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Revised Master Plan Book.indb by Jordanpeterson

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									M A RI N C O U N T Y F R E E LI BR A RY
                             L IBR         2007 REPORT
SERVICES AND FACILITIES VISION PLAN
                                          August 2007
                                                                                       TABLE OF CONTENTS

Marin County Free Library Vision Plan Report
A Vision for the Future

Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                                                                  1

NEEDS ASSESSMENT                                                                   5
              Methodology
              Demographics and Community Analysis
              Library Use
              Summary of Library Service Needs
              Summary of Library Facility Needs

PA R T I C I PAT I O N                                                            17

R E C O M M E N D AT I O N S                                                      21
              System-wide Vision
              Service Level Recommendations
              Service Areas
              Library Improvement Strategies

I M P L E M E N TAT I O N                                                         31
              Capital Cost Planning
              Capital Improvement Funding Strategies
              Operational Budgeting

FAC I L I T Y S U M M A R I E S                                                   39
              Civic Center
              Corte Madera
              Fairfax
              Novato
              Marin City
              South Novato
              Point Reyes Station
              Bolinas
              Inverness
              San Geronimo Valley
              Stinson Beach




Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Table of Contents    i
                                                                                     EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


INTRODUCTION

The Marin County Free Library (MCFL) operates as a Special District within
the County of Marin which has been serving residents for 80 years. The
District includes all of the unincorporated areas of the County as well as
the Towns of Corte Madera, Ross and Fairfax, the City of Novato, and the
communities of Marin City, Point Reyes Station, Bolinas, Stinson Beach,
and Inverness. Over time, the MCFL system has grown to 11 facilities, a
bookmobile, and literacy services. The system is an interconnected network
of regional libraries and community libraries that share resources and work
together to serve the residents of the district. Almost all residents use multiple
branches. The Regional Libraries are Civic Center, Corte Madera, Fairfax, and
Novato. The Community Libraries are Bolinas, Inverness, Marin City, Point
Reyes Station, San Geronimo Valley, South Novato, and Stinson Beach.

The regional facilities, which handle 70-80% of the Library’s use, were
built in the 1960’s and 1970’s. While the Library has expanded its smaller
facilities incrementally over the last ten years, there has been no significant
expansion or renewals of the large regional libraries since their construction.
Meanwhile, library services have changed significantly since the 1970’s, with
the introduction of new formats for library materials, new technology and the
important library role in helping bridge the ‘digital divide’, increased demand
for educational support through group study areas and homework centers as
well as materials, the rise of the library as a community gathering place, and
new, more efficient operational models.

MCFL owns or leases and operates all of its libraries and the bookmobile as
well as its Administrative headquarters at the County Administration Building,
Technical Services offices at Hamilton in Novato, and a Literacy office in Pt.
Reyes Station.
In early 2006, the need for a long-range vision for Marin County Free
Library’s facilities was identified by the Board of Supervisors and Library
Administration. The Library embarked on a Services and Facilities Vision
Plan project in late 2006 with the intent of studying the community’s needs
and desires for these or other improved library services and developing a
services and facilities plan that would support needed service improvements.
This work builds upon the Library’s Strategic Action Plan for 2006-2009 and
is a response to unmet and growing needs of the community.

The Services and Facilities Vision Plan articulates a direction for the future of
Marin County Free Library that was developed through a highly participatory
process and includes overall service recommendations and improvements
for a revitalized system. The Vision Plan identifies viable options for
improvements to facilities and associated project costs, including capital costs,


Marin County Free LibraryServices & Facilities Vision Plan – Executive Summary   1
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
                              and implementation strategies for the overall plan, including capital funding
                              strategies.
                              Several methods were used to gather input from over 1,500 people throughout
                              the County. These included community meetings and focus groups, a planning
                              survey in English and Spanish, and a Strategic Vision Workshop with
                              community leaders and elected officials. Community meetings were held
                              throughout the process to listen to and determine library services needed, to
                              review and receive feedback on potential library improvement strategies, and
  Strategic Vision Workshop   to review next steps.



                              THE NEED

                              The role of libraries has changed significantly during the three decades since
                              the older facilities, including all of the regional libraries, in MCFL’s system
                              were built. The system’s population has increased significantly since these
                              libraries were built in the 1960’s and 70’s, and has become more diverse, new
                              technologies have been develop, and the role of the library as a community
                              gathering place has increased. The number of people competing for space at
                              the library has increased at the same time that the Library has replaced seats
                              with more shelving and computers. Even with the addition of technology, the
                              libraries have not kept pace with the infrastructure and space needs required to
                              provide the 21st century library services, such as computer classrooms, group
                              study space, and homework centers that are in demand today. There is a need
                              for more space at almost all of the libraries, in the newer facilities as well as
                              the aging buildings.

                              The Library’s facilities have been well maintained, but there is a growing
                              backlog in all facilities of physical deficiencies that need to be corrected,
                              including heating and ventilation improvements, increased electrical capacity,
                              and better acoustical controls. ADA accessibility upgrades are needed at most
                              facilities, with some significant upgrades needed in the older buildings. The
                              County’s senior population is expected to increase more than any other age
                              group over the next few decades, making the need for universally accessible
                              and easy to use facilities a critical component of good service.
                              A Strategic Vision Workshop held with elected and community leaders
                              in Marin found that the library remains a vital service to the community
                              through its traditional services of providing and promoting reading and book
                              collections, but needs to increase its leadership role to provide both traditional
                              (books, programming) and new (technology, group study and educational
                              support, community gathering space) services.



                              T H E R E C O M M E N D AT I O N

                              The existing libraries play a significant role in the day-to-day lives of residents,
                              and the existing network of facilities, with four regional libraries, seven branch


                              2     Marin County Free LibraryServices & Facilities Vision Plan – Executive Summary
                                                                                      EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
libraries, and a bookmobile, work well geographically. However, many
of these facilities are stretched beyond their capacity, and have no room to
grow or change to meet evolving community needs. The vision for the Marin
County Free Library system based on community feedback is to significantly
increase the library space in the system to provide for expanded services. This
vision recommends the Library’s facilities increase from the current 63,821
square feet to a range of approximately 123,500 to 136,800 square feet, while
retaining the same number of facilities. This vision outlines the need to:

    Identify revenue sources to improve all present library facilities by 2020       Regional Libraries serve a larger
                                                                                     range of residents, often based on
    to meet the recommended 2030 service levels. This will allow the Library
                                                                                           County-wide lifestyle
    to provide 21st century library services at all locations;
    Greatly increase Library services:
       more books – and DVD’s, CD’s, and audiobooks;
       more computers – and space to hold training classes;
       more seats of all kinds – quiet, more active, family;
       space for all user groups – teens, children, adults, seniors
       space for library programs for all ages
       educational support through group study space, increased collection,
       and tutoring space
    Expand use of the bookmobile to include other stops within the County.

Options for how to increase space for each facility were identified as part
of this vision planning effort, including expansions, new construction, and
relocations/new sites. Options are described in the Facility Summaries section
of this report. Potential revenue sources are described in the Implementation
section of this report.


I M P L E M E N TAT I O N

The Library’s goal is to have an implementable vision and plan. This vision
process identified full project costs for the library improvement options
that included capital costs, soft costs, land costs, and escalation costs for
constructing needed improvements within a five year period. As described
in the Implementation chapter, costs were developed for the option that was
near the higher-cost range of the various options, in order to assure adequate
funding will be available for whichever option is determined to be the preferred
option. The scale of improvements identified by this process cannot be
achieved within the existing funding sources. Therefore, a variety of funding
options were studied that could raise revenue for this one-time capital funding
need. A combination of a ballot measure for a general obligation bond, grants,
and private donations were identified as a viable funding strategy. Operational
costs for an improved Library system were also studied, to ensure the Library
can operate the expanded facilities within the current operation funding
sources.



Marin County Free LibraryServices & Facilities Vision Plan – Executive Summary   3
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
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                    4    Marin County Free LibraryServices & Facilities Vision Plan – Executive Summary
                                                                                     NEEDS ASSESSMENT
NEEDS ASSESSMENT

M E T H O D O LO GY

In September 2006, the County Library engaged the services of Page + Moris, a
library planning firm, to conduct a library services and space needs assessment
of the County Library. Page + Moris staff worked with the project planning team
to develop a multifaceted assessment approach that included community input,
demographic and current library service level analysis, facility tours and staff
interviews, and benchmarking against similar libraries and recognized library
industry planning guidelines.

The consultant visited the 11 existing libraries in the County Library system,
interviewed staff at each library and toured each facility to become familiar
with both the services provided and the obstacles to service. She also analyzed
library usage and collection data and prepared a demographic profile for each
library service area, based on Census data and other relevant demographic
data. The County Library was compared to other, similar libraries both within
Marin County and throughout California, to develop a context within which to
interpret current service levels and to develop service level recommendations.
The consultant also reviewed the activities of MARINet, a library automation
consortium, and the relationship of the County Library to the several independent
city libraries, to take this important set of services into account.

At the same time, Group 4 Architecture conducted additional analyses, including
a customer mapping exercise to identify the geographic use patterns of residents
of the County Library service area, and functional investigations of all eleven
existing facilities and rigorous technical reviews of three regional libraries.

Community Meetings

Nine community input meetings were scheduled during January and February
2007 at eight locations across the County. The meetings were widely publicized
and well attended, with a total of 260 participants. Each meeting following the
same general outline, first identifying the library usage patterns, or non-usage
patterns, of attendees, then a discussion of the group’s library service experi-
ences and priorities. Attendees’ perceptions of their “home library” strengths
and weaknesses were identified as well as their expressions of most-needed
improvements. The results of these meetings were reviewed in conjunction
with library usage statistics and current service levels.

Focus Groups

Nine focus groups were also held in February and March 2007, to gather input
from several user groups that might be under-represented at the community
meetings. The focus groups included teens, business leaders, parents of school
age children, seniors and members of the Latino community. A total of 147
people participated in the focus groups. At these sessions, participants’ library
experiences and service needs were explored. In these small, informal settings,
the consultants were able to probe more deeply than at the larger community
meetings to learn more about the factors that block effective use of the County’s
libraries and the service needs of these groups. The results of these meetings


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment   5
NEEDS ASSESSMENT
                                     were reviewed in conjunction with library usage statistics and current service
                                     levels.

                                     Survey

                                     During January 2007, Library staff and volunteers distributed surveys in each
                                     community, targeted to reach people who may not regularly use a library. A
                                     total of 742 usable responses were returned, 703 of which were completed by
                                     Marin County residents. Responses were divided almost equally between library
                                     users and non users, including a large percentage (39%) who self-identified as
Strategic Vision Workshop: Survey    “irregular” users, visiting a library only a few times per year. Respondents noted
                                     numerous reasons for lack of use, including leading busy lives, lack of interest or
                                     lack of a specific type of material. Not surprisingly, many participants reported
                                     getting their reading materials and information from other sources, including
                                     bookstores and the Internet. The most-noted factors that would attract non-user
                                     or irregular users to the library were more new books or DVDs to check out,
                                     places to sit, read or study, more open hours and a café or coffee bar.

While low population growth is       Demographic Analysis
expected for most of Marin County,
the population of the regional       Marin County occupies 520 square miles in the heart of northern California’s
library service areas has grown      Bay Area. The County is surrounded by water on three sides, the Pacific Ocean
by over 60% since the 1960’s and     and the San Francisco Bay forming its boundaries to the west, east and south.
     70’s when they were built.      The County begins at the north entrance to the Golden Gate Bridge and extends
                                     north to the Sonoma County line. Almost half of the County’s land mass is
                                     public land, dedicated for use as park land or open space. Marin County is one
                                     of California’s original 27 counties and is one of the smallest in size.

                                     Marin County had 247,289 residents in 2000, according to the U.S. Census.
                                     Most of the population is clustered in communities located along Highway 101,
                                     which runs north to south through the eastern side of the County. This pattern
                                     reflects the city-centered corridor for population growth, a strategy called for
                                     in the Marin County General Plan, which was adopted in 1973.

                                     West Marin County is rural, made up primarily of public and agricultural land.
                                     The County’s communities are surprisingly diverse, ranging from urban areas,
                                     such as San Rafael, with multicultural populations, to smaller, established cities
                                     and towns that include Corte Madera, Larkspur, Ross, Tiburon, Belvedere and
                                     Mill Valley. The city of Novato in the northern region of the County contains
                                     both growing suburban areas and an emerging community located on the former
                                     Hamilton Air Force Base.

                                     Marin County ranks 25th among California counties in population size, the next
                                     to smallest among Bay Area County populations. The County population will
                                     reach approximately 284,000 by the year 2030, according to the Association
                                     of Bay Area Governments, an overall 15% population increase from 2000,
                                     averaging an annual 0.5% increase. Most of the growth is expected to occur in
                                     the north part of the County, in and around the city of Novato. Marin County’s
                                     growth rate is less than half the projected population growth rate for California
                                     as a whole, which is projected to grow 41% between 2000 and 2030.

                                     The Marin County Free Library is one of seven public library systems that serve


                                     6      Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment
                                                                                              NEEDS ASSESSMENT
the County’s residents, providing service to the City of Novato and towns of                    Novato is the one Marin
Corte Madera, Fairfax and Ross as well as residents of the unincorporated areas               Community expected to see
of the County. The County Library service area includes 482 of the County’s                significant population growth -- as
520 square miles. Independent city libraries provide service to residents in the           much as 27% from 2000 to 2030.
remaining 38 square miles. They are the Belvedere-Tiburon Library, Larkspur
Library, Mill Valley Library, San Anselmo Library, San Rafael Library and
Sausalito Library. They comprise MARINet which consists of one catalog of
all holdings in the 7 libraries jurisdictions available for all county residents.
The ease of access is extremely popular with library customers.

The County Library serves approximately one-half of County residents. In 2000,
the eleven County Library branches served a combined population of 117,365
people. By 2030, the County Library service area is projected to reach 138,9381,
an 18% increase, which is somewhat higher than the projected increase for
the County as a whole. The largest projected increases will be in the northern
region of the County, in the Civic Center, Novato and South Novato areas. The
demographic profile of the population served by the County Library closely
parallels the demographics of the County as a whole.

