Irish Studies - Course Handbook 2010-11

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Irish Studies - Course Handbook 2010-11 Powered By Docstoc
					                      IRISH STUDIES
                                 Magee Campus

                               Faculty of Arts
        School of English, History and Politics
School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures
                    School of Performing Arts

COURSE HANDBOOK 2010/11
                       Certificate in Irish Studies
 Certificate of Higher Education in Irish Studies
            Advanced Certificate in Irish Studies
              Advanced Diploma in Irish Studies




               Course Director: Dr Malachy Ó Néill
CONTENTS
Fáilte / Welcome                                                      2
Summary of Courses in Irish Studies                                   3
            Summary of Module Choice
            Educational Aims of Courses in Irish Studies
            Learning Outcomes of Courses in Irish Studies
            Requirements for each of the Awards
Faculty office staff                                                  10
Teaching Staff                                                        12
Organisation of the academic year                                     13
             Semester system
             Modular system
             Delayed choice
             Choosing modules: Rules & Regulations
             Changing modules and courses
Teaching, Learning and assessment of student progress                 15
           Teaching: lectures and seminars
           Forms of assessment
           Notification of absence
           Deadlines and extensions
           Counselling service
           Administration of the courses
           Adviser of Studies
           Staff-student consultative committee
Courses in Irish Studies and Course Diagrams                          19
Modules of Study                                                      25
Assessment of Student Progress                                        31
           Marking
           Passing a module
           Boards of Examiners
           Progress from year to year
           Classification and Awarding of Degrees
           Appeals
           Plagiarism
           Generic Assessment Criteria
Resources                                                             36
Dealing with problems                                                 28
Appendices                                                            31
            The University Portal
            Coursework Submission Sheet
            Record of Plagiarism Offence
            Leave of Absence Policy
            Dates of Attendance / Examinations / Vacations 2010/11
Disclaimer                                                            30

                                          1
Fáilte / Welcome
Congratulations on becoming a student of the University of Ulster! We are delighted to
welcome you to the Faculty of Arts, and more specifically to the School of English, History
and Politics; the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures; and the School of
Performing Arts. Together with our colleagues, we hope that you enjoy the experience of
reading Irish Studies with us, and that the knowledge and skills you will acquire during your
course will not only help you develop your own personal interests, and prepare you well for
future employment, but also make you ready to respond to and participate in the increasingly
complex world of twenty-first-century culture and society.

In the course of your studies, you will be expected to take a number of modules in a variety
of areas of Irish Studies, ranging from history and folklore to language and literature.
Whatever the exact specification of your course, and whatever combination of modules you
take, we shall always expect you to do your key reading, to think critically about what you
have read, to engage in discussions with your tutors and your fellow-students, and to
produce written work for assessment. In return, we shall be offering you expert specialist
teaching in all areas of Irish Studies, a broad range of learning resources, and an
opportunity to build your own course from the numerous optional modules available. But
most importantly, we shall be encouraging you to develop as a person – to explore the rich
heritage of Irish culture, and to rise up to the intellectual challenges that it creates. It will be a
journey which will be exciting and stimulating, both intellectually and emotionally; it will not
always be easy, and it will require hard work and dedication, but it will bring you a great deal
of satisfaction, and it will benefit you in the future. Together with our colleagues, we will be
there for you throughout, offering help and advice to the best of our ability; we all hope to
see you, later in the year, leaving the University not only with a parchment confirming the
award of your new academic qualification, but also with memories of a happy and
intellectually stimulating time which you have had with us – indeed, we would like you to
become ambassadors of the University in your own communities back at home, and take
your knowledge of Ireland and Irish culture with you to share with your family and friends.

This handbook will give you a brief but comprehensive introduction to Irish Studies at the
University of Ulster, Magee campus; read it carefully, and keep it for reference throughout
your time at the University. If you need any further information, contact one of us –
depending on the nature of your query, you may want to talk to your studies advisor, one of
your seminar tutors or module co-ordinators, your Course Director, or indeed ourselves; we
shall all be glad to help whenever you need us.

So, as the new academic year begins, and as you enter this new and exciting stage in your
intellectual and personal journey through life, we wish you every success in your studies at
the University of Ulster. Have a great time, and the very best of luck!

Professor Jan Jędrzejewski
Head of School, School of English, History and Politics

Professor John Gillespie
Head of School, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Professor Paul Moore
Head of School, School of Performing Arts




                                                  2
Summary of Courses in Irish Studies

                                                              Certificate in Irish Studies
                                        Certificate of Higher Education in Irish Studies
                                                   Advanced Certificate in Irish Studies
                                                     Advanced Diploma in Irish Studies

Advanced Diploma in Irish Studies

Students are required to take six 20 credit point modules over two semesters
in order to obtain the award of AdvDip. A total of 100 credit points should be
gained at Level 5 (i.e. five 20 credit point modules), and a maximum of 20
credit points should be earned at Level 4 (i.e. one 20 credit point module). The
final mark is an average of the five modules taken at Level 5.


Certificate of Higher Education in Irish Studies

To obtain the award of CertHE, students are required to complete modules to the
overall value of 120 credit points at Level 4 (i.e. six 20 credit point modules) over two
semesters. The final mark is an average of the six modules studied.


Advanced Certificate in Irish Studies

Students are required to take three 20 credit point modules in one semester in order
to obtain the award of AdvCert. A total of 40 credit points should be gained at Level
5 (i.e. two 20 credit point modules), and a maximum of 20 credit points at Level 4
(i.e. one 20 credit point module). The final mark is an average of the two modules
taken at Level 5.


Certificate in Irish Studies

To obtain the award of Cert, students are required to complete modules to the
overall value of 60 credit points at Level 4 (i.e. three 20 credit point modules) in one
semester. The final mark is an average of the three modules studied.




                                           3
Summary of Module Choice

Level 4

At Level 4 students may choose from a range of modules in Engish, History, Irish
and/or Politics. The introductory Irish language module, An Introduction to Speaking
Irish (ICS1XX) is appropriate for ab initio learners of Irish and will be strongly
recommended to all students taking this course. This module introduces students to
Irish as a living language and is ideal preparation for students who intend to take the
modules in poetry and/or folklore at Level 5. It will be made available in both
Semester 1 and 2 to enable all students to participate and it is hoped that this
module will ensure cohort identity and synergy.

Medieval Ireland (HIS108) offers an introduction to Irish history from the dawn of the
Christian period in Ireland, Early Modern Ireland, 1534-1691: An Introduction
(HIS106) enables students to focus on this period of Irish history (1534-1691), while
Modern Irish History (HIS121) examines the 1691-1925 period. Alternatively
students may take a module in English – Literature and Society in Ireland: An
Introduction (ENG106) – and/or a module in Politics – Irish Government and Politics
(POL106).


Level 5

At Level 5 students may choose from a range of modules in Irish (taught through the
medium of English), History, Drama, Music,and Politics. Translations: Modern Poetry
in Irish (IRS313) focuses on contemporary Irish language poetry (studied in
translation) while Irish Folklore and Heritage Studies (IRS317) examines customs
and traditions unique to this island.

Students may also choose from a range of modules in History – Ireland -
Historiography & Research Methods (HIS340), The Irishman at War since 1534
(HIS301) and/or Ireland and Britain under the Union, 1800-1922 (HIS324), The Irish
Revolution 1913-1925 (ICS3XX), Ireland: Conflict and Change, 1879-1914
(ICS3XX), Capital and Labour (ICS3XX), Irish Communities Abroad (ICS3XX), Ulster
and Scotland in Comparative Perspective, 1608-1921 (ICS3XX), The British
Monarchy and Ireland since 1800 (ICS3XX) and/or Jacobitism in the Three
Kingdoms, 1688-1766 (ICS3XX).

