSSCO EC project manager participated on the Pennsylvania SpecialQuest team in Summer 2007.
      Additionally the HSSCO Director participates on the Pennsylvania National Center for Professional Devel-
      opment Inclusion Team. Both teams are cross-disciplinary and are striving to consistent approaches regarding
      inclusion for all Early Care and Education Providers.

      Information is disseminated annually to all Head Start directors regarding the PA Department of Health
      Barrier Elimination Grants. Programs can apply for up to $3000 to promote inclusion at their sites.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      No activities reported.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      The HSSCO Director and Project Manager participated on the Pennsylvania Office of Child Development
      and Early Learning (OCDEL) Leadership Team. The team also included Early Intervention, Subsidy, Child
      Care Certification, Early Learning Services, and PA Pre-K Counts. The OCDEL Leadership Team works
      to frame a system of early care and education services in Pennsylvania. This system continues its efforts to
      increase accessible, quality child care, Head Start, early intervention services, voluntary pre-kindergarten, and
      full-day kindergarten. The team works to better coordinate and integrate these and other related early child-
      hood programs throughout the Commonwealth.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      A success has been the success of the Head Start community in the PA Pre-K Counts initiative. Of the 145
      successful applicants, 35 were Head Start and an additional three were listed as partners in this new initiative.

      The HSSCO Director has been involved in meetings with Higher Education. Pennsylvania has revised its
      Early Childhood Teacher requirements. The HSSCO Director is involved with a committee that is discussing
      these changes with the state colleges and the community colleges. The goal is articulation agreements across
      entities.

      Related to professional development, Pennsylvania hosts Governor’s Institutes for early educators annually.
      Head Start has been included in these week-long summer professional development opportunities. The Gov-
      ernor’s Institute counts as three credits in ECE if follow-up work is completed.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      HSSCO participates in the Family Literacy Consortium, which support programs for English Language
      Learners. The “One Book” initiative provided books in Spanish to all children identified by the local programs
      as in need of Spanish-language books.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   273




How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The HSSCO has accomplished much to be proud of in 2007. As part of the preparation for the refunding ap-
plication and work plan, the HSSCO and the PHSA have reconvened an ongoing work group to guide activi-
ties. Presently the work group is completing a mini-survey of priorities from Head Start and Early Head Start
programs. These results will guide the 2008 application and will allow for Head Start community input until
the work group has an opportunity to finalize the PA HSSCO Needs Assessment and create the HSSCO
strategic plan.
274   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 275




                             Rhode Island


Collaboration Director       Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                             areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
lawrence G. Pucciarelli
                             plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Rhode Island Department of
Human Services
                             Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
600 new london Avenue        services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Child Care Office            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Cranston, RI 02920           at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 401-462-3071          in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 401-462-6878
                             The Rhode Island Head Start-State Collaboration Office
lpucciar@dhs.ri.gov          (HSSCO) is a charter member of a Pre-kindergarten Explor-
                             atory Work Group established in Rhode Island. Members of
Lead Agency Contact          this group are early childhood, public school, various depart-
                             ment leaders, including the Commissioner of Education and
Donalda Carlson              the Chairperson of the Board of Higher Education. In April,
Phone: 401- 462-6833         a consensus was established, and legislation was filed to begin
                             the process of creating a pre-kindergarten system in Rhode
fax: 401-462-6878
                             Island.
dcarlson@dhs.ri.gov
                             The preliminary design calls for Head Start, child care, and
ACF Regional Contact         school districts to be eligible for recognition as pre-kinder-
                             garten sites if they can meet a set of standards currently under
tom Killmurray               development at the Department of Education.
ACf Region I
                             The Head Start community is making every effort to align
JfK Building
                             these new standards with the Head Start Program Performance
Government Center            Standards. Already, the Standards are being used as the founda-
Boston, MA 02203             tion for Rhode Island’s Comprehensive Child Care Networks,
Phone: 401-565-1104          created through legislation in 1998. Approximately 350 chil-
                             dren in child care have access to a full-range of comprehensive
fax: 401-565-2403
                             services through this program.
tom.killmurray@acf.hhs.gov

                             Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
                             and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
                             plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
                             Health Care
                             The HSSCO works closely with the Department of Health
276   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      and other agencies in the promotion of child and family health. The HSSCO continues to serve over 90 per-
      cent of the eligible children, despite cutbacks in eligibility.

      Oral Health
      State-level

      Improvements in the capacity to provide dental care have been accomplished. Funding for a dental van and
      the introduction of dental interns to St. Joseph’s Hospital have had an impact statewide.


      Local-level

      Dental Partnerships: Community Action Programs

      ♦ “The Molar Express” is a mobile van providing services in Rhode Island.

          Contact:
          toni enright, Head Start Director
          Cranston Community Action Agency (CAA)
          www.riheadstart.org


      ♦ St. Joseph Hospital for Specialty Care expanded its capacity to serve low-income children.

          Contact:
          Phone: 401-456-4054
          www.specialtycareri.com


      Welfare
      Welfare benefits and policies are under review as the State moves to close a budget deficit. The Welfare Imple-
      mentation Task Force meets monthly to advise the Department of Human Services. Efforts are being coordi-
      nated to use Head Start family workers and others to provide hands-on information about coming changes in
      benefits. We have worked closely with departmental administrators to address confidentiality requirements as
      we move to a new level of partnership.

      Child Care
      Rhode Island has not filled its child care administrator position. As a result, the HSSCO Director works
      closely with the Administrator of Family Support Services to ensure the successful operation of a number of
      quality set-aside programs funded by the Department of Human Services and important to overall goals of
      the HSSCO.

      The Quality Rating System (QRS) is in its second year piloting a template for program evaluation. The Rhode
      Island Association for the Education of Young Children (RIAEYC) was awarded the grant to implement
      QRS in Rhode Island. Together with the Department of Health, the HSSCO are funding partners in the
      Child Care Support Network. The Network provides technical assistance to child care centers, primarily
      around health issues. The HSSCO has launched a new program that pools health practitioners to be available
      to centers, especially those centers with infants and toddlers.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   277




Child care has experienced a decrease in the eligibility threshold for subsidy and the loss of health care sup-
ports for employees. Potential future cuts are on the table for 2009. The continuation and strengthening of
quality initiatives such as QRS, CCSN, Apprenticeship, Comprehensive Child Care, and the Early Learn-
ing Standards Project will require careful analysis and close cooperation among all the players, including the
HSSCO.

Education
Prior to the passage of the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, the HSSCO and the
Department of Education began a conversation about a possible new governance structure for all early care
and education programs, an Early Learning Council. This proposed council would link the Department of
Education, the Department of Human Services, and the Department of Children, Youth and Families, all of
which fund critical activities for young children and their families.

The HSSCO anticipates planning for a fall 2008 retreat and council roll-out by January 2009. Early Learn-
ing Standards were promulgated in Rhode Island and more than 600 teachers and administrators have been
trained, many for credit through this partnership. A SAMSA PEP/PBIS grant to strengthen the mental
health supports capacity now includes preschool and Head Start programs, which have been folded into the
training.

Community Services
AmeriCorps volunteers located in Providence are attached to Ready to Learn, a community organization.
Ready to Learn has a partnership with Providence Head Start, our largest grantee. AmeriCorps volunteers are
part of a research project focusing on language and literacy outcomes at Providence Head Start.

Family Literacy Services
In addition to the training partnership between the Department of Human Services and the Rhode Island
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (RIDE), materials specifically aimed at parents, created
by a team which included numerous Head Start parents, have been widely distributed. These Family Fun
Activity books are durable, family-friendly, and are keyed to the learning domains. They can be downloaded at
www.ride.ri.gov/els.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO is on the advisory committee for Project Connect, a Department of Human Services program
that creates opportunities for children with disabilities to be placed in child care settings. Medicaid funds are
used to hire additional staff and lower ratios.

Services to Homeless Children and Families

The Rhode Island Coalition Against Homelessness meets monthly in Providence. Families are moved
through a series of step-down scenarios toward independence. Family workers have received training, and
there are new challenges due to the increasing rate of home foreclosures.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
There are limited opportunities to influence state policies and plans because of the unfavorable economic
picture in the State.
278   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      The HSSCO is on a very good track to expand the relationship and seamless design of an early care and edu-
      cation system with quality safeguards for the future.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      The HSSCO makes every effort to include the needs of Hispanic providers in order to recruit potential family
      child care providers who can become licensed and deliver quality services. Advocacy organizations, Progresso
      Latino and the Center for Hispanic Policy and Advocacy (CHisPA) have invited our staff to planning groups
      and conferences.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      The establishment of an Early Learning Council will only be successful if there is wide support for its mis-
      sion and function. Hopefully, national organizations such as the National Governors Association (NGA) will
      promote the concept broadly and network with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the
      U.S. Department of Energy.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 279




                                         South Carolina


Collaboration Director                   Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
Mary lynne Diggs
                                         areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
South Carolina Department                plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
of Social Services
1535 Confederate Ave., 3rd floor         Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Columbia, SC 29202                       services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 803-898-2550                      are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 803-898-4458                        at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Mary.Diggs@dss.sc.gov                    in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Lead Agency Contact                      During the 2007 calendar year, the South Carolina Head
                                         Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) continued mem-
Kathleen M. Hayes, State Director        bership and work with the Early Childhood Comprehensive
South Carolina Department                Systems (ECCS) Grant. Progress with at least ten early child-
of Social Services                       hood partners was made in the areas of agreement to support a
P.O. Box 1520                            statewide technical assistance system. This technical assistance
Columbia, SC 29202                       system:
Phone: 803-898-7360
fax: 803-898-7277                        ♦ Ensures training access for staff serving special needs chil-
Kathleen.Hayes@dss.sc.gov                  dren and their families.
(leigh Bolick, State Child Care Admin-
istrator-Immediate Supervisor)           ♦ Encourages the seven medical home components of pediat-
                                           ric primary care.
ACF Regional Contact

Bobby Griffin                            ♦ Supports implementation of a statewide 4K preschool pro-
ACf Region IV                              gram and the creation of a professional development and
61 forsyth Street SW, Suite 4M60
                                           family support work plan to ensure Medicaid information.
Atlanta, GA 30303
Phone: 404-562-2874                      ♦ Supports parental knowledge and location of quality child
fax: 404-562-2983                          care.
bobby.griffin@acf.hhs.gov
                                         ♦ Ensures that partners share knowledge of and support the
Beverly A. taylor                          South Carolina Child Care Development Fund’s Advocates
Head Start Program Specialist              for Better Care (ABC) program standards.
Health and Disabilities Services
61 forsyth Street SW, Suite 4M60         The year ended with a draft of recommendations to be consid-
Atlanta, GA 30303                        ered for the State ECCS implementation plan. In conjunction
Phone: 404-562-2847                      with this effort, South Carolina was awarded a $10,000 plan-
fax: 404-562-2982                        ning grant from the National Governors Association (NGA)
beverly.taylor@acf.hhs.gov               by way of the Buffet Foundation. Head Start and Community
                                         Action Agencies (CAA) were included.
280   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      The HSSCO Director was a speaker at the kick-off breakfast featuring Dan Pederson of the Buffet Founda-
      tion. South Carolina continues to maintain a set-aside in the State Child Care Development Fund (CCDF)
      fund. As a result of an August training session, 15 of the 21 grantees became eligible to serve children through
      a wrap-around.

      From October 1, 2006, to September 30, 2007, South Carolina Head Start grantees expended $594,697 of the
      $1.4 million set-aside. In November, in partnership with the South Carolina Community Action Partnership,
      the South Carolina Head Start Association (SCHSA), and the South Carolina CAA Directors Association,
      the HSSCO participated in negotiations for a new agreement with the South Carolina Department of Social
      Services (DSS), addressing the usage of the CCDF set-aside as well as the roles and responsibilities of noted
      partners.

      During 2007, South Carolina pre-kindergarten was administered based on a two-year proviso affecting 38
      of the 85 school district service areas, focusing on children at the 185 percent poverty level or below. South
      Carolina pre-kindergarten services can be accessed through public school expansion or through South Caro-
      lina First Steps for School Readiness. Eight South Carolina grantees are affected by the proviso. Head Start is
      approved as a public school expansion and a private-setting provider. Five South Carolina Head Start grantees
      participated. A January 2008 report from the South Carolina Education Oversight Committee will identify
      the numbers of children served, as well as how much of the State allocated $23 million was expended.

      The HSSCO staff, Head Start leadership, and other early care partners have been included in a South Caro-
      lina Senate Select Committee. This committee focuses on the expansion and statewide service legislation.

      A milestone event was a two-day retreat in September that included Head Start directors, Head Start execu-
      tive directors (CAA directors), grantee fiscal officers, and 4K implementation partners. The focus was fiscal
      implementation of 4K. This event was made possible by the Office of Head Start 4K supplemental funds.

      The HSSCO also participated in and hosted the Director of the Office of Early Childhood and the President
      of the State Head Start Association at the National Collaboration Network 4K Partners Meeting in Wash-
      ington, per supplemental funds.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      During 2007, the HSSCO in partnership with the South Carolina Head Start Health Network completed
      an Asthma 101 train-the-trainer initiative. The trainers from the South Carolina Lung Association trained
      South Carolina Head Start health coordinators. Twenty grantees were represented. Trainees received 4.5 child
      care licensing training hours. The 2007-08 plan includes accessing implementation materials for each South
      Carolina Head Start center.

      South Carolina Head Start moved forward with the South Carolina Obesity Prevention Efforts (SCOPE)
      partnership by responding to the State goal of 20 percent of child care centers by 2007 participating in the
      Color Me Healthy train-the-trainer series. In 2007, seven grantees participated in training and have imple-
      mented the curriculum that utilizes music and senses exploration to teach children that health, food, and
      physical activity can be fun. This initiative is funded through a grant from the Centers for Disease Control
      and Prevention and material purchase expansion through Blue Cross Blue Shield. The State Department of
      Health and Environmental Control is the lead partner.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   281




Consistent with the Region IV Office of Head Start’s obesity focus, the HSSCO, along with representatives
from two Head Start grantees and Region IV Head Start technical assistance staff, received intense training
to implement I Am Moving, I Am Learning. Similar to Color Me Healthy, this initiative focuses on movement
for children, teachers, staff, and family. Both initiatives were highlighted during the October Head Start As-
sociation/Health Network, Collaboration Office Oral Health Summit as a nutrition focus.

In addition, I Am Moving, I Am Learning was introduced to the South Carolina Head Start/CAA community
as a part of the fall managers’ training. Upon recommendation from the HSSCO, all South Carolina Head
Start statewide events begin and end with I Am Moving, I Am Learning activities, including line dances. Stu-
dents and teachers from the two Region IV designated grantees introduced activities to the more than 1,200
attendees at the October Head Start Awareness Day in Columbia.

The SCHSA has implemented health walks and a weigh down competition where staff are recognized at
the two statewide training conferences. The HSSCO partnered to access seven scholarships for the March
30 statewide conference, “Changing the Shape of South Carolina.” Presentations focused on approaches to
combating obesity and advocating for food/nutrition policy implementation. The American Heart Association
joined SCORE program partners for this event.

All of the activities noted above are in line with working to change South Carolina’s ranking as 6th in the
nation in obesity.

Oral Health
The HSSCO continues to work toward the goal of assisting and encouraging Head Start programs to con-
tinue quality health services through coalitions and partnerships. One objective includes implementation of
the South Carolina Oral Health Plan. The 2007 activities included continued membership in the State Oral
Health Coalition. Further efforts included accessing oral health training for each of the two South Caro-
lina Head Start training conferences, as well as accessing training opportunities for the initiative at partner
conferences – the South Carolina Association for the Education of Young Children (SCAEYC), grandparents
summits, and Head Start Awareness Day.

In partnership with the South Carolina Dental Association (SCDA), 2007 Oral Heath Awareness post-
ers were distributed to all South Carolina Head Start centers for children’s dental health month, along with
participation in the February cavity-free month activities.

In addition, the HSSCO partnered with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental
Control (SCDHEC), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Voices for South Carolina’s
Children, and the SCDA to sponsor the South Carolina Seventh Annual Oral Health Forum, May 31-June 1,
2007. The more than 100 attendees assisted with focus groups affecting the early childhood social marketing
section of the Oral Health State Plan and critiqued a rural health documentary produced by the University of
South Carolina, Arnold School of Public Health. Other topics included oral health for children with special
health care needs and oral cancer and tobacco cessation.

The HSSCO partnered with the SCHSA to access supplemental funding from Region IV. The funds al-
lowed for parenting materials, classroom kits of mouth models, timers, dental health books, laminated first aid
sheets, Flora and Floppy Go to the Dentist videos and coloring books, oral health stickers, large puppets, and
toothbrushes.

Head Start classes from around the State traveled to Columbia’s EdVenture Children’s Museum to view the
exhibit From Brushes to Bristles made available through the American Dental Association’s Harris Award.
Head Start is included in SCDA’s yearly Harris Award submission.
282   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Welfare
      The present host agency, the South Carolina Department of Social Services (DSS) is dedicated to Adminis-
      tration for Children and Families-funded programs. The placement provides opportunities for welfare issues.

      Child Care
      The first section of this report noted the ongoing partnership through CCDF. During 2007, 14 grantees pro-
      vided wrap-around services to 467 children. This is a 40% increase in grantee participation and a more than
      50% increase in the number of children linked since 2006.

      South Carolina Head Start programs continue to lead in National Association for the Education of Young
      Children Accreditation (NAEYC) in South Carolina. Seventy Head Start centers have achieved this status
      and will continue to be considered at the top tier of the Early Childhood Environmental Rating Scale (EC-
      CERS) driven top tier under the CCDF rating system. There are just fewer than 130 NAEYC centers in the
      State.

      The HSSCO and the SCHSA continue to partner and encourage the NAEYC centers, through techni-
      cal assistance and scholarships. The HSSCO was co-sponsor for a presentation by Dr. Wendy Valerio at the
      SCAEYC conference in October. The presentation focused on approaches through music.

      Work continues to embrace the unfolding South Carolina Technical Assistance Program for Preschool-
      ers (TAP). Four Head Start staffers wear the TAP pen, signifying 15 field hours beyond a required graduate
      course and are available to assist the early care community.

      Head Start programs had access to the five domestic violence trainings across the State for child care centers
      offered through a grant to the University of South Carolina. More than 30 Head Start staff received training
      in 2007.

      Education
      The HSSCO Director continues to serve on the TEACH Advisory Council. Head Start received 136 scholar-
      ships during 2007, including 17 for the B.A. level.

      After three submissions, South Carolina is one of four entities in the nation, to receive the U.S. Department
      of Education’s grant focusing on teacher mentoring. Head Start is a leading partner in the “Bridges” grant.