Age Distribution

Marin County residents include a higher percentage of seniors and older adults
than the State overall. In 2000, 13.6% of the population was 65 years or older,
compared to 10.7% for California as a whole. The median age within the County
was 41.3 years in 2000, compared to 33.3 years for all Californians. Marin’s
senior population is expected to grow more than any other age group over the
next few decades. By 2020, one-third of the population will be 60 or older. This
aging of the population will affect not only programs and materials that the
Library offers, but also require the Library to provide accessible and easy to use
facilities for those who encounter mobility challenges that come with aging.

Children represent a smaller percentage of the overall population than for
California overall. In 2000, children and teens between the ages of 0 and 19
made up 21.9% of the population, compared to 30.1% for the state as a whole.
This trend appears to be shifting, however, as school districts report increasing
enrollment across the County. Students enrolled in public schools increased in
2006/07, for the second year in a row, after several years of declining enrollment.
School officials credited the growing family population at the former Hamilton
military base in Novato as well as the arrival of new, young families to various
communities in the County during the past decade. Most of the growth in the
student population is in the current elementary school population.

Ethnic Diversity

The County population is 84.0% White. Hispanics of all races make up 11.1%
of the population, although this group represents only 9.1% of the population
within the County Library service area. Asians make up 4.5%, African Ameri-
cans 2.9% and American Indians 0.4% of the population. “Other” ethnic groups
include the remaining 8.0% of the population.

Hispanics represent more than 5% of the population in six County Library

1
    This figure excludes the approximately 6,000 inmates of San Quentin penitentiary.

Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment         7
NEEDS ASSESSMENT
                   service areas. Point Reyes has the highest percentage, at 19.1% of the popula-
                   tion. Next highest is South Novato, with 16.6%, followed by Civic Center,
                   with 10.0%, Novato with 9.6%, Bolinas with 9.2% and San Geronimo Valley
                   with 6.1%.

                   African Americans represent 9.3% of the Marin City service population. In all
                   other service areas, this group is between 1.0 and 2.9% of the population.

                   Asians or Pacific Islanders represent more than 5% of the population of four
                   service areas. Corte Madera’s Asian residents represent 5.9% of the total popu-
                   lation, followed by Civic Center with 5.5%, Marin City with 5.4% and Novato
                   with 5.0%.

                   Educational Attainment

                   Marin County residents are generally well educated. Over 90% of the adult
                   population has graduated from high school, and the County Library service
                   population exceeds the County population overall, at 93.4% with a high school
                   diploma. This is almost twenty percentage points higher that the graduation rate
                   for Californians as a whole. The percentage of adults with college degrees is
                   twice that for the state as a whole – 51.3% compared to 26.1%.

                   Income Levels

                   Income levels of County residents are significantly higher than the income of
                   the average Californian. Almost one in five County households (19.1%) had an
                   annual income of $150,000 or more in 2000 (17.1% of County Library service
                   area households were in this category), compared to 8.0% for the State overall.
                   Last year, state officials reported that the median for Marin County residents’
                   joint tax returns for 2004, at $99,902, was the highest in the state. This was the
                   twenty-fifth year that Marin County ranked first in this category. For several
                   years, the County has also topped the state with the highest median for all tax
                   returns filed, at $46,699.

                   Commuters

                   Commuting to and from work is a way of life for many residents. 38 % of County
                   residents who are employed travel outside the County to their jobs. At the same
                   time, 36% of people who work in Marin County travel to their jobs from outside
                   the County. Two-thirds of County residents who commute outside Marin County
                   for work travel to San Francisco – almost 31,000 people. Alameda, Sonoma
                   and Contra Costa Counties are the next three most frequent destinations, with
                   4,729, 3,493 and 2,740 commuters respectively. Most incoming commuters are
                   Sonoma County residents – over 18,000 (42% of the total).

                   Customer Mapping

                   In addition to conducting community meetings, focus groups, and surveys, the
                   planning team researched demographics and library use statistics. Library use
                   patterns were mapped to further examine how the libraries worked as a system,
                   and to confirm that all areas of the County were being adequately served.



                   8      Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment
                                                                                        NEEDS ASSESSMENT
“Snapshot” data were collected of materials checked out at all branches in the
Marin County Free Library system during one week in early December 2006,
with a total of 4,750 records mapped. The address of each person who checked
out materials was plotted on a map in order to better understand the core and
expanded geographic areas from which each branch draws its customers, as
well as to identify any underserved areas within the County.

With the use of circulation data, the customer mapping revealed the geographic
use patterns of customers:
    The Marin County Free Library’s system structure, with four regional
    libraries that serve a large range of the District’s residents, seven smaller
    branch libraries with local community focus, and a bookmobile, is working
    well as a system. Indeed, the four regional libraries circulate over 80% of
    library material circulation and handle 70% of library visits.
    Customer mapping shows, however, that the smaller facilities play an im-
    portant role in serving local needs. There is a cluster of users around each
    of the smaller branches, but each location also showed that residents use
    libraries throughout the County based on their living and working patterns.
    This was confirmed in the community meetings and other library statistics,
    which show that residents use multiple libraries both within and beyond
    the MCFL system.
    MCFL’s 11 facilities and a bookmobile serve its geography well; there were
    no major underserved areas identified within the district.




                                                                                     Each color dot represents a user
                                                                                     of MCFL libraries (dots are color-
                                                                                          coded for each library).




Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment   9
NEEDS ASSESSMENT
                   SUMMARY OF LIBRARY SERVICE NEEDS

                   Collections and Shelving

                   The Library’s facilities currently house a combined collection of 461,424 books
                   and media items, which offers an average 3.31 items per person served. Given
                   the County Library’s geographically dispersed population, however, the real-
                   ity is that most library facilities cannot shelve a sufficient number of items to
                   meet local needs. Historically, library industry guidelines have recommended
                   collection sizes ranging between 2.5 and 6.0 items per capita, depending on
                   the population size, with increasingly higher ratios for smaller populations. In
                   recent years, California libraries have raised these targets to include additional
                   languages, multiple audio and video media formats, additional titles to support
                   school curricula and similar collection development trends. By comparison, the
                   collections at the Mill Valley and Belvedere-Tiburon libraries, widely considered
                   two of the most successful library facilities in the region, respectively provide
                   8.24 and 5.33 items per capita.

                   The MARINet request and delivery system somewhat cushions the inadequacy
                   of the County Library’s local collections. It cannot completely compensate, how-
                   ever, for inadequate shelving capacity. Shelving is at capacity at every County
                   Library facility. Shelves are generally 100% full, with bottom and top shelves
                   in use. Staff is forced to withdraw titles that still have value to make room for
                   new, incoming materials. Needed collections cannot grow simply because there
                   is not enough shelving space. New and popular titles cannot be displayed effec-
                   tively for browsing. Some collections are shelved in inappropriate areas, such as
                   crawl space, due to lack of space. In several communities, many residents have
                   stopped browsing the in-house collection and instead simply request new titles
                   to be borrowed from other facilities. Essentially, several community libraries
                   no longer offer viable collections.

                   Crowded shelving conditions are almost universal through the system, with
                   serious consequences. Retrospective titles must be weeded to create shelf space.
                   Over time, the Library’s collections are losing integrity and depth. Staff cannot
                   respond effectively to emerging community needs, adding new, and high-inter-
                   est collections targeted toward at-risk groups, such as teens, Spanish speakers
                   or other populations with special needs, simply because there is no space to
                   shelve appropriate materials. More shelving is needed to allow the collections
                   to “breathe”, so that each shelf is filled approximately 75% to 80%, rather than
                   the packed shelving conditions that are now the norm. This report recommends
                   that the Library’s combined shelving capacity increase to accommodate 643,000
                   books and media items, or an average 4.6 items per person served.

                   Seating and Space for People

                   As the Library’s collections have grown in response to community needs, shelv-
                   ing has displaced spaces for people. Seating for the public is in short supply
                   at every facility. Space constraints force quiet reading areas to be located next
                   to active areas for children or teens. Conflicts are ongoing between different
                   groups of users due to noise and disruptive activity. Table seating often must be
                   located far from collections due to lack of space. Most facilities lack quiet zones
                   or places for concentrated study. There are no acoustically enclosed group study


                   10     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment
                                                                                       NEEDS ASSESSMENT
rooms to accommodate students who need to work together on assignments, or
small groups of adults that wish to meet.

Space for people is arguably the most significant space needs deficit in the
County Library system. The lack of sufficient seating is so severe that the
libraries with separate meeting rooms have placed study tables in these spaces
to create study zones. At Novato, most of the adult seating is located in the
meeting room (as is part of the adult book collection). Corte Madera and Fairfax
have designated their meeting rooms as tutoring spaces. These rooms are filled
with tables at which tutoring groups work on a daily basis, unless a program
forces staff to clear the room. The Corte Madera Library meeting room also
houses shelving for parts of the adult collection and three public computers.
Point Reyes has one table in the public space that is used by all visitors who
need to work at a table, including students of all ages, laptop users and even
the library’s knitting group.

Teens in particular are affected by the low seating levels. Often, this age group
feels uncomfortable in both the children’s and the adults’ areas of the library.
Teens who attended community meetings and focus groups commented that
a major reason they do not use the library in their community is the lack of a
space that they recognize as “their own”. Adults also commented on the lack
of quiet seating.

There are currently 436 seats for the public at County Library facilities, or an
average 3.3 seats per 1,000 residents. The ratio of seats per population runs
between 3 seats per 1,000 people for populations of 100,000 or above to 10+
seats for populations under 10,000 people. This report recommends an increase
in seating capacity to provide 901 seats – a service level of 6.5 seats per 1,000
residents by the year 2030. This service level will enable the libraries to be
organized into zones in accordance with activity level, including areas condu-
cive to quiet reading and concentrated study as well as more active spaces for
children and teens.

Group Study and Tutoring Space

Schools at every level, from elementary through college, assign group study
projects on a regular basis. Students often find it difficult to locate appropriate
space in which to meet and will take over reading tables at their public library
for this purpose. One-on-one and small group tutoring is also increasingly popu-
lar among students, increasing demand on library seating space. Acoustically
separate space is needed at almost every County Library facility in which small
groups of students, as well as the general public, can meet and work together
without disturbing other library visitors. The number of seats needed ranges
from 4 in small facilities to 24 in the largest facilities, in acoustically enclosed
spaces with glass partitions for visibility.

Programming Space

The lack of appropriate, dedicated space for programming negatively impacts
the way the Library conducts programs and has a negative impact on other li-
brary services. At Novato, Corte Madera and Fairfax, staff is routinely required
to ask customers using the tables in the meeting rooms to vacate the space so


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment   11
NEEDS ASSESSMENT
                   they can set up for scheduled programs.

                   Children’s programs that attract 50 to 75 attendees are held in open access
                   children’s spaces, generating noise that fills the entire public space. The Civic
                   Center Library has no meeting room space of its own and must use the Board
                   of Supervisors’ chambers for adult programs, a space with fixed seating and a
                   raised dais. Children’s programs at Civic Center must be conducted in a space
                   that is adjacent to the Anne T. Kent California Room, within full hearing of
                   researchers using that service. The Library needs dedicated space at each re-
                   gional facility in which to present programs for people of all ages, in spaces that
                   accommodate between 80 and 150 adults. The Marin City, South Novato and
                   Point Reyes libraries also need dedicated meeting room space that accommo-
                   dated 30 to 50 people. All other libraries can effectively use open public space
                   for programming. The Charlotte Jones Room at the Stinson Beach Library is
                   highly successful as an open access space that also can be used for programming
                   and events. This glass-partitioned area can be used as a model in facilities that
                   need a shared-use meeting space.

                   Computers

                   The Library’s public access computers are in constant use throughout the system,
                   often with visitors waiting for a workstation to become available. The Library
                   has implemented free wireless access at all facilities. This service is extremely
                   popular – many customers use their own laptop computers at the library which
                   has relieved some of the pressure on the Library’s computers. This service
                   has attracted even more library visitors, which has increased demand on seat-
                   ing. The Library’s computers are still in high demand and are used by many
                   customers, whether or not they have a computer at home. In older facilities,
                   space for computers has been carved out of existing square footage, often at
                   the expense of privacy or comfort. At Novato, 16 computers are clustered in
                   a cramped corner of the adult public space that provides little privacy or clear
                   work surfaces for users.

                   The continuous use of the current computers prevents the Library from being
                   able to present computer-based training in an effective manner, in a classroom
                   setting. A portion of the additional computers recommended should be located
                   within acoustically separate spaces to enable training to occur. These spaces
                   can be designed to allow individual customers to use the equipment whenever
                   training is not in session.

                   The County Library needs to double the number of computer workstations avail-
                   able to the public, from the current 138 to a total of 278 workstations. These
                   computers will allow the Library to provide Internet access, work processing
                   and other software applications, access to the Library’s website and electronic
                   information resources and eventually downloading capability. These computers
                   are needed even with the availability of wireless access at the Library’s facilities,
                   to ensure that all residents have access to electronic information. The number
                   of workstations recommended for each facility ranges from four at Inverness
                   to fifty at Novato.




                   12     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment
                                                                                      NEEDS ASSESSMENT
Staff Work Space, Service Desk, Visibility

Library staff cannot work productively in undersized or inappropriate work
space. Lack of space also makes it difficult for the Library to take full advan-
tage of cost-effective technologies, such as self service checkout or automated
sorting. In some locations, staff work space is scattered through the building,
awkwardly configured, not acoustically enclosed or too small. The regional
libraries provide self checkout technology that is popular with the public. More
self checkout machines are needed to meet this demand, but space constraints
prevent installation of any additional equipment.