The modules in Politics which are available at this level are The Government and
Politics of Northern Ireland (POL305) and Ireland and Europe (POL313). Students
may also opt to take a module in Music – Irish Traditional Music (ICS3XX) – and/or
Drama (ICS3XX) – Contemporary Irish Theatre – at Level 5.

Information about rules governing module selection is provided to all students in the
Course Handbook, and through module lists available for each level of study.
Students are expected to consult their module choices with their Advisers of Studies.
The language of instruction is English.

                                          4
Educational Aims of Courses in Irish Studies

Advanced Diploma in Irish Studies / Advanced Certificate in Irish Studies

1. To advance students‟ knowledge, understanding, and skills appropriate for a
multidisciplinary programme of academic study in Irish Studies (the programme may include
an Irish language component).

2. To engage students in the study of a selection (AdvCert: a sample) of texts and sources
representative of the literary, historical and cultural heritages of the island of Ireland from the
earliest times to the present day.

3. To advance students‟ powers of independent critical thinking and judgement, particularly
in relation to the specific skills involved in the study, analysis, evaluation, and appreciation of
literary and non-literary texts and other sources.

4. To advance students‟ intellectual, practical, and transferable skills of value in employment.

5. To prepare students for further study of Irish literature, culture, history and related
disciplines at degree level, and for employment in a range of relevant contexts.

6. To advance students‟ intellectual curiosity and enthusiasm for the subject and to enhance
their awareness of the social and cultural importance of literature and culture in the modern
world.

Certificate in Irish Studies / Certificate of Higher Education in Irish Studies

1. To introduce students to the knowledge, understanding, and skills appropriate for an
introductory multidisciplinary programme of academic study in Irish Studies (the programme
may include an Irish language component).

2. To introduce students to the study of a selection (Cert: a sample) of texts and sources
representative of some aspects of literary, historical and cultural heritages of the island of
Ireland.

3. To initiate the development of students‟ powers of (Cert HE: independent) critical thinking
and judgement, particularly in relation to the specific skills involved in the study, analysis,
evaluation, and appreciation of literary and non-literary texts and other sources.

4. To initiate the development of students‟ intellectual, practical, and transferable skills of
value in employment.

5. To introduce students to the academic study of Irish literature, culture, history and related
disciplines, and to enhance their employability.

6. To stimulate students‟ intellectual curiosity and enthusiasm for the subject and to
introduce them to the social and cultural importance of literature and culture in the modern
world.




                                                5
Learning Outcomes of Courses in Irish Studies


A: Advanced Diploma in Irish Studies / Advanced Certificate in Irish Studies


Successful students will be able to:

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF SUBJECT

K1      demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of a selection (AdvCert: a sample) of
        historical events, literary and non-literary texts (in English and/or Irish), and other cultural
        products, such as material artefacts, musical productions, dramatic performances, etc., from a
        range of periods of literary, social and cultural history of the island of Ireland (AdvCert: from
        selected periods of history);

K2      display an awareness (AdvCert: display, to a degree, an awareness) of the diversity of
        concepts, ideas, and values implied in and conveyed through a range (AdvCert: a selection)
        of historical events, literary and non-literary texts (in English and/or Irish), and other cultural
        and/or musical products, and of the impact of historical, social, cultural, and linguistic contexts
        of Irish history and culture on their creation, dissemination, and reception;

K3      describe the distinctive formal features (AdvCert: the most significant distinctive formal
        features) of literary and non-literary texts (in English and/or Irish), cultural artefacts and/or
        performances representing a selection (AdvCert: a sample) of different literary genres,
        historical documents, musical productions and/or dramatic performances, and identify ways
        (AdvCert: the most significant ways) in which literary, historical and/or musical artefacts
        contribute to the creation of meaning;

K4      appreciate (AdvCert: to a degree) the diversity of critical approaches and responses to literary
        and non-literary texts and cultural artefacts representing a selection (AdvCert: a sample) of
        different literary genres and sets of historical data, and identify ways (AdvCert: the most
        significant ways) in which literary, historical and musical artefacts contribute to the creation of
        meaning;

K5      apply, in an informed way, a range (AdvCert: a selection) of specialised critical skills (AdvCert:
        critical skills) to review, consolidate, extend, and apply their knowledge and understanding of
        literary, historical, musical and other forms of data (in English and/or Irish).

INTELLECTUAL QUALITIES

I1      perform, with a degree of guidance, an analysis of a selection/sample of written texts and
        other forms of discourse, and identify the ways in which they generate meaning;

I2      evaluate textual and extra-textual evidence, and exercise independence of mind in assessing
        its reliability, validity, and significance;

I3      generate conclusions to create a body of knowledge on the basis of evidence originating from
        a wide range of sources;

I4      conduct research, at an appropriate level, through identifying and defining complex problems,
        and applying appropriate knowledge and skills to solve them;

I5      construct and defend a balanced argument, taking into consideration and responding to
        alternative viewpoints, and applying their own criteria of judgement.




                                                    6
PROFESSIONAL/PRACTICAL SKILLS

P1      take responsibility for the planning and execution of their own learning within a specific
        timescale and in a specific contextual framework;

P2      display and exercise critical awareness in the delivery of their own work;

P3      operate successfully in new and unpredictable contexts, requiring the use of a range of skills
        and techniques.

TRANSFERABLE SKILLS

T1      apply, in the process of acquisition, analysis, evaluation, and assimilation of information, a full
        range of learning skills, including information retrieval and IT skills;

T2      exercise initiative and independence of mind in the identification of their own learning needs,
        and in the planning and execution of their own learning;

T3      engage effectively in debate, and present ideas and sustained arguments, in writing, in a
        clear and fluent form, and in accordance with relevant conventions governing the presentation
        of academic work.



B: Certificate in Irish Studies / Certificate of Higher Education in Irish Studies


Successful students will be able to:

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF SUBJECT

K1      demonstrate a factual and conceptual knowledge and understanding of a selection (Cert: a
        sample) of historical events, literary and non-literary texts (in English and/or Irish), and other
        cultural products, such as material artefacts, musical productions, dramatic performance, etc.,
        from a range of periods of literary, social and cultural history of the island of Ireland (Cert:
        from selected periods of history);

K2      display an awareness of a range of concepts, ideas, and values implied in and conveyed
        through a range (Cert: a selection) of historical events, literary and non-literary texts (in
        English and/or Irish), and other cultural and/or musical products, and of the impact of
        historical, social, cultural, and linguistic contexts of Irish history and culture on their creation,
        dissemination, and reception;

K3      describe some of the most significant distinctive formal features (Cert: the most significant
        distinctive formal features) of literary and non-literary texts (in English and/or Irish), cultural
        artefacts and/or performances representing a selection (Cert: a sample) of different literary
        genres, historical documents, musical productions and/or dramatic performances and identify
        ways (Cert: the most significant ways) in which literary, historical and/or musical artefacts
        contribute to the creation of meaning;

K4      appreciate something of the diversity of critical approaches and responses to literary and non-
        literary texts and cultural artefacts representing a selection (Cert: a sample) of different
        literary genres and sets of historical data, and identify ways (Cert: the most significant ways)
        in which literary, historical and musical artefacts contribute to the creation of meaning;

K5      apply a range of critical skills (Cert: critical skills) to review, consolidate, extend, and apply
        their knowledge and understanding of literary, historical, musical and other forms of data (in
        English and/or Irish).