      The HSSCO continues partnerships with the Child Care Quality section of CCDF, as well as the McKinney-
      Vento Homeless Education Office, offering graduate credit and teacher re-certification opportunities. A total
      of 19 Head Start staff received the scholarships focused on infant toddler or serving homeless children.

      The South Carolina Early Learning Standards were rolled out September 25-26. Sixty Centers for Child Care
      Career Development (CCCD) certified trainers shared the good news. The Standards, a part of No Child Left
      Behind, the Good Start/Grow Smart section, include training guides and videos. The HSSCO has been part
      of this learning and development project for five years. Early care partners pooled time, talent, and resources.
      Seven Head Start staff persons along with the two Head Start technical assistance specialists are train-
      ers. Both state-level Head Start training meetings served as overview opportunities. Each director and each
      Head Start education coordination received copies of the Standards in preparation for classroom training and
      implementation in 2008.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   283




Community Services
As shared yearly, 98 percent of the South Carolina Head Start grantees are sponsored by Community Action
Agencies. The HSSCO is part of a planning team with the South Carolina Community Action Partnership
Office (State Head Start Association and CAA Associations headquarters) along with the Governor’s Office
of Economic Opportunity (OEO). The team assists in planning a fall managers’ training and joint spring
conferences. In addition, efforts are underway for a joint technology system. The South Carolina Head Start
Collaboration Committee is chaired by a CAA Executive Director. The OEO director and the HSSCO ac-
cess professional development opportunities for each other.

Family Literacy Services
The National Head Start Family Literacy Center at Sonoma State University provided training and informa-
tion during the spring all-state conference. Parents were included in this training. Another literacy focus was
the HSSCO’s inclusion in the SCAEYC conference. A relationship has been forged with the State Library,
including co-sponsorship of the November celebration of National Family Literacy Week. With the assis-
tance of Kohl’s Department stores, hardback books and plush stuffed animals were made available to educa-
tion coordinators for the literacy week events.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO co-sponsored the attendance of the two South Carolina Head Start Resource and Training
Specialists to the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPCDI) training in Chapel Hill.
This is in preparation of the South Carolina’s submission for state technical assistance. The HSSCO partnered
with resource specialists for an autism track at the fall managers’ training. Head Start technical assistance
staff assisted with the social and emotional video production of the South Carolina Early Learning Standards.
Head Start Social and Emotional Performance Standards were adopted for this statewide effort. After more
than four years of efforts, education and Head Start came to the table to work toward an updated disabilities
transition agreement. A Summer 2008 target date is awaited.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
All statewide Head Start trainings and activities include updates from the South Carolina McKinney-Vento
Office. The HSSCO partnered with the Association to access 11 scholarships to the March 1 Connecting the
Pieces McKinney-Vento Conference focusing on the causes of poverty, issues around unaccompanied youth
and preschool homeless issues. Community services staff were included. In addition, seven staffers received
scholarships for the summer course, Promoting School Success in Homeless and Other High-Risk Students.

The HSSCO and the SCHSA extended access to in-kind contributions from the Cooperative Ministries to
the Children’s Garden, a child care center for homeless children. In addition, the HSSCO accessed assistance
from the South Carolina Federation of Women and Girls’ Clubs to join the SCHSA in assisting the Fam-
ily Shelter, Inc., a family transition program. Federation members provided toothbrushes and toothpaste, and
Head Start provided oral health kits.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO has worked to ensure the SCHSA’s voice in legislative planning meetings and hearings around
4K. The HSSCO continues to yield its voting seat on the Child Care Coordinating Council to the SCHSA.
The Head Start Health Network is represented on the State Oral Health Coalition. The Collaboration advi-
sory group meets on a regular basis, reviews grant progress, and participates in formulating the direction of the
Collaboration grant. The HSSCO Director provides updates at Head Start Association meetings, directors’
forums, and the CAA directors’ meetings.
284   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      The HSSCO partnered with the SCHSA for a fall Hispanic/Latino conference. In addition to serving as a
      co-sponsor, the HSSCO presented sessions on the history and purpose of Head Start, and provided in-kind
      items from Kohl’s Department stores for literacy activities. The HSSCO also presented during the South
      Carolina Commission on Minority Affairs Hispanic/Latino conference. The HSSCO accessed awareness
      training for statewide conferences focusing on interpreting verses translation. The National Migrant Collabo-
      ration Office continues to assist with statewide programs in an effort to further involve Migrant Head Start.
      The HSSCO Director accompanied the Migrant Collaboration Director on site visits in the State.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      All of the above descriptions of the HSSCO’s activities are consistent with the approved South Carolina
      Head Start Collaboration grant.
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 285




                                 South Dakota


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Steph lebeda
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
South Dakota Department
of education
                                 Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Office of educational Services   services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
and Support
                                 are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
700 Governors Drive
                                 at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Pierre, SD 57501
                                 in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 605-773-4640
fax: 605-773-3782                Goal 1
stephani.lebeda@state.sd.us
                                 To promote the development of access to comprehensive ser-
                                 vices through quality Head Start programs by supporting Head
Lead Agency Contact
                                 Start quality improvement efforts.
Janet Ricketts
                                 Outcomes
Phone: 605-773-4689
fax: 605-773-3782                Early Learning Guidelines (ELGs) were presented and dis-
janet.ricketts@state.sd.us       cussed during workshop sessions at the State No Child Left
                                 Behind (NCLB) Conference sponsored by the Department
ACF Regional Contact             of Education – Title programs. The participants included Lo-
                                 cal Education Agencies (LEAs) staff, including teachers and
Ross Weaver                      administrators.
ACf Region VIII
                                 Work continues to complete additional materials to supple-
1961 Stout Street                ment the Early Learning Guidelines. These items include
9th floor                        ELG posters for each domain and a calendar coordinated with
Denver, CO 80294                 activities related to the ELGs. The Head Start-State Col-
                                 laboration Office (HSSCO) Director assisted with plans for
Phone: 303-844-1154
                                 professional development through the University of South
fax: 303-844-3642                Dakota and regional ECEs (through Child Care Services) by
rweaver@acf.hhs.gov              notifying grantees of the training and providing feedback to
                                 the coordinator in Child Care Services on how many Head
                                 Start staff will be participating.

                                 The HSSCO Director attended a policy discussion that was
                                 part of the Early Childhood Summit. The National Governors
                                 Association awarded South Dakota a grant for an Early Child-
                                 hood Summit that is part of the work of the 2010E (Starting
                                 Strong) initiative. The HSSCO Director also attended the
286   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Pre-kindergarten Summit. The HSSCO Director assisted in providing information to the coordinator of the
      Early Childhood Summit to invite participation of all Head Start directors in this meeting. Several Head
      Start/Early Head Start directors/representatives attended the meeting and provided valuable input to plan-
      ning future legislation and collaborations.

      The HSSCO Director met with TA Specialists to continue working on the Medicaid Agreement process.
      Contacts have been made with staff in the Department of Social Services to resume the process for the Med-
      icaid work group.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Goal 3

      To create linkages with a more coordinated approach to planning and service delivery in child care, welfare,
      health care, education, community service activities, family literacy services, activities related to children with
      disabilities, and services for homeless children in order to strengthen and support South Dakota’s families.

      Outcomes

      Planning had begun to reconvene the South Dakota Early Childhood Council. This was put on hold pending
      reauthorization. Discussions have begun within the Department of Education regarding the State Advisory
      Councils as defined in reauthorization. Some information has been shared within the State through various
      reports and discussions. South Dakota has been offered technical assistance connected to Pre-K Now, and the
      HSSCO Director participated in a conversation with the consultant to South Dakota and the Deputy Secre-
      tary of Education regarding the State Advisory Council and how it may evolve in the State.

      Health Care
      The HSSCO Director participates in the Oral Health Steering Committee meetings to work on improved
      oral health services for low-income families across the State. The South Dakota Dental Association has
      received a new grant to fund a second mobile dental unit with funds to pilot a voucher program for children
      whose dental work cannot be completed in the care mobile and must be treated at a dental office. The HSS-
      CO Director, as well as many program representatives, also participates in the Region VIII monthly mental
      health calls/discussions.

      The HSSCO Director met with the State Agencies and Head Start to discuss a collaborative agreement be-
      tween Medicaid and Head Start programs for improved coordinated Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and
      Treatment (EPSDT) services. Final agreement is pending.

      Oral Health
      State-level

          South Dakota Oral Health Coalition Steering Committee
          Paul Knecht, Executive Director
          South Dakota Dental Association
          P.O. Box 1194
          Pierre, SD 57501
          Phone: 605-224-9133
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   287




  paul@sddental.org
The Head Start programs complete quarterly oral health activity reports as part of the participation with the
South Dakota Dental Association. These reports are sent to and compiled by the South Dakota Head Start As-
sociation (SDHSA) and distributed to the Oral Health Coalition. The information is used by various entities.

Through a grant, a Ronald McDonald Dental Care Mobile was purchased and travels throughout the State.
Dentists and other staff volunteer their time to provide services to children. This is a joint venture between
Delta Dental of South Dakota and the South Dakota Dental Association, coordinated by Delta Dental of
South Dakota. This past year, more grant funding was awarded to allow the purchase of a second dental mobile.
This second mobile is expected to be ready in Fall 2008. It will expand services to treat some adults as well.


Local-level

Below is a sample of programs that provided information on their partnerships. A more detailed listing can
be found at the end of this report.

         Interlakes Community Action Head Start

         Dr. Speiker and Dr. Hattervig provide free initial exams for Hutterite children, apply fluoride var-
         nish, and order it for the rest of the year. Dr. Speiker and Dr. Crump educate families in oral health
         by speaking in the classroom and at parent meetings. The HSSCO uses the Care Mobile with a dif-
         ferent dentist each time. We also work with the South Dakota Oral Health Strategies Coalition and
         with Delta Dental. Dr. Crump’s dental hygienist will also be educating staff on the use of the oral
         health education flip chart. Drs. Hanson, Elpert, Schuurmanns, Crump, and Hattervig all are on our
         Health Advisory and help with education of children and parents.

         Oglala Lakota College Head Start/Early Head Start

         The Oglala Lakota College Head Start Program has a partnership with the Indian Health Service
         Dental Clinic through Delores Starr, whose position is partially funded through the Head Start
         Program with Indian Health Services (IHS), along with the IHS dental program’s employees, Nicole
         Glines and Amy Dayhoff. They have gone into the centers to apply the fluoride varnishes and com-
         plete dental screenings. We also partner with the Healthy Smiles Program, which is a Tribal program
         through the Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairman’s Health Board.

         Oahe Child Development Center Head Start/Early Head Start

         Eight local dentists provide in-kind services for children’s initial exam at Head Start.

         Sioux Falls Head Start

         Sioux Falls Head Start partnered with the Care Mobile and the University of South Dakota Dental
         Hygiene Program (dental varnish and education). The Head Start program has worked with the Uni-
         versity of South Dakota student nurses, who have provided dental education in classrooms. The pro-
         gram also partners with Sioux River Community Health, which reserves dental days for Head Start
         exams and treatment. The Children’s Dental Center is represented on the Health Services Advisory.

         Youth and Family Services

         The Ronald McDonald Care Dental Care Mobile visits the site twice a year. Volunteer dentists treat
         children, including those in Youth and Family Services Area dentists also volunteer to see children
         on Give Kids a Smile Day.
288   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Additional information

      The HSSCO serves as the liaison between the South Dakota Dental Association (which through a Wellmark
      grant provides oral health supplies to local programs) and the Oral Health Coordinator with the South Da-
      kota Department of Health and local programs. The HSSCO Director is a member of the South Dakota Oral
      Health Coalition and the Steering Committee.

      Welfare
      ♦ The South Dakota Head Start Association is revising the Resource Directory for all programs. It is located
        on the South Dakota Head Start Association Web site.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director is a member of the Statewide Advisory Board for the South Dakota Parent Infor-
        mation Resource Center. This is a newly formed group that is looking at ways to get parents more involved
        in their children’s education, among other areas.

      ♦ Per the agreement between the HSSCO and the Department of Social Services (DSS), current data
        regarding eligible participants are shared with appropriate programs as requested.

      ♦ Head Start recruitment flyers were published and inserted in Food Stamps and TANF mailings.



      Child Care
      This was a topic for one of the Networking Sessions coordinated with the SDHSA meetings. The HSSCO
      Director has been in contact with the State Child Care Administrator. Discussions will continue. The HSS-
      CO Director participated in the South Dakota Alliance for Children work group/meeting.

      Education
      ♦ Expanding and Improving Education Opportunities in Early Childhood Programs.

      ♦ Early Learning Guidelines were presented and discussed during workshop sessions at the State NCLB
        Conference sponsored by the Department of Education — Title programs. The participants included
        LEA staff, including teachers and administrators.

      ♦ Work continues to complete additional materials to supplement the Early Learning Guidelines. These
        items include ELG posters for each domain and a calendar coordinated with activities related to the
        Early Learning Guidelines. Plans for professional development continue through the University of
        South Dakota and regional ECEs (through Child Care Services).

      Community Services
      The SDHSA developed a resource directory of services. It is being revised to be able to sort information by
      county.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   289




Family Literacy Services
♦ A proposal was written with collaboration between Special Education 619 Coordinator, Child Care
  Services and the HSSCO Director on statewide technical assistance for early literacy interventions.
  Notification was received that South Dakota will be receiving this. This will come through the Center
  for Early Literacy and Learning (CELL) which is funded through a grant from the Office of Special
  Education Programs (OSEP). The technical assistance will be at no cost to the State, and a resource team
  (including Head Start staff ) will be formed to determine the statewide needs of the partners.

♦ Head Start programs continue to partner with Even Start Family Literacy programs in communities
  that have Even Start programs. Typically, Head Start provides quality early childhood services for the
  preschool-age child and jointly plans parenting education for parents.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The agreement was completed. Plans are currently underway to revisit and continue a previous discussion on
coordination and transition with Head Starts and LEAs.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
A meeting was held regarding the State’s homeless families, including those who receive Head Start services.
The intended outcome is to strengthen the statewide system of support for homeless families among the
several agencies working with these families. Work continues in this area.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
Goal 2

To maintain the structure of collaborative policy making, resource planning, coalition building and informa-
tion exchange among Head Start, state and Federal programs serving young children and their families and
across the broader early childhood system, in order to improve and expand services of low-income children
served in Head Start, child care, and other state programs and initiatives.


Outcomes

♦ The Head Start Fact Sheets for Health and Family Services are completed. They have received positive
  response from organizations and agencies across the State. They are also posted on the SDHSA Web
  site as well as the Kids Count Web site through the University of South Dakota.

♦ Statewide PIR information was reviewed and distributed for inclusion in the Annual Head Start Profile.
  The Head Start Association updated and printed a program information brochure and distributed it to
  the South Dakota Legislature and the public.

♦ The HSSCO Director maintained ongoing contact and communication with the Head Start Association
  by attending its board meetings.

♦ The HSSCO Director continued to represent Head Start on various committees or work groups as
  requested.
290   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Since the beginning of May 2006, the HSSCO Director has worked to build and maintain relationships
        with Head Start programs.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director participated in the joint Region VII and Region XI South Dakota Head Start Di-
        rectors’ Meeting and the Northern Plains Tribal Head Start Directors’ Meeting (South Dakota, Nebraska,
        and North Dakota Region XI directors).

      A series of Round Tables was planned and will be continued. The participation has increased from directors,
      and both Region VIII and Region XI directors have expressed an interest in continuing these meetings. The
      meetings are proving to be beneficial to all attending.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      South Dakota Early Learning Guidelines were translated into Spanish and are available online in Spanish.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      Efforts to meet with the Region XI directors have proved successful. All directors have been supportive and
      try to make the outreach contacts as well.

      The follow-up meeting (to the January Partners and Pre-kindergarten meeting January 2007) was successful.
      Discussion included a more focused approach for South Dakota’s Children’s Cabinet to take. A more focused
      direction for the Starting Strong group is one outcome of this ongoing activity.

      The Medicaid work group (the DSS and the Medicaid Director) is working to correct issues from their Fed-
      eral review. The final draft is awaiting changes based on this.
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 291




                                     Tennessee


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
Janet Coscarelli                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Andrew Johnson tower                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
9th floor
710 James Robertson Parkway
                                     Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
nashville, tn 37243                  services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 615-741-4849                  are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 615-532-4989                    at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Janet.Coscarelli@state.tn.us         in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
www.tnheadstart.org
                                     Early childhood systems and access to comprehensive services
                                     Janet Coscarelli, Director of the Tennessee Head Start-State
Lead Agency Contact                  Collaboration Office (HSSCO), is on the Executive Advi-
                                     sory Board and Planning Committee of the Tennessee Early
Bobbi lussier, Executive Director
                                     Childhood Comprehensive Services (ECCS) project and
Office of early learning
                                     participates in all meetings. The ECCS project is funded to the
tennessee Department of education    Maternal and Child Health section of the Tennessee Depart-
Phone: 615-253-3167                  ment of Health. ECCS’s project goals and objectives are in
fax: 615-532-4989                    keeping with the medical, dental, and mental health Head Start
Bobbi.lussier@state.tn.us            Program Performance Standards. Coscarelli and Lesa Byrum,
                                     the previous ECCS Director, participated in the National
ACF Regional Contact                 Head Start/ECCS meeting in January 2007 and presented
                                     two papers, Work with Children’s Cabinets and Governor’s Task
Marsha lawrence                      Forces and Assuring a Medical and Dental Home for Every Young
ACf Region IV                        Child. Both presentations were well-received and encouraged
Regional Program Manager
                                     good discussion for participants. Coscarelli works cooperatively
                                     with the newly appointed director, Rosie Wooten, in meeting
61 forsyth Street, Suite 4M60
                                     ECCS responsibilities.
Atlanta GA 30303
Phone: 404-562-2841
fax: 404-562-2982                    Tennessee Pre-kindergarten
mlawrence@acf.hhs.gov
                                     Many Head Start programs are collaborating and partnering
Bobby Griffin, Branch Manager        with Local Education Agencies (LEAs) to increase enrollment
State Collaboration Office Contact   in quality early childhood pre-kindergarten programs. Total
bgriffin@acf.hhs.gov
                                     funding for state pre-kindergarten programs is $85M ($60M
                                     from the State and $25M from excess lottery funds). Out of
Gail Maynard                         the 137 Tennessee LEAs, 136 have pre-kindergarten class-
Program Specialist                   rooms resulting in 934 classrooms statewide. Tennessee Head
                                     Start programs lead the state in providing classroom opportu-
State Representative for tennessee
                                     nities for pre-kindergarten; 62 percent of the pre-kindergarten
gmaynard@acf.hhs.gov
                                     classrooms not in LEAs are in Head Start.
292   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      The HSSCO Director was appointed to the State PreK Advisory Coalition (SPAC), an advisory group that
      advises Department of Education Office of Early Learning on the statewide operation of the pre-kinder-
      garten program. SPAC has been expanded to become the State Advisory Council specified in the new Head
      Start Act. Seven Head Start program directors have been appointed to SPAC. They represent urban, rural,
      suburban, and Hispanic settings. SPAC held its first meeting on January 9, 2007.