The Novato facility has been recently remodeled to incorporate a more efficient,
ergonomic sorting and returns operation. The volume of circulation at Novato
justifies the use of automated materials handling equipment to manage returns
and sorting at this facility. Space constraints, however, prevent the possibility
of incorporating this equipment. Meanwhile, the volume of circulation at No-
vato continues to grow and the overall space needed for this function should
be enlarged.

The Library has reorganized the interior layouts of several of its facilities over
time to accommodate more shelving, computers and other components. These
efforts sometimes have impeded visibility into parts of the public space. Ser-
vice desks are not able to be located in locations that allow staff to effectively
oversee activity.

Some staff workspaces are not acoustically separate. Conversations and noise
spill out into the public space. Some workrooms are extremely small and awk-
ward. There is a lack of storage space for supplies at most facilities.

Administrative, Support Services and Outreach Space

Library Administrative offices are located in the County Civic Center, as is
the bookmobile service office. Technical Services, Information Technology
and the MARINet offices are located in leased space adjacent to the South
Novato Library, at the former Hamilton military base in Novato. The Literacy
Program occupied leased space in Point Reyes as well as a small office in the
South Novato Library.

These support functions currently occupy 8,100 square feet of space – 12.5%
of the Library system’s total square footage. Support functions will need to
grow to keep pace with the expanded services. For example, increased shelving
will enable the Library to devote more resources to the collections. Technical
Services staff will need more space in which to process and distribute new ma-
terials. The expanded number of computer workstations will require additional
maintenance effort by IT staff. Space at each regional library is needed for
on-site equipment repair and maintenance. There will be a need for additional
bookmobile staff and collections, as well as space for rotating collections to be
sorted and managed. An overall increase is recommended for support functions
space – 11,650 to 12,400 square feet in needed. This represents 8.5% to 9.0%
of the total overall square footage recommended.




Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment   13
NEEDS ASSESSMENT
                   S U M M A RY O F L I B R A RY FAC I L I T Y N E E D S

                   At the same time that the demographic analysis, surveys, and focus groups were
                   underway, a functional analysis was done by the project team to evaluate each
                   library according to how well the existing facility “worked” for customers and
                   staff. The project team examined each existing library facility, observed how
                   customers and staff were using the library, and noted any functional problems
                   that interfered with library services and programs, such as poor layout, acoustics
                   or lighting, a shortage of seats or computers, crowding or long lines at service
                   areas, or the library’s location. In addition, Group 4 along with supporting en-
                   gineers (structural, electrical, and mechanical), performed a technical review
                   of the Library’s three owned regional libraries – Corte Madera, Fairfax, and
                   Novato (Civic Center was not studied as it is one suite within a much larger
                   facility not controlled by the Library). Marin County also commissioned ADA
                   (Americans with Disabilities Act) compliance studies by Sally Swanson (West
                   Marin facilities) and MIG (all other facilities). These comments will be inte-
                   grated into the technical documentation for this report.

                   This assessment found that the Library’s regional libraries, which were all built
                   in the 1960’s and 1970’s and have not been significantly expanded or upgraded
                   since then, are aging and in need of renewal. There is also a growing backlog
                   in all facilities of physical deficiencies that need to be corrected, including
                   ADA accessibility upgrades, heating and ventilation improvements, and better
                   acoustical controls. Finally, there is a need for more space at almost all of the
                   libraries, in the newer facilities as well as the aging buildings. There is simply
                   not enough room in many of the facilities for the number of services the com-
                   munity is asking the library to provide.

                   As the analyses of each of the Library’s facilities demonstrates, the functional
                   limitations of many existing facilities means that most facilities do not adequate-
                   ly support services and programs currently being provided, let alone the increase
                   of services that is needed. A prime example of how the facilities’ functional
                   limitations impede the ability of the Library to provide adequate services to the
                   community can be found at the Corte Madera and Novato Libraries. Because
                   there is not enough room for the collection, stacks are placed in the meeting
                   rooms, meaning that these areas of the collection are inaccessible when library
                   or community programs are being held. In addition, these facilities use their
                   meeting room as primary table seating for users as well as for tutoring. Again,
                   these users must be asked to leave the room whenever programs are held. Other
                   facilities do not have dedicated or flexible program space, which means that
                   even basic, traditional library programs such as children’s storytelling cannot
                   be provided without negatively impacting other library users.

                   Physical facility problems also include aging and inflexible infrastructure for
                   heating, cooling and ventilation (HVAC) systems as well as electrical distribu-
                   tion, with some facilities at capacity in terms of electrical infrastructure and
                   not able to add any additional technology without upgrades.

                   Recent ADA (American’s with Disabilities Act) compliance studies conducted
                   by both Sally Swanson and MIG for the County found that, although ADA
                   upgrades have been done by the Library to its older facilities within the last
                   10-15 years, there are numerous ADA deficiencies in the facilities. Some of


                   14     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment
                                                                                         NEEDS ASSESSMENT
these items will have significant building impacts to the facilities – such as the
need to widen hallways where there is no room, or site grading and building
entries that are too steep. Even the newer facilities have items of non-compli-
ance. While the Library is undertaking upgrades at some of the facilities, some
of these facility deficiencies are too costly for the Library to attain within its
current funding.

Accessibility facilities is not only required by Federal law, it is also a priority
for the County and Library, especially as the County’s population ages and
the need for universally accessible facilities and services grows. Designs that
accommodate all types and ability of users through a barrier-free environment
will not only benefit those with both temporary and permanent physical dis-
abilities, but also those with other mobility challenges, such as parents with
small children and strollers. Making its facilities completely accessible and
easy to use will be a critical component of good service.

While the Library has maintained its facilities well, the pressures of aging in-
frastructure, heavy public use, population growth, and demand for new services
are increasingly taking their toll on the Library’s ability to provide services that
its residents expect and deserve. As these facilities continue to age, they will
become increasingly inadequate to meet both the growing demand for traditional
library services and the new expectations placed on modern libraries for such
services as Internet access and technology training classrooms. The findings of
facility needs for each library are briefly summarized in each of the Facilities
Summaries section of this Report.

Despite the problems found in the Library’s existing facilities, the location
of most libraries within their communities provide convenient access. These




                                                                                       Example of functional evaluation
                                                                                       of MCFL facilities: Bolinas Library




Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment   15
NEEDS ASSESSMENT
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                   16     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan – Needs Assessment
                                                                               PARTICIPATION
PARTICIPATION



The Marin County Free Library’s Vision process for services and facitlities
was prepared through a highly participatory process. Over 1,500 people gave
input into the plan through three rounds of community meetings, surveys,
focus groups and the Strategic Visions Workshop. In addition to community
participation, numerous meetings with City staff and elected officials were
held in the process of developing and refining this plan.

The following individuals and organizations participated in the library’s
planning process and provided invaluable information and guidance in the
creation of this vision:

Over 389 people participated in 27 community meetings during three rounds
of 9 meetings each in January, March and May. As the work evolved the
community had 3 opportunities to provide input and feedback on the specifics
for each community library area vision as plans evolved.

Over 800 community members completed a planning survey.

FOCUS GROUPS
Drake High School Leadership Class, approx. 40 participants
North Bay Council, 9 participants
Tamalpais High School Black Students Union, 23 participants
Corte Madera Parents, 14 participants
Novato Mothers’ Club, 5 participants
Corte Madera Seniors, 16 participants
Point Reyes Hispanic Community, 4 participants
South Novato Hispanic Community, 6 participants
Bolinas White Caps (including Stinson Beach residents), 30 participants

S T R AT E G I C V I S I O N PA R T I C I PA N T S
Susan Andrien, Director of Learning Resources, College of Marin
Mary Buttler, Assistant Superintendent, Marin County Office of Education
Wyna Barron, President of the Friends of Marin City Library
Barbara Barwood, former Marin County and San Rafael Library Literacy
Director
Jean Bonander, Town Manager, Larkspur
Susan Brandborg, Councilmember, Town of Fairfax
Nancy Davis, Branch Manager, Corte Madera Library
David Dodd, Library Director, San Rafael Library
Jim Farley, Cultural Services Director, County of Marin County
Lyons Filmer, Director, KWMR
Libby Flynn, Technical Services Manager, Marin County Free Library
Ron Ford, Santa Venetia Neighborhood Association
Carol Friedman, Director, Dance Palace, Point Reyes Station
Ron Gerber, Redevelopment Director, City of Novato

Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Participation          17
PARTICIPATION
                Melissa Gill, Mayor, Town of Corte Madera
                Frances Gordon, Library Director, Larkspur Library
                Shelby Gross, President, Marin County Free Library Foundation
                Jeanne MacLeamy, Mayor, City of Novato
                Kenneth Harth, Novato Downtown Business District
                Cal Kurzman, Interim Director Dominican University Library
                Gail Haar, Deputy Director, Marin County Free Library
                Jana Haehl, Corte Madera Beautification Committee
                Bill Hansell, Board Member, Marinwood Community Services District
                Pat Harper, Administrative Librarian, Marin County Free Library
                Patricia Hess, Vice President, Friends of the Marin County Free Library
                Damon Hill, Branch Manager, Civic Center Library
                Joel Josehart, Chair, Corte Madera Planning Commission
                Jo Julin, County of Marin Planning Commission
                Dan Keen, City Manager, City of Novato
                Steve Kinsey, Supervisor, District 4
                John Logan, Jr., District Manager, Marin City Community Services District
                Kathleen O’Neill, Co-Chair, Bolinas Community Center
                Kathy Page, Principal, Page + Moris
                Charles Porrata, Trustee, Marin Community Foundation
                Elisabeth Ptak, Director, Inverness Association
                Joyce Schriebman, Marin Literacy Advisory Board
                Jane Slack, Stinson Beach Historical Society Board
                David Speer, Facilities Planning Manager, Marin County
                Suki Sennett, Marin City Community Representative
                Carol Starr, Director, Marin County Free Library
                Dr. Shirley Thorton, Director, Sausalito/Marin City School District
                Ingrid Weiss, Director, Fairfax Chamber of Commerce
                Gail Wiemann, Branch Manager, Fairfax Library
                Cecilia Zamora, Executive Director, Latino Council of Marin

                LIBRARY COMMISSION

                Judy Anderson, District 2
                Claudia Cardoza, District 5
                William Crandall, Jr., District 3
                Lynn David Fickbohm, District 1
                Linda Goldberg, District 2
                Shelby Gross, District 3
                Susan Haas, District 3
                Richard Jensen, District 4
                Barbara Madrid, District 5
                Harriett Michael, District 1
                Meredith Parnell, District 2
                Leslie Plant, District 4
                Lawrence Smith, District 4
                Reggie Winner, District 5



                18                Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Participation
                                                                            PARTICIPATION
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

Susan L. Adams, District 1
Harold C. Brown, Jr., 2nd Vice President, District 2
Charles McGlashen, Vice President, District 3
Steve Kinsey, President, District 4
Judy Arnold, District 5

CORTE MADERA JOINT LIBRARY BOARD

Steve Kinsey, Marin County Board of Supervisors (Chair)
Michael Lappert, Corte Madera Vice-Mayor
Charles McGlashan, Marin County Board of Supervisors
Jin Yang, Corte Madera Council Member
Melissa Gill, Mayor of Corte Madera Mayor (Corte Madera alternate)
Hal Brown (County Board of Supervisors alternate)
Staffed by:
Carol Starr, Director, Marin County Free Library
Nancy Davis, Corte Madera Branch Manager
Dave Bracken, Corte Madera Town Manager

C I T Y O F N O V AT O

Dan Keen, City Manager
Mary Neilan, Assistant City Manager
Ron Gerber, Redevelopment Director

L I B R A R Y S TA F F

Branch managers and staff from all libraries, the bookmobile and literacy
office.

C O M M U N I T Y A N D A G E N C Y C O N TA C T S

Matthew Hymel, County Adminsitration
Michael Smith, CountyTreasurer - Tax Collecter
Roy Given, Assistant Treasurer - Tax Collector
David Speer, Facilities Planning and Development Manager, Office of The
County Administration
Lawrence Beaton, Assistant Engineer, Department of Public Works
Andrew Yon, Administrative Services Manager, Library Administration
Terry Toner, Chief Real Property Agent, Department of Public Works

PROJECT MANAGEMENT TEAM

Carol Starr, Director, Marin County Free Library
Gail Haar, Deputy Director, Marin County Free Library
Kathryn Page, Page + Moris
David Schnee, Group 4 Architecture, Reseach + Planning
Kari Holmgren, Group 4 Architecture, Research + Planning
Wayne Gehrke, Group 4 Architecture, Research + Planning

Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Participation      19
PARTICIPATION
                C O N S U LTA N T T E A M

                Group 4 Architecture, Research + Planning
                Wayne Gehrke, Group 4 Architecture, Research + Planning
                David Schnee, Group 4 Architecture, Reseach + Planning
                Kari Holmgren, Group 4 Architecture, Research + Planning

                Page + Moris LLC
                Kathryn Page, Library Consultant
                Elena Engel

                Davis Langdon
                Gary Holland, Cost Consultant
                Alice Nguyen, Cost Consultant

                Weir/Andrewson Associates, Inc.
                Roy Andrewson, Structural Engineer
                Paul Weir, Structural Engineer

                Guttman & Blaevoet
                Jeff Blaevoet, Mechanical Engineer

                O’Mahony & Myer
                Paul Carey, Electrical and Lighting Engineer

                Wulff, Hansen & Co.
                Mark Pressman, Municipal Financing Consultant

                TBWB Public Finance Strategies
                Barry Barnes, Partner




                20                 Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Participation
                                                                                   RECOMMENDATIONS
R E C O M M E N D AT I O N S

The Marin County Free Library works hard to serve its customers. Circulation
statistics and library visits continue to grow each year. Library programs are
well attended. Public access computers are in great demand and wireless
access has brought many new users into its facilities. Many residents have
expressed their appreciation for the library and identify themselves as loyal
customers. Facility limitations, however, and particularly lack of space, have
eroded the Library’s ability to respond to community needs. Over time, the
scope of traditional services has narrowed while emerging service needs have
been difficult to implement. For many, the library is no longer pertinent to
their needs, unable to compete with other institutions that offer space as well
as access to print and digital information.