                                                     7
INTELLECTUAL QUALITIES

I1    perform, with guidance, an analysis of written texts and other forms of discourse, and identify
      some of the ways in which they generate meaning;

I2    evaluate, with guidance, textual and extra-textual evidence;

I3    collect and categorise information, in standard contexts, towards a given purpose;

I4    conduct, with guidance, simple research tasks;

I5    construct, with guidance, a simple argument, with some awareness of alternative viewpoints
      within pre-determined criteria of judgement.


PROFESSIONAL/PRACTICAL SKILLS

P1    take responsibility, with appropriate support, for the planning and execution of their own
      learning within a specific timescale and in a specific contextual framework;

P2    display a degree of autonomy in the delivery of their own project and familiarity with the
      framework existing in the society in legislative, industrial and funding spheres;

P3    operate successfully in predictable contexts, requiring the use of a range of standard skills
      and techniques.


TRANSFERABLE SKILLS

T1    apply, in the process of acquisition, analysis, evaluation, and assimilation of information, a
      basic range of learning skills, including information retrieval and IT skills;

T2    exercise, with appropriate support, a degree of initiative and independence of mind in the
      identification of their own learning needs, and in the planning and execution of their own
      learning;

T3    present ideas and arguments, in writing, in a clear and reasonably fluent form, and displaying
      an awareness of conventions governing the presentation of academic work.




                                                8
Requirements for each of the Awards


Certificate in Irish Studies (1 semester)

For the final award of Certificate three modules (60 credit points) should be taken at Level 4.
The final mark is calculated as an average of these three modules.

Certificate of Higher Education in Irish Studies (2 semesters)

For the final award of Certificate of Higher Education six module (120 credit points) should
be taken at Level 4. The final mark is calculated as an average of these six modules.

Advanced Certificate in Irish Studies (1 semester)

For the final award of Advanced Certificate one module (20 credit points) should be taken at
Level 4 and two modules (40 credit points) at Level 5. The final mark is calculated as an
average of the two modules taken at Level 5.

Advanced Diploma in Irish Studies (2 semesters)

For the final award of Advanced Diploma one module (20 credit points) should be taken at
Level 4 and five modules (1000 credit points) at Level 5. The final mark is calculated as an
average of the five modules taken at Level 5.




                                               9
Faculty Office Staff

Secretaries

The secretaries for the Faculty of Arts can be found in room MA002 at Magee. The
Faculty office deals with such matters as registration, payment of grants, collection
and release of marks, award of degrees, changing course/modules and so on. You
can seek advice and information on queries you might have in relation to your course
from this office, and you can leave messages for your lecturers and tutors, or find out
whom to contact if you need to sort out a problem. The Secretary will be happy to
offer assistance.

Members of the Faculty Office will always be able to help you directly, or advise you
on
whom to turn to with any particular query you might have.

The Faculty staff at Magee are Mrs Ros O‟Hagan and Mrs Jill Donaghey and can be
contacted in room MA002.

Contact details: Mrs Ros O‟Hagan
- by phone: +44 (0)28 71675277
- by fax:
- by e-mail: r.ohagan1@ulster.ac.uk
- by post:   Faculty of Arts (Room MA002)
             University of Ulster
             Magee Campus
             Derry
             BT48 7JL


Contact details: Mrs Jill Donaghey
- by phone: +44 (0)28 71675597
- by fax:
- by e-mail: j.donaghey@ulster.ac.uk
- by post:   Faculty of Arts (Room MA002)
             University of Ulster
             Magee Campus
             Derry
             BT48 7JL


More complex problems can be addressed directly to the Head of Faculty
Administration, Mr Gary Kendall, who is based in room C100 on the Coleraine
Campus (tel. 028 70324391).




                                          10
Communication

All student mail addressed via the University will usually come to the Faculty Office
(MA002). On arrival it will be placed for collection on the Student Mail Rack outside
the office. Communications from students to members of academic staff should be
handed to one of the secretaries in the Faculty Office.

The primary method of communication between University staff and students
is the via University’s email system, you are expected to check this on a
regular basis and use it (and not your private email accounts) when contacting
University staff. Important mail will be sent to your term-time address. It is
therefore absolutely vital that, if you change your address, you should notify
both the Academic Registry and the Faculty Office. It is your responsibility to
make sure that you keep us informed on this matter.

Noticeboards

The main noticeboards for Irish Studies at Magee are outside Irish Studies staff
offices on the ground floor of the MA Building. On these noticeboards you will find
detailed information about lecture schedules for individual modules, about essay
deadlines, class tests, and any other matters that might be of interest to students in
Irish. It is important that you keep a regular check on these noticeboards to keep
yourself informed.




                   Student visit to Glenveigh National Park, April 2010




                                           11
Teaching Staff on Irish Studies Courses at Magee

Dr Gerry O‟Brien              Room MA115
                              Tel: 028 71675296
                              E-mail g.obrien@ulster.ac.uk

Dr Anthony McCann             Room MA204
                              Tel: 028 71675300
                              E-mail at.mccann@ulster.ac.uk

Dr Máire Nic Cathmhaoil       Room MA205
                              Tel: 028 71675509
                              E-mail m.niccathmhaoil@ulster.ac.uk

Dr Éamonn Ó Ciardha           Room MI208
                              Tel: 028 71675257
                              E-mail e.ociardha@ulster.ac.uk

Dr Emmett O‟Connor            Room MA106
                              Tel: 028 71675211
                              E-mail pej.oconnor@ulster.ac.uk

Prof. Mairéad Nic Craith      Room MI019
                              Tel: 028 71675519
                              E-mail m.niccraith@ulster.ac.uk

Dr Paul Devlin                Room MQ205
                              Tel: 028 71675116
                              E-mail pp.devlin@ulster.ac.uk

Mrs Sally Halliday            Room MI020
                              Tel: 028 71675098
                              E-mail sp.halliday@ulster.ac.uk

Prof. Jan Jędrzejewski        Room B031 (Coleraine Campus)
                              Tel: 028 71670124553
                              E-mail jp.jedrzejewski@ulster.ac.uk

Dr Billy Kelly                Room MI206
                              Tel: 028 71675458
                              E-mail bp.kelly@ulster.ac.uk

Dr James Loughlin             Room MA101
                              Tel: 028 71675346
                              E-mail jp.loughlin@ulster.ac.uk

Dr Malachy Ó Néill            Room MA210
                              Tel: 028 71675219
                              E-mail mf.oneill@ulster.ac.uk
                                     12
ORGANISATION OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR

Semester System

The academic year at the University of Ulster is divided into two semesters: the
autumn semester and the spring semester. Each semester consists of twelve
teaching weeks and a two-week examination period. The autumn semester normally
starts in late September; the teaching lasts until just before Christmas, and the
examination period does not begin until the second or third week of January, which
gives students some extra time to prepare for the examinations. In the spring
semester, the teaching starts towards the end of January and lasts normally until
early May, with a two-week Easter vacation falling some time in the course of the
teaching period; the last week of teaching is followed by a revision week (no formal
classes) and then by two weeks of exams.