      The Tennessee HSSCO cosponsored with the Department of Education, Office of Early Learning, PreK
      Alliance and Pre-K Now, the 2nd Annual Early Childhood Summit Collaboration Conference on May 3-4,
      2007, with more than 600 participants. Carmen Bovell, of the Office of Head Start, was invited to speak at
      the conference and made a presentation to the group on Head Start policy and its commitment to quality
      early childhood programming. Atlanta Region IV Head Start program specialist Gail Maynard also attended.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      Tennessee has a statewide health system called TennCare. The 2006-07 Program Information Report (PIR)
      revealed outstanding accomplishments in health for Tennessee’s Head Start programs with 99% of children
      having an ongoing medical home, 93% having appropriate immunizations for their age, and 86% having an
      ongoing source of continuous, accessible dental care.

      ♦ CoverTN and CoverKids are new state health insurance plans for adults and children that can help families
        not eligible for TennCare. CoverKids uses State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) monies
        for health care, including oral health care for children birth to 18. Oral health care was added through
        legislation in 2007. The HSSCO Director advocated with state legislators for this oral health inclusion in
        the State plan.

      ♦ Tennessee received a $5,000 grant from the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors
        (ASTDD) to hold an Oral Health Dental Forum in collaboration with the Tennessee Department of
        Health, Oral Health Services; TennCare Oral Health Division; and the Tennessee Head Start Association
        (THSA). The Oral Health Forum was conducted in concert with the annual Tennessee Dental Associa-
        tion conference May 17-18, 2007 in Nashville. The full-day forum had 75 dentists in attendance with
        several signing onto TennCare contracts to accept TennCare patients.

      Oral Health

      State-level

          Statewide Oral Health Sub-Committee
          Contact:
          Jacqueline Clouse
          tennessee early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and treatment (ePSDt) Coordinator for Doral Dental


          tennCare Oral Health Advisory Board
          Contact:
          Jim Gillcrist
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   293




Local-level

All Head Start programs have contacts with dentists in local areas to provide oral dental services to children.
Tennessee Head Start programs have remarkable oral health data.


Additional Information

The HSSCO Director participates on the statewide Oral Health Sub-Committee, which was a by-product
of the Tennessee Head Start Oral Health Forum, funded by the Association of State and Territorial Dental
Directors (ASTDD) and held in May 2007. Jacqueline Clouse, Tennessee EPSDT for Doral Dental is the
chairperson for this sub-committee that meets on a regular basis. Doral Dental administers the TennCare
statewide oral health program. The sub-committee recently held a full-day meeting with professionals inter-
ested in quality oral health services to children and young adults and able to influence oral health policies and
pending state legislation.

Welfare
TANF and child care funding will probably be cut based on current Federal allocations. To date, the TANF
Reauthorization Bill has not been signed, so final state allocations are uncertain.

♦ The HSSCO was a co-sponsor of the Tennessee Conference on Social Welfare annual conference on April
  3-5, 2007, held in Nashville with approximately 400 participants. This event provided training and techni-
  cal assistance to Head Start staff and others in the social service arena.

Child Care
The Tennessee Department of Human Services for the past six years has administered the Infant-Toddler
Environmental Rating Scale (ITERS) and Early Childhood Environmental Rating Scale (ECERS) for all
licensed child care centers in the State. Scoring is on a STAR rating system with a 3-star rating as the highest.
Head Start classrooms are licensed by the Tennessee Department of Human Services and consistently score
in the 3-STAR level, with approximately 90 percent of the Head Start classrooms scoring at the 3-STAR
level.

♦ The HSSCO and the Department of Education Office of Early Learning and the Office of Safe School
  held a joint train-the-trainer session on child safety using the Talk About Touching curriculum; 38 pre-
  kindergarten and Head Start staff attended. This training session has sparked the utilization of this cur-
  riculum in all pre-kindergarten classrooms and Head Start programs.

♦ The HSSCO was a co-sponsor of the 5th Annual Leadership Conference for Early Childhood Profes-
  sionals on June 29-30, 2007, in Memphis, with approximately 250 participants. This event provided pro-
  fessional training for participants and focused primarily on staff working with children birth to five.

♦ The HSSCO Director serves on the Advisory Board for the Tennessee Department of Human Services,
  Child Care Referral and Resource Centers that provides training and technical assistance to child care
  centers and Head Start programs across the State.

Education
Advancement in the Tennessee public education system has been a cornerstone in Gov. Phil Bredesen’s ad-
ministration with pre-kindergarten education as a highlight. Currently 934 pre-kindergarten classrooms are
294   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      operational across the state, with Head Start programs being the primary partner. The Tennessee pre-kinder-
      garten budget is at $85M with a possible increase of $25M for 2008.

      ♦ The Tennessee Early Learning Developmental Standards (ELDS) are being implemented in the pre-kinder-
        garten classrooms; staff development is being implemented in using the ELDS document in the class-
        room. ELDS is in keeping with the Head Start Program Performance Standards, so compliance for Head
        Starts and pre-kindergartens in partnership is easy.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director serves on the Advisory Board of the Tennessee Association for the Education of
        Young Children (TAEYC), a statewide group of professionals serving young children. TAEYC is the state
        arm for the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

      Community Services
      Head Start has always been a community-based organization that revolves around community needs. Ac-
      tivities that involve families have been important for the HSSCO. Each year, the Week of the Young Child
      (WOYC) has been a unified event in Nashville, spearheaded by the Nashville Area Association for the
      Education of Young Children. The HSSCO has always been an active co-sponsor of the WOYC event. The
      HSSCO also participates and helps in co-sponsoring Children’s Advocacy Days (CAD), a legislative event for
      advocates to meet legislators and discuss state issues prevailing in the State Legislature.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director participated in the Children’s Advocacy Days held March 13-14, 2007. CAD is a
        “Day on the Hill” for advocates to meet legislators and discuss prevailing bills being considered for pas-
        sage. Advocating for inclusion of oral health dental care in CoverKids, the state-level insurance plan was a
        priority.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director participated in the Week of the Young Child and served on the overall Planning
        Committee and the Cultural Diversity Sub-Committee. WOYC events were held April 2-7, 2007.

      Family Literacy Services
      Increasing literacy skills for children is high focus in Tennessee through the Governor’s Books From Birth
      Foundation that distributes the Imagination Library throughout the State, county-by-county. Gov. Bredesen,
      through the Dolly Parton Foundation, has created a partnership that seeks to bring the joy of appropriate
      books to every child, age birth to five in the State. Membership in the Imagination Library provides an age-
      appropriate book that arrives in the mail each month to each registered child. All 95 Tennessee counties are
      involved in Imagination Library.

      ♦ Head Start program staff register Head Start children and siblings into the Imagination Library upon
        initial contact and have been instrumental in making Imagination Library successful across the State.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director serves on the Even Start Advisory Council. Even Start, funded through the U.S.
        Department of Education, promotes family literacy in children, birth to seven. Many Head Start programs
        collaborate with Even Start centers. Continued Federal funding for Even Start programs is uncertain at
        this time.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      Tennessee’s Program Information Report (PIR) data for 2005-06 indicated that of the funded enrollment of
      16,397 children in Head Start, 13.2% (2,180) had diagnosed disabilities recognized by the Local Education
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   295




Agencies (LEAs) for services. Of the 2,180 children with disabilities, only 1,107 had the diagnosed disability
coming into Head Start. The remaining 1,073 children (51%) were identified in Head Start as having a dis-
ability due to the comprehensive and thorough screening and assessment procedures completed by Head Start
programs. This collaboration assists LEAs in meeting the Federal requirement of child find implementation
that is part of the Special Education Act.

♦ A Memorandum of Agreement between Head Start and Tennessee Department of Education/Special
  Education has been signed. It was distributed to all Head Start programs, LEA special education sections,
  and signatory parties.

♦ The Tennessee Department of Education/Special Education’s program, Tennessee Early Intervention
  Services, which is Part C of the Special Education Act, has gone through a comprehensive review by an
  outside consulting firm for management and fiscal integrity. A Core Team was appointed to assist and
  spearhead the review; the HSSCO Director served on the Core Team. Significant changes in policy, man-
  agement, and personnel in the program were started in September 2007. As a result, services to children
  with disabilities have become more uniform and consistent statewide, with reliable data being collected.
  Contracts for services are now uniform with a consistent fee basis statewide.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The HSSCO Director was appointed to serve on the Advisory Board of the Interagency Council on Home-
lessness, which was established by Gov. Bredesen in 2004. This council meets on a quarterly basis.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO Director participates on numerous boards, Steering Committees, task forces, and committees
that are detailed within the text of this document. Serving on these entities allows the HSSCO Director to
provide input into policies, plans, legislation, processes, and decisions that benefit young children.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The actual number of collaborative partnerships between Head Start and State pre-kindergarten in imple-
menting pre-kindergarten classrooms increased significantly during 2007. Most of the classrooms not in LEA
buildings are located in Head Start facilities.

Tennessee was awarded a $5,000 grant from the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors to con-
duct an Oral Health Forum. The HSSCO Director wrote the grant in cooperation with the Tennessee Head
Start Association and worked with Region IV oral health dentist consultant, E. Joseph Alderman.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ Worked cooperatively with the Telamon Corporation, located in Knoxville, that manages the Migrant
  Head Start program throughout Tennessee. Telamon staff is included in all Head Start activities supported
  by the HSSCO.

♦ Assisted and co-sponsored with the Tennessee Head Start Association the Latino Summer Institute on
  June 4-6, 2007, in Nashville. Presenters included Luis Hernandez, Laura Ashkazari, Maria Clara Mejia,
  and Carmencita Espada speaking on language development for ELL children, cultural sensitivity, internal
  and institutional biases, and health care for Latino families.
296   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Participated on boards, task forces, committees. This participation allowed the HSSCO Director to en-
        courage that all informational documents for families to be translated in Spanish for clarity.

      ♦ How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or upcom-
        ing year?

      ♦ Activities for 2008 will remain similar as 2007 with the implementation of more partnerships with early
        childhood pre-kindergarten programs being paramount. The Improving Head Start for School Readiness
        Act of 2007 has given the HSSCO several new responsibilities in addition to responsibilities outlined
        in the original RFP. New responsibilities will be incorporated into existing work plan and time table for
        completion.
                                                                             AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 297




                                      Texas


Collaboration Director                Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                      areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Dorothy J. Calhoun, ed.D.
                                      plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Children’s learning Institute (ClI)
university of texas Health Science    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Center                                services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
7000 fannin Street, Suite 2355        are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Houston, tX 77030                     at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 713-500-3835                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 713-500-0386
                                      The Texas Head Start-State Collaboration Office’s (HSSCO)
Dorothy.J.Calhoun@uth.tmc.edu         accomplishments in early childhood systems and access to
Http://cli.uth.tmc.edu/thssco         comprehensive services for all low-income children, to include
www.uth.tmc.edu/tececds               a description of support to Head Start/child care/pre-kinder-
                                      garten collaborations, with connections to the Five-Year Ap-
                                      proach and Plan of Action, follows:s
Lead Agency Contact
                                      In Texas, the HSSCO continues to focus on providing seam-
Susan H. landry, Ph.D., Director
                                      less, integrated services that address all of the Head Start/Early
Children’s learning Institute         Head Start priorities. The HSSCO believes that providing for
university of texas Health Science    Head Start/Early Head Start children and families in Texas
Center                                will benefit all low-income children and families in the State.
7000 fannin Street, Suite 2300        Consequently, Texas’ answer to providing the best education
Houston, tX 77030                     possible for all children, is demonstrated through the Texas
                                      Early Education Model (TEEM).
Phone: 713-500-3710
fax: 713-500-3705                     Priority Area 1: Collaboration
Susan.H.landry@uth.tmc.edu
                                      Objective: Strengthen communication to enhance collabora-
                                      tions through TEEM, mandated by HB 76 and HB 23 to
ACF Regional Contact                  integrate Head Start programs, child care programs, and public
                                      schools. All Head Start programs have been visited to date,
Shannon Hills, MPA                    with the exception of 20, which will be visited in 2008.
ACf Region VI
1301 Young Street, Room 925 B         Priority Area 3: Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten
Dallas, tX 75202
                                      Objective: Education Standards — Increase collaboration
Phone: 214-767-2796                   and integration to strengthen partnerships among Head
fax: 214-767-2038                     Start, Child Care and pre-kindergarten. Head Start program
                                      directors were encouraged to learn more about the process of
Shannon.Hills@acf.hhs.gov
                                      strengthening their ability to engage the expansion dollars with
                                      pre-k programs through collaborations.
298   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Brief Update on TEEM:

      The Texas Early Education Model (TEEM) School Readiness Project is in its 5th year of implementation. The
      project has grown from 110 classrooms during the pilot year to more than 2,600 classrooms this school
      year. The model has demonstrated that community partnerships can successfully collaborate across service de-
      livery models and that Head Start, Title I pre-kindergarten classrooms, and Texas-licensed child care provid-
      ers can come together and work collaboratively to support the most at-risk children in a community. Various
      agencies have taken the lead within each of the 38 community partnerships, including several large child care
      providers, Head Start agencies, school districts, and education service centers.

      Through these collaborations, the Texas State Center for Early Childhood Development (SCECD) has
      worked to support these integration efforts and to identify the barriers to continued efforts to better sustain
      these partnerships. As legislation is crafted for the next legislative session, the SCECD hopes to inform
      policymakers around these identified barriers so that state agencies and organizations can continue to work to
      better serve the needs of the State’s growing at-risk population of 3- and 4-year-olds, their families, and their
      teachers.

      The TEEM Project has continued to support a model of cognitive instruction that encompasses the profes-
      sional development of teachers; their planning of instruction based on feedback from student observation and
      assessment conducted on a handheld device; and the implementation of a curriculum and instructional activi-
      ties designed to accelerate the literacy and language development of young children. Findings from the first
      two years of the study can be found in an article entitled “An Experimental Study Evaluating a State Funded
      Pre-Kindergarten Program: Bringing Together Subsidized Childcare, Public School, and Head Start,” written by
      Dr. Susan Landry, Ph. D., the Director of the Children’s Learning Institute and the TEEM School Readi-
      ness Project, and others, at the University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston. The article can be found
      online at: http://cli.uth.tmc.edu/documents/TEEM-2year.pdf.

      During the third year of the TEEM Project, the Texas Legislature supported the development of a Web-
      based system to certify school readiness. The SCECD has worked, using the TEEM classrooms and volunteer
      sites across the State, to help design and test the system. The design allows a school to describe in some detail
      the educational experiences of teachers and the school in which they teach and work. Student information is
      collected in such a way that the system is able to locate the children the following year in kindergarten and
      obtain their beginning of the year reading screening scores from the Texas Primary Reading Inventory or its
      Spanish version, the TejasLEE.

      Working to certify some 483 classrooms in the pilot year, this year’s potential for certifying classrooms is over
      2,500. As pre-kindergarten sites are entering data into the system, they are capturing data on all preschool
      classrooms so that the system certifies at the building or site level next year, achieving its goal of certifying at
      the site level. As more early care and education providers become aware of the system and the potential for
      certification as a Texas School Ready! Site, interest is growing in the system. Sites within Texas that are inter-
      ested in learning more about the Texas School Readiness Certification System can access information at the
      following link: http://cli.uth.tmc.edu/our-programs/program-overview/TX-school-ready/default.html


      Priority Area 2: Children with Disabilities

      Objective:

      Continue encouraging all programs to improve service to children with disabilities through the Raising Texas
      State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (SECCS) Grant, Texas Association for Infant Mental Health
      (TAIMH), Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) Agency.
                                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   299




♦ Meetings initiated by the HSSCO with the Region VI Disabilities Content Specialist, the Office of
  Head Start, the T/TA Council Representative, ECI, Texas Migrant/Seasonal Representative and Texas
  Head Start Association. The new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was completed and signed by
  representatives from the Department of Assistive Rehabilitative Services, U.S. Department of Health and
  Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Regions VI and XII Office of Head Start,
  Texas Head Start Association, and Texas Migrant Council, Inc.

♦ The revised MOU will available to Early Head Start personnel in early 2008.

Priority Area 4: State-Level Representative

Objective: Increase representation of Head Start issues to related state agencies.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
♦ The results of the Texas Head Start Save Our Smiles oral health project, which was supported by Texas
  Department of State Health Services, Texas Dental Association, Texas Dental Hygienists’ Association,
  Head Start grantees, and personnel from Region VI staff and T/TA Specialists, were outstanding.

♦ The four Head Start sites were Dallas, Georgetown, Corpus Christi, and San Antonio. A total of 1,071
  children were examined, given fluoride varnish, and determined for urgency of treatment: routine, atten-
  tion soon, or attention urgent. The professional value of services totaled $55,281.49.

♦ Plans for 2008 are to include rural area programs and Early Head Start.

♦ Baylor College of Medicine’s collaborative partnership, addressing obesity and nutrition, with the four
  grantees in Harris County continues to be productive and resourceful.

♦ Work continues with Texas Lead Poisoning Control and Prevention Council to eliminate lead-related
  incidents in our state.

♦ Met with Texas Infant Mental Health Association to develop a training plan for Early Head Start
  personnel.

♦ Baylor College of Medicine’s intentions to expand the research to include rural Head Start programs.

Oral Health
♦ The HSSCO Director is a Board Member of the Texas Oral Health Coalition.

♦ The HSSCO Director chairs the Texas Head Start Save Our Smiles (S.O.S.) Oral Health Group, which
  includes the Texas Department of State Health Services (Oral Health Group), Texas Dental Association,
  Texas Academy of General Dentistry, Texas Association of Pediatric Dentists, Texas Dental Hygienists’
  Association, and staff and students from the dental schools. Dentists, dental hygienists, dental school pro-
  fessors, Region VI T/TA Network, dental students, parents, and volunteers from many parts of the State
  participated in and supported the Texas Head Start S.O.S. initiative.
300   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Head Start and Early Head Start programs throughout the State have developed and continue to develop
        partnerships with local dentists who support their efforts in meeting the needs of Head Start/Early Head
        Start children.

      Welfare
      ♦ Texas became the first state to determine how well public preschools, child care, and Head Start programs
        prepare children for kindergarten. State officials hope the new School Readiness Certification System will
        transform a parent’s search for a good preschool from a game of chance into more of a science. The system
        was launched under an education law sponsored by Sen. Judith Zaffirini, D-Laredo. The goal is to improve
        teaching in public and private pre-kindergarten programs and boost the odds that children will enter
        kindergarten ready to learn.