The Marin County Free Library district is well-served geographically between
the 11 library facilities and the Bookmobile. However, library facilities have
not kept pace with the changing and growing communities and services.
While the Library has expanded its smaller facilities incrementally over the
last 10 years, there have been no significant expansions or renewals of the
large regional libraries since their construction in the 1960’s and 1970’s. The
four regional libraries, Civic Center, Corte Madera, Fairfax and Novato, are
responsible for over 80% of total circulation and handle 70% of the system’s
total visitors each year. These libraries were built between 1962 and 1978, and
are an average of 36 years old. Much has changed during the 3 decades since
these facilities opened. First, the County’s population has increased over 60%
over the past 40 years, with explosive growth during the 1960s and then much
slower growth rates in the years since.1 The number of people competing
for space at the library has increased at the same time that the Library has
replaced seats with more shelving and computers. Even with their addition of
technology, the libraries have not kept pace with the infrastructure and space
needs for providing the 21st century library services, such as computer classes,
group study space, and homework centers that are in demand today.

LIBRARY USE HAS CHANGED OVER TIME

The ways that people want to use libraries has evolved, as well. While there is
still need for quiet reading space, many people need space to meet with other
people – interactive space for tutoring, small groups of students working on
an assignment, home schooling groups, business meetings, books discussion
groups. Our society has become increasingly collaborative and access to
space that accommodates discussion and interaction is critical. It is no wonder
that coffeehouses and other venues that support such activity are universally
popular and seen as community assets. Many people see the library as the
community’s “living room” and want to use it for this purpose. Pressure for
this type of use is so strong that the County Library has attempted to create
part-time tutoring and group study spaces, at the expense of other services. In

1
    California Department of Finance historic population data.

Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations           21
RECOMMENDATIONS
                           the current small facilities, however, space constraints prevent these measures
                           from being effective. Many potential users go elsewhere when the Library
                           cannot meet these needs.

                           People continue to look to their libraries for reading materials and information.
                           The very definition of library collections, however, has expanded over time.
                           While a well balanced, up to date book collection remains an essential
                           component of every public library, the collection must now include audio and
                           video changing formats; from cassette tapes to CDs and video tapes to DVDs,
   Additional Technology   as well as print material. In many communities, both print and media must
                           also be provided in multiple languages to be responsive to the people they
                           serve. The amount of space needed to house and display these collections has
                           increased.

                           As libraries continue to add new materials to meet demand, older titles are
                           often withdrawn to make room on the shelves. Over time, the loss of this
                           material undercuts the depth and integrity of the collection. Customers whose
                           interest transcend the easily accessible bestsellers or newly published titles are
                           less able to have access to retrospective or less well known titles. This loss is
                           particularly noticeable in communities such as Marin County, in which many
                           residents are intellectually curious and literate. At several County Library
                           facilities, shelving capacity is too low to sustain collections that are large
                           enough to meet community need. Repeatedly, community members reported
                           that they no longer even browse the local collection, but simply request items
                           over the online system to be delivered to their local library. Additional shelving
                           capacity is needed to allow collections to be made viable again.

                           Library service has also taken on a more active teaching and training role.
                           Computer-based library service is universal and while younger customers are
                           more apt to be computer literate, the generations that came of age pre-internet
                           need orientation and training to use this technology and information literacy.
                           This enables users to critically evaluate digital information sources, and is
                           needed especially among the young. Currently, there is only one dedicated
                           space for computer training classes in the system, at the Marin City Library,
                           although such spaces are needed at most facilities.

                           The library as a venue for programming and cultural events reflects another
                           evolving service role for libraries. In many communities, the library is the
                           primary space in which all community members can come together, celebrate
                           their common heritage and their cultural diversity. Displays, exhibits, musical
                           and dance performances and many other events draw the community together
                           and give it identity. Space is essential to support these activities. In addition,
                           service to all ages and abilities – young and old, able-bodied and those with
                           physical disabilities – means the facilities need to be universally accessible
                           and easy to use to meet the library’s goals of serving all people.

                           The recommendations that follow outline spaces needed by the County
                           Library to meet the needs of the current population as well as to serve future


                           22           Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations
                                                                                      RECOMMENDATIONS
generations of residents. They will enable the Library to restore service levels
that truly meet community needs.

The space needs have been developed in the context of library industry
planning guidelines that provide a framework for establishing recommended
collection sizes, seating capacity, numbers of computers and total square
footage based on their relationship to the population served. These guidelines
evolved over time and reflect the experience of library facilities considered
to provide exemplary public service. They have been modified to factor in
recent societal trends and service of communities, as well as provide balance      More books and other library
                                                                                   materials for all ages, levels; both
between communities with rapidly growing populations and those whose
                                                                                       learning and enrichment
populations will remain stable well into the future.

The recommendations take into account the way that the County Library
incorporates electronic technology into its services and assume that this
will continue to be a major factor in library service. The recommendations
also factor in community input and current usage trends, the MARINet
cooperative environment, the need for efficient staffing patterns and best
use of available resources and the incorporation of emerging library service
delivery methods.


Guiding Policies

The following general policies form the basic framework and were carefully
considered in developing the library improvement options:

THE LIBRARY SHOULD:

1. Provide library services for all

The library has a responsibility to provide library services to all residents,
including all geographical areas and all ages. The planning for facilities needs
to factor in the geographic remoteness and the smaller communities in West
Marin. It also recognizes that there needs to be space and services for all
ages - from children to teens, adults and seniors. Lastly, service and space
recommendations should recognize the changes in library services, provide
for 21st century services, and retain the flexibility to change in response to
evolving needs.


2. Plan for future flexibility

Service and space recommendations should recognize the changes in library
services and provide 21st century services and retain the flexibility to change
to meet evolving needs.




Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations           23
RECOMMENDATIONS
                                 3. Build upon current strengths

                                 The network of existing branches and of the local branches and larger, full
                                 service regional branches, work well within Marin County Free Library. This
                                 network and number of branches is sustainable and improvements should be
                                 made within this existing network. Also, the fast, efficient delivery of materials
                                 and ease of use of MARINet work wonderfully and should be maintained and
                                 strengthened.

   Additional technology to
accommodate computer training    4. Maximize coordination with other agencies
          and classes
                                 Libraries are excellent partners for a wide variety of community facilities.
                                 Partnerships should be considered for new projects as well as for new and
                                 existing services. MARINet is a service that should be used to leverage library
                                 services throughout the system in ways that make this system available and
                                 more efficient for all residents to use. Coordination with other agencies, such
                                 as schools and universities, Whistleshop Wheels, and other service providers,
                                 should be pursued to better leverage taxpayer dollars.


                                 5. Look at the way we do business

  Kiosk on site for pick-up of   The Library needs to expand the range of services it offers and support the
   materials (books, DVDs)       evolution of how service is provided. This must be done within an operating
                                 budget that will remain at or near its current level for the foreseeable future.
                                 The Library, therefore, needs to take advantage of technologies and efficient
                                 operation techniques that will allow the Library to operate more efficiently and
                                 to maximize staff interaction with users. These strategies may include further
                                 incorporation of self-checkout technologies, the introduction of exterior kiosks
                                 for after-hours check-out of holds, or other new technologies.


                                 6. Create a library system that is sustainable

                                 Library improvements should support efficient operations. They should also
                                 be healthy, utilizing sustainably designed materials and both energy and
                                 operationally efficient. The buildings should be designed to reduce material
                                 handling time, allow staff to efficiently serve the public, and allow library
                                 users to serve themselves whenever possible. To promote efficient library
                                 operations, most libraries are recommended to be single-story buildings, with
                                 the possible exception of the Novato and Corte Madera Libraries.




                                 24           Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations
                                                                                    RECOMMENDATIONS
S U M M A R Y O F R E C C O M E N D AT I O N S

The recommendations for the County’s library facilities over the next 25 years
are:
     Maintain the existing service areas and branches;
     Identify revenues to improve all present libraries by 2020 to meet the
     recommended 2030 service levels, which will allow the Library to provide
     21st century library services at all locations;
                                                                                   Example of Library Expansion
     Expand the use of the bookmobile to include other stops within the County        Option: Civic Center
     and thereby increase the level of local service provided in the most remote
     areas.                                                                        (Relocate public library uses to
                                                                                    Renaissance Center complex)


S E R V I C E A R E A S T R AT E G I E S

Library improvement options are provided for each service area, the process
used to determine these options for each study area had the following steps:
1. Determine the services needed and the square footage required providing
   those services.
2. Analyze the existing locations and alternative locations identified by the
   Library and County or city leaders for needed site capacity for the needed
   expansion and /or analyze alternative locations.
3. As described in the Implementation chapter, costs were then developed
   for the option that was near the higher-cost range of the various options,
   in order to assure adequate funding will be available for whichever option
   is determined to be the preferred option.
4. After funding is attained, the next step will be to work with each
   community to confirm which library improvement option is the preferred
   strategy. Library administration and staff, government leaders, library
   users and support groups should be included in this planning.


DETERMINING THE NEED

A library service area is the approximate geographic area served by an
individual library. It is used to analyze and plan library services to meet
community needs in an equitable manner. Although specific needs will vary
depending upon the characteristics of the service population, it is generally
true that the larger the population to be served, the larger the library need to
be. In simple terms, more potential library users require more materials and
seating, and thus more building square footage is needed. Smaller service
areas, however, are not penalized because service needs are developed on a
per resident basis. Less populous communities, in fact, need somewhat higher
ratios of materials and services to population served to ensure an adequate
level of service. For instance, many users of West Marin libraries have

Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations           25
RECOMMENDATIONS
                                 exhausted everything in the local collections that they care to read. A higher
                                 base collection would allow for a larger rotating collection as well as larger
                                 ‘base’ from people to choose from.


                                 Service Roles – Regional and Community Libraries

                                 The Marin County Free Library is an interconnected network of regional
                                 libraries and community libraries that share resources and work together to
Patron Mapping: Countywide Use   serve the residents of the district. Almost all residents use multiple branches, so
           Patterns              improvements in any part of the system benefit the entire Library. Therefore,
                                 implementation of improvements should be planned so that there is continuity
                                 of services and so that library service is improved uniformly throughout the
                                 County.

                                 All libraries in the system serve the populations in the areas immediately
                                 surrounding them. This community library role is more prominent among
                                 the smaller libraries - Bolinas, Inverness, Marin City, Point Reyes, San
                                 Geronimo, South Novato and Stinson Beach. These facilities are in fact the
                                 prime library service resource for residents with mobility issues, such as
                                 low income families, children and seniors. The lack of convenient public
                                 transportation was mentioned repeatedly, especially in West Marin. The space
                                 needs recommendations, therefore, strive to ensure adequate service levels at
                                 each community library location as well as at the regional libraries.

                                 The community input process and the customer mapping project confirmed
                                 that four libraries serve as Regional Libraries. These facilities – Civic
                                 Center, Corte Madera, Fairfax and Novato – draw visitors from wide areas,
                                 well beyond the local communities in which they are located. They are well
                                 positioned along major transportation routes and offer a wide range of services.
                                 A fifth facility, the Point Reyes Library, plays a quasi-regional role for the West
                                 Marin area. The community’s widespread use of the multiple libraries reflects
                                 the population’s generally high level of mobility. Many residents routinely
                                 commute from their home community to work elsewhere in the County, or
                                 travel to other communities to shop, visit the doctor or take their children to
                                 school, stopping to use a convenient library as well.

                                 The Civic Center and Corte Madera libraries act as stand-alone facilities,
                                 serving primarily the central areas of the County Library service population.
                                 Both of these facilities draw visitors from the entire County, however, based
                                 on their accessibility from Highway 101 and proximity to other government
                                 functions (in the case of Civic Center) and shopping (in the case of Corte
                                 Madera).

                                 The other three libraries are the center of the system’s three remaining regional
                                 networks. The Fairfax Library for the Fairfax/ San Geronimo Valley network,
                                 the Novato Library for the Novato/ South Novato network and the Point
                                 Reyes Library for the West Marin network, which also includes the Bolinas,
                                 Inverness and Stinson Beach Libraries.

                                 26           Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations
                                                                                           RECOMMENDATIONS
Many residents of the Fairfax/San Geronimo Valley and Novato/South Novato
networks use both libraries in their network on an equal basis. In West Marin
many Inverness residents also the Point Reyes facility, while Bolinas and
Stinson Beach residents flow back and forth between those facilities and
frequently use Point Reyes. In these areas, the guidelines were applied both to
individual service areas and to each network as a whole.

Customer mapping also indicated that the current placement of the library
facilities provides all but the most rural residents with convenient access. The
bookmobile serves isolated areas of the population along the northern coast,
in the Dillon Beach and Tomales areas.

The accompanying chart summarizes the recommended Service Level
Guidelines for each branch in the MCFL system:




Marin County Free Library Facilities Recommendations

                            Year Built or Last    Existing      Proposed Square Feet
Library                                                                                 Improvement Options
                             Major Upgrade       Square Feet          (Range)



Regional Libraries

CIVIC CENTER                      1962             12,700      16,090          17,880   Expansion/Relocation
 California Room                  1962            inc. above    5,950          6,610    Expansion/Relocation (with Civic Center)

CORTE MADERA                      1971              9,800      18,250          20,270   Expansion/Relocation

FAIRFAX                           1978              9,000      12,500          13,875   Renovation/Expansion

NOVATO                            1971             10,400      27,375          30,420   Expansion/Relocation


Community Libraries

BOLINAS                           2001              1,074       2,680          2,980    Renovation/Relocation

INVERNESS                         1986              1,246       1,540          1,710    Renovation

MARIN CITY                        1997              4,000       9,375          10,420   Expansion/Relocation

POINT REYES STATION            1997/2007            2,280       5,550          6,170    Renovation/Expansion

SAN GERONIMO VALLEY               1961              1,904       2,990          3,330    Renovation

SOUTH NOVATO                      2004              3,204       7,230          8,040    Renovation/Expansion

STINSON BEACH                     1999              2,400       2,410          2,680    Renovation


Systemwide Support Spaces

Technical Services and IT         2004              2,623       4,500          5,000    Expansion/Relocation

Administration                    1962              2,875       3,750          3,750    Renovation/Expansion

MARINet Offices                   2004               700         700            700     Relocation




Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations            27
RECOMMENDATIONS
                  D E T E R M I N I N G T H E L O C AT I O N


                  Location, Location, Location

                  Library location is a critical consideration for planning. As with any business,
                  a poor location can limit the use of a library, just as a very good location will
                  promote usage. The existing and potential alternative locations were examined
                  to determine potential library improvement strategies, both in terms of location
                  and site capacity. All existing facilities are well-located geographically within
                  the areas they serve. Most have capacity for the additional expansion needed,
                  although some expansions would require underground parking or other non-
                  traditional strategies.