Modular System

All teaching at the University of Ulster is based on the principle of modularisation.
Some modules are delivered by one lecturer only, while on others you will be taught
by a team of people; in either case, however, the responsibility for the organisation
and delivery of the teaching lies with the module coordinator. Each module is taught
and examined over one semester – that is, modules taught in the autumn semester
are examined in January, and those taught in the spring semester are examined in
May. There is, as a result, no such thing as “finals”, during which you would be
examined in subjects you may have been taught months before. If you have any
problems with a module or need any information about it, you should contact the
module co-ordinator.

Delayed Choice

Entering university is a major threshold in everyone‟s life, regardless of whether you
come directly from school, or you have taken time off studying to work or travel, or
you are a mature student returning to education after maybe several decades spent
working or raising your family. Some university entrants know exactly what they want
to concentrate on in their studies, but to others the university environment may
appear bewildering - so you may need time to find your way around the place, not
just in terms of where to look for the library or the lecture theatres, but also how to
make the best possible use of the opportunities the university offers. It may be some
time before you work out where exactly your interests lie, or what structure of degree
would be best suited for the particular career path you plan to follow; it is therefore
important that all the decisions with respect to the choice of subjects you will be
studying are made when you feel you are genuinely ready to do so.

To make sure that this is the case, the Faculty of Arts operates a system of delayed
choice. This means that whatever course in the Faculty you have been admitted to,
you can choose, in the course of your first year, from a variety of potential paths
towards your final award.



                                          13
Choosing Modules: Rules and Regulations

All students are expected to complete 60 credit points per semester - normally three
modules in the full-time mode. If you need help with your choice of modules, turn in
the first instance to your Course Director – it is his or her role to offer you help and
guidance. You may also wish to speak to the co-ordinator of a particular module to
develop a greater understanding of the specifics of that course element. It is
important to choose a pathway which is appropriate to your own academic interests
and which facilitates sufficient credit points (at each level) as required for each exit
qualification.

Changing Modules and Courses

The University will normally expect you to make up your mind about which modules
you will be taking in any given year when you register - that is, in the week preceding
the first week of Semester 1. It is a good idea to think about your choice of modules
before you arrive for registration, so that you have the time to consider all the options
and select your optimum combination of modules. Still, thoughtful as you may have
been when choosing your modules, it may nonetheless happen that you want to
make a last-minute change – perhaps because you have unexpectedly discovered a
module which you would really want to do and which you did not notice when first
studying the module list, or perhaps because you got confused over the various
module codes. If this happens before the end of Week 2 of the semester, which the
change would affect, it is not too late: you can still de-register from the module which
you want to drop, and register for the one you want to opt into. To do so, you need to
collect a change of course/module form from the Faculty Office, fill it in, get it signed
by your Course Director, and return it back to the Faculty Office - before the Friday of
Week 2. Late re-registrations will only be accepted in exceptional circumstances,
and will normally require the permission of the Dean.




                                     Grianán Ailigh

                                           14
TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS

Teaching: Lectures and Seminars

All modules in Irish Studies are taught through a combination of lectures (during
which the material is explained to the students by the lecturer) and seminars (in
which issues arising from the lectures and from other material studied can be
discussed by students under the guidance of the seminar tutor). Lectures are
designed for all students doing the module, seminars are normally taught in small
groups (of around 10 people), so it is during them that you will have the opportunity
to ask questions, to focus on problems that you find particularly important or
particularly difficult, and to discuss points of interest both with your fellow-students
and with your seminar tutor. Arrangements with regard to dividing the module into
seminar groups and working out the schedule of meetings will normally be made by
the module co-ordinator some time during the first week of the semester in which the
module is taught. Do not be reluctant to contribute to seminars. They can be very
enjoyable as well as instructive if there is a free exchange of views, and no one will
mind if what you say is controversial.

On a number of modules, the teaching is shared between various people - there may
be more than one person taking the lectures, and different seminar groups may be
taught by different tutors - some of them perhaps part-time members of staff, others
postgraduate research students. All people involved on a module would always be
happy to discuss with you any issues relating to the material you study, to answer
any questions you might want to ask, or to help with any difficulties you might be
facing; among them, your first port of call would normally be your seminar tutor, or,
on matters relating to the administration of the module (registration, allocation to a
seminar group, and so on), the module co-ordinator.




                                     Magee College




                                          15
Forms of Assessment

The Faculty of Arts employs a variety of forms of assessment. Most modules are
examined through a mixture of coursework and formal examination; in some
modules, a small proportion of coursework marks may be awarded for seminar
attendance and performance. The relative weighting of coursework marks vs.
examination marks is normally 50%/50%. Modules which are examined through
coursework only may consist of various elements including a class test written under
exam conditions. The difference between examinations and class tests is largely a
technical matter to do with university regulations relating to the administration of
assessment procedures, the recording of marks, and the analysis of student
performance and progress. The overall coursework mark (which is at the same time
the module mark) is calculated on the basis of performance in the various elements.
The titles of coursework essays you will be expected to write will normally be set for
you by the module coordinators at the beginning of the semester.

Examinations and class tests are all sat during the exam periods, i.e. in early or mid-
January in Semester 1 and in mid-May in Semester 2. The format of the examination
(or class test) will of course depend on the contents of the module, but you will
usually be given some idea as to the structure of the paper, how many questions you
will be expected to answer, and so on. If the end of term examination is
scheduled for a date beyond your planned stay at this campus it is essential
that you inform the module co-ordinator of this at the earliest possible date. It
may be possible to complete an alternative form of assessment (e.g.
negotiated essay).

Notification of Absence

If you have been absent for more than three days through illness or other reason you
must immediately notify the course/subject director. Where the absence is for a
period of more than five working days, and is caused by illness, which may affect
your studies, you should arrange for a medical certificate to be presented. Where the
period is less than five working days, you may fill in a self-certification form (NA1),
although a medical certificate is also acceptable. The form can be downloaded from
http://www.ulster.ac.uk/academicservices/student/
If your health or other circumstances have interfered with your ability to submit
assessed work or attend an examination, the NA1 form may authenticate a difficulty,
which arose before, the assessment date but which nevertheless affected your
performance. You should also think carefully about whether it is wise to seek
assistance from a counsellor or other advisor at an early stage rather than waiting
until your problems are severe. Do not feel that you have to go into great detail about
your difficulties on this form. If your circumstances are complex then a letter from a
doctor or counsellor is advised.

Deadlines and Extensions

The Faculty of Arts maintains a strict system of discipline to ensure that all
coursework is submitted on time. Deadlines for the submission of essays are
announced at the beginning of each semester, so that students know exactly when
                                          16
they will be expected to complete their assignments. However, there are situations
when you may be prevented from submitting work on time by circumstances beyond
your control - illness, bereavement, unexpected family problems, etc. In cases like
those, you can apply for extensions on your essays; the person to contact is the
Course/Subject Director for your programme. You will be expected to present
some form of evidence of the circumstances, medical or compassionate, preventing
you from completing your work on time; you will also need to show evidence of the
existence of work in progress (notes, draft versions of the essay, and so on). Medical
and/or compassionate evidence is also required to cover absence from examinations
and class tests. In cases like those, you would normally be expected to contact your
Course Director, who would advise you what course of action could best be taken in
your specific circumstances. You are also entitled to an automatic three-day
extension if you have three essay deadlines coinciding on the same day - if that is
the case, you need to see the Course/Subject Director for your programme, who
will grant you an extension on an Irish module of your choice, as long as you can
present evidence of work in progress, as well as some form of confirmation that work
for the other two modules due on that day has in fact been submitted.