      ♦ “We are the only state in the nation that now links the certification or rating of an early childhood
        classroom to what’s happening in that classroom and how it predicts kindergarten readiness,” said Susan
        Landry, director of the Texas State Center for Early Childhood Development, which created the certifica-
        tion system using about $4 million in state money.

      ♦ Texas has become the first state to make every child who has ever been in foster care eligible for pre-
        kindergarten. When school started this Fall, hundreds of newly eligible children were enrolled in pre-
        kindergarten classroom across Texas for the first time.

      ♦ Texas 2-1-1 system helps to ease the transition of military personnel returning from war.

      ♦ Continue to educate Head Start/Early Head Start staff and parents about the (Earned Income Tax
        Credit) EITC program.

      Child Care
      Activity detailed earlier.

      Education
      ♦ Continued involvement with Sen. Zaffarini’s staff to present a bill requiring trainers of teachers who teach
        children birth to five to become a Texas Registered Trainer.

      ♦ Online Trainer Orientation should go live in June 2008.

      ♦ Working with the Texas Early Care and Education Career Development System (TECECDS) Council
        to develop the teachers’ career development system. Will attend the 2nd Annual State Professional Devel-
        opment Leadership Team Work Day in June 2008 with a Texas Team to work on developing the system.

      ♦ Hosted, with The State Center for Early Childhood Development, “One Beat One Sound,” a two-day
        gathering of Regional VI personnel, Texas T/TA Specialists, and TEEM Education Coordinators to
        discuss the need for more mutual support and a better working relationship between TEEM Education
        Coordinators and T/TA Specialists.

      ♦ Successful “Pre-kindergarten Day at the Texas Capitol” in collaboration with the Texas Early Childhood
        Education Coalition (TECEC) and many legislators, parents, and press conference speakers.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   301




♦ College credit is being given to non-traditional teachers who take the Child Development Associate
  (CDA) course through a pilot program.

♦ Four higher education colleges are participating in a grant to help non-traditional Early Childhood Edu-
  cation personnel become more professional, and that allows for the transferability of college credits among
  the four colleges.

Community Services
♦ The HSSCO Director is actively involved with the Texas 2-1-1 call in and Web site to ensure that correct
  information is given to those in need of social benefits, Head Start/Early Head Start, child care, and pre-
  kindergarten information.

♦ Texas 2-1-1 call in and Web site are of tremendous benefit to veterans returning to Texas after military
  service.

♦ Collaboration with Mental Health America of Texas, which championed Operation Healthy Reunions, a
  first-of-its-kind program, focused on the mental health of soldiers and their families.

♦ Ensures that all Texas Head Start/Early Head Start programs are aware of 2-1-1 capabilities and resources.

Family Literacy Services
♦ Combined efforts and meetings with the Even Start Director to encourage collaboration between Even
  Start and Head Start programs, especially those located near each other or in the same buildings.

♦ Communication with Even Start directors to encourage involvement with Head Start.

♦ Promote collaborative partnerships with community-based organizations/agencies.

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ Revised the 2007 Early Childhood Intervention (ECI)/Early Head Start Memorandum of Under-
  standing (MOU).

♦ Copies and information will be presented to Head Start/Early Head Start directors at the 2008 Texas
  Head Start Association (THSA) Conference and the South By Southwest Summer Training Institute.

♦ Secured presenters from ECI to present to speak on the Revised ECI/Early Head Start MOU.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ Continued participation on the Texas Interagency Homeless Council (TICH), working to integrate the
  McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act as applicable to Head Start programs as authorized in the
  Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007.

♦ Secured presenters from the Texas Homeless Network to speak on the McKinney-Vento Act as related to
  Head Start/Early Head Start.
302   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      The HSSCO Director continues working with legislative groups that are involved with improving the lives of
      children, especially low-income children, in Texas. These groups include but are not limited to:

            ♦ Children Learning Center
            ♦ Parents As Teachers
            ♦ Texas Early Childhood Education Coalition
            ♦ Texas Infant Mental Health Association
            ♦ Texas Child Abuse Prevention Association
            ♦ Texas Interagency Coalition for the Homeless
            ♦ Texas Association for the Protection of Children
            ♦ Mental Health America of Texas
            ♦ Texas Association for the Education of Young Children (AEYC)

      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      ♦ The State Legislation funded research through the State Center for Early Childhood Development to
        work on a three-year project, which will facilitate increased participation in professional development by
        early childhood educational professionals and encourage those professionals to seek additional education.

      ♦ Online Texas Trainer Registry Orientation.

      ♦ Inclusion of Early Head Start and rural Head Start programs in Texas Head Start S.O.S. (oral health
        initiative).

      ♦ Invitation to involve Texas Head Start/Early Head Start children in Texas Project WILD.

      ♦ Continued research with Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Department
        of Pediatrics, throughout the State.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      Everything the HSSCO Director does in the State of Texas describes her efforts and focus on all low-income
      Head Start/Early Head Start children, the majority of whom are Hispanic, representing 68% of Head Start/
      Early Head Start children being served in the State.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      All activities reported are congruent with and impact favorably the current work plan for this year. Adjust-
      ments will be made to the work plan to come into compliance with the mandates of the Improving Head
      Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 as applicable to this position.
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 303




                                   Utah


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Janna forsgren
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
utah Department of Health
Division of Community and family   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Health Services                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Child, Adolescent and School       are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Health Program
                                   at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
P.O. Box 142001
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Salt lake City, ut 84114
Phone: 801-538-9312                The Utah Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO)
                                   promotes the development of coordinated early childhood
fax: 801-538-9409
                                   systems and services for children in Utah (from birth through
jannaforsgren@utah.gov             age eight) and their families and collaboration among agencies,
                                   organizations, service providers, and parents.
Lead Agency Contact
                                   ♦ Worked with Utah’s State Early Childhood Comprehen-
George Delavan, MD                   sive Systems Grant Director to support and coordinate
Phone: 801-538-6901                  early childhood systems development efforts with the
                                     Utah Kids Link Project. Provided technical support for
fax: 801-538-6591
                                     the Community-Based Services for Children Age Birth to
gdelavan@utah.gov                    Eight Grants.

ACF Regional Contact               ♦ Maintained and updated the Utah Early Childhood Con-
                                     nections Web site (http://earlychildhoodconnections.weber.
Debbie Hedin                         edu) as a vehicle to form linkages and partnerships for all
ACf Region VIII                      early childhood providers.
federal Office Building
                                   ♦ Created parent support section on the Utah Early Child-
1961 Stout Street                    hood Connections Web site to assist parents in accessing
Denver, CO 80294                     resources and services for young children and their families.
Phone: 303-844-1154
dhedin@acf.hhs.gov                 ♦ Developed Utah Early Childhood Coordination Bulletins
                                     and distributed to all early childhood programs and state
                                     agencies to keep them informed of current initiatives and
                                     assist them in how they can get involved.

                                   ♦ Worked with the Utah Child Care Professional Devel-
                                     opment Institute to coordinate cross-sector professional
                                     development planning and implementation activities.
304   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Served on the Utah Family Partnership Network Advisory Board to include Head Start in local Utah
        Parent Information Center (Utah PIRC) activities to support and educate families.

      ♦ Continued to assist the Early Intervention Research Institute at Utah State University with the inclusion
        of Head Start programs in Utah’s Universal Application System, Utah Clicks. Utah Clicks is a Web-based
        application process designed for Utah families that have young children, especially those with special
        needs.

      ♦ Continued to facilitate Head Start representation on state-level committees through working with the
        Utah Head Start Association. Head Start was represented on the following state-level committees by
        either a Head Start program staff person or the HSSCO Director:

            ♦ Utah Family Partnership Network Advisory Board
            ♦ Utah Interagency Coordinating Council
            ♦ Governor’s Early Childhood Commission
            ♦ Office of Child Care Advisory Committee
            ♦ Utah Oral Health Coalition
            ♦ Child Care Conference Planning Committee
            ♦ Covering Kids Utah
            ♦ Early Childhood Conference Planning Committee
            ♦ Special Education Preschool Conference Planning Committee
            ♦ Utah Issues
            ♦ Child Care Professional Development Institute: Steering Committee, Core Competencies
              Work Group, Mentor Certification Work Group, Trainer Certification Work Group
            ♦ Child Abuse Prevention Task Force
            ♦ Utah Fetal Alcohol Prevention Committee
            ♦ Early Childhood Alternative Teacher Preparation (ECATP) Advisory Committee


      The HSSCO promotes collaborations at the local level between Head Start, child care and pre-kindergarten
      programs and involves Head Start programs in state pre-kindergarten initiatives.

      ♦ Provided information to six community-level early childhood interagency coordinating councils to provide
        opportunities to implement locally determined collaborative projects. Local Child Care Resource & Re-
        ferral agencies and school districts serve on the early childhood council in their region.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      ♦ Worked with the Department of Health’s Children’s Mental Health Promotion specialist to address
        mental health issues impacting Head Start and child care centers with a focus on providing programmatic
        consultation meetings.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   305




♦ Involved the Mental Health Promotion specialist in the Region VIII Mental Health Initiative, which
  resulted in a presentation at the Region VIII Head Start Association Conference in South Dakota.

♦ Continued to provide technical assistance and follow-up activities with Head Start programs on the im-
  pact of the lead screening/testing requirements of Medicaid.

Oral Health
State-level

  Utah Oral Health Coalition
  Peggy A. Bowman
  801-538-6026
  peggybowman@utah.gov


Local-level

All of the local health coordinators have formed oral health partnerships. The HSSCO does not have the
specific names and contacts.


Additional Information

Identifying specific program needs and following through with technical assistance requests.

Welfare
Partnered with the Utah Domestic Violence Council and the Child Care Professional Development Institute
to provide a Domestic Violence Train-the-Trainer Event to create a statewide network to support children
and families affected by domestic violence in child care and Head Start programs.

Child Care
♦ Worked with the Utah Child Care Professional Development Institute (CCPDI) to continue to imple-
  ment strategies outlined in the Utah’s Blueprint for Cross-Sector Early Childhood Professional Development.

♦ Served on the CCPDI Steering Committee and Training Approval Sub-committee to promote and
  implement early childhood cross-sector training opportunities.

Education
No activities reported.

Community Services
Funded early childhood coordinating councils in six communities throughout the State.

Family Literacy Services
Collaborated with the State Office of Education to read Even Start proposals and award grants.
306   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Services to Children with Disabilities
      No activities reported.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      Served on the Supportive Services Subcommittee of the Homeless Coordinating Committee to include Head
      Start programs in providing preventive services to families.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      ♦ Worked with Voices for Utah Children and Head Start Education specialists to create a template for
        Head Start programs to report their child outcomes. The outcomes will be aggregated into state-level data
        to educate legislators and policymakers on the impact that Head Start has on children and school readi-
        ness.

      ♦ Worked with Voices for Utah Children to include Utah Head Start PIR data in the 2008 Utah KIDS
        COUNT Data Book.

      ♦ Assisted the Utah Head Start Association in understanding the legislative process and educated state
        agencies and legislators as they prepared to submit a bill during the 2008 Utah Legislative Session to
        receive state funding for Head Start programs in Utah.

      ♦ Researched state-funded Head Start models and shared information with Utah Head Start programs.

      ♦ Assisted with adding state funding for Head Start programs in the Utah Department of Health Building
        Block submitted to Gov. Huntsman.

      ♦ Developed and distributed a Head Start Issue Brief in partnership with Voices for Utah Children.

      ♦ Represented Head Start on Gov. Huntsman’s Early Childhood Commission and assisted in creating an
        early childhood strategic plan for Utah that will be presented at the Governor’s Early Childhood Summit
        in April 2008.

      ♦ Attended Gov. Huntsman’s Child and Family Cabinet Council meetings and shared updates with Head
        Start programs.

      ♦ Represented Head Start on the Utah Policy Matters Project to assist in reviewing current early childhood
        policies and setting goal policy levels based on Utah political and policy context.

      ♦ Summarized Head Start Program Performance Standards into a document to use in discussions during
        meetings with the Utah Policy Matters Project and the Governor’s Early Childhood Commission.

      ♦ Educated the Utah Department of Health’s Community and Family Health Services Division Director,
        MCH Bureau Director, and the State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Director on the Im-
        proving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 and the impact on Head Start programs and the
        HSSCO.

      ♦ Educated Gov. Huntsman’s Education Director on the Head Start Reauthorization and the mandates
        related to the State Advisory Councils.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   307




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Facilitated the inclusion of staff from Centro de la Familia de Utah Migrant Head Start program to represent
the Hispanic population on the Utah Policy Matters Project.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The HSSCO will continue to assist with implementing two major objectives of Utah’s Early Childhood
Blueprint for Progress: 1) promoting new and supporting existing local interagency early childhood councils
through providing funding and technical assistance; and 2) providing support to early childhood professionals
and promoting shared training opportunities through maintaining and managing the Utah Early Childhood
Connections Web site along with a partnership with the Utah Child Care Professional Development Institute
and the Utah Office of Child Care.
308   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 309




                              Vermont


Collaboration Director        Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                              areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
K.C. Whiteley
                              plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Agency of Human Services
103 South Main Street         Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Waterbury,Vt 05671            services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 802-241-2705           are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 802-241-1220             at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
kc.whiteley@ahs.state.vt.us
                              in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
                              Following many years of hard work with constituents, legisla-
Lead Agency Contact           tors, and administration officials, the Vermont Legislature
                              passed Act 62, a law related to pre-kindergarten education, in
Kim Keiser                    2007. This was signed into law by the Governor and came into
Deputy Commissioner           effect on July 1, 2007. Act 62 codified what has been a long-
                              standing practice in some school districts to include their 3-
Phone: 802-241-1209
                              and 4-year-olds in their student count in order to access public
fax: 802-241-4676             funds for pre-kindergarten.
kim.keiser@ahs.state.vt.us
                              From the Vermont Head Start-State Collaboration Office’s
ACF Regional Contact          (HSSCO) view, the most important elements of this legisla-
                              tion are:
tom Killmurray
ACf Region I                  ♦ The requirement for a community discussion and needs
                                assessment prior to a school district’s establishment or
JfK federal Building
                                expansion of a pre-kindergarten program.
Room 2000
Boston, MA 02203              ♦ The promotion of partnerships between school districts and
Phone: 617- 565-1104            qualified community providers, including Head Start.
fax: 617-565 -2493
                              The pre-kindergarten legislation opens the door for Head Start
tom.killmurray@acf.hhs.gov
                              and other community providers to enter into negotiated agree-
                              ments with their school districts to provide pre-kindergarten
                              services and to be reimbursed for a portion of their actual costs.
                              While the HSSCO continues to promote full-day/full-year
                              services for families who need them, Act 62 provides funding
                              for only 10 hours a week for 35 weeks a year, the approximate
                              length of the school year. It should be used as one of several
                              funding streams, including Head Start, to support the opera-
                              tions of quality, comprehensive pre-kindergarten programs.
310   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      HSSCO Activities to Support Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten Collaborations

      ♦ The HSSCO was, and continues to be, a lead player in the planning and implementation phases of Act
        62. During the 2007 year, the HSSCO Director was asked to represent the Department of Children and
        Families with the Deputy Commissioner on a four-person team representing the two lead agencies: the
        Department of Children and Families and the Department of Education.

      ♦ The HSSCO is committed to working with seven Head Start programs to help ensure their active part-
        nership in their Building Bright Futures community planning processes.

      ♦ During 2007, the HSSCO kept the Vermont Head Start Association (VHSA) well-informed about the
        rulemaking process for Act 62 and worked closely with Head Start directors and the VHSA to present
        and advocate for Head Start interests throughout the process.

      ♦ As part of the interagency team, the HSSCO developed three technical guidance documents for parents,
        providers, and schools summarizing the legislation and recommending next steps for those three stake-
        holder groups.

      ♦ The HSSCO developed a statewide inventory of individual program partnerships. From this inventory,
        a baseline report was prepared on the status of Head Start/pre-kindergarten partnerships in Vermont.
        This information was shared with a facilitated discussion at the VHSA Retreat in Fall 2007. At that time,
        directors had the opportunity to explore how individual partnerships were structured and to learn how
        each program developed their partnerships. The directors indicated an interest in developing a partnership
        template for future use.


      Building Bright Futures (BBF)

      Over the past 14 years, the HSSCO has focused its resources on building an early care, health, and education
      system in Vermont that achieves the Federal goal to assist in building early childhood systems and access to
      comprehensive services and support for all low-income children.

      Building Bright Futures is Vermont’s public/private partnership designed to assure that all Vermont children
      are healthy and successful by improving the quality, affordability, and accessibility of services for families with
      children under the age of six in the areas of health, early care, and education. It is Vermont’s approach to as-
      suring a formal structure for the early childhood system that links local communities and state government in
      the design, delivery, and evaluation of the continuum of services that comprise the early childhood system.

      The Governor established Building Bright Futures in 2006 under an executive order. The order calls for the
      hiring of regional directors who are responsible for assuring regional program coordination and accountability;
      data collection and analysis to track outcomes for children and families; establishing a formal plan for ad-
      dressing service gaps and eliminating duplication; and raising private funds for direct services. The 12 regional
      directors were hired in July 2007.

      The 19-member State Building Bright Futures Council meets bi-monthly and includes the heads of state
      agencies serving young children, as well as business and community leaders. A few of the 2007 accomplish-
      ments are:

      ♦ Hired Executive Director ( January 2007).

      ♦ Approved a committee structure ( January 2007).
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   311




♦ Approved fiscal agent for BBF (February 2007; effective July 1, 2007).

♦ Approved the regional director Job Description (April 2007).

♦ Statewide Planning Conference convened with national expert Charlie Bruner (May 17, 2007).

♦ Implemented BBF Early Childhood Regional Planning Process.

♦ Hired 12 regional directors ( June - July 2007).

♦ BBF regional directors trained in Results Based Accountability ( July 2007).

♦ Regional plan format finalized (August 2007).

♦ System Design and Finance Committee — recommended an action plan addressing the following
  indicator be created by the State and Regional Councils (September 2007).

             ♦ Outcome: Children are ready for school.

             ♦ Indicator: Percentage of children ready for kindergarten in all five domains.

♦ Approved infrastructure standards for the Regional Councils (November 2007).

♦ Council approved receipt of funding from the Vermont Community Foundation — $200,000 over 3 years
  (November 2007).

The HSSCO and ECCS are active members on five of the six Building Bright Futures committees:

♦ Parent Committee — Assure that parents are essential and valued partners in shaping Vermont’s services
  and programs for young children.

♦ Professional Preparation and Development Committee — Ensure a comprehensive and coordinated system
  of quality learning opportunities to promote ongoing professional development of professionals (direct
  service and administrators) working with young children and their families.

♦ Public Engagement Committee — Develop a coordinated, comprehensive public engagement plan that
  builds upon existing efforts and is designed to generate increased commitment and resources for BBF.