                  The following criteria were used in evaluating existing and potential library
                  locations:

                  A.       Location within the service area
                  The library should be near the population center of the service area. All of
                  the facilities were found to be well-located within their communities. The
                  location should be served by public transportation and have good bicycle and
                  pedestrian access. All sites included in these options are convenient to public
                  transit; many are convenient for pedestrians and bicyclists.

                  B.       Compatible with local regulations and context
                  The library should be compatible with the appropriate county or city General
                  Plan, any specific area plans or special planning studies, and specific local
                  zoning requirements. The library should be compatible with neighboring
                  properties. Some uses, such as parks and community centers, are excellent
                  development partners and may enhance library usage. The library’s impact on
                  traffic and the environment also must be carefully evaluated.

                  C.       Visible to the community
                  To promote use, the location should be easily visible to the community. Most
                  branches are on sites that are visible to the community and passers-by. The
                  Civic Center branch is the exception. Although it is geographically central
                  for residents, its location on the fourth floor of the County Administration
                  Building prevents both visibility and convenience. Users have complained
                  about the difficulty in accessing it, the distance from parking, particularly for
                  those with limited mobility and those with young children, and the limited
                  hours (it must conform to overall building hours).

                  The sites that met the location criteria were also evaluated for their potential
                  for new branches or for accommodating expansion or new construction on
                  the site. The following additional considerations are important for evaluating
                  library sites:



                  28            Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations
                                                                                         RECOMMENDATIONS
D.       Quality of site
Sites with special aesthetic qualities are desirable, and sites with existing
problems that would be prohibitively expensive to mitigate are to be avoided.
Sites that offer opportunities for partnerships with complementary uses are
desirable.

E.       Availability
Sites should be obtainable for a fair price within a reasonable time if not
currently owned by the Library or other public entity.

F.       Site capacity
The site should have enough build-able area for the library building, outdoor
amenities, landscaping, and parking.

In determining the site capacity, several factors come into play:
     Building size — From an operational point of view, facilities under
     25,000 square feet should be a single story to provide the most efficient
     staffing scenario. Facilities larger than 25,000 square feet are often done
     as two story buildings more efficiently than one story facilities. Ideally
     the building area for most libraries, therefore, will equal the building’s
     footprint. If the Corte Madera Library remains on its existing site, it will
     need to expand to a second floor.
     Parking — Parking requirements vary from community to community.
     Generally, they are in the range of one space per 250 to 500 square feet of
     building area. Sites were analyzed according to the zoning codes of the
     jurisdictions with authority over each facility. The size of parking spaces
     varies, with an average of 180 to 200 square feet per space. Area for
     driveways, driving aisles and landscaping will approximately double the
     site area required per parking space to around 400-450 square feet of site
     per parking space
     Landscaping — Most communities require landscaping on at least 15% of
     the site. In practice, a ratio of 20% is more realistic to factor in entry patios
     and courtyards. Retaining sufficient landscaping area for the aesthetic
     appeal was considered in the site evaluations.

Generally speaking, the required site area will be approximately three
times the recommended building area. Much will depend, however, on
local planning requirements and the characteristics of the site. For example,
irregularly-shaped sites need to be larger than rectangular sites due to the less
efficient circulation and layout options they require. Local design guidelines
and smart growth policies, such as shared parking options, may also factor into
the needed site.

In the Facility Summaries section, the library improvement options that were
found to adequately meet the above criteria are outlined. Further evaluation


Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations                 29
RECOMMENDATIONS
                  of these sites will need to be done within each community to determine the
                  preferred site and library improvement option. This evaluation will need to
                  include California Environmental Quality Act review (CEQA) as well as any
                  other locally required studies.

                  The specific library improvement options for each branch are summarized in
                  this section and explained in more detail in the Facility Summaries section.
                  The proposed expansion and remodeling or replacement of existing libraries,
                  combined with new construction where there is not an adequate site, will
                  provide the facilities needed for meeting the library service needs.


                  What’s Next?

                  The same type of planning process that the Marin County Free Library has used
                  in providing the library improvement options should be used in developing the
                  final site determination, planning and design for remodeling and expanding
                  the existing branches and building new facilities. Working closely with each
                  community and with local library users has been invaluable in understanding
                  library needs and developing recommendations that support a strong library
                  system and support local goals.

                  The benefits of such an inclusive approach are:
                       An understanding of specific local needs.
                       The opportunity to adapt the design to local needs.
                       Strengthened local support.
                       Assurance that the library will be an effective part of an interconnected
                       library system.
                       Creation of a vision for a new library that is shared by users, officials, and
                       the Marin County Free Library.
                       Work with local community leaders, developing informal and formal
                       partnerships which strengthen both.




                  30            Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Recommendations
                                                                                           IMPLEMENTATION
IMPLEMENTATION

The Marin County Free Library (MCFL) operates as a Special District
within the County of Marin. As a special district, the Marin County Free
Library does not receive funding from the General Fund as many library
districts do. Instead, it receives a share of the property tax collected in the
County. It also receives funding from special assessment tax measures that
were passed in 1993 and 1994 in three tax zones that together encompass the
District’s boundaries. MCFL owns or leases and operates all of its libraries
and the bookmobile as well as its Administrative headquarters at the County          Regional Libraries (in blue) serve
Administration Building, Technical Services offices at Hamilton in Novato,            a larger range of residents, often
and a Literacy office in Pt. Reyes Station, and funds the operation of library          based on County-wide lifestyle
services as well as maintenance of these facilities out of these funds.
                                                                                      Community Libraries (in yellow)
These revenue sources are sufficient to fund the Library’s operations and
                                                                                       serve a more focused area
general capital maintenance costs, but there is no funding available within
this revenue for the facility upgrades needed to bring MCFL’s libraries into
the 21st century. To serve the continuing and new roles well into the future,
a new, separate capital funding measure is needed. Although the previous
funding measure was passed in three different pieces, a funding strategy that
addresses all the needed capital library improvements in a single measure for
the whole district is preferred. This will allow the Library to implement the
improvements most efficiently, with residents seeing systematic improvements
to all of the libraries they use.
Making the plan easier to implement is the fact that there are many options avail-
able to fulfill the recommended service and facility recommendations. The
cost to implement the plan depends on which improvement option is deter-
mined to be best for each library. We have estimated that if all of the higher
cost improvement options are selected the Vision Plan will cost approximately
$145M in bondable construction related costs. If some lower cost improvement
options are selected the complete plan could be implemented for $135 M or
less. Similarly, technology and furniture costs vary from approximately $9.5M
to $8.5M depending on the improvement options selected. In the following
pages the cost planning methodology is described.



COST PLANNING

A premier library system requires adequate funds to provide the excellent
materials, talented professional staff, convenient hours of operation, and the
facilities that support the Library’s mission. A thorough analysis of the costs
of the Services and Facilities Vision Plan recommendations was prepared in
order to identify the new one-time capital funds necessary to construct the
library building and site improvements and also to confirm that the Library’s
existing on-going funding sources are adequate to continue to operate and
maintain them.



Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Implementation              31
IMPLEMENTATION
                 Plan costs can be broken down into two categories: capital project costs and
                 operating and maintenance costs (which includes both personnel costs and
                 service costs such as new collection materials and technology, utilities, custodial
                 care, and supplies).


                 E S T I M AT I N G C A P I TA L C O S T S F O R F A C I L I T Y I M P R O V E M E N T S

                 Comprehensive costs were estimated. Components of the one-time capital
                 project costs include hard and soft costs, contingencies and escalation.

                 Hard costs include land acquisition where required; demolition; renovation
                 or new construction costs as appropriate to each project, including ADA
                 upgrades where needed; site improvements including parking, landscaping, and
                 hardscaping; site utility allowances; furniture, fixtures and equipment; library
                 shelving, signage and technology infrastructure and equipment.

                 Soft costs include design and engineering, project management and construction
                 management, plan check, inspections, and permits. Soft costs also include
                 community input meetings and public communications as well as utility
                 company grant applications and sustainable design certification and energy
                 efficiency commissioning costs.

                 Contingencies for design and construction and allowances for escalation due
                 to inflation are included as well.


                 C A P I TA L C O S T S E S T I M AT I N G M E T H O D O L O G Y

                 The hard costs estimates were developed by the Master Plan consultants
                 and an estimating specialist who has experience with both construction and
                 renovation of similarly sized branch libraries. Construction costs are based
                 on per square foot costs for building, landscape, and parking appropriate to
                 public buildings of the size and type proposed. Costs are based on a traditional
                 design/bid/build project delivery by a public sector entity. Costs are based on
                 a high level of energy efficiency and sustainable design. The larger regional
                 libraries are recommended to be designed to achieve a silver certified rating as
                 measured by the United State Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy
                 and Environmental Design (LEED) program.

                 Library building construction costs are based on the average of the square feet
                 space ranges shown in the Recomendations chapter and Facilities Summary
                 sections of this plan. For most of the libraries there are several facility
                 improvement options to meet the recommended needs. To plan conservatively
                 the higher cost option was estimated for each library. This ensures that adequate
                 funds will be raised for whichever option is selected as the preferred option by
                 the communities and the Library.




                 32                Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Implementation
                                                                                    IMPLEMENTATION
Furniture budgets are based on square foot costs and are for new items to replace
and augment existing furniture.

Soft costs utilize a budget of 33% of the hard costs, which includes engineering
and design fees, project management, and construction management costs and
a 10% contingency on soft costs.

Temporary facilities will be budgeted for the Regional Libraries where required
to avoid interruption of services. Smaller libraries will be served by adjacent
libraries during interruptions in service during construction.

A construction contingency of 10% for new construction and 15% for
renovations and additions was utilized. Public Art requirements were included
where required. Capital costs are anticipated to rise over the course of building
the projects. Escalation is calculated based on a build-out of all projects over
approximately five years with the first projects starting planning and design in
a target date of late 2008.




Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Implementation             33
IMPLEMENTATION
Projected Costs MCFL Services and Facilities Vision Plan
                                                                                                    BONDABLE COSTS              NON-BONDABLE

Library                                              Improvement Options                           Construction Budget               FF&E

                                                                                                        2007 Dollars              2007 Dollars

BOLINAS                                              Renovation/Relocation                                     $4,662,000                   $180,000

CIVIC CENTER                                         Expansion/Relocation                                    $20,038,000                 $1,485,000

CORTE MADERA                                         Expansion/Relocation                                    $24,904,000                 $1,220,000

FAIRFAX                                              Renovation/Expansion                                    $10,770,000                    $835,000

INVERNESS                                            Renovation                                                 $148,000                     $50,000

MARIN CITY                                           Expansion/Relocation                                      $9,299,000                   $627,000

NOVATO                                               Expansion/Relocation                                    $31,104,000                 $1,901,000

POINT REYES STATION                                  Renovation/Expansion                                      $2,085,000                   $292,000

SAN GERONIMO VALLEY                                  Renovation                                                $1,736,000                   $121,000

SOUTH NOVATO                                         Renovation/Expansion                                      $2,490,000                   $453,000

STINSON BEACH                                        Renovation                                                 $327,000                    $110,000

Technical Services                                   Expansion/Relocation                                      $2,039,000                   $378,000

Admin                                                Renovation/Expansion                                       $715,000                    $238,000

Temporary Facilities                                                                                           $5,000,000

Sub Total                                                                                                   $115,317,000                 $7,890,000

Escalation based on 5+ year build out                                                                        $29,560,000                 $1,425,000

Total Costs Vision Plan projects                                                                           $144,877,000                 $9,315,000


Notes:
See Recommendations section of this report for description of Improvement Options
Cost figures for each branch were estimated to cover any of the improvement Options listed
Bolinas bondable cost includes possible land purchase



                                                            The above cost table is based on providing the flexibility to select any of the
                                                            listed improvement options. Depending on which improvement options are
                                                            chosen the total bondable costs could be as low as $135 M or less and non-
                                                            bondable costs of $8.5M or less.




                                                            34                     Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Implementation
                                                                                        IMPLEMENTATION
O P E R AT I N G T H E L I B R A R I E S

The Library’s operating budget is comprised of 3 parts: Personnel, and Services
(collection, technology, etc.), and Operations/Maintenance.

•         Personnel includes all costs (i.e., salaries and benefits) associated with
          the people part of the organization – the staff needed to provide the
          array of library services offered to the general public.

•         Services include those costs associated with the day-to-day operation
          of the system. Those costs include, but are not limited to, purchases
          for the collection, technology, utilities, custodial care, and supplies.
          Service costs do not include costs associated with the operation and
          maintenance of the facilities or capital renewal costs (other than routine
          cleaning and maintenance).

•         Operations and Maintenance include those costs associated with routine
          capital work needed to maintain the facilities. This budget includes
          building repairs and minor upgrades, but will not cover the capital
          renewal and facility upgrades recommended by this Vision.

The operating costs associated with the implementation of the recommended
improvements has been analyzed by Library Administration, which has confirmed
that the library could operate all of their expanded facilities within its existing
budget (including projected budget growth factors). For the implementation of
the Master Plan projects, a phased approach to construction is planned that will
allow the library to administer and manage the projects appropriately.
With the library renovations and upgrades, a comprehensive approach will
be undertaken to emphasize design solutions that will lower maintenance
and repair costs by ensuring energy conservation, employing sustainable
building materials and encouraging use of renewable energy.