Counselling Service

If you have a personal problem, the first person you should approach is your Adviser
of Studies. However, if you feel the problem is too personal to discuss with your
adviser, the University has an excellent Counselling Service, which is completely
confidential and which has a number of trained professional counsellors on its staff.

Administration of the Courses

The courses in Irish are run by the BA Hons Irish Subject Committee. This includes
all the members of staff who teach on the courses, along with the Head of School of
Languages and Literature and the Dean of the Faculty of Arts. The Course/Subject
Director for Irish is Professor Ailbhe Ó Corráin. He is responsible for the organisation
and management of these courses. Professor John Gillespie is our actively engaged
and interested Head of School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures. He has an
important and overarching role in a range of areas including human and physical
resources and quality management.

Adviser of Studies

On the day you register at the University, you will be assigned an Adviser of Studies
and an appointment will be made for you to see your adviser before teaching begins.
The role of the Adviser of Studies is to help students with any academic or personal
difficulties, which might arise. For example, if you initially find it difficult to understand
the timetable, you should contact your adviser for assistance. Similarly, if you wish to
change one of the subjects you have opted to study, your adviser of studies will help
you complete a module amendment form. Please note, however, that you should
normally do this only during the first week of the Semester, or, in exceptional cases,
during the second week. In short, do not hesitate to contact your adviser whenever
you want help or guidance on academic or other matters.

                                             17
Staff-Student Consultative Committee

If you have any views, ideas, or complaints about the course or the modules you are
taking, as well as the general services provided by the University, you can make
these known formally through the Staff-Student Consultative Committee which meets
once a semester and reports to the Subject Committee. The Staff-Student
Consultative Committee consists of two members of academic staff and one elected
student representative for each year of each course. The student representatives are
elected at the beginning of the academic year. All students registered for Irish
Studies courses including combined courses are eligible.




                           Library facilities at Magee (LRC)




                                         18
Courses in Irish Studies and Course Diagrams
Note: Not all modules will be available in every year

                                   I. CERTIFICATE IN IRISH STUDIES

Module                                        Credit    Credit          Module Status
Title                                         Level     Points       [compulsory/optional]

                                             Semester 1:

An Introduction to Speaking Irish (ICS1XX)         4     20              compulsory

Early Modern Ireland, 1534-1691: An                4     20              compulsory
Introduction (HIS106)

Medieval Ireland (HIS108)                          4     20              compulsory


                                             Semester 2:

An Introduction to Speaking Irish (ICS1XX)         4     20              optional

Literature and Society in Ireland: An              4     20              optional
Introduction (ENG106)
Ireland: Historiography and Research Methods       4     20              optional
(HIS102)
Irish Government and Politics (POL106)             4     20              optional




                        II. CERTIFICATE IN HIGHER EDUCATION IN IRISH STUDIES


Module                                        Credit    Credit          Module Status
Title                                         Level     Points       [compulsory/optional]

An Introduction to Speaking Irish (ICS1XX)     4        20               compulsory

Early Modern Ireland, 1534-1691:               4        20               compulsory
An Introduction (HIS106)
Medieval Ireland (HIS108)                      4        20               compulsory

Literature and Society in Ireland:             4        20               compulsory
An Introduction (ENG106)
Ireland: Historiography and Research           4        20               optional
Methods (HIS102)
Irish Government and Politics (POL106)         4        20               compulsory




                                                   19
                             III. ADVANCED CERTIFICATE IN IRISH STUDIES

Module                                          Credit     Credit        Module Status
Title                                           Level      Points     [compulsory/optional]

                                               Semester 1:
An Introduction to Speaking Irish (ICS1XX)       4    20                  optional

Early Modern Ireland, 1534-1691: An              4        20              optional
Introduction (HIS106)
Medieval Ireland (HIS108)                        4        20              optional

Ireland - Historiography & Research              5        20              optional
Methods (HIS340)

The Irish Revolution 1913-1925 (ICS3XX)          5        20              optional

Ireland: Conflict and Change, 1879-1914          5        20              optional
(ICS3XX)
Capital and Labour (ICS3XX)                      5        20              optional

The Government and Politics of Northern          5        20              optional
Ireland (POL305)
Contemporary Irish Theatre (ICS3XX)              5        20              optional

Irish Traditional Music (ICS3XX)                 5        20              optional


                                               Semester 2:
An Introduction to Speaking Irish (ICS1XX)       4    20                  optional

Literature and Society in Ireland: An            4        20              optional
Introduction (ENG106)
Ireland: Historiography and Research             4        20              optional
Methods (HIS102)
Irish Government and Politics (POL106)           4        20              optional

The Irishman at War since 1534 (HIS301)          5        20              optional

Ireland and Britain under the Union, 1800-       5        20              optional
1922 (HIS324)
Translations: Modern Poetry in Irish             5        20              optional
(ICS3XX)
Irish Folklore and Heritage Studies (IRS317)     5        20              optional

Irish Communities Abroad (ICS3XX)                5        20              optional

Ulster and Scotland in Comparative               5        20              optional
Perspective, 1608-1921 (ICS3XX)
The British Monarchy and Ireland since 1800      5        20              optional
(ICS3XX)
Jacobitism in the Three Kingdoms, 1688-          5        20              optional
1766 (ICS3XX)
Ireland and Europe (POL313)                      5        20              optional

* For the final award of Advanced Certificate one module (20 credit points) should be taken
at Level 4 and two modules (40 credit points) at Level 5. Final mark is calculated as an
average of the two modules taken at Level 5.
                                                     20
                               IV. ADVANCED DIPLOMA IN IRISH STUDIES

Module                                         Credit    Credit           Module Status
Title                                          Level     Points        [compulsory/optional]


An Introduction to Speaking Irish (ICS1XX)      4        20             optional

Early Modern Ireland, 1534-1691: An             4        20             optional
Introduction (HIS106)

Medieval Ireland (HIS108)                       4        20             optional

Ireland - Historiography & Research Methods     5        20             optional
2 (HIS340)

The Irish Revolution 1913-1925 (ICS3XX)         5        20             optional

Ireland: Conflict and Change, 1879-1914         5        20             optional
(ICS3XX)
Capital and Labour (ICS3XX)                     5        20             optional

The Government and Politics of Northern         5        20             optional
Ireland (POL305)
Contemporary Irish Theatre (ICS3XX)             5        20             optional

Irish Traditional Music (ICS3XX)                5        20             optional

Literature and Society in Ireland: An           4        20             optional
Introduction (ENG106)
Ireland: Historiography and Research            4        20             optional
Methods 1 (HIS102)
Irish Government and Politics (POL106)          4        20             optional

The Irishman at War since 1534 (HIS301)         5        20             optional

Ireland and Britain under the Union, 1800-      5        20             optional
1922 (HIS324)
Translations: Modern Poetry in Irish            5        20             optional
(ICS3XX)
Irish Folklore and Heritage Studies (IRS317)    5        20             optional

Irish Communities Abroad (ICS3XX)               5        20             optional

Ulster and Scotland in Comparative              5        20             optional
Perspective, 1608-1921 (ICS3XX)
The British Monarchy and Ireland since 1800     5        20             optional
(ICS3XX)
Jacobitism in the Three Kingdoms, 1688-         5        20             optional
1766 (ICS3XX)
Ireland and Europe (POL313)                     5        20             optional

* For the final award of Advanced Diploma one module (20 credit points) should be taken
at Level 4 and five modules (100 credit points) at Level 5. Final mark is calculated as an
average of the five modules taken at Level 5.