♦ System Design and Finance Committee — Propose to the State Council three major priority areas of prog-
  ress over the next two years.

             ♦ Guide department actions to integrate efforts toward those priority areas.

             ♦ Develop a multi-year budget proposal related to these three priority areas for con-
               sideration by the State Council.

♦ Ad Hoc Kindergarten Readiness Survey Committee — Address issues related to the Kindergarten Readiness
  Survey (review/revise the survey(s), teacher training, system for survey distribution and data collection and
  analysis, recommend funding needs to the State Council).
312   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Ad Hoc Regional Planning Committee — Support the design and implementation of the early childhood
        regional plans.


      Children’s Integrated Services (CIS)

      Last year, the HSSCO reported on the early stages of integrating Part C services, early childhood and family
      mental health services, and maternal/child health services. This effort continues, with considerable progress
      made this year. The State team (including the HSSCO) clarified its vision, developed a technical guidance
      document, disseminated it with technical assistance to all regions of the state, and selected three regions to
      pilot a performance-based grant. The HSSCO is an active player on the State team and provides technical
      assistance to three regions of the State.


      HSSCO Activities to Support CIS for 2007

      ♦ Planned and facilitated the CIS State Team Summer Work Days and Fall Technical Assistance Guidance
        Document Training.

      ♦ Wrote the chapter on professional development for the CIS Technical Assistance Guidance Document.

      ♦ Clarified the role of Head Start/Early Head Start in regional CIS teams, demonstrated the comparable
        responsibilities and purposes between Head Start/Early Head Start and CIS, and stressed the importance
        of communicating that role to regional team members.

      ♦ Led the refunding process to consolidate prevention and early intervention services (Part C) as CIS in the
        Northeast Kingdom section of Vermont, including writing the Request for Proposal (RFP), organizing a
        bidder’s conference, and facilitating the proposal review process.


      Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS)

      Vermont’s ECCS grant is administered by the Child Development Division in partnership with the Ver-
      mont Department of Health. Day-to-day operations are supervised and supported by the HSSCO Director
      to ensure close coordination and alignment of the ECCS grant goals with the Federal HSSCO goals and
      with the Building Bright Futures statewide work. The ECCS grant resources are focused on the Building
      Bright Futures system development. The ECCS grant resources have added capacity to the ongoing systems
      development work with a specific focus on strengthening the health role and representation at both the state
      and regional levels. These efforts have been successful in building a stronger role for health and mental health
      within Building Bright Futures.


      ECCS Activities in 2007

      ♦ Provided technical assistance and consultation to the 12 regional Building Bright Futures councils on
        regional planning and the Results Based Accountability (RBA) process.

      ♦ Organized two statewide conferences for all 12 regions; one featuring Charlie Bruner, Executive Direc-
        tor of the Child and Family Policy Center and national evaluator of the nine-state Build Initiative, and
        one led by Kay Johnson, National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University. These conferences
        were designed to support regions in developing comprehensive plans for their early care, health, and edu-
        cation systems using the RBA process.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   313




Infant Toddler Early Learning Guidelines

The HSSCO took the lead on a project to develop Infant Toddler Early Learning Guidelines for Vermont.
After attending the 2007 NAEYC Professional Development Institute, the HSSCO decided to postpone
plans to develop an infant-toddler credential until the guidelines were in place. The guidelines create the
foundation for the credential. There is widespread support for this project from within the Early Head Start
community, child care, Children’s Integrated Services, and education.


HSSCO Activities to Support Infant Toddler Guidelines for 2007

♦ Recruited over 40 individuals representing the geographic, programmatic, and expertise diversity in Ver-
  mont to participate in the development of the infant toddler early learning guidelines. Participants elected
  to be involved in three different functions: writing, determining overall structure and advisory, and review
  of final drafts.

♦ Secured technical assistance from ZERO TO THREE’s Infant Toddler Child Care Initiative for technical
  support and assistance throughout the development period.

♦ Planned and facilitated a kick-off meeting bringing together the writers and overall structure advisory
  groups for a daylong work session.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
Oral Health for the prenatal to 5-year-old population continued to be a focus for the Collaboration Office
in 2007. The HSSCO continued to provide information and coordination between the Vermont Department
of Health (VDH) and Head Start programs. In partnership with the Department of Health and Head Start
health managers and directors, a collaborative foundation has been built to advance the issue of access to
dental care for young children. The HSSCO serves as liaison between Vermont Head Start programs and the
Department of Health.


HSSCO Activities to Support Oral Health in 2007

♦ Convened and facilitated a meeting with Head Start health managers to discuss finding dental homes for
  children, improving access, continuing funding for the Tooth Tutor Program, providing oral health services
  to Head Start families, and other related oral health issues. As a result, a statewide 2008 meeting is being
  planned to include all health managers, tooth tutors, and the Department of Health staff.

♦ Funded oral health initiatives through the mini-grant program

Oral Health

State-level

♦ Vermont HSSCO ( Jill Spiro) and the Vermont Department of Health, Office of Oral Health (Rebecca
  MacDonald)
314   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Vermont HSSCO, Vermont Department of Health, Head Start health managers, Tooth Tutors

      ♦ Vermont Head Start Association and the HSSCO

      ♦ Building Bright Futures and Head Start Programs

      ♦ Urgent Needs Committee and Early Education Services (EES)

      ♦ Vermont Dental Hygienists’ Association and Champlain Valley Office of Economic
        Opportunity (CVOEO)

      ♦ Vermont State Dental Society and CVOEO

      ♦ Vermont Department of Health, Office of Oral Health, and all Head Start Programs

      ♦ Vermont Department of Health, Office of Oral Health:

            ♦ Rebecca MacDonald and Robin Miller
            ♦ WIC — Donna Bister
            ♦ Coordinated School Health — Emily Pastore
            ♦ AAP — Laura Murphy
            ♦ ADHA/VDHA — Tina Marshall
            ♦ BBF
            ♦ MCH Coordinators
            ♦ Children’s Integrated Service Team; HBKE, VNA, CUPS, FIR
            ♦ Agency of Human Services, Department of Children and Families, CDD


      Other Vermont Department of Health, Office of Oral Health activities include:

      ♦ Collaboration with the VSDS in the Workforce Grant, a 3-year grant to increase the numbers of dentists
        in Vermont with a variety of strategies.

      ♦ Collaboration to present and offer continuing education credits for a 3-hour course, Welcoming the Young
        Child into Your Practice, with additional 1-hour presentations for 1 credit, presented in the dental office.

      ♦ Collaboration with OVHA (Office of VT Health Access) with the Dental Dozen, 12 initiatives to
        increase access to dental care for MC/DD recipients.

      ♦ Assisting with fluoridation efforts.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   315




Local-level

Some partnerships include a dental hygienist in a medical pediatric practice, dental hygienists at WIC clinics,
Saturday dental clinics for Head Start families, and private/public partnerships. A partial list of dentists and
programs that are currently serving Head Start children can be found at the end of this report.


Additional information

The HSSCO offers continual support and acts as a liaison between the Department of Health, Office of
Oral Health and Head Start programs. The HSSCO organized and supported the Head Start Oral Health
Forum in 2005 and continues to support activities from that Oral Health Action Plan. The HSSCO provided
support for the Head Start programs to obtain their Oral Health Initiative funding in 2005. The HSSCO is
providing support in the current Oral Health/Health Head Start Improvement and Innovation Grant, which
the directors will submit this summer.

The HSSCO has hosted, coordinated, and facilitated the state-wide review of the Oral Health Action Plan
and update and review of the Tooth Tutor program. This full-day meeting allowed tooth tutors to receive
continuing education credit and provided the information to update and plan the continued state-wide efforts
to support every child in finding a dental home. The HSSCO continues to support oral health programs for
Head Start families through its mini-grant program.

Contact information by Head Start, including Head Start health managers, the HSSCO, Department of
Health, tooth tutors, and others can be found at the end of this report.

Welfare
In 2007, the Vermont Legislature passed an Act Relating to Child Poverty in Vermont, establishing the Vermont
Child Poverty Council. One of the strategies employed by the Council to examine child poverty in Vermont
was to hold public hearings in each of Vermont’s 14 counties. The HSSCO facilitated Head Start involve-
ment at these public hearings and worked with the VHSA Chair on a presentation to the Council specifically
geared to issues of Head Start families. The Council will submit a working plan to legislative committees in
2008.

Child Care
The HSSCO continues to provide leadership and coordination to 14 state-funded infant and toddler child
care programs. The purpose of this network is to increase capacity of the child care system to serve infants
and toddlers, enhance the quality of care, and increase opportunities for infant toddler professional develop-
ment throughout the state. Topics addressed with the grantees in 2007 included family support within child
care settings, ongoing child assessment practices, professional development needs of infant toddler teachers,
advocacy for funding increases, and retaining staff.

The HSSCO was instrumental in acquiring data from the Bright Futures Information System, the child care
management information system, for each Head Start grantee on the number of children enrolled in child
care in the communities they serve. Previously this data was unavailable at the community level, but as the
Bright Futures system capacity is more fully developed, the HSSCO is able to mine data that meet the report-
ing needs of Head Start.
316   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Education
      In 2006, the HSSCO produced and distributed a document called Guiding Your Child’s Early Learning: A
      Parent’s Guide to the Vermont Early Learning Standards. In 2007, the HSSCO responded to requests through-
      out the State for more copies of the guide and continued to ensure adequate distribution through Head Start
      grantees, Building Bright Futures Regional Councils, public pre-kindergarten programs, early childhood
      special education programs, and family literacy programs.

      The HSSCO is involved in two initiatives to increase the number of licensed early childhood educators so
      that Head Start and other community early childhood programs can participate in public pre-k partnerships
      with their school districts. HSSCO provides expertise and information to ensure the success of these initia-
      tives, and is the primary coordinator for one of the initiatives.

      The HSSCO Director is the co-chair for Vermont’s Professional Preparation and Development Committee
      (PPD) on early childhood and afterschool care and education. Vermont’s PPD Committee is a standing com-
      mittee of Building Bright Futures. Accomplishments in 2007 include:

      ♦ Secured consistent participation from the Head Start TA specialists.

      ♦ Produced a matrix of teacher qualifications required by Head Start, NAEYC,
        and state programs, from present to 2015.

      ♦ Provided input to revamp the CDA support system within the State.

      ♦ Sponsored a small-scale statewide professional development needs assessment
        with plans to expand it statewide in 2008.

      ♦ Disseminated information about the Loan Forgiveness Program embedded
        in the 2007 Higher Education College Cost Reduction Act.

      ♦ Produced a compendium of small grants and other resources available for
        professional development from the Child Development Division.

      The HSSCO provides leadership to a collaborative grant review committee for two state-funded professional
      development grants. In 2007, grants have gone to programs and communities for trainings in Touchpoints,
      child care health promotion, early literacy, home visiting, working with afterschool programs, and the Incar-
      cerated Women’s Initiative.

      There is an active Touchpoints Initiative in Vermont, which has been supported by the Collaboration Office
      since 2002. The Touchpoints approach — strengthen families by helping them understand their child’s devel-
      opment and enhancing parent/child relationships — is a unifying theme for the Child Development Division
      Children’s Integrated Services Teams, child care programs, and Head Start. The HSSCO provides faculty for
      one Touchpoints training per year, serves on the Touchpoints State Advisory Council, and developed and taught
      one Touchpoints Reflective Practice workshop in 2007.

      Community Services
      No activities reported.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   317




Family Literacy Services
The HSSCO Director served on a review team to award continuation funding to two Even Start programs in
2007. The HSSCO worked with the Department of Education’s Even Start Coordinator to ensure that Head
Start grantees are a key partner in an Even Start grant. Vermont’s two Even Start programs have active and
successful partnerships with Head Start.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO responded to the VHSA request for data on numbers of children with disabilities for use in
Head Start community needs assessments by accessing relevant data from the Department of Education.

The HSSCO Director met with Vermont’s 619 coordinators to agree on ways to increase communication and
collaboration between Vermont’s Essential Early Education program and Head Start disabilities managers.
This resulted in an invitation to attend a VHSA meeting with disabilities coordinators and directors, and an
individual session with the disabilities managers and the 619 coordinators. All parties agreed to meet at least
annually.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
No activities reported.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
Quality Rating System: The HSSCO has been a lead player in its development and has a seat on the STARS
Oversight Committee. The charge for this committee is to advise and assist the Child Development Division
in the development, promotion, and evaluation of STARS, Vermont’s quality rating system.

In 2007, the Oversight Committee reviewed and recommended changes to the STARS rules. One notewor-
thy change is a five-star rating (the highest) for Head Start/Early Head Start programs that achieve a blue or
gold certificate after their Federal monitoring review. As of December 2007, 12 Vermont Head Start centers
were enrolled in STARS; six at the 4-STAR level, and six at the 5-STAR level. A minimum STARS rating of
3 is required by the Pre-kindergarten Legislation (Act 62) as a condition of partnering with a school district.

Quality Incentive Bonuses: Since 1999, the Child Development Division has awarded Quality Incentive
Bonuses to individuals who obtain credentials or degrees in early childhood development or education and
are working in regulated child care and Head Start settings. Data from professional development surveys and
anecdotal information suggest that these bonuses are not as effective as they could be to promote continued
advancement toward higher credentials and degrees. The HSSCO Director serves on a committee to recom-
mend policy changes with recommendations due in 2008.

Core Competencies for Early Childhood Professionals: The HSSCO took part in a five-year scheduled review of
the Core Competencies for Early Childhood Professionals. This was done under the direction of the North-
ern Lights Career Development Center.

Building Bright Futures: In 2007, the HSSCO worked to have a Head Start director appointed to an open seat
on the Building Bright Futures State Council. Efforts were not successful. However, the HSSCO plans to
include a Head Start representative in the council membership when enabling legislation is drafted in 2008.
318   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      Vermont was the recipient of two technical assistance grants from nationally renowned training centers in
      2007: the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) and the Center
      for Early Literacy Learning (CELL). With guidance from these two centers, Vermont will integrate the two
      approaches into the project named Foundations for Early Learning (FEL). FEL is a 5-year training program
      for Vermont’s Head Start and early childhood community that will support the social and emotional develop-
      ment and early language and literacy learning of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. The HSSCO plays a key
      role in this professional development initiative as a training coordinator on the State Leadership Team. A
      kick-off event and train-the-trainer institute will take place this July and September. Head Start participation
      is required, and the HSSCO is instrumental in making sure Head Start is actively engaged with FEL.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      The HSSCO has no targeted outreach to this extremely small population in the State.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      The responses above are in alignment with the work plan. However, the new HSSCO responsibilities and
      requirements as outlined in the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 will have a direct
      impact on the work that is, as yet, not clearly defined. The HSSCO will be making adjustments and revisions
      accordingly.
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 319




                                     Virginia


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Denise Branscome
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Virginia Department of Social
Services
                                     Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
7 north 8th Street                   services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Richmond, VA 23219                   are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 804-726-7807                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 804-726-7655                    in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
denise.branscome@dss.virginia.gov
                                     The goal of the Virginia Head Start-State Collaboration Of-
                                     fice (HSSCO) is to represent or promote Head Start programs
Lead Agency Contact                  at the state level and to serve as a catalyst and facilitator in
                                     working with all programs that serve low-income preschool
Kathy Glazer                         children in Virginia.
Phone: 804-371-4018
fax: 804-726-7655                    Virginia is developing a cohesive early childhood system under
                                     the guidance of Gov. Timothy Kaine. The Governor convened
kathy.glazer@governor.virginia.gov
                                     a working group to coordinate executive branch efforts on
                                     early childhood programs and strengthen public and private
ACF Regional Contact                 programs. The Governor’s Working Group (GWG) brings
                                     together high-level staff from cabinet offices and state agencies
Diane Kendall                        in the area of education, health and human services, economic
ACf Region III                       development, finance and policy. Gov. Kaine also convened
150 S. Independence Mall West        the Start Strong Council to study the expansion of preschool
                                     in Virginia. Over the past year, the Council met to study the
Suite 864                            existing network of public and private providers and look at
Philadelphia, PA 19106               ways to remove barriers to access and increase service to at-risk
Phone: 215-861-4024                  4-year-olds. The Start Strong Council concluded their meet-
                                     ings on July 18, 2007, and finalized the Comprehensive Early
fax: 215-861-4070
                                     Childhood Strategic Plan (Virginia’s Plan for Smart Begin-
dkendall@acf.hhs.gov                 nings). The major focus of Virginia’s Plan for Smart Begin-
                                     nings is to build and sustain a system in Virginia to support
                                     parents and families as they prepare their children to arrive at
                                     kindergarten healthy and ready to succeed.

                                     Another comprehensive initiative is the alignment project
                                     to develop documents to help align children’s growth and
                                     development across settings and sectors and to articulate the
                                     skills and competencies adults need to best support children’s
                                     optimal growth and learning. Head Start was on the team that
320   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      developed two resource documents, The Milestones of Child Development and The Competencies for Early Child-
      hood Professionals. The Milestones of Child Development is a set of child development indicators and strategies
      for adults to support the growth and development of young children from birth to five. The Competencies for
      Early Childhood Professionals outlines standards of competent practice, identifying what early childhood pro-
      fessionals must know, be able to do, and care about to provide quality early care and education.

      The HSSCO is working to build a better relationship with the Department of Education. Throughout the
      year there have been numerous opportunities to collaborate on the Governors initiatives. One goal of the
      HSSCO is to provide direct technical assistance to Head Start programs experiencing difficulties. The Col-
      laboration Office, along with the Department of Education support, provided such assistance to seven Head
      Start centers. After feedback from initial visits, the Executive Director of the GWG recommended develop-
      ing a reference guide for the preschool community to highlight best practices. Collaboration will be the focus
      of the document.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      Obesity Prevention — The HSSCO in collaboration with the Department of Health offered the I Am Moving,
      I Am Learning training to all Head Start centers, Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program offices, and
      community partners. Eight regional trainings were held across the State.

      Oral Health — The HSSCO continued to partner with the State Dental Director at the Virginia Department
      of Health (VDH) to improve the availability and accessibility of oral health care for Head Start children. The
      HSSCO and the VDH participate in the Region III Oral Health quarterly conference calls and Web casts.

      The Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) — The HSSCO devoted time and resources to the statewide home
      visiting initiative. The HVC is studying the State’s home visiting programs, reviewing national research, and
      considering alternative designs with the goal of improving effectiveness and efficiency in home visiting. Coor-
      dinated data collection and evaluation and training are two areas of focus for the HVC.

      Mental Health — The HSSCO Advisory Committee recognized the need for a committee to study mental
      health. A statewide committee was formed to ensure all children will receive a social and emotional develop-
      ment screening, increase support and services for families, and develop support network and training oppor-
      tunities for teachers. The HSSCO sponsored a state-by-state comparison of current policy, regulations, and
      guidance to gain an understanding of current practices in the mental health field.