Many options are included in the planning to reduce energy consumption.
For example, aging mechanical equipment and lighting can be replaced
with more energy efficient models and drafty building windows can
be replaced with dual-paned, weather-tight windows with a protective
coating to reduce unwanted solar heat gain. To promote sustainability,
recycled building products or those made from renewable resources can
be employed. Durable construction materials can be utilized to reduce
life-cycle replacement and maintenance costs. Where possible, renewable
solar power technology can be incorporated as well.

The Library is committed to increased efficiency in both the design of new
facilities as well as when retrofitting existing facilities. This includes new service
models such as self-service/self-check machines; multiple material return slots
for rough sorting of returns; and streamlined materials handling. Self-check
out by patrons at ATM style machines can predictably handle over 75% of all

Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Implementation                 35
IMPLEMENTATION
                 check-outs. Multiple return bins can simplify check-in and reshelving. MCFL
                 has implemented a number of these models already; with self-check at many
                 locations and the MARINet system for reserving holds online, etc.


                 M O D E L S O F C A P I TA L F U N D I N G

                 Capital funds are not available within the existing funding resources for the
                 facility improvements recommended by this Vision Report; new funding sources
                 are needed. Over the years, libraries have used several sources for capital
                 improvement funding. The libraries built since the creation of the Marin County
                 Free Library in 1927 have used several sources for capital project funding to
                 build projects, including previous County Library Property taxes, local bonds,
                 and redevelopment funds or agreements. For example, a local bond was used
                 to construct the Corte Madera Library, and the Marin City Library was acquired
                 through a redevelopment agency project. The scope of work that needs to be
                 done to renew and expand is too great to be done through the Library’s current
                 funding measure. Alternative strategies for capital funding are needed.

                 C A P I TA L F U N D I N G S T R AT E G I E S

                 Funding for the recommended library projects can come from many sources. We
                 have found that for many successful projects the funding typically does come
                 from multiple sources. A partnership approach recognizes that good libraries
                 and a strong library system benefits many groups within a service area, and
                 reduces the burden to all parties. Among the funding alternatives that should
                 be considered are the following.

                 A. Property Tax Based Funding Sources
                    Most tax-based funding requires approval of those who would be called
                    upon to pay the tax. Tax measures can be local for only the immediate
                    jurisdiction in which the library is proposed; they can be for a district,
                    presumably the service area of the library; or countywide. The measures
                    can be used in combination. For example, the existing parcel tax
                    supports operations; an alternative method may be used to support new
                    construction.

                      GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS
                      Since the passage of Proposition 46 on the 1986 ballot, municipalities
                      have been able to issue general obligation bonds to acquire, construct or
                      improve real property. General obligation bonds are the most efficient
                      form of long-term debt financing because they require neither a reserve
                      fund nor funded interest (i.e. capitalized interest) during construction or
                      acquisition of the project. Therefore, general obligation bonds are smaller
                      in size and annual total debt is correspondingly lower than any other form
                      of long term debt financing. The major challenge of a general obligation
                      bond is the required two-thirds majority voter approval.



                 36                Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Implementation
                                                                                   IMPLEMENTATION
    MELLO ROOS
    The Mello-Roos Community Facilities Act was passed by California in
    the 1980s and allows for a special tax to finance authorized community
    facilities and services. Mello-Roos Districts tend to encompass large
    development projects but can cover whole cities and counties. They
    require a two-thirds voter approval of all residents or, if small in number,
    a vote of all landowners.

    Other types of parcel tax funding, such as a benefits assessment or a
    special purpose parcel tax, may be available. Typically these would also
    require a two-thirds approval by voters for passage.

B. Grant Funding Sources
   Federal and state grants are available from time to time. In 2000, California
   voters approved Proposition 14 which committed $350 million to match
   local funds (a 35% local match is required) for library construction. While
   all of the money from Prop. 14 has been allocated, a new, larger library
   construction bond measure was introduced in the State legislature in 2007.
   If this bond measure moves forward and is approved by voters, and if the
   new bond measure application requirements are similar to the 2000 state
   library bond measure, the application process will require a substantial
   commitment of time, resources and money. The last State funding measure
   required preparation of a needs assessment, a plan of service, a building
   program, a feasibility study of any building to be renovated or expanded,
   a geotechnical investigation and report, a complete conceptual site and
   building design, review and approval of California Environmental Quality
   Act, and other studies and documentation. That state bond act provided
   for 65% of allowable project costs with a 35% local match requirement.

C. Private Donation Funding Sources
   Libraries have been the center of many successful private fundraising
   campaigns. Because libraries have such a large impact on the residents
   and communities that they serve and because of their high visibility,
   they offer an attractive focus for fund raising campaigns. Friends of the
   Library groups and library foundations are good leaders or partners in
   fundraising.

    The Library’s Strategic Vision Workshop included members of the
    Library’s Foundation, and Friends organizations, as well as business
    leaders from throughout the County. These leaders acknowledged that
    libraries play a role in economic development as anchors to shopping
    areas, partner in community and cultural events, and pride, and community
    gathering centers.

    The Marin County Free Library has a Marin County Library Foundation
    which has begun a fund development program in order to look at
    opportunities for private fundraising.



Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Implementation            37
IMPLEMENTATION
                 D. Sales Tax Funding Sources
                    A special purpose sales tax could be levied on top of the existing sales tax
                    to pay for library operations and construction. Special purpose sales taxes
                    require a two-thirds majority vote of the residents. However, a sales tax
                    measure would be required to be a County-wide measure, which does not
                    align with the Marin County Free Library’s jurisdiction. Past analysis
                    has indicated that, while some other library jurisdictions may be open to
                    a sales tax measure, there is not enough uniformity of opinion throughout
                    the county for such a measure to work.


                 BUILDING IMPROVED LIBRARIES


                 The specific timing for construction of improved and new libraries is unknown,
                 but cost planning has assumed and budgeted for capital costs and cost rises
                 for implementation beginning in 2009 and lasting approximately five years for
                 implementation of all projects.

                 Phased improvements will schedule work that encourages effective oversight
                 by staff and community participation in the design process. The project
                 schedule includes a time contingency for unforeseen modifications in project
                 schedules, such as delays in land acquisitions or accelerations resulting from
                 partnership opportunities. Library and County staff will manage bond or other
                 revenue funds with input from a Citizens Oversight Committee so there is
                 public input into the implementation of the improvement program.

                 This Vision Plan includes flexibility to permit the Library and/or communities to
                 take advantage of development opportunities that allow the Library to leverage
                 funds or partnerships with other County, non-profit, or other developments that
                 may arise in the future.

                 Phasing should permit continuous library service to the community in each part
                 of the County so that geographically there are no major gaps in service. For each
                 facility that is required to close for improvements, a new or improved facility
                 will open to allow the Library to maintain service to patrons. For regional
                 libraries that require closing for improvements, temporary library facilities
                 will be provided.




                 38              Marin County Free Library Facilities Master Plan – Implementation
                                                                                       FACILITY SUMMARIES
INTRODUCTION                                                                                          KEY
The Facility Summaries section summarizes specific needs and
recommendations for communities and facilities within the Marin County
Free Library system. The format follows the planning process, with the first
page documenting community characteristics and needs; the current condition
of the facility, and the Service Recommendations for the community. The
second page outlines the Library Improvement Options as well as Next Steps.
Existing Customer Use maps for the specific Library are included on the
second page.

NEEDS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
The Neighborhood Needs section outline who is using the specific Library,
including important demographic characteristics, and what their needs are
as found through the Needs Assessment and community participation effort.
Similarly, the Existing Facility section outlines the building and functional
deficiencies based on site visits by the consultant team and interviews with
the branch supervisor and other library staff.

The Recommendation chart and text outlines the existing service levels as
well as the range of services and square footage recommended for the service
area.

FACILITY RECOMMENDATIONS
The Library Improvement Options section describes the physical strategy
options that were identified that would allow the Library to meet the Service
and Facility needs outlined in the Recommendations. These options were
identified through coordination with the Library, Marin County Real Estate
and municipal planning departments. Multiple options are identified for
each facility; the Library will work with each community and the County
to determine the preferred library improvement strategy and implement the
projects.

Library Name and
Type
                                                                                             Library Improvement
Community                                                                                    Options Description
Information
                                                                                             Next Steps
Existing Facility
Summary                                                                                      Mapping and
                                                                                             Description of Existing
                                                                                             Library Users

Service and Square Footage
Recommendations




Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   39
CIVIC CENTER
REGIONAL LIBRARY
                       1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES

                            The Civic Center Library serves two main groups – the local surrounding
                            community, including the Santa Venetia neighborhood and other nearby
                            unincorporated areas, and those who work at the County Administration
                            complex. In addition, groups with special learning needs often utilize this
                            facility. The Ann T. Kent California Room, with historic documents related
                            to California, Marin County, and the Frank Lloyd Wright complex, serves
                            a unique countywide role for both archives and research.

                            The profile of area users is fairly typical of Marin County Free Library’s
Civic Center Library        users, with a broad range of ages and incomes in the community, a fairly
                            well educated population, with over 90% with high school degrees and
                            half of people completing higher education, and just over 20% of residents
                            who speak languages other than English (Spanish as well Indo-European
                            languages). The area is expected to have moderate population growth over
                            the next decades.

                       2. EXISTING FACILITY – LIMITED FLEXIBILITY AND SERVICE

                            The Civic Center Library is located in the historic Marin County Civic
                            Center designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and completed in 1962. While its
                            location makes the library a destination for some users, there are three major
                            facility issues that hamper public use. The first is its location on the fourth
                            floor, which places it out of the visible view in the community and makes
                            it difficult to find. The distance from parking to the library is a complaint
                            by many users, especially those with mobility issues, young children, or
                            limited time.

                            The historic nature of the building and the accompanying building
                            restrictions means there is a huge lack of flexibility in the facility. The
                            space cannot be reconfigured due to historic building restrictions, and cannot
                            get much-needed acoustical separation between spaces. Adding wiring for
                            lighting or data or attaining environmental controls for preservation of
                            archival documents for the historic collections is extremely difficult and
                            prohibitively expensive within the current structure and historic building.

                            The other restriction the library faces in this location is the lack of expansion
                            space.

                             Components                     Existing              Recommended
                               Collection                89,360 vol.             94-105,000 vol.
                                Seating                   83 seats                105-120 seats
                              Computers                 19 computers             34-38 computers
                              Storytelling                0 spaces               in program room
                            Program Room                   0 seats                    70-80 seats
                             Group Study                   0 seats                  16-18 seats
                             Building Size                12,700 SF             16,090-17,880 SF


                       40     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
3. RECOMMENDATIONS
    This facility has not been significantly renewed or altered since the 1960’s
    when it was constructed. It is in need of major improvements and increases
    in all areas of service, with many services, such as seating and computers,
    needing to be doubled. Program space and group study space are also highly
    needed in this area.
4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
Among the library improvement options are:
  Expansion of library at a new building near the Civic Center lagoon area
  as part of the Renaissance Partnerships’ proposed development. This
  expansion could include the history area or just the general public library
  functions;
  Expand within the Civic Center to the extent possible, even though this will
  not allow for recommended expansion size;
                                                                                       Civic Center Library Floor Plan
  Expand at an alternative site.
5. NEXT STEPS
    Determine preferred site and expansion option.

  Customer Use Mapping
  Purple dots represent users of Civic
  Center Library

      Civic Center serves eastern
      Marin County and beyond

      One of four regional libraries
      in MCFL Library system (with
      Novato, Corte Madera, and
      Fairfax)




Existing Library                              Customer Mapping of Civic Center


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   41
CORTE MADERA
REGIONAL LIBRARY       1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES
                            The Corte Madera Library is the second busiest library in the MCFL system,
                            and serves residents of Corte Madera and the whole county, especially north
                            and south along the 101 corridor.
                            This area is typical of much of Marin County, with a highly educated
                            clientele, with a 96% high school graduation rate, and a high median income.
                            It is not anticipating significant population growth in the next decades.
                            In addition to being a very busy library for general use, the library supports a
                            number of tutoring groups that use the program room; unfortunately conflicts
Corte Madera Library        arise when programs occur in the room and the tutors must leave.

                       2. EXISTING FACILITY
                            The location of the Corte Madera Library is central within the service area;
                            its close proximity to Highway 101 also makes it convenient for users
                            throughout the county. While the site is well-located, any expansion would
                            need to address the need for additional parking.
                            The existing building has excellent day-lighting integrated throughout
                            the building, acoustic separation between children and adult uses, and
                            comfortable seating alcoves all of which are appreciated by the users.
                            The existing facility has a number of significant problems, and much of
                            its infrastructure, including mechanical, electrical, lighting, and exterior
                            envelope, has outlived its useful life. Inadequate drainage of the soil around
                            and under the building is causing a number of significant building problems;
                            it affects operability and waterproofing of windows, doors, interior movable
                            partitions, and plaster finishes. In addition, there are significant ADA
                            deficiencies, including the site grading to the entrance, the storytelling
                            area in the children’s area, and at the restrooms.

                       3. RECOMMENDATIONS
                            There is simply not enough room to support the number of users currently
                            using the library, or the materials and services they demand. This will only
                            grow worse over time. Therefore, the library services are recommended to
                            be significantly increased in all areas.



                             Components                     Existing                 Recommended
                               Collection                83,000 vol.                96-107,500 vol
                                Seating                   77 seats                   129-143 seats
                              Computers                 20 computers               40-45 computers
                              Storytelling            in children’s room            30-35 spaces
                            Program Room                   36 seats                  70-85 seats
                             Group Study                    0 seats                  22-24 seats
                             Building Size                 9,800 SF               18,250-20,270 SF


                       42     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
    In addition to significant increases in books and other materials, computers,
    and seating, dedicated program space and group study space are also highly
    needed in this area. Technology should also be provided so that some
    computers can be in a glass enclosed training space.
    Increase seating capacity to provide more table, lounge, and group study
    seating throughout the facility, including for children, tutoring, student
    groups, adults, teens, and laptop users.