                                                    21
      Irish Studies: Example Diagrams of Possible Routes

             A range of structured thematic pathways offer students the opportunity to focus on particular aspects within the broad discipline of Irish
             Studies. The highly recommended module in Irish language – An Introduction to Speaking Irish – is included in each structure and
             available in both Semester 1 and Semester 2. It is considered a valuable introduction to Irish Studies and as an important step in
             nurturing cohort identity. Students opting to spend two semesters at Magee will be encouraged to take this module in Semester 1.

             The thematic options available are:
             (1) Contemporary Irish Society – combining modules in English, History, Irish language and Politics to gain a greater insight into
                 modern Irish life.
             (2) Literature in Ireland – students will study aspects of Irish language, poetry, customs and folklore alongside options History and/or
                 English.
             (3) The Fighting Irish – focusing on modules from the History provision, students will examine aspects of Irishmen in battle during
                 various periods alongside modules in Irish language and/or English.
             (4) Irish Relations – examining relations between Ireland and other nations, the Irish diaspora alongside modules in Irish language
                 and/or English.

             There is a wide choice of options offered within the Irish Studies programme. Although the programme that awards CertHE/AdvDip is
             designed as a one-year course of study, students who are able to study for one semester only may avail themselves of alternative
             options at Cert/AdvCert level.


                                                               1. Contemporary Irish Society


  1      ICS1XX An Introduction to Speaking Irish                          20        4            O          None             R
  1      ICS3XX The Irish Revolution 1913-1925                             20        5            O          None             R
  1      POL305 The Government and Politics of Northern Ireland            20        5            O          None             C
  1      ICS3XX Capital and Labour                                         20        5            O          None             R
Award: AdvCert
For the final award of Advanced Certificate one module (20 credit points) should be taken at Level 4 and two modules (40 credit points) at Level 5.
  2      ICS1XX An Introduction to Speaking Irish                           20       4            O          None             R
  2      ENG106 Literature and Society in Ireland: An Introduction          20       4            O          None             C
  2      HIS102 Ireland: Historiography and Research Methods 1              20       4            O          None             C
                                                                            22
  2      POL106 Irish Government and Politics                               20       4            O          None             C
  2      POL313 Ireland and Europe                                          20       5            O          None             C
Award: AdvCert/AdvDip
For the final award of Advanced Certificate one module (20 credit points) should be taken at Level 4 and two modules (40 credit points) at Level 5;
For the final award of Advanced Diploma one module (20 credit points) should be taken at Level 4 and five modules (100 credit points) at Level 5.


                                                                   2. Literature in Ireland


  1       ICS1XX An Introduction to Speaking Irish                         20        4            O          None             R
  1       HIS106 Early Modern Ireland, 1534-1691: An Introduction          20        4            O          None             C
  1       HIS340 Irish History and Historians                              20        5            O          None             C
  1       ICS3XX Contemporary Irish Theatre                                20        5            O          None             R
Award: AdvCert
For the final award of Advanced Certificate one module (20 credit points) should be taken at Level 4 and two modules (40 credit points) at Level 5.
  2       ICS1XX An Introduction to Speaking Irish                          20       4            O          None             R
  2       ENG106 Literature and Society in Ireland: An Introduction         20       4            O          None             C
  2       IRS313 Translations: Modern Poetry in Irish                       20       5            O          None             C
  2       IRS317 Irish Folklore and Heritage Studies                        20       5            O          None             C
  2       ICS3XX Ulster and Scotland in Comparative Perspective,            20       5            O          None             R
                    1608-1921
Award: AdvCert/AdvDip
For the final award of Advanced Certificate one module (20 credit points) should be taken at Level 4 and two modules (40 credit points) at Level 5;
For the final award of Advanced Diploma one module (20 credit points) should be taken at Level 4 and five modules (100 credit points) at Level 5.


                                                                    3. The Fighting Irish


  1     ICS1XX     An Introduction to Speaking Irish                       20        4            O           None             R
  1     HIS106     Early Modern Ireland, 1534-1691: An Introduction        20        4            O           None             C
  1     ICS3XX     The Irish Revolution 1913-1925                          20        5            O           None             R

                                                                            23
  1     ICS3XX     Ireland: Conflict and Change, 1879-1914                  20       5            O           None             R
  2     ICS1XX     An Introduction to Speaking Irish                        20       4            O           None             R
  2     ENG106     Literature and Society in Ireland: An Introduction       20       4            O           None             C
  2     HIS121     Modern Irish History 1691-1925                           20       4            O           None             C
  2     HIS301     The Irishman at War since 1534                           20       5            O           None             C
  2     HIS324     Ireland and Britain under the Union, 1800-1922           20       5            O           None             C


                                                                        4. Irish Relations


  1      ICS1XX An Introduction to Speaking Irish                           20       4            O          None             R
  1      HIS340 Irish History and Historians                                20       5            O          None             C
  1      POL305 The Government and Politics of Northern Ireland             20       5            O          None             C
  1      ICS3XX Ireland: Conflict and Change, 1879-1914                     20       5            O          None             R
Award: AdvCert;
For the final award of Advanced Certificate one module (20 credit points) should be taken at Level 4 and two modules (40 credit points) at Level 5.
  2      ICS1XX An Introduction to Speaking Irish                           20       4            O          None             R
  2      ENG106 Literature and Society in Ireland: An Introduction          20       4            O          None             C
  2      ICS3XX Irish Communities Abroad                                    20       5            O          None             R
  2      ICS3XX Ulster and Scotland in Comparative Perspective,             20       5            O          None             R
                    1608-1921
  2      ICS3XX The British Monarchy and Ireland since 1800                 20       5            O          None             R
  2      POL313 Ireland and Europe                                          20       5            O          None             R
Award: AdvCert/AdvDip
For the final award of Advanced Certificate one module (20 credit points) should be taken at Level 4 and two modules (40 credit points) at Level 5;
For the final award of Advanced Diploma one module (20 credit points) should be taken at Level 4 and five modules (100 credit points) at Level 5.




                                                                             24
                                   Modules of Study
                    Note: Not all modules will be available in every year

                               SEMESTER 1 – LEVEL 4


IRS001 – An Introduction to Speaking Irish (Aural Comprehension & Oral Practice)
                                           (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Malachy Ó Néill)

This module encompasses the sound system of the Irish language and drills in oral
practice (basic tenses, patterns and vocabulary) for conversation through direct method
approach in acquiring basic skills ab initio.

Coursework:         100%                  Semester:      1 and 2
Exam:               0%                    Credits:       20


HIS106 - Early Modern Ireland, 1534-1691: An Introduction
                                                 (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Billy Kelly)

The module offers an introduction to the history of Ireland from the Rebellion of `Silken
Thomas (1534) to the Treaty of Limerick (1691). It will assess major events,
controversies and historical debates in their various political, military socio-economic
and religious and cultural contexts. Students will also be introduced to key historical
debates and controversies.

Coursework:         50%                   Semester:      1
Exam:               50%                   Credits:       20


HIS108 - Medieval Ireland                         (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerry O‟Brien)

This introductory module in medieval Irish history is designed to give the student a clear
understanding of the various communities, events and developments which brought
about the society which eventually became Early Modern and Modern Ireland. It gives
appropriate consideration to all relevant institutions and historical processes of the
period beginning with the arrival of Christianity and concludes at the year 1500.