      The Head Start Health Advisory Committee — The HSSCO continues to support the efforts of the Virginia
      Head Start Health Advisory Committee by attending quarterly meetings and providing state-level updates
      in the area of health. This committee has proved to be a strong group of health professionals from around the
      State.

      Oral Health
      State-level

      The Virginians for Improved Access to Dental Care (VIADC) is a statewide group that includes Virginia
      dental directors and meets regularly. The HSSCO was invited to serve on this committee.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   321




  Contact:
  Barbara Rollins
  Virginia Dental Association
  7525 Staples Mill Road
  Richmond, VA 23228
  804-261-1610
  www.vadental.org

In July 2007, a dental summit on Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) was held in Rich-
mond. Funded by a grant from the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors (ASTDD), the Sum-
mit brought together 50 diverse stakeholders, who developed a plan for the Commonwealth for improving
oral health education and oral health care for CSHCN. The HSSCO helped in the development of a plan for
the Commonwealth to improve oral health education and oral health care for CSHCN. The dental summit
was organized by Parent to Parent of Virginia, (804) 795-1481, www.ptpofva.com.


Local-level

The Southeastern Mobile Dental Services (SMDS) will begin delivering on-site dental services in parts of
Virginia during school year 2007-08. There are seven programs in the southwest region, two in the northwest,
and one each in the northeast and the southeast that have signed contracts for provision of dentistry services.

In this arrangement, SMDS brings a fully-equipped dental van to Head Start sites. They provide routine den-
tal services, including the services of dentists, hygienists, dental assistants, and other qualified personnel. The
SMDS bills Doral Dental of Virginia for services provided according to an established fee schedule.

  Contact:
  Bryan Wilson
  Southeastern Mobile Dental Services
  1195 Old Hickory Blvd, Ste 203
  Brentwood, tn 37027


Additional information

The HSSCO continues to support the Fluoride Bright Smiles for Babies program. Now in its second year, the
program includes screening and application and a questionnaire for parents. Program coordinators have col-
lected data on the children and have also worked with the Dental Hygiene Association to adopt a Head Start
program. They have applied for funding to expand the fluoride program to include migrant populations and
completed a new brochure in English and Spanish for pregnant women. They are also completing state-wide
training of the Head Start home visitors for screening.


Welfare

Head Start Wrap-Around — The HSSCO works with the State subsidy system to ensure that families have ac-
cess to extended care. Head Start Wrap-Around funds may be used to pay for child care for eligible siblings of
an enrolled Head Start/Early Head Start child. A co-payment is assessed for the siblings. If there is no local
agency waiting list, child care for the siblings of the enrolled Head Start child will be paid. Head Start Wrap-
Around funds may be used for child care services for the summer prior to attendance in a part-year Head
Start/Early Head Start program for families with a child enrolled in a Head Start/Early Head Start program.
322   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ Department of Social Service Listing — The HSSCO provided a listing of potentially eligible recipients of
        Medicaid, TANF, and Food Stamps to allow Head Start programs to recruit income eligible children. In
        addition, foster care children in custody have been included. A confidentially agreement has been signed
        by every program requesting the information.

      ♦ Local departments of social services collaborated with local Head Start programs to facilitate applications
        for child care subsidies for Head Start families.

      Child Care
      ♦ Early Head Start Grants — The Division of Child Care and Development sponsored $471,500 for qual-
        ity improvement activities statewide for Early Head Start (EHS) programs. The HSSCO partnered with
        the State Association to provide a summer summit training event for EHS staff that included high level
        training. Community partners were also invited to attend. EHS programs were also given the opportunity
        to apply for up to $35,000 in program improvement funds. Some of the activities proposed were internal
        mentoring that would include the Virginia Quality Rating Improvement System, college course develop-
        ment, compensation incentives, evaluation initiatives, and inclusion activities that promote access to child
        care for children with special needs.

      ♦ Virginia Child Care Resource and Referral Network (VACCRRN) — The HSSCO continued to collabo-
        rate with the VACCRRN by providing up-to-date information to parents. The VACCRRN director is an
        active participant on the HSSCO board and provides a voice for child care providers.

      ♦ The HSCCO, in collaboration with the State Division of Child Care and Development, supplied a copy of
        the Milestones to each Head Start classroom and a copy of the Competencies to each Head Start center.

      Education
      ♦ Professional Development Task Force — The HSSCO participated on a statewide professional development
        taskforce convened by the GWG to address the growing needs of early childhood professionals.

      ♦ Regional Forums — As a follow-up to the grants funded in 2006 by the Region III Office to promote the
        blended classroom model and encourage single point of entry for recruitment, the HSSCO partnered with
        the State Head Start Association to host four collaborative forums held across the Commonwealth. Rep-
        resentatives were invited from Head Start, state pre-kindergarten, and child care programs. The forums
        were held in part to highlight the work and the progress made, as well as to share lessons learned by the
        grantees that had received the single point of entry grants.

      ♦ Virginia’s Plan for Smart Beginnings — The HSSCO Director served as a goal group leader for the Educa-
        tion goal in the Smart Beginnings Plan. Leaders from each group consist of a State Representative and a
        private partner leader.

      ♦ The Family Service Credential — A team from Virginia developed a credential for Head Start family
        service workers. The Family Development Associate (FDA) credential is awarded to individuals who
        have completed a process involving demonstrated competence in working with families of young children
        through on-the-job training and mentoring, related classroom instruction, and the completion of a profes-
        sional portfolio.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   323




Community Services
♦ Head Start Web Site — The HSSCO sponsored and helped maintain the Virginia Head Start Web site. The
  Web site is a useful tool to provide resources and information to the Head Start and early childhood com-
  munity. Parents and families also use the Web site.

♦ Mini-grants — The HSSCO funded eight mini-grants for Head Start programs to improve collaboration
  and build networks. Some of the approved activities consisted of partnering with other early childhood
  programs to develop single point-of-entry applications and hold joint recruitment, provide training op-
  portunities with community partners, and coordinate community public relations campaigns.

Family Literacy Services
♦ Read-A-Book is a distance learning self-study program for early childhood professionals to earn training
  credit hours by reading children’s literature and books on early childhood education and child development.
  The Virginia Department of Social Services’ Division of Child Care and Development collaborated with
  the Library of Virginia to place sets of books in each of the 350 public libraries across Virginia. Read-A-
  Book focuses on the importance of incorporating children’s literature across the curriculum, reading to
  and with young children daily, understanding early brain development, fostering language and literacy
  development, and communicating successfully with young children.

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) Priority Project — The HSSCO participated on the Early
  Childhood Special Education Priority Project Team consisting of representatives from the Department
  of Education and the Training and Technical Assistance staff from area colleges. The team works collab-
  oratively on initiatives that benefit children with special needs, including the planning of and presenting
  at the Shining Stars Conference held in Virginia Beach each summer. Head Start programs are informed
  of these activities.

♦ Oral Health Summit — see response above in the Oral Health section.

♦ SpecialQuest — Virginia received one of ten SpecialQuest grants to support professional development
  on inclusive practices. The grant will help Virginia identify a team and develop a statewide professional
  development plan and incorporate the SpecialQuest approach.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The HSSCO staff attended the Project Hope — Virginia Annual Seminar and presented with a representa-
tive from the Department of Education on collaboration. The HSSCO also sponsored the attendance of a
child care representative at the event.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
State-level leadership is provided by the GWG in the public sphere and the Virginia Early Childhood Foun-
dation (VECF) in the private sphere. Virginia’s Plan for Smart Beginnings provides an avenue to many state
policies and decisions. The five goal areas of the plan span key areas: governance and finance, parent support
and education, early care and education, health and public engagement. The plan is designed to build and
support an early care system that includes increasing access to comprehensive services.
324   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Public and private agencies work collaboratively in each area to develop goals, strategies, activities, and
      outcomes. Head Start is involved in all goal areas including representation by the HSSCO Director on the
      GWG. Many state initiatives fall under the umbrella of the GWG including: the home visiting consortium,
      the professional development task force, the alignment project and early childhood grant opportunities


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      Virginia is making great progress in the field of early care and education. Virginia’s Plan for Smart Begin-
      nings, a definition of school readiness, and a new office of early childhood development will support children,
      their families, schools and communities for success. There is a true statewide collaborative effort to support
      early care and education and that momentum will continue to drive the HSSCO to succeed.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      In order to support the Hispanic children and families of Virginia, data were analyzed to determine grantees
      in need of support. From this assessment, a plan will be developed to meet the needs of the Head Start grant-
      ees and the Hispanic children and families.


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      By reviewing the work of last year, the areas needing additional attention are revealed. The work plan will be
      altered to reflect additional support to Hispanic families. Activities will be added to address the needs in the
      priority areas of family literacy and community services. The work plan will also focus on the Office of Head
      Start’s selected priority areas and address the needs of Head Start grantees.
                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 325




                               Washington


Collaboration Director
                               A Building Year

                               In 2007, the Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO)
Kelli Bohanon, M.ed.
                               in the Department of Early Learning (DEL) continued to as-
Department of early learning   similate to the ever-changing early learning context in Wash-
P.O. Box 40970                 ington State. Despite ongoing transformation at the state level,
Olympia, WA 98504              the HSSCO has continued to serve as a leader and catalyst in
                               facilitating the development of multi-agency and public/pri-
Phone: 360-725-4940
                               vate partnerships across the state. The HSSCO accomplished
fax: 360-413-3482              a number of goals and objectives over the last year, continuing
kelli.bohanon@del.wa.gov       to play a significant role in developing and supporting initia-
www.del.wa.gov
                               tives that improve opportunities and outcomes for children and
                               families in Washington State.

Lead Agency Contact
                               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
Jone Bosworth, J.D.            areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Phone: 360-725-4877            plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
fax: 360- 413-3482
jone.bosworth@del.wa.gov       Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
                               services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
ACF Regional Contact           are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
                               at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Julianne Crevatin              in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
ACf Region X
                               Rivers of Culture/Rios de Cultura Coalition — In partnership
2201 6th Avenue, MS-70         with the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Collaboration
Seattle, WA 98121              Office, the HSSCO assisted in the Rivers of Culture/Rios de
Phone: 206-615-2615            Cultura Coalition, a group of early learning leaders based in a
                               culturally diverse region of Washington State, in developing a
jcrevatin@acf.hhs.gov
                               plan for building a community-based early learning system.

                               The Coalition involves a number of community partners
                               dedicated to early learning, from Head Start programs (Head
                               Start/Early Head Start, Migrant and Seasonal Head Start, and
                               American Indian/Alaska Native Head Start) to school districts
                               to Child Care Resource and Referral, with a specific focus
                               on building an early learning system grounded in culture and
                               language. The HSSCO has assisted the coalition by providing
                               contracts for group facilitation processes and for the imple-
                               mentation of a professional development needs assessment
                               in partnership with New Perspectives Consulting, Education
                               Service District 105, and Heritage University.
326   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      In 2008, the Rivers of Culture/Rios de Cultura Coalition plans to develop a comprehensive early learning
      strategic plan to forward the work of the group over the next few years. The HSSCO will continue to sup-
      port the coalition by: 1) facilitating an official introduction to the Kids Matter framework (Washington Early
      Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) framework) as an optional tool in supporting the development
      of a strategic plan and in communicating to the larger community about early learning; 2) coordinating a
      presentation to the coalition from an early learning coalition based in the Spokane area of Washington; and
      3) fostering relationship-building between coalition leaders early learning foundations throughout the State.

      Kids Matter — In 2007, the HSSCO continued its partnership with the Department of Health, ECCS Grant
      and the Foundation for Early Learning to facilitate the ongoing development and implementation of the Kids
      Matter framework. The HSSCO participated in and provided guidance to the following:

      ♦ Kids Matter Advisory Group Meetings — Monthly meetings established to address ongoing plans and
        approaches to Kids Matter efforts at the state level. The HSSCO participated in these meetings as
        one of three core partners involved in the ongoing implementation of Kids Matter in Washington.

      ♦ DEL Early Learning Advisory Council Presentation — The HSSCO participated with other Kids
        Matter partners and communities in presenting the Kids Matter framework to the Department of
        Early Learning’s Early Learning Advisory Council.

      ♦ Kids Matter Survey — The HSSCO participated in the planning, development, and implementation
        of a statewide Kids Matter survey, designed as an element of evaluation of Kids Matter implementation
        across Washington.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care

      Oral Health
      State-level

          Washington State Oral Health Coalition
          leeAnn Hoaglin Cooper
          Chair 2007-2008
          Phone: 425-339-5230
          lcooper@shd.snohomish.wa.gov


          Dr. Chris Delecki
          Immediate Past Chair
          cdelec@chmc.org


      Activities

      ♦ Washington State Collaborative Action Plan on Oral Health Access for Special Populations — This report,
        released by the Washington Department of Health in February 2007, contains a statewide action plan
        for addressing the specific oral health needs of children with special needs. The report can be accessed at
        http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/Oral_Health/Documents/actionplan_cshcn.pdf
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   327




♦ The Impact of Oral Disease on the Lives of Washingtonians: The Washington State Oral Disease Burden Document
  This document, released by the Washington Department of Health in July 2007, contains summarized
  statewide data on oral diseases, preventive measure, workforce, and dental services. The appendices contain
  more detailed information, including technical notes and data sources, a glossary of terms, additional data
  tables, and county oral health profiles.

♦ For the two activities above, contact:

   Joseli Alves-Dunkerson, DDS, MPH, MBA
   Senior Oral Health Consultant
   MCH Dental Health Program
   WA Department of Health
   Phone: 360-236-3524
   Joseli.Alves-Dunkerson@doh.wa.gov


Local-level

In Washington, there are currently 33 county oral health coalitions (out of 39 counties). The HSSCO does
not currently have data regarding specific Head Start involvement in county oral health coalitions. However,
a number of programs also have local partnerships/contracts with area dentists to provide ongoing oral health
care to children in the programs.

One recent example of a major oral health partnership between Head Start programs and other entities is
the University of Washington Fluoride Varnish Study (2003-2005), a partnership with the National Institute
of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), University of Washington, The Yakima Valley Farm Work-
ers Clinic, Enterprise for Progress in the Community (EPIC), and Washington State Migrant Council. (The
latter two are Head Start programs.) This study involved regular fluoride varnish applications to Head Start
preschoolers in an effort to determine the long-term benefits of fluoride to children’s oral health.


Additional activities

At this time, the HSSCO is not involved in any specific initiatives or activities with regard to oral health. The
HSSCO maintains contact with the Dental Program Manager at the Department of Health for the purpose
of obtaining new information and updates regarding oral health in Washington and ways to involve Head
Start programs in those efforts.

Head Start programs across the State appear to have close involvement at their community levels with oral
health coalitions, and they have not shared any immediate needs with the HSSCO. Following the statewide
needs assessment process with Head Start programs in 2008, the HSSCO should be able to obtain a clear
picture of specific needs, which may result in statewide, regional, or local support of efforts.

Welfare
Head Start/Early Head Start Data Share Agreements — The HSSCO has 31 data share agreements to provide
the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) client data to Head Start/Early Head Start programs
in Washington for recruitment and enrollment purposes. Four data share agreements are with Tribal Head
Start programs. This past year, the HSSCO amended several data share agreements to allow for Early Child-
hood Education and Assistance (ECEAP) recruitment. The Department of Early Learning currently holds
responsibility for maintaining the data share agreements.
328   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      DEL Child Welfare Work Group — The HSSCO Project Manager led the initial work of the Department of
      Early Learning’s Child Welfare work group, a team charged with defining common language and communi-
      cation mechanisms in coordination with Children’s Administration, a division of DSHS that oversees foster
      care and early learning issues related to child welfare. To date, the Department of Early Learning is awaiting
      a response from DSHS regarding further development of this project, designed to foster a shared approach to
      DSHS and Department of Early Learning’s ongoing work with issues related to child welfare.

      Children and Families with Incarcerated Parents-Data Sharing — The HSSCO provided relevant Head Start,
      Early Head Start, Migrant and Seasonal Head Start, and American Indian/Alaska Native Head Start PIR
      data to a state-level task force addressing issues related to children and families with incarcerated parents. In
      addition, the HSSCO connected an Early Head Start manager to the task force who operates an Early Head
      Start program within the Washington Women’s Correctional Center.

      Child Care
      The HSSCO provided information to the Department of Early Learning’s Public Works Survey regarding
      issues impacting Head Start programs with regard to subsidy policy. The HSSCO solicited feedback from a
      variety of Head Start program staff regarding subsidy issues, which was consequently shared with the Public
      Works team.

      Education
      Collaborative Leadership Institute — The HSSCO continued to support the Collaborative Leadership Institute
      (CLI), the 10-month intensive training institute for growing leaders in the early learning and care field. The
      goal of the CLI is a renewed and lasting network of leaders prepared to advance innovative approaches that
      benefit children and families in Washington. Now embarking on its third year, the CLI has continued to rep-
      resent highly positive results, though more recent follow-up with graduates is needed to assess outcomes. All
      participants have a greater understanding of their own leadership style and potential and developed a network
      of colleagues from other disciplines and types of organizations that will help them as they work to improve
      early learning and help children in Washington.

      In 2008, the CLI will host its first Early Learning Leaders Panel, which will be comprised of leaders from
      a variety of early learning entities across Washington. The purpose of the panel discussion is to support CLI
      participants in increasing their understanding of the complex system of organizations and efforts involved in
      early learning, and provide an opportunity for the 24 cohort members to explore new and changing directions
      taking place in early learning with leaders throughout the State.

      Head Start Outcomes Work Group — The HSSCO, in partnership with the Washington Head Start Association
      (WHSA) and ECEAP, convened a group of Head Start staff, Head Start T/TA staff, Region X staff, and state
      pre-kindergarten partners for the purpose of developing a statewide approach to gathering and representing
      child and family outcomes data for programs in Washington.

      In 2008, the group plans to hire a contractor to facilitate the process, which will involve the development of a
      plan to collect outcomes data from all Head Start programs in Washington to represent in a statewide picture.
      The group will work closely with experts from Washington institutions of higher education with regard to
      data collection, analysis, and representation.

      Community Services
      No activities reported.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   329




Family Literacy Services
The HSSCO Project Manager served on the panel for reviewing grant proposals and selecting grantees for
the Thrive By Five/Department of Early Learning Reading Readiness grants distributed in September 2007.
Proposals were submitted from a variety of early learning programs with plans to support parent/child literacy
services and included partnerships between several Head Start programs and other community entities across
Washington.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Early Intervention Collaboration Meetings — The HSSCO Project Manager participated in quarterly meet-
ings with the Department of Early Learning (including Department of Early Learning’s Assistant Director
of Systems, Partnerships, and Collaboration, the State Pre-K Administrator, and the Infant/Toddler Early
Intervention Program. The purpose of the meetings was to maintain an ongoing schedule for communicating
about relevant issues regarding the care of infants and toddlers in Washington.