4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
Among the library improvement options are:
    Expand the existing facility, either by renovation and addition or new
    construction;
    Expand the existing facility at an alternative location.

5. NEXT STEPS
                                                                                       Corte Madera Library Floor Plan
    Determine preferred site and expansion option.

  Customer Use Mapping
  Brown dots represent users of Corte
  Madera Library

      Corte Madera serves
      residents of Town of Corte
      Madera as well as residents
      north and south along the
      Highway 101 corridor.

      Functions as a regional
      library serving a large
      geography of residents




Existing Library                              Cusomter Mapping of Corte Madera


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   43
 FAIRFAX           Aax
REGIONAL LIBRARY
                         1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES

                              The Fairfax Library serves both the Fairfax community as well as areas
                              along the Sir Francis Drake Boulevard; it is also one of the closest libraries
                              for the more rural areas of West Marin, including San Geronimo Valley,
                              Forest Knolls and Woodacre.

                              The profile of area users is fairly typical of Marin County Free Library’s
                              users, with a broad range of ages and incomes in the community, although
                              with less children under 18 than areas like Novato, and a fairly well
                              educated population—with over 95% attaining high school graduation. It
Fairfax Library
                              is not anticipating significant population growth in the next decades.

                              In addition to being a very busy library for general use, the library supports a
                              number of tutoring groups that use the program room; unfortunately conflicts
                              arise when programs occur in the room and the tutors must leave.

                              Residents see the library as an important gathering place in the community;
                              however, the building has few areas that support this important social
                              purpose. The seating is extremely limited, and there are few opportunities
                              for differentiation of different activities or for acoustic separation.

                         2. EXISTING FACILITY – AGING WELL BUT IN NEED OF RENEWAL

                              The Fairfax Library is a pleasant building with opportunities for indoor
                              and outdoor connections and which fits its park-like setting well. The site
                              is well located and was built with a potential expansion of facilities on the
                              site.

                              While the building is aging well, many components are nearing the end
                              of their useful service life and need renewal. In addition, there are several
                              ADA accessibility problems with the building, including the restroom and
                              the entry ramps to the building, which need to be corrected.

                              There are no well-defined areas for children or teens in the building; the
                              only ‘children’s area’ is an ill-defined room that houses a portion of the
                              children’s collection and one table.



                               Components                     Existing              Recommended
                                 Collection                74,201 vol.              76-85,000 vol
                                  Seating                   59 seats                 72-80 seats
                                Computers                 14 computers             22-30 computers
                                Storytelling            in program room            in program room
                              Program Room                 30-40 seats                70-80 seats
                               Group Study                   0 seats                  16-18 seats
                               Building Size                 9,000 SF             12,500-13,900 SF


                         44     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                         FACILITY SUMMARIES
3. RECOMMENDATIONS
    While this facility does not have as drastic need for more space as other
    facilities, it does need additional space to accommodate needed increases
    in services, including seating of all kinds, group study areas for tutoring
    and small group work, and a dedicated program room.
    This facility has not been significantly renewed or altered since it was
    constructed in the late 1970’s, except for replacement of the heating system,
    and a major renovation to renew other systems (electrical, plumbing) is
    recommended.

4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
Among the library improvement options are:
  Expansion of library at existing site, including a major renovation of existing
  space and addition of new square footage;
  Expand at an alternative site.
                                                                                       Fairfax Library Floor Plan
5. NEXT STEPS
    Determine preferred option.
  Customer Use Mapping
  Green dots represent users of
  Fairfax Library

      Serves Fairfax, surrounding
      communities, and West
      Marin

      One of four regional libraries
      in MCFL Library system (with
      Novato, Corte Madera, and
      Civic Center)




Existing Library                              C


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   45
NOVATO
REGIONAL LIBRARY
                   1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES
                        The Novato Library is the busiest library in the MCFL system in all regards,
                        and also serves the largest population within its direct service area. The
                        area has experienced a large population growth since the construction of
                        the Novato Library; although the South Novato Library was introduced to
                        help serve this population, both facilities are too small to serve the current
                        population let alone the anticipated growth. The population served by the
                        Novato and South Novato libraries are anticipated to grow by another 28%
                        over the next decades.
                        The profile of Novato has a younger population, higher percentage of families,
Novato Library          and more moderate incomes than the rest of the county. Approximately a
                        fifth of the population are English language learners in Novato, similar to
                        the Civic Center Library’s demographics.
                   2. EXISTING FACILITY – AGING WELL BUT IN NEED OF RENEWAL
                        The Novato Library has not changed significantly since its construction in
                        the 1970’s, despite the significant increase in population in the area. The
                        facility is strained under the large number of users – Novato and South
                        Novato service area residents make up almost half of the MCFL’s service
                        population, and yet it is only slightly larger than the other regional libraries
                        that serve significantly fewer people.
                        The building has generally aged well; however many components will be
                        nearing the end of their useful service life and need renewal. In addition,
                        there are several ADA accessibility problems with the building, including
                        within the courtyard and in the restrooms.
                        While the library has tried to increase services within the same amount
                        of space, the building does not have the flexibility in its infrastructure
                        to accommodate these changes. The result is poor electrical and HVAC
                        distribution, and noise conflicts due to lack of space for proper acoustic
                        separation.
                        The site is well-located and generally has enough parking to meet existing
                        needs. However, some customers have expressed difficulties finding parking
                        at busy times.

                   3. RECOMMENDATIONS
                        While the facility has been well-maintained and is in adequate condition, it
                        is much too small to meet the needs of the community. Novato needs almost
                         Components                     Existing              Recommended
                           Collection                97,744 vol.            155-172,750 vol.
                             Seating                  57 seats               201-223 seats
                          Computers                 25 computers               45-50 comp.
                          Storytelling            in children’s area          45-50 spaces
                        Program Room                   51 seats               135-150 seats
                         Group Study                    0 seats                22-24 seats
                         Building Size                10,400 SF             27,375-30,400 SF


                   46     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
    two times as much services to serve its population than it currently has.
    Given the size of the building needed to meet the service needs, it is
    recommended that it be a two-story facility.

4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
Among the library improvement options:
  Expansion of library at existing site, either through a major renovation
  of existing space and addition of new square footage or through all new
  construction. Addition to the existing building would likely require partial
  demolition of some of the building. Either option would require underground
  parking to accommodate the required parking on-site.
    Expand at the City’s downtown site near the Community House structure
    owned by the City of Novato. This option would likely require underground
    parking to accommodate the required parking on-site.
    Expand at an alternative site
                                                                                       Novato Library Floor Plan
5. NEXT STEPS
    Determine preferred site and expansion option.
  Customer Use Mapping
  Light blue dots represent users of
  Novato Library

      Serves residents throughout
      Novato as well as areas to
      the south

      One of four regional libraries
      in MCFL Library system (with
      Corte Madera, Fairfax, and
      Civic Center)




Existing Library                              Customer Mapping of Novato


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   47
BOLINAS
COMMUNITY LIBRARY
                    1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES

                         The Bolinas Library forms a network with the Point Reyes, Stinson Beach,
                         and Inverness Libraries that serves the largely rural population living in West
                         Marin. The residents of West Marin include a high percentage of highly-
                         educated, creative, literate, intellectually curious individuals, including
                         those who work for themselves as writers, artists, and artisans. It has a
                         high level of education attainment, with over 90% graduating from high
                         school. Approximately 15% of residents are English language learners in
                         Bolinas, which includes Spanish and Indo-European languages.
Bolinas Library          Bolinas is one of the more remote communities in Marin, although it is
                         within close proximity to Stinson Beach. It is not anticipating significant
                         population growth in the next decades.

                    2. EXISTING FACILITY – TOO SMALL TO ADEQUATELY SERVE THE
                       COMMUNITY

                         The Bolinas Library is a tenant of and is co-located with the Bolinas
                         Community Center. The facility was recently renovated, but the facility is
                         much too small to accommodate the services this area demands.

                         The location has the highest circulation per staff member per open hour.
                         Finding an open seat or computer at the library is difficult due to heavy
                         demand and the small size of the facility. Regular users complain that they
                         have read through most of the library’s collection.

                         The site is well-located within the community, but has no dedicated parking
                         available to customers, and there is limited street parking available. Given
                         the limited availability of parking within downtown Bolinas, this presents
                         a problem for those unable to access the library without driving.

                    3. RECOMMENDATIONS

                         While the facility was recently renovated, it is too small to meet community
                         demands. The current site does not have room for the size of library that is
                         needed. The facility is recommended to at least double to allow for increased
                         collection, technology access, and seating.


                          Components                     Existing              Recommended
                            Collection                10,012 vol.              11-12,500 vol.
                             Seating                   16 seats                 29-32 seats
                           Computers                 5 computers                7-8 computers
                           Storytelling                0 spaces               in children’s area
                         Program Room                   0 seats                  18-20 seats
                          Group Study                   0 seats                    4 seats
                          Building Size                 1,074 SF               2,680-2,980 SF


                    48     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
    The operational structure of the facility is recommended to be similar to
    Stinson Beach. This building incorporates acoustic separation between the
    children and adult uses and also allows the adult seating area to double
    as a program room, providing flexibility even within the relatively small
    building.

4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
Among the library improvement options are:

    Expansion of the library at an alternative site. No available sites have been
    identified.

    If an available site cannot be found for an expanded Bolinas Library, the
    current facility should include upgrades to allow the Library to provide
    better service out of the existing space.                                          Bolinas Library Floor Plan

5. NEXT STEPS
    Find and acquire site appropriate for a library facility.

  Customer Use Mapping
  Dark Blue dots represent users of
  Bolinas Library

      Serves    Bolinas              and
      surrounding area

      Nearest regional libraries are
      Fairfax and Corte Madera




Existing Library                              Customer Mapping of Bolinas


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   49
INVERNESS
COMMUNITY LIBRARY
                    1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES

                         The Inverness Library forms a network with the Point Reyes, Bolinas, and
                         Stinson Beach Libraries that serves the largely rural population living in
                         West Marin. The profile of Inverness users includes both full-time residents
                         as well as part-time residents who live in other areas of the Bay Area and
                         come to Inverness residences mostly for weekends. There are also a number
                         of Bed and Breakfasts and leased vacation houses in the area; the library
                         serves both vacation visitors, making Saturday hours popular, and full time
                         residents.
Inverness Library        The residents of West Marin include a high percentage of highly-educated,
                         creative, literate, intellectually curious individuals. The area has an almost
                         100% high school graduation rate, and two-thirds of residents have post-
                         secondary degrees. The area also has a high English-speaking rate, with
                         less than 5% English-language learners. It is not anticipating significant
                         population growth in the next decades.

                    2. EXISTING FACILITY

                         The Inverness Library is housed on the first floor of the historic Jack Mason
                         house; the library leases this space from the Inverness Foundation. It also
                         has use of a shared program room on the first floor, while the second floor
                         of the building houses storage for the Inverness Historical Museum. The
                         building sits among beautiful gardens on the site that include a deck with
                         some outdoor seating areas that are well-used in the summer when the
                         library use is generally higher due to seasonal travel within the area.

                         The library is undergoing an upgrade for ADA accessibility. This requires
                         the library to thin the collection to increase aisle space. The facility is an
                         historic house owned by the Inverness Foundation, and it is highly unlikely
                         that additional space could be acquired at the site. Customer mapping for
                         Inverness showed that residents utilize both the Inverness and Pt. Reyes
                         Station Libraries for their services, likely due to these limitations as well
                         as the two facilities’ complementary hours.




                          Components                     Existing              Recommended
                            Collection                 7,374 vol.             6.750-7,500 vol.
                             Seating                    15 seats                 18-20 seats
                           Computers                  4 computers                4 computers
                           Storytelling            in children’s area         in children’s area
                         Program Room              20 seats (shared)          20 seats (shared)
                          Group Study                    0 seats                    0 seats
                          Building Size                 1,246 SF               1,540-1,710 SF


                    50     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
3. RECOMMENDATIONS
    A slight expansion of some services is recommended for Inverness, including
    more seating and a slight expansion of the collection. However, the facility
    is not able to expand to meet these needs. While the facility is smaller than
    needed, the community has a great sense of dedication to the facility, even
    though they are aware of its limitations.

4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
Among the library improvement options are:
    This library is in need of only minor upgrades to improve service to
    customers.

5. NEXT STEPS                                                                          Inverness Library Floor Plan

    Plan and implement improvements.




  Customer Use Mapping
  Pink Dots represent users of
  Inverness Library

      Serves Inverness and parts of
      the surrounding area

      Nearest regional libraries
      are Novato and Fairfax




Existing Library                              Customer Mapping of Inverness


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   51
MARIN CITY
COMMUNITY LIBRARY
                     1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES
                          The Marin City Library serves the area of Marin City and unincorporated
                          southern Marin County, including residents of the houseboats along
                          Richardson Bay.
                          The residents of the Marin City service area have a high rate of educational
                          attainment, with over 97% of residents achieving high school graduation.
                          Approximately 13% of residents are English language learners, which
                          includes Spanish and Indo-European languages.

                          The area is more diverse than the rest of the MCFL service area, with 80%
Marin City Library
                          Caucasian, almost 10% African-American, and over 5% Asian residents,
                          and 5% mixed ethnicity. The percentage of children is similar to Novato,
                          while young adults make up a higher percentage in this area than seniors.
                          The area is expected to have low to moderate population growth over the
                          next decades.

                     2. EXISTING FACILITY
                          The Marin City Library occupies approximately 4,000 square feet in the
                          Gateway Mall, a ten-year old commercial complex in central Marin City
                          developed as part of a redevelopment project. The library is well-located
                          within the service area and is near schools, community services and public
                          transportation.
                          While the location is central to the service area, the building itself has
                          experienced facility damage, with defective building envelope construction
                          causing significant damage to the windows and the interior walls adjacent
                          to these windows.
                          The library provides a high level of technology at this branch, but it is still
                          not enough. Indeed, the library is much too small for the community it
                          serves in all regards. Additional seats, collection, technology and program
                          space are all needed.