Coursework:         50%                   Semester:      1
Exam:               50%                   Credits:       20
                                SEMESTER 1 – LEVEL 5


HIS324 - Ireland and Britain under the Union, 1800-1922
                                           (Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Loughlin)

An analysis of Irish History in relation to the nationalities of the British Isles, and the
Westminster parliament.

Coursework:         100%                 Semester:      1
Exam:               0%                   Credits:       20


HIS340 - Ireland: Historiography & Research Methods
                                            (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerry O‟Brien)

This module explores the historiographical background to events and role-players of the
Irish past, enables students to come to terms with them through an understanding of
sources and evidence, and instructs them in the practical application of those sources
and that evidence to their own course-related research and writing.

Coursework:         100%                 Semester:      1
Exam:               0%                   Credits:       20


HIS523 – Irish Communities Abroad                (Module Co-ordinator: Mrs Sally Halliday)

An analysis of the role played by Irish migrants and their descendants in the formation
and development of societies in which they have retained a distinct identity.

Coursework:         100%                 Semester:      1
Exam:               0%                   Credits:       20


HIS524 – Ireland: Conflict and Change 1879-1914
                                          (Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Loughlin)

An analysis of the principal social, political and economic changes in Ireland in the
period 1879-1914.

Coursework:         100%                 Semester:      1
Exam:               0%                   Credits:       20


HIS526 – Capital and Labour                  (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emmett O‟Connor)

This module investigates the evolution of the working class in Ireland, and its interaction
with capital, labour organization, society, and politics.

Coursework:         100%                 Semester:      1
Exam:               0%                   Credits:       20


                                            26
POL305 - Northern Ireland: Culture and Identity
                                     (Module Co-ordinator: Prof. Mairéad Nic Craith)

This module will provide an analysis of culture and identity politics in Northern Ireland in
both historical and contemporary contexts. It will draw attention to other comparable
situations.

Coursework:          100%                 Semester:     1
Exam:                0%                   Credits:      20


DRA505 – Contemporary Irish Theatre                 (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Devlin)

This module looks in detail at contemporary Irish theatre practice and in doing so
enables students to focus their understanding of contemporary Irish theatre by placing it
in a range of relevant discursive and theoretical contexts. Students will read a range of
contemporary playtexts and see a range of performances. This module is taught by
seminar and assessed by 100% coursework.

Coursework:          100%                 Semester:     1
Exam:                0%                   Credits:      20


ICSXXX – Irish Traditional Music
                                              (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anthony McCann)

This module is designed to provide an overview of the conversations, communities, and
contexts of traditional musics in Ireland.

Coursework:          100%                 Semester:     1
Exam:                0%                   Credits:      20




                                            27
                                 SEMESTER 2 – LEVEL 4


IRS001 – An Introduction to Speaking Irish (Aural Comprehension & Oral Practice)
                                           (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Malachy Ó Néill)

This module encompasses the sound system of the Irish language and drills in oral
practice (basic tenses, patterns and vocabulary) for conversation through direct method
approach in acquiring basic skills ab initio.

Coursework:          100%                  Semester:     1 and 2
Exam:                0%                    Credits:      20


ENG106 - Literature and Society in Ireland: An Introduction
                                        (Module Co-ordinator: Prof. Jan Jędrzejewski)

The module offers an introduction to the history of Irish literature in its socio-cultural and
political context, involving a close study of text by some of the most representative Irish
writers in English.

Coursework:          50%                   Semester:     2
Exam:                50%                   Credits:      20


HIS121 – Modern Irish History                      (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerry O‟Brien)

This module is designed to provide a firm foundation in modern Irish history, focusing on
the main features of the political, social and cultural development of Irish and Anglo-Irish
society between the late seventeenth century and the establishment of the Irish Free
State and Northern Ireland.

Coursework:          50%                   Semester:     2
Exam:                50%                   Credits:      20


POL106 – Irish Government and Politics (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emmett O‟Connor)

This module investigates the primary forces shaping Irish politics, political institutions
and structures, political behaviour, the mass media and policy making.

Coursework:          50%                   Semester:     2
Exam:                50%                   Credits:      20




                                             28
                                SEMESTER 2 – LEVEL 5


IRS313 - Translations: Modern Poetry in Irish
                                     (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Máire Nic Cathmhaoil)

In this module an in-depth study of modern poetry in Irish literature is undertaken,
examining English translations of poems originally written in Irish.

Coursework:          50%                  Semester:     2
Exam:                50%                  Credits:      20


IRS317 - Irish Folklore and Heritage Studies
                                          (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anthony McCann)

This module introduces students to important aspects of Irish heritage with special
emphasis on the understanding of these elements both within their own context and as
part of Irish heritage.

Coursework:          50%                  Semester:     2
Exam:                50%                  Credits:      20


HIS301 - The Irishman at War since 1534
                                       (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Éamonn Ó Ciardha)

This course will focus on the cult of the „Fighting Irish‟ in history, literature, art,
iconography, film and media. Lectures and readings will deal primarily with the period
between the Reformation (1534) and the Irish Civil War (1923). Hundreds and
thousands of Irishmen (Catholic and Protestant) both fought for and against the English
and British colonial regime in Ireland for over four hundred years. Hundreds and
thousands more served on five continents (often on opposite sides) in the armies of
Britain, France, Spain, Russia, the Papal States, Austria, America, Canada and Mexico.

Coursework:          100%                 Semester:     2
Exam:                0%                   Credits:      20


HIS522 – The Irish Revolution, 1913-1925         (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerry O‟Brien)

This module provides both an overview and an in-depth analysis of the various
circumstances, forces and events which shaped the revolutionary period and which
underlay the revolution itself. Consideration is given to the principal issues of the time
and to the personalities and parties involved. Attention is also afforded to the legacies of
both the civil war and the establishment of Northern Ireland.

Coursework:          100%                 Semester:     2
Exam:                0%                   Credits:      20




                                            29
HIS526 – Ulster and Scotland in Comparative Perspective, 1608-1921
                                               (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Billy Kelly)

This module is primarily an account of the shared histories of Ulster and Scotland largely
in the early modern and modern periods. The module will emphasise the importance of
regional and comparative.

Coursework:         100%                 Semester:     2
Exam:               0%                   Credits:      20


POL313 – Ireland and Europe                 (Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emmett O‟Connor)

This module investigates Irish involvement in European integration which has been a
strategic aim of successive governments since 1961. The European Union (EU)
currently exerts a significant impact on legislation, the economy, social policy and
foreign policy. Membership of the EU has also been a catalyst in the redefinition of
modern Ireland and its relations with Northern Ireland and Great Britain. An analysis of
the European dimension is essential to an understanding of the contemporary Irish polity
and its self-perception.

Coursework:         100%                 Semester:     2
Exam:               0%                   Credits:      20




                                           30
ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS

Marking

All work is marked on the traditional scale from 0 to 100 points. The pass mark is 40;
marks between 40 and 49 fall into the third-class category, those between 50 and 59
indicate lower-second class performance, those between 60 and 69 are awarded for
upper-second class work, and those of 70 and above mark first-class standard. All
marking is subject to internal and external monitoring, and a substantial proportion of the
work, particularly in the final year, is routinely double-marked.