State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC) Meetings — The HSSCO Project Manager represented the
Department of Early Learning at SICC meetings throughout 2007, serving as a communication liaison
between the Infant/Toddler Early Intervention Program (ITEIP) and the Department of Early Learning.

Infant/Toddler Early Intervention Program (ITEIP) Listserv — The HSSCO coordinated with ITEIP to
establish a contact list for Early Head Start programs across Washington to receive ongoing, weekly newslet-
ters and updates from ITEIP.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The HSSCO provided publication resources to Head Start programs regarding the McKinney-Vento Home-
less Act following the changes in the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 related to
serving homeless children and families.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO has continued to serve as a single point of contact for Head Start within the State and worked
closely with the state association with recruiting Head Start, Early Head Start, Migrant and Seasonal Head
Start, and American Indian/Alaska Native participation in state planning efforts. The HSSCO connected
groups working on related issues and assured local Head Start representation on various state work groups
and committees. Some efforts in 2007 included:

♦ Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) School District Transportation regulation
  clarification — The HSSCO facilitated communication between OSPI and a few Head Start programs
  with regard to state school district transportation reimbursement regulations.

♦ Children and Families with Incarcerated Parents—Data Sharing (see Welfare section for details).

♦ Child Care Subsidy Study (see previous in Child Care section for details).


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
Head Start Program Visits — In 2007, the HSSCO conducted four Head Start program visits for the purpose
of building relationships with programs, increasing the visibility of the HSSCO with programs, and commu-
nicating with programs at a local level to assess needs and current context. Reoccurring themes that resulted
330   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      from the visits included programs sharing their successes and challenges with regard to child care subsidies,
      community mobilization, pre-kindergarten expansion, and family literacy approaches.

      DEL Early Learning Partnership Strategic Action Plan Team — The HSSCO Project Manager led a De-
      partment of Early Learning team assigned to develop a strategic action plan for the dissemination of one-
      time funds to communities across the State for the purpose of building early learning partnerships. The Early
      Learning Partnerships appropriations served to support the continued efforts of existing early learning coali-
      tions and other emerging community mobilization endeavors across the State in identifying future directions
      and resources for sustaining local efforts in building effective early learning systems.

      Head Start, Migrant and Seasonal Head Start, American Indian/Alaska Native Conference Call — The
      HSSCO coordinated a conference call at the Region X Leadership Conference in September that involved all
      four Region X Collaboration Directors, the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Collaboration Director, and the
      American Indian/Alaska Native Collaboration Director. The purpose of the call was to check in and assess is-
      sues specific to the needs of American Indian/Alaska Native and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs
      in all four Region X states.


      Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
      families in your State.
      In 2007, the HSSCO had the opportunity to partner with the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Collabora-
      tion Office in supporting the ongoing development of the Rivers of Culture/Rios de Cultura Coalition in the
      lower Yakima Valley of Washington. These efforts specifically focused on the needs of Hispanic children and
      families in Central Washington, both immigrant and non-immigrant, with the primary goal of the coalition
      to ensure the preservation of children’s language and culture throughout their early learning experiences. In
      one specific effort, a community-based needs assessment was conducted to identify trends and issues among
      child care providers and Head Start programs with regard to professional development.

      As stated in the 2006 annual report, it is important to emphasize that the HSSCO will continue to support
      action that creates opportunities for improving early learning systems and processes that serve to be inclusive
      of all populations within the State (i.e., children with disabilities, homeless children, children representing all
      racial and ethnic backgrounds, children in foster care, etc.).


      How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
      upcoming year?
      The HSSCO will continue to evolve and adapt in 2008, largely based on its new context within the Depart-
      ment of Early Learning. In early 2008, the Department of Early Learning presented four new strategic goal
      areas, all of which have been aligned with the HSSCO’s Continuation Application for FY2008-09. Further,
      the HSSCO will examine its role in promoting action and providing leadership to projects related to all eight
      priority areas — particularly those that may not have been addressed to the extent that others were in 2007.
      In summary, the HSSCO’s work plan and grant funds for the coming year will be greatly influenced by and
      aligned with the Department of Early Learning strategic planning, results of the statewide needs assessment
      of Head Start programs, and existing projects and initiatives.
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 331




                                    West Virginia


Lead Agency Contact                 Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                    areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Charles Young
                                    plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Phone: 304-558-5204
charlieyoung@wvdhhr.org             Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
                                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
ACF Regional Contact                are support Head Start/Child Care/Prep-kindergarten collaborations at
                                    the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs in
nancy elmore
                                    State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
ACf Region III
Suite 864                           West Virginia’s pre-kindergarten program has continued to
150 South Independence Mall, West   grow with more collaborations occurring between Head Start
                                    grantees and Local Education Agencies (LEAs). Technical
Philadelphia, PA 19106
                                    Assistance was provided to local county teams to promote ef-
Phone: 215-861-4048                 fective collaborations that are inclusive of low-income children
nancy.elmore@acf.hhs.gov            and allow for the provision of Head Start services across set-
                                    tings (LEA, Head Start, and child care).

                                    The State’s policy governing WV pre-kindergarten (State
                                    Board of Education Policy 2525) was revised this year and
                                    went into effect August 13, 2007. The revisions were developed
                                    through a process of including state and local level representa-
                                    tion from child care, education, and Head Start. The revisions
                                    will promote further collaboration with community partners to
                                    allow for children to receive services in the most appropriate
                                    setting for their needs.


                                    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
                                    and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
                                    plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
                                    Health Care
                                    Oral Health

                                    The Oral health project wrapped up its first phase with the
                                    delivery of grantee training events, which were facilitated by
                                    oral health educators for each grantee.
332   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Welfare
      The WV Head Start for Safety project delivered training to each grantee in the State through support from
      the WV Coalition Against Domestic Violence, child protective service workers, substance abuse counsel-
      ors, and Head Start staff who were trained in the curriculum. The project will begin phase two with training
      events for a wider audience (teachers, child care, pre-kindergarten staff, etc.).

      Work began with WV WIC to improve partnerships to ensure that WIC staff are able to inform families of
      Head Start services and vice versa. A training module for WV DHHR staff is being developed; phone opera-
      tors for WV DHHR are being trained to help provide better information to families seeking assistance.

      Child Care
      The WV pre-kindergarten program has been at the center of child care issues. The State is beginning to focus
      energies on improving support to child care programs. Part of this effort will be to implement a quality rating
      and improvement system for child care centers. This system will not include Head Start or education at this
      time. The HSSCO Director has been involved in numerous work groups to work out the details of how this
      system will be delivered and phased in. It is part of overall work from an Executive Order issued by the Gov-
      ernor. That report is due June 30, 2008.

      Education
      WV’s pre-kindergarten program continues to be a priority as issues arise as a result of further blending of
      resources. Meal service delivery has been an issue to overcome in collaborative classrooms. The HSSCO Di-
      rector has been involved in discussions with the State Office of Child Nutrition, the WV Head Start Associa-
      tion Health Services Advisory, Region III staff, and the Office of Head Start. Work continues on this issue.
      Another issue that has arisen is requiring partners in collaborative settings to verify income of families that
      are seeking pre-kindergarten services. There is a fear that if income verification is not required in counties, it
      will be impossible to include Head Start as a partner once WV pre-kindergarten becomes universal in school
      year 2012-13. This could be detrimental to Head Start enrollment across the State. The HSSCO continues to
      address this issue through attorneys at WV Department of Health and Human Resources and WV Depart-
      ment of Education. The Region III Office is also aware and involved in these discussions.

      Community Services
      No activities reported.

      Family Literacy Services
      No activities reported.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   333




Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO Director continues to be involved in the WV Birth to Three Interagency Coordinating Council.
As this group awaits regulations, consideration is being given to revised eligibility criteria. This is due in large
part to the strain on funds for the Birth To Three system. Services have expanded a great deal in the past three
years without additional Federal funding. The HSSCO Director and local Head Start staff continue to be
involved in the State’s Transition Steering Committee. Work is being finalized to revitalize local early child-
hood partners and focus on productive transition procedures for children exiting birth-to-three services into
preschool special needs classrooms.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
No activities reported.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO Director continues to participate on the State’s early learning council PIECES (Partners Imple-
menting an Early Care and Education System). Work is underway to examine early childhood systems issues
concerning finance, governance, and quality standards from an executive order by the Governor. The HSSCO
Director has been named co-chair for the governance committee. The HSSCO Director will also participate
on the other two groups.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
West Virginia has a very limited Hispanic population. It is localized to the eastern section of the State.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The HSSCO will continue with the work outlined in the work plan and attempt to begin work with the
homelessness issues that face the State.
334   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 335




                                 Wisconsin


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
linda leonhart
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Workforce
Development
                                 Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
P.O. Box 7946                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Madison, WI 53707                are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 608-261-2137              at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 608-267-7952                in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
linda.leonhart@wisconsin.gov
                                 Wisconsin Early Childhood Collaborating Partners (WECCP)

Lead Agency Contact              WECCP is a network of state, regional, and community, public
                                 and private organizations, state departments, agencies, associa-
JoAnna Richard
                                 tions, and individuals working together to positively impact the
Department of Workforce          lives of young children and their families. A WECCP priority
Development                      this year has been implementation of the revised organiza-
Phone: 608-267-3200              tional structure designed to include the five Early Childhood
joanna.richard@dwd.state.wi.us   Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) components and to improve
                                 ongoing communication across state, regional and community
                                 levels. WECCP now encompasses early care and education,
ACF Regional Contact             health, mental health, parent education, and family support
                                 through a state action team, regional networks, and evolving
terry lechner                    communications systems.
ACf Region V
233 north Michigan               Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards
Suite 400
Chicago, Il 60601                The first edition of the Standards was disseminated in Fall
                                 2003. Since then, support for implementation of these Stan-
Phone: 312-353-7796              dards has included development of training curriculum, spon-
fax: 312-886-5373                sorship of a three-day training for trainers, community-based
                                 training and technical assistance, revision/expansion of the
                                 Standards to include ages birth to three, and efforts to develop
                                 statewide accountability guidelines related to the Standards.
                                 The revised Standards were completed and printed in 2007.

                                 Strongest Links Collaboration Events

                                 The 2007 Strongest Links Economic Summit (Building the
                                 Case for Investments in Early Education) was held on April 23.
                                 The Committee for Economic Development and the United
336   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Way of Wisconsin hosted the summit for 15 community leadership teams from around the State. The com-
      munity teams included business and economic development leaders interested in improving quality and access
      to early learning programs and services. Guest speakers included representatives from the Committee for
      Economic Development (CED), the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIERR), the Mi-
      ami Herald, the Illinois Early Learning Council, and the Minnesota Business for Early Learning. Summit
      outcomes included increasing understanding of the importance of economic development/early childhood
      connections; increased awareness of successful strategies for engaging business and community leaders in sup-
      port of early childhood development; and enhanced networking among individuals, programs, communities,
      institutions and systems to improve the lives of young children and families.

      Preserving Early Childhood Collaboration Conference

      This annual conference was held March 13-14 in Madison for communities interested in exploring and
      implementing four-year-old kindergarten using community approaches. Highlights included tours of a
      number of selected 4K community sites and a keynote address by James Autry. Additional speakers included
      representatives from Pre-K Now, the Children’s Defense Fund, Child Care, Inc., of New York, and the Maine
      Department of Public Instruction.

      Strengthening Families through Early Care and Education

      Wisconsin was one the first seven states to pilot the Strengthening Families through Early Care and Educa-
      tion Initiative, designed to prevent child maltreatment by building on the strong relationships that parents
      typically have with their Head Start/child care providers. Strengthening Families-Wisconsin is continuing
      to work in three main areas: increasing the number of Head Start/child care programs in the State that build
      protective factors with families; enhancing relationships between child welfare and early care and education;
      and improving coordination across fields that work with young children and their families. Wisconsin is one
      of three states selected to receive continuing support in implementation from the Center for the Study of
      Social Policy. The HSSCO director serves on the state leadership team for Strengthening Families.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      ♦ Worked closely with the Wisconsin Infant Mental Health Alliance.

      ♦ Served on the Professional Development Initiative’s Health Systems work group.

      ♦ Worked to increase the number of low-income children and families who have access to developmental
        screening opportunities through a statewide videoconference on screening and issues relating to the con-
        cept of medical home.

      ♦ Assisted in the development of guidelines to support fluoride varnish applications for Head Start children.
        The guidelines were developed as a result of the ongoing oral health partnership involving the HSSCO,
        the Wisconsin Head Start Association, and the Department of Health and Family Services. The primary
        purpose of this partnership is to develop strategies for improving access to oral health services to Head
        Start children and families.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   337




Oral Health
Information on Wisconsin’s state- and local-level partnerships can be found at the end of this report.

Welfare
♦ Participated in development of the Strengthening Families state plan.

♦ Supported efforts to apply a service integration approach to the early childhood community in Wisconsin
  (consistent with the NGA Partnership Academy’s recommendations).

♦ Worked closely with the Governor’s KidsFirst policy advisor in the Secretary’s Office at the Department
  of Workforce Development through the HSSCO Advisory Committee and regular communication.

Child Care
♦ Continued to support a Tribal child care liaison position contracted through the Wisconsin Child Care
  Resource and Referral Network to strengthen partnerships among Tribal Head Start and Tribal child care
  programs.

♦ Worked closely with the State Child Care Administrator through the HSSCO Advisory Committee and
  regular communication.

Education
♦ Continued to serve on the State Superintendent of Public Instruction’s Forces for Four-Year-Olds Advi-
  sory Committee.

♦ Participated in planning for the annual Preserving Early Childhood collaboration conference in March.

♦ Completed revision of the Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards. The goal is to improve quality in
  programs and services for children from birth through kindergarten.

♦ Supported development of a course focusing on the Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards within
  the Wisconsin Technical College System.

Community Services
♦ Worked closely with the Executive Director of the Wisconsin Community Action Association through
  the HSSCO Advisory Committee and regular communication.

♦ Supported and participated in planning for the regional Economic Summit (Forward with Our Children:
  Investing Early in Our Future Workforce) held in Green Bay. Over 350 participants attended this event.

♦ Provided funding for the regional collaboration coaches in order to support a variety of early childhood
  partnership efforts at the community level.

♦ Provided support for expansion of the regional websites on www.collaboratingpartners.com to become
  more effective as an information-sharing tool.
338   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Family Literacy Services
      ♦ Served on the Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards steering committee.

      ♦ Participated in efforts to align professional competencies across early childhood systems.

      ♦ Met periodically with representatives from public library services to explore opportunities for partnership.

      ♦ Partnered with the Head Start TA specialists and Wisconsin Head Start Association in facilitating family
        literacy training sessions for Wisconsin Head Start programs.

      Services to Children with Disabilities
      ♦ Served on the Governor’s Birth to Three Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC).

      ♦ Participated in efforts to increase preschool options for young children with disabilities.

      ♦ Participated in an inter-Tribal gathering intended to strengthen connections among Tribal Head Start
        programs and other early childhood programs, especially those serving young children with special needs.

      Services to Homeless Children and Families
      ♦ Worked closely with the Department of Public Instruction’s liaison to public school programs serving
        children affected by homelessness.

      ♦ Included representation from services to homeless children and families on the HSSCO Advisory
        Committee.


      Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
      ♦ Continued to serve on the Steering Committee for the Wisconsin Early Childhood Collaborating
        Partners, a state network of Wisconsin organizations, agencies, and individuals concerned with young
        children and families.

      ♦ Served on the leadership committees for T.E.A.C.H., R.E.W.A.R.D., the Registry, the Professional
        Development Initiative (PDI), Strengthening Families, and other statewide early childhood initiatives.

      ♦ Participated in ongoing activities in support of the Department of Public Instructions’ work plan for
        revising a number of key interagency agreements.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
      ♦ Continued to provide funding to support extended contracts for five regional collaboration coaches (plus
        Milwaukee). Regular planning calls were held for the regional coaches and representatives from the fund-
        ing organizations.

      ♦ Facilitated state-level planning to strengthen partnerships between the business and early childhood
        development communities.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   339




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ Participated in the development, training-for-trainers curriculum, and ongoing revision of the Wisconsin
  Model Early Learning Standards, including printing and dissemination in Spanish.

♦ Continue to serve on the T.E.A.C.H. Advisory Committee, which provides higher education scholarship
  support to early childhood professionals, including those from culturally diverse populations.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
The focus of the HSSCO will continue to build on current efforts across the priority areas, and to strengthen
early childhood partnerships. In particular, efforts are expected to focus on the following areas:

♦ Continuing to refine the redesign of the Wisconsin Early Childhood Collaborating Partners to include all
  five components of the Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems initiative.

♦ Building and sustaining cross-sector community collaboration and use of regional coaches.

♦ Increasing engagement and support within the business community for early childhood development as an
  economic development strategy.

♦ Facilitating policies that support collaboration, community approaches, and blended funding.

♦ Continuing cross-sector professional development.

♦ Revising/developing of selected state-level interagency agreements.

♦ Transition planning for the new state Department of Children and Families.
340   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 | 341




                                     Wyoming


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Rick Hufnagel
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
university of Wyoming
Wyoming Institute for Disabilities   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Department 4298                      services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
1000 east university Avenue          are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
laramie, WY 82071                    at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 307-766-2454
                                     in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 307-766-2549                    Through collaborative relationships developed via member-
rhufnage@uwyo.edu                    ship on the Wyoming Head Start-State Collaboration Office
http://wind.uwyo.edu/headstart/      (HSSCO) Advisory Board and participation in the Wyoming
                                     Head Start Association (WHSA) meetings and other early
                                     childhood work groups, statewide early childhood care and
Lead Agency Contact                  education organizations and state agencies representing the
                                     Governor’s Office, Department of Family Services, Depart-
laurie Westlake                      ment of Health, Department of Education, Child Develop-
Phone: 307-766-2456                  ment Centers/Developmental Preschools, WHSA, Head Start
fax: 307-766-2549                    and Early Head Start programs, Tribal Head Start, and early
                                     childhood education advocacy groups have provided advice,
laurie@uwyo.edu
                                     guidance, and input into the development of the Wyoming
                                     Head Start statewide strategic plan. This plan outlines, along
ACF Regional Contact                 with numerous other strategies, Head Start/child care collabo-
                                     rations at the state and local levels and the facilitation of Head
Debra Hedin                          Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans,
ACf Region VIII                      processes, and decisions.
1961 Stout Street
                                     The HSSCO also participates in the regular meetings of the
Office 926
                                     WHSA and is an active part of relevant subcommittees to
Denver, CO 80294                     maintain a link with local service delivery issues and other
Phone: 303-844-1154                  issues effecting Head Start grantees.
fax: 303-433-4288
                                     The HSSCO also continues to play an active role in all relevant
debra.hedin@acf.hhs.gov
                                     legislative committee meetings and hearings, governmental
                                     agency, state board and council, advisory group, and private
                                     organization meetings to keep abreast of statewide policy is-
                                     sues that effect low-income children and families. The HSSCO
                                     has been, and will continue to be, involved in conversations
                                     concerning the formation of a State Advisory Council on
                                     Early Childhood Care as outlined in the recent reauthorization
                                     of Head Start.
342   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      Goal 3: Support efforts to improve access to comprehensive health services (medical, dental, vision, hearing,
      mental health, and nutrition) across the full continuum of preventive, early intervention and treatment ser-
      vices for low-income pregnant women and children.