                     3. RECOMMENDATIONS
                          The Marin City Library is recommended to significantly increase in size
                          to allow all services to grow drastically. The collection is recommended to


                           Components                     Existing              Recommended
                             Collection                20,974 vol.              39-43,500 vol.
                              Seating                   35 seats                 72-80 seats
                            Computers                 18 computers               32-36 comp.
                            Storytelling            in children’s area         in program room
                          Program Room                   0 seats                  45-50 seats
                           Group Study                   0 seats                  11-12 seats
                           Building Size                 4,000 SF              9,378-10,420 SF


                     52     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
    increase significantly; the seating should increase to include more seating
    throughout, a dedicated teen area, group study areas, and program space.

4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
    This facility is relatively new and meets the community needs well with the
    exception of the wall and window damage, which is in need of resolution.
    A slight addition of more display for material browsing and some enclosed
    group study space would add to the library’s function.
Among the library improvement options are:

    Expansion at the current location, either in the current space or in an
    alternative space in the Gateway Mall;
    Expansion at the site of the planned new Manzanita Center;
    Expansion at an alternative site.

5. NEXT STEPS                                                                          Marin City Library Floor Plan

    Determine preferred expansion option.

  Customer Use Mapping
  Peach dots represent users of Marin
  City Branch Library

      Serves residents of Marin
      City and surrounding areas,
      including houseboats and
      parts of Tam Valley

      Nearest regional library is
      Corte Madera




Existing Library                              Customer Mapping of Marin City


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   53
PT. REYES STATION
COMMUNITY LIBRARY
                            1.   NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES
                                 The Point Reyes Station Library forms a network with the Stinson Beach,
                                 Bolinas, and Inverness Libraries that serves the largely rural population
                                 living in West Marin. Residents of West Marin include a high percentage
                                 of highly-educated, creative, literate, intellectually curious individuals,
                                 including those who work for themselves as writers, artists, and artisans.
                                 In addition, Point Reyes includes a significant population of English-
                                 language learners at a quarter of the population; almost a fifth of the
                                 population speaks mainly Spanish, the highest among MCFL service area.
Pt. Reyes Station Library        Indo-European language learners also reside in the community. Income
                                 levels in Point Reyes are more stratified than other areas of the county,
                                 with 45% earning less than $50,000 a year household income and 25%
                                 earning $100,000 or more a year, leaving only a quarter of the population
                                 at the middle income levels. The area is expected to have low to moderate
                                 population growth over the next decades.

                            2. EXISTING FACILITY – A MODEL LIBRARY
                                 The Point Reyes Station Library is currently housed in the Creamery
                                 building, and functions well as part of this multi-use building. The facility
                                 has good natural daylight through skylights, and the interior is welcoming
                                 and comfortable. It serves as a sort of “hub” for West Marin communities,
                                 and has multiple use by those in Inverness and in the surrounding rural
                                 areas.
                                 The library recently acquired an additional 320 square feet of space that
                                 became available in the building, which is being made into a program area.
                                 However, even with this recent acquisition of new space, the facility is
                                 too small to meet demand. Seating and technology are extremely limited,
                                 inadequate acoustic separation between children’s and adult areas, as well
                                 as within the adult area, creates noise conflicts. There is also an active teen
                                 user group, but currently there is no dedicated space for teens.
                                 The site is well-located within the community; however, some customers
                                 have expressed difficulties finding parking at busy times. The configuration
                                 of the parking lot, the demand by library users, and demand from other uses
                                 in the Creamery building affect the parking availability.


                                  Components                     Existing              Recommended
                                    Collection                14,936 vol.              18-20,000 vol.
                                     Seating                  17-23 seats               45-50 seats
                                   Computers                 14 computers             18-20 computers
                                   Storytelling            in children’s area         in program room
                                 Program Room                   0 seats                  27-30 seats
                                  Group Study                   0 seats                   7-8 seats
                                  Building Size                 2,280 SF               5,550-6,170 SF


                            54     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
3. RECOMMENDATIONS
    This facility is relatively new and meets the community needs well.
    Additional space is needed to increase services, especially seating of all
    types and for all ages, technology and collections. Group study space and
    program space is also recommended for this facility.

4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
Among the library improvement options are:
    Expansion at existing site (Creamery Building), as appropriate space
    becomes available;
    Or other options to be determined.

5. NEXT STEPS
    Determine preferred expansion option.                                              Pt. Reyes Station Library
                                                                                       Floor Plan



  Customer Use Mapping
  Dark green dots represent users of
  Pt. Reyes Station

      Serves Pt. Reyes as well as
      surrounding communities in
      West Marin

      Nearest regional libraries
      are Fairfax and Novato




Existing Library                              Customer Mapping of Pt. Reyes Station


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   55
SAN GERONIMO VALLEY
COMMUNITY LIBRARY
                              1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES
                                   The San Geronimo Library forms a network with the Fairfax Library that
                                   serves the largely rural population living in Lagunitas Valley.
                                   The profile of area users is similar to that of Fairfax and the County’s users,
                                   with a broad range of ages and incomes in the community, although with
                                   less children under 18 than areas like Novato, and a fairly well educated
                                   population—with over 95% attaining high school graduation. About 6% of
                                   the population speaks mainly Spanish, while other Indo-European language
                                   learners also reside in the community. It is not anticipating significant
                                   population growth in the next decades.
San Geronimo Valley Library
                              2. EXISTING FACILITY – IN NEED OF MAJOR UPGRADES
                                   The San Geronimo Valley Library is housed in a leased building on the
                                   Lagunitas School District’s campus. Its location adjacent to both elementary
                                   and middle schools, as well as the San Geronimo Valley Community
                                   Center, and on Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, is well-suited for serving the
                                   community. However, the current structure is somewhat hidden from view
                                   and does not have a significant presence along the street.
                                   The building, which used to house two classrooms, was originally
                                   constructed in 1961 and has not undergone a major renovation or upgrade.
                                   It has a number of facility deficits, including an inadequate heating system,
                                   inappropriate insulation in some areas, roofing drainage problems, and
                                   cooling problems in the warmer weather. Several ADA accessibility issues
                                   were also identified in a recent study. Parking is limited near the building,
                                   with additional parking available near the Community Center.

                              3. RECOMMENDATIONS
                                   The facility is in need of an upgrade, and it is also too small to meet
                                   community needs. An expansion of space would allow for more seating,
                                   including parent and child seating, a group study area, more technology
                                   workstations, and an increased collection.
                                   The operational structure of the facility is recommended to be similar to
                                   Stinson Beach. This building incorporates acoustic separation between the
                                   children and adult uses and also allows the adult seating area to double


                                    Components                     Existing              Recommended
                                      Collection                9,952 vol.                 12,500 vol.
                                       Seating                   22 seats                  30-33 seats
                                     Computers                 4 computers                7-8 computers
                                     Storytelling                0 spaces               in program room
                                   Program Room                   0 seats                  36-40 seats
                                    Group Study                   0 seats                  11-12 seats
                                    Building Size                 1,904 SF               2,990-3,330 SF


                              56     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
    as a program space, providing flexibility even within the relatively small
    building.

4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
    The library is located on Lagunitas School District property, and any changes
    to it at this location will be subject to approval and coordination with the
    School District.
Among the library improvement options are:
    Upgrade the current facility, either through an extensive renovation or a
    more moderate upgrade.


5. NEXT STEPS
    Determine preferred renovation option in conjunction with the community
    and the Lagunitas School District.
                                                                                       San Geronimo Valley Library
                                                                                       Floor Plan


  Customer Use Mapping
  Yellow dots represent users of San
  Geronimo Library

      Serves San Geronimo Valley
      residents and nearby area

      Nearest regional library is
      Fairfax




Existing Library                              Customer Mapping of San Geronimo


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   57
SOUTH NOVATO
COMMUNITY LIBRARY
                       1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES
                            The South Novato Library works as a network with the Novato Library
                            to serve Novato and the northern part of Marin County. This area has
                            experienced a large population growth over the last several years, which is
                            anticipated to continue with a 25-30% increase in population anticipated by
                            2030 for the City of Novato. A significant part of this growth has occurred
                            in the south Novato area as a result of the redevelopment of Hamilton
                            Field.
                            The profile of both Novato and South Novato users is slightly different
                            than the rest of Marin County Free Library’s users, with a slightly younger
South Novato Library
                            population, higher percentage of families, and more moderate incomes
                            than the rest of the county. About a quarter of South Novato’s service
                            population are English language learners, one of the highest among MCFL
                            service areas. This area also has the largest Spanish-speaking and Hispanic
                            population, at about 15%. Educational attainment at the high school level
                            is similar to other areas of the county at just over 90%.

                       2. EXISTING FACILITY – FUNCTIONING WELL, BUT IN NEED OF
                          EXPANSION
                            The South Novato Library is one of the system’s newest facilities, and it is
                            functioning well. The biggest issues for the facility are the lack of acoustic
                            separation between the children and adult spaces, partially due to lack of
                            space, a too small teen area, and the lack of programming space. Currently
                            the children’s area is used for programming, further exacerbating acoustic
                            problems.
                            The facility is well-located within the South Novato service area, only a
                            couple of blocks from the community center, along a bus line, and adjacent
                            to the area’s housing, including senior housing.

                       3. RECOMMENDATIONS
                            This facility is relatively new and is functioning well. However, it is too
                            small to meet the community’s needs. An expansion to significantly increase
                            the public services is recommended, to make room for more collection,
                            seating, and computers. Group study areas and a dedicated program space
                            are also needed.

                             Components                     Existing              Recommended
                               Collection                17,204 vol.                36,000 vol
                                Seating                   28 seats                  50-56 seats
                              Computers                11 computers              21-24 computers
                              Storytelling           in children’s’ area         in children’s area
                            Program Room                   0 seats                    45-50 seats
                             Group Study                   0 seats                  11-12 seats
                             Building Size                 3,204 SF               7230-8,040 SF


                       58     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
Library improvement options:
    The Marin County Free Library leases both the South Novato Library and
    the adjacent space which houses the system’s Technical Services Department
    and MARINet offices. One option is to expand the South Novato Library
    into the Technical Services space and possibly the MARINet area, and
    relocate these services elsewhere.
    Or other options to be determined.

5. NEXT STEPS
    Determine preferred expansion option.



                                                                                       South Novato Library Floor
                                                                                       Plan


  Customer Use Mapping
  Orange dots represent users of
  South Novato Library

      Serves residents in Novato as
      well as surrounding areas

      Nearest regional library is
      Novato, with Civic Center
      also nearby




Existing Library                              Customer Mapping of South Novato


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   59
STINSON BEACH
COMMUNITY LIBRARY
                        1. NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES
                             The Stinson Beach Library forms a network with the Point Reyes, Bolinas,
                             and Inverness Libraries that serves the largely rural population living in West
                             Marin. The residents of West Marin include a high percentage of highly-
                             educated, creative, literate, intellectually curious individuals, including
                             those who work for themselves as writers, artists, and artisans.

                             The profile of area users includes both full-time residents as well as part-
                             time residents who live in other areas of the Bay Area and come to Stinson
                             Beach residences. The area has an almost 100% high school graduation
Stinson Beach Library        rate, and two-thirds of residents have post-secondary degrees. The area also
                             has a high English-speaking rate, with only about 5% English-learners. It
                             is not anticipating significant population growth in the next decades.

                        2. EXISTING FACILITY – A MODEL LIBRARY
                             The Stinson Beach Library is housed in a recently renovated building and is
                             serving the community well. The building incorporates acoustic separation
                             between the children and adult uses. The adult seating area can also double
                             as a program room, providing flexibility even within the relatively small
                             building. In fact, this model works well and is recommended for both the
                             Bolinas and San Geronimo Valley as well.

                             While the parking is generally adequate for the Library, the configuration
                             and the parking needs of adjacent uses make it difficult for customers
                             arriving by vehicle to maneuver within the parking lot.

                        3. RECOMMENDATIONS
                             This facility is relatively new and meets the community needs well. If
                             anything were to be added, a slight addition of more display for material
                             browsing and some enclosed group study space would add to the library’s
                             function.

                             Minor modifications to the parking configuration, and potentially
                             coordinating with adjacent land owners, may help to alleviate parking
                             concerns.


                              Components                     Existing              Recommended
                                Collection                12,853 vol.                11,700 vol
                                 Seating                   17 seats                  22-24 seats
                               Computers                  8 computers                8 computers
                               Storytelling            in children’s area         in children’s area
                             Program Room                 18-20 seats                  18-20 seats
                              Group Study                    0 seats                    4 seats
                              Building Size                 2,400 SF               2.400-2,680 SF


                        60     Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries
                                                                                        FACILITY SUMMARIES
4. LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS
Among the library improvement options are:
    This library is in need of only minor upgrades to improve service to
    customers, including to the parking configuration.


5. NEXT STEPS
    Plan and implement improvements.




                                                                                       Stinson Beach Library Floor
                                                                                       Plan



  Customer Use Mapping
  Dark Purple Dots represent users of
  Stinson Beach Library

      Serves Stinson Beach as
      well as surrounding areas in
      southwest Marin, including
      Bolinas and Muir Beach

      Nearest regional library is
      Corte Madera




Existing Library                              Customer Mapping of Stinson Beach


Marin County Free Library Services & Facilities Vision Plan– Facility Summaries   61
G     R    O    U   P     4



A R C H I T E C T U R E


R E S E A R C H               +
P L A N N I N G ,       I N C




211       LINDEN       AVENUE


SO.       SAN   FRANCISCO


C A        9 4 0 8 0    U S A


T :   6 5 0 . 8 7 1 . 0 7 0 9


F:    6 5 0 . 8 7 1 . 7 9 1 1




                                  06359-01

								
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