      Objective 3.2: Support efforts to increase the availability of comprehensive health services to families and
      providers in Head Start and other early care and education programs.

      Task 3: Continue collaboration with the State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) program.

      ♦ The HSSCO attended the Early Childhood System Building Partnership Meeting as a member of the
        Wyoming ECCS State Team. This meeting focused on system building activities in two of the five key
        components of the ECCS Early Childhood Development System: Social and Emotional Development
        and Early Childhood Mental Health and Family Support. The team reviewed the ECCS State Plan as it
        addressed the two key components identified above, including a discussion of system-building activities
        that are taking place in these two areas. The ECCS Program Manager has been appointed to the HSSCO
        Advisory Board.

      ♦ Supported partnership with the Child Development Centers to conduct comprehensive developmental
        screenings that include hearing, vision, and dental screenings.


      Objective 3.3: Support efforts to increase the availability of infant/child mental health resources to families
      and providers in Head Start and other early care and education programs.

      Task 1: Support efforts to collaborate with Child Development Centers and regional clinicians working on
      the Positive Social-Emotional Development Project.

      ♦ Attended the 2007 Positive Social-Emotional Development Project training conference. Developed an
        understanding of the project and how it fits into the Head Start system. This project involves training
        early childhood care providers using a train-the-trainer model. Presentation consisted of an overview of
        the project, the program requirements, and the core training modules. This project represents Division
        of Early Childhood (DEC) best practices and has increased support available for Head Start programs
        incorporating Response to Intervention (RTI) processes and developing Positive Behavioral Interventions
        and Supports (PBIS) strategies.

      ♦ The HSSCO Advisory Board has appointed the Director of the Child Development Center of Natrona
        County to the Board.

      ♦ The HSSCO Director regularly attends the Child Development Services (CDS) Board meetings and
        provides updates on the activities that result from collaborative efforts between the two groups. The CDS
        board represents a statewide system of child development centers that provide developmental screenings
        and children’s mental health and intervention services to Wyoming Head Start programs.


      Task 5: Facilitate Head Start involvement in preschool Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS).
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   343




♦ Head Start staff from programs receiving State TANF Preschool funding have attended PBIS training.
  The HSSCO will continue to inform Head Start programs when additional training is being offered.


Objective 3.4: Facilitate Head Start input toward the development of state policies/procedures and participate
in system-building efforts that improve access to comprehensive health services.

Task 1: Ensure all Head Start and Early Head Start children receive a comprehensive developmental screen-
ing that would include lead testing.

♦ Additionally, through collaboration with the ECCS grant and the Department of Health, Public Health
  Office, the HSSCO is working to improve the lead testing process for Wyoming children.

Oral Health
State-level

The Wyoming Department of Health, Community and Rural Health Division, Dental Health Program has
started a pilot program and contracted with four dental hygienists to do dental screenings and educational
presentations in selected counties. Presentations and screening are being done in preschools, Head Start pro-
grams, and elementary schools. The counties included in the pilot program are Albany, Carbon, Sweetwater,
Sublette, Sheridan, Johnson, Hot Springs, and Fremont. Program contact person is Trish O’Grady, RDH, at
307-777-7947. The Wyoming Oral Health Coalition has been inactive for over a year and will not be meeting
in the foreseeable future.


Local-level

The HSSCO is not aware of any local oral health partnerships. Questions will be developed within the up-
coming program assessment that should help the HSSCO increase understanding of any local partnerships.


Additional Activities

♦ The HSSCO Director participates on the National Head Start-State Collaboration Office Oral Health
  Committee.

♦ The HSSCO disseminates the booklet Tooth Truth from Gilly the Gator to early care and education facili-
  ties to promote the importance of oral health practices.

Welfare
Goal 2: Support efforts to improve the opportunities for Head Start and other low-income families to achieve
long-term self-sufficiency, as well as safe and stable families.


Objective 2.1: Increase the understanding and knowledge of Head Start program staff concerning the ability of
low-income families to achieve long-term self-sufficiency.

Task 1: Planning for statewide Bridges Out of Poverty training is on hold due to resource limitations. It will
be addressed during the 2008-09 refunding period.
344   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Child Care
      Goal 1: Support efforts to increase the availability, accessibility, and quality of full-day, full-year early care and
      educational services for children in Head Start and Early Head Start in collaboration with other early care
      and education programs.


      Objective 1.2: Support efforts to improve the quality of early care and education programs through licensing,
      technical assistance, or other program quality initiatives.

      Task 2: Facilitate Head Start participation in professional development articulation meetings.

      ♦    Participated in two University of Wyoming/Wyoming Community College professional development
          articulation meetings. The purpose of these meetings was to gain a clear understanding of what the options
          are for awarding professional development scholarship monies and understanding the paths for profes-
          sional development to meet the needs and interests of early childhood professionals. Participants included
          representatives from the University of Wyoming, Wyoming community colleges, Wyoming Department
          of Education, Head Start, early childhood education providers, Wyoming Children’s Action Alliance,
          Child Nutritional Services, and Wyoming Department of Workforce Services.


      Objective 1.3: Support efforts to inform state and Federal policies/procedures and participate in system-build-
      ing efforts that increase availability, accessibility, affordability, and quality full-day, full-year, child care and
      preschool services.

      Task 5: Develop a statewide Head Start branding campaign.

      ♦ Organized the 2007 Wyoming Head Start Visioning Conference. The overall purpose of the Visioning
        Conference was to develop a shared vision of Head Start in Wyoming with a plan for achieving the vision
        that identifies existing and potential resources and enhances our capacity to work together. The outcome
        of this conference was a set of strategic visions and goals for the HSSCO and the Head Start State As-
        sociation, along with a concrete plan for implementation. One of the goals focused on public relations and
        branding. Currently in the planning stages for the follow-up April 2008 Visioning Conference.

      ♦ Developed and printed the Wyoming PIR data book. Distributed this resource to Head Start programs,
        state agencies, Wyoming Congressional delegation, and the early childhood education community.

      ♦ Participated in the Equality State Policy Center seminar on understanding and influencing the legislative
        process. Topics included insights and tips for understanding how the citizen legislature works and how to
        get the attention of legislators and affect policy deliberations.

      Education
      Goal 4: Support efforts to improve planning for seamless services (transition to public school) for children
      and families in Head Start and other early care and education programs.


      Objective 4.1: Support efforts to establish shared child outcome expectations for children in Head Start and
      other early care and education programs.

      Task 1: Support efforts to develop a statewide Head Start educational outcomes database.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   345




♦ Organized an educational outcomes sub-committee of the Wyoming Head Start Association. Members
  included all eight Head Start program education coordinators. Data were collected on 4-year-olds using
  The Creative Curriculum® Developmental Continuum and the High Scope Child Observation Record.
  This data reported the number of children who had achieved Level III at the beginning of the school year
  and the number of children who had achieved Level III at the end of the school year. Level III is consid-
  ered kindergarten ready in Wyoming. Results demonstrated the effectiveness of Head Start in preparing
  children for public school. Information was disseminated to the WHSA and at the Wyoming Department
  of Education spring school improvement conference.


Task 3: Collaborate with the Department of Education to define preschool readiness, revise Wyoming Early
Childhood Readiness Standards, and develop preschool program outcomes.

♦ The Wyoming Department of Education Early Childhood consultant is currently revising early child-
  hood readiness standards. The WHSA has been involved in developing standards and pre-testing readiness
  measures. The HSSCO is continuing to work with the WHSA and grantees to refine the child outcomes
  database.

♦ In collaboration with the Wyoming Department of Education Early Childhood Consultant, the HSSCO
  facilitated a roundtable discussion addressing transition issues at the Fall School Improvement Confer-
  ence. The Transition Roundtable was a dialogue among preschool and public school leaders to discuss
  the successes, challenges, and barriers to improving educational opportunities for preschool children in
  Wyoming.

Community Services
Goal 5: Support efforts to facilitate the collaboration between Head Start and other community service pro-
grams at the state and local levels.


Objective 5.1: Strengthen joint planning and collaborative activities between Head Start staff and other com-
munity service programs.

Task 2: Develop collaborative strategies for placement of community service volunteers in Head Start or other
early care and education programs.

♦ The HSSCO is still developing opportunities to partner with community service programs. The HSSCO
  Advisory Board has recruited the Community Action Agency State Director to be a member of the board
  to help identify future collaborations. On a local level, questions will be developed for use in the program
  assessment survey that will shed light on the opportunities that exist to collaborate with community ser-
  vice volunteers and on the involvement of Head Start grandparent volunteers.

Family Literacy Services
No activities reported.

Services to Children with Disabilities

Goal 7: Collaborate with ongoing efforts to expand the opportunities for inclusion of children with special
needs in Head Start, Early Head Start, and other early care and education programs.
346   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Objective 7.1: Strengthen opportunities for joint education, training, and mentoring of Head Start and other
      early care and education program staff to understand the intent of inclusion.

      Task 2: Support efforts to identify barriers to inclusion.

      ♦ Applied for and received a SpecialQuest Birth–Five: Head Start/Hilton Foundation Training Program
        grant. This grant is designed to support inclusion of infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families
        by expanding support for inclusive services and exploring new ways of using the SpecialQuest approach,
        materials, and resources to promote and sustain inclusive practices across the State.

      ♦ The HSSCO has been invited to participate on the SpecialQuest Birth-Five: Head Start/Hilton Founda-
        tion Training Program National Advisory Committee to represent Head Start collaboration grants. The
        purpose of this and future meetings is to review the plans for the next three years and to gather input on
        key elements of the program.
collaboration with
   regional offices
348   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            | 349




Collaboration with
Regional Offices

Describe how you have supported and collaborated with the Regional
Office on national and regional priorities (e.g. Fatherhood, Faith-Based
and Community, Healthy Marriage, Youth and Rural Initiatives and TA
Network, professional development, Community Action Agencies, State
Head Start Association, and other activities).

Alabama
Faith-based and community organizations have partnered with
Head Start to address healthy marriage and male involvement.
Thirty-four Head Start staff received scholarships to partici-
pate in the Alabama Healthy Marriage Initiative through Au-
burn University. The HSSCO regularly distributes information,
resources, and training opportunities for Head Start staff and
parents. A Valentine’s Day wedding was held at the Lauderdale
County Head Start with children, staff, and parents participat-
ing as a result of this initiative.

The third annual Fatherhood Conference resulted from a
partnership with the Alabama Departments of Human Re-
sources, Children’s Affairs, and Health; Children’s Trust Fund,
State Attorney General’s Office, and the Governor’s Faith and
Community-based Agency. Twenty-five Head Start fathers
received training, resources, and networking opportunities.

A written agreement was established between the HSA and
the Community Action Agencies of Alabama to assist Head
Start grantees with conference planning, public relations, and
advocacy activities, and oversight of $950,000 in state funds.
The funds are allocated from the Legislature for all Head Start
grantees based on the Federal formula. This has resulted in
additional funding for Head Start to offset Federal cuts and
matching grant funds

STG International, the Region IV TA contractor and the
HSSCO jointly developed a state plan that included long- and
short-range goals, strategies, indicators, timelines, and cost
estimates. Representatives attend state-level professional de-
velopment and disability service meetings. Alabama’s Disaster
Preparedness Plan includes the TAs as the first responders
to grantees. A model plan was shared with all grantees and a
system is in place for local, state, and regional reporting.
350   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Alaska
      Both Region X and AIANPB have collaborated with the HSSCO to address Alaska-specific issues, as well
      as ACF priorities. Aside from addition resources (both human and monetary), they have continued to aid the
      HSSCO’s work on issues around differences among regional grantees, state structural changes, changes in
      the structure of the HSA (outcome 5 goal 3), and TA changes. All issues have been met with open dialogue
      and face-to-face involvement (a rarity in Alaska due to geography). The state office support has been strong
      around rural initiatives as that is the nature of Alaska.

      Fatherhood has continued a strong focus with the inclusion of a Fatherhood strand in the 2006 Alaska Head
      Start Leadership Conference. This year has seen the continued development of a close and responsive working
      relationship between the HSSCO and the TA system. They developed and implemented strategies to allow
      greater involvement in ACF priorities, as well as a strengthened link to both regional offices in the planning
      of the 2006 Alaska State Head Start Leadership Conference. Professional Development continues to be an
      issue of concern and high involvement. The HSSCO continues involvement in Alaska’s System for Early
      Education Development (SEED) to a variety of distance delivery projects with the Alaska University system
      and to cross-educational agency shared training projects.


      American indian/Alaska Native
      Worked under the auspices of the Region XI TA network to learn about collaboration-related needs of AIAN
      grantees and provide requested support to Local TA Specialists and/or to individual grantees. Conducted
      database queries, researched relevant documents, and provided materials developed by AIAN-TAN. At cluster
      gatherings, provided forums for discussion of collaboration-related concerns.

      Worked with members of the National Indian Head Start Directors Association, some state Head Start As-
      sociations, and several state-level Tribal Head Start Associations to support collaboration-related needs and
      concerns. (For example, met with Arizona Indian Head Start Directors association to learn of their collabora-
      tive concerns and share information on LEA collaboration, 619 coordinators, and IDEA legislation.)


      Arizona
      Of these organizations, and for this reporting period, the HSSCO has focused work on the AHSA, with work
      focused on strategic planning, projects, and the AHSA contracting relationship with the HSSCO. This work
      has taken the HSSCO through a very thorough, lengthy, and time-consuming process in defining and rees-
      tablishing the HSSCO role with AHSA. Together, the HSSCO and AHSA, and with assistance of an outside
      consultant, examined the existing sub-granting, the balance of HSSCO funding, and the direction for AHSA.
      The AHSA Strategic Plan will be of good use in terms of project planning, positioning as a state-wide entity,
      and in fiscal growth and management. The new contracting structure between the HSSCO and AHSA will
      be mutually beneficial and create the best opportunity for real outcomes targeted to benefit the children of
      Arizona.


      Arkansas
      ♦ MOU Workgroup established annual priorities and signed updated MOU agreement among HSSCO,
        HSA, Arkansas Community Action Agencies Association, Office of Community Services, and Division
        of Child Care & Early Childhood Education. The group worked in coordination with the Region VI TA
        Network in hosting training on leadership, finance, and governance held in Little Rock in November.

      ♦ Served on the Arkansas Early Childhood Professional Development Steering Committee; working to
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   351




   implement changes in professional development system, including registry process for child care and early
   childhood education staff.

♦ Participated in monthly conference calls with Regional Office and Region VI HSSCO Directors and in
  routine meetings with liaison from Booz-Allen-Hamilton, contractor for Region VI TA Network.

♦ Maintained routine communication with HSA, including bi-monthly Association and Class meetings;
  assisted with HSA Annual Institute held in Batesville in July. Participated in panel discussion on “Col-
  laborative Partnerships” with representatives of Division of Child Care & Early Childhood Education,
  Arkansas Association of Educational Administrators, and Department of Education.

♦ Reviewed proposed IM for Head Start Emergency Preparedness; submitted comments to the Office of
  Head Start.

♦ Participated in Region VI training for I Am Moving, I Am Learning held in Dallas in November.


California
The HSSCO has a very successful working relationship with the Region IX Office, the Regional Office TA
staff and CHSA. Besides the planning and communication that occurs at regularly scheduled quarterly meet-
ings, the HSSCO has worked on an ad hoc basis to pull together other important activities and products such
as upcoming roundtables with Community Care Licensing, which is a joint venture between the Regional
Office, HSSCO, CHSA, and the TA Network.


Colorado
The Colorado Department of Human Services, Colorado Works Division, was awarded a $10 million Federal
grant over five years to strengthen father/child relationships and improve parenting. The Promoting Respon-
sible Fatherhood Initiative awarded several grants to Head Start programs, as well as the HSA, to promote
awareness and understanding of the availability of assistance to fathers and increase the number of fathers
requesting and receiving mentoring assistance from community organizations. Staff from this initiative joined
the HSA in planning a parent/staff training conference.

Professional development has emerged as a theme around which the HSSCO’s work seems to be focused. As
mentioned previously, the Director is a member of the CSEFEL State Partnership, which is a national train-
ing and technical assistance initiative to foster the professional development of the early care and education
workforce for dealing with children with challenging behavior. The Colorado initiative is moving into its sec-
ond year and focusing on five goals to sustain this effort. The HSSCO Director has assisted staff from Head
Start grantees in attending the various trainings that have been offered.

Colorado was selected as one of ten Special Quest/Hilton Head State Leadership Teams. The HSSCO
Director coordinated the inception of the team, a well as the development of the grant application. Again, the
goal of this T/TA initiative is to support cross-department professional development around the inclusion of
children with disabilities, birth to five.

The relationship between the HSSCO and the HSA has become strong this year. The HSSCO attends each
of the HSA meetings and meets regularly with the HSA president and join the Executive Committee for a
portion of their meetings. The Director has helped coordinate several training activities to meet needs identi-
fied by Head Start programs.
352   |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Connecticut
      ♦ Participated regularly in OHS and Region I meetings and on scheduled conference calls. Maintain regular
        contact with Regional Office staff. At the October 23 CT Early Care and Education Providers’ Summit,
        the HSSCO engaged Carmen Bovell from the Office of Head Start as the Keynote Speaker and Louise
        Eldridge of Region I as a panel presenter to share OHS priorities with state and local partners across sec-
        tors of early care and education.

      ♦ Worked with Region I Head Start program manager to build dialogue with State Agency Commission-
        ers. Meetings with new Commissioners of the Departments of Social Services and Children and Families
        were held, and a meeting with new Commissioner of the State Department of Education is planned.

      ♦ Continued to work with OHS and the Region I HSQI on coordination of training and technical as-
        sistance activities as needed to meet the needs of grantee agencies, including co-hosting Special Quest
        reunion in October.

      ♦ Attended Head Start Health and Nutrition Managers meetings and Head Start Education and Dis-
        abilities Managers meetings to support the work of Head Start and Early Head Start programs and to
        exchange information regarding pertinent state initiatives.


      Delaware
      ♦ Worked on the National Initiative Strengthening Operations for Learning a