In all matters relating to marking, the last word belongs to the external examiners -
senior academics from other universities, appointed to ensure parity of standards across
the university sector nationwide. Because their approval is needed before whatever
marks awarded in Irish modules become final, you should remember that any marks
issued to you in the course of the academic year (including all coursework and Semester
1 examination marks) remain provisional until externally confirmed. Changes will not
happen very often, but do not be surprised if the marks officially released after the final
meeting of the Board of Examiners in May/June differ from those you will have obtained
in the course of the academic year - this would mean that the external examiners have
considered your work and decided to change the original marks.

Coursework essays will normally be marked and returned to you, with comments, in the
course of the semester; class test and examination scripts remain confidential and are
not released to the students after they have been marked. If you are for any reason
unhappy with the mark you have been awarded, or if you require clarification of the
marker‟s comments, ask him or her for a more detailed explanation; you may always ask
for your essay to be read by another examiner, and indeed, in exceptional
circumstances, by an external examiner.

Passing a Module

To pass a module you must achieve an overall pass mark of 40% with a minimum of
35% in each element for modules where the assessment is made up of a Coursework
and an Exam mark (usually 50/50). For modules which are assessed by 100%
Coursework an overall mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Boards of Examiners

All decisions with respect to student progress and classification are taken by the Board
of Examiners for your course. All meetings of the Board are normally chaired by the
Dean, and attended by all members of the teaching staff. Boards of Examiners meet at
the end of each semester to consider student progress in the course of that semester;
they look at evidence of medical and compassionate circumstances in cases of non-
submission (or late submission) of coursework, and non-attendance at examinations,
they evaluate the performance of each individual student, and they take decisions on his
or her progress to the following year of the course or on any supplementary work he or
she might be required to do before proceeding. In the case of final-year students, the
role of the Board of Examiners is also to make recommendations for the award of
degrees and to decide the class of degree to be awarded to each individual student.




                                            31
Classification and Awarding of Degrees

When you reach the end of your final year and successfully complete all the work
required, the Board of Examiners will consider your progress throughout your time at the
University and will make its recommendation about the degree you will be awarded. The
classification of your degree will depend on your result achieved in the final year of your
course – the final average mark as well as the marks for the individual final-year
modules.

The final mark is simply the mean average of the module marks for the modules you will
have taken at the appropriate level. Please note the following:

Certificate in Irish Studies: average of three modules taken.
Certificate of Higher Education in Irish Studies: average of six modules taken.
Advanced Certificate in Irish Studies: average of two modules taken at Level 5.
Advanced Diploma in Irish Studies: average of five modules taken at Level 5.

Pass mark of                      40%
Final result classifications:
Pass with Distinction             70%
Pass with Commendation            60%
Pass                              40%

In some circumstances, involving students who have had to repeat the final year, the
University may award an unclassified degree; further details on that can be found in the
University regulations.

All decisions with respect to classification and award of degrees are closely scrutinised
by the external examiners; they analyse all mark profiles, they read work by candidates
considered for the award of first-class honours degrees, they adjudicate in cases of
borderline candidates, and they confirm all fails. In this way, the University ensures that
the degrees it awards recognise and reward student achievement along the same lines
as those normally adopted by other universities throughout the country.

Appeals

There is no mechanism for the appeal of academic marks or of degree classifications –
in this respect, the decisions of the Board of Examiners, externally confirmed, are final.
However, it may happen that the Board of Examiners may not, during its deliberations,
have access to full knowledge of your circumstances: for example, unexplained
nonsubmission of coursework or absence from an examination, for which you will
normally be penalised, may have been caused by a medical or compassionate problem
not known to the Board. In situations like those, you may lodge an appeal (details of
procedures available from the Faculty Office); these are heard by a Board of Appeals, a
meeting of which you can attend in order to present your case. This Board cannot
change your marks, but it can, for instance, accept your explanations and offer you
another chance to sit an examination, or decide to retrospectively accept an essay that
was submitted late. In any case, it is always useful, before lodging an appeal, to discuss
your circumstances with your Course/Subject Director.




                                            32
Plagiarism

There are two kinds of plagiarism. The first is the copying of passages from books,
articles or some other source, and attempting to pass them off as your own words. A
piece of work containing plagiarised passages will normally receive a mark of zero, and
persistent plagiarism may lead to formal disciplinary action against you. Remember that
it is not enough to quote a source in a general way at the end of your essay. You must
formally and explicitly acknowledge ALL sources at the time that they are used. This is
usually done in the form of footnotes. The second type of plagiarism is getting someone
else to help you write translations, essays or your dissertation. All your work must be
written by you in your own words.
FRAMEWORK OF PENALTIES FOR PLAGIARISM OFFENCES IN TAUGHT PROGRAMMES
          1ST               2ND                   3RD                   4TH         Plagiarism
      OFFENCE            OFFENCE               OFFENCE               OFFENCE         detected
                                                                                    subsequent
                                                                                         to
                                                                                    graduation
 Reduction in marks     Mark of zero       Mark of zero for       Mark of zero for   The award
 based on exclusion   for assignment    assignment containing         module.          may be
 of plagiarised work.    containing   plagiarism and maximum                          revoked.
                         plagiarism.     mark of 40% (UG) or     Case referred to
 Formative interview                  50% (PG) for coursework        University
     with module       Interview with           element.            Disciplinary
  coordinator and/or  Head of School                              Committee with
        lecturer.     and/or Course     Case referred to Dean    recommendation
                      Director and/or  with recommendation of    of suspension (1
Where 1st offence is      Lecturer.     reprimand and fine not     semester or 1
      in Master’s                      exceeding the maximum      year as advised
Dissertation: Mark of   Formal letter  amount permitted under      by Faculty) or
   Zero. Resubmit.       placed on    the Ordinance on Student      discontinue
 Interview with Head    student file.  Discipline at the time of   studies at the
   of School and/or                      application of penalty.     University.
   Course Director
  and/or Supervisor.                    Formal letter placed on  Outcome placed
                                              student file.        on student file.




                                              33
Generic Assessment Criteria – Qualitative-Based Work                                                                                                                   Level 4
Classification        % Range    Content                  Application of            Knowledge and              Evidence of             Referencing and            Presentation,
                                                          Theory                    Understanding              Reading                 Bibliography               Grammar and
                                                                                                                                                                  Spelling

I                     80 – 100   Excellent description    Evidence of detailed,     Excellent knowledge        Evidence of reading a   Excellent referencing      Excellent
[Outstanding Work]               and discussion of        relevant application of   and depth of               wide range of           and bibliography           presentation,
                                 main issues and          theory, where             understanding of           appropriate                                        logically structured,
                                 material with            applicable                principles and             supplementary                                      using correct
                                 evidence of critical                               concepts                   sources                                            grammar and
                                 evaluation                                                                                                                       spelling

I                     70 – 79    Detailed description     Evidence of relevant      Knowledge and depth        Evidence of reading     Accurate referencing       Good presentation
[Excellent Work]                 of main issues and       application of theory,    of understanding of        appropriate             and bibliography           logically structured,
                                 material with            where applicable          principles and             supplementary                                      using correct
                                 evidence of                                        concepts                   sources                                            grammar and
                                 evaluation                                                                                                                       spelling
II (i)                60 – 69    Description of main      Occasional relevant       Knowledge and sound        Evidence of directed    Appropriate                Orderly
[Good Quality Work]              issues and material      application of theory     understanding of the       reading and some        referencing and            presentation,
                                 with occasional                                    key principles and         supplementary           bibliography               competently
                                 evidence of                                        concepts                   sources                                            structured and
                                 discussion                                                                                                                       acceptable
                                                                                                                                                                  grammar and
                                                                                                                                                                  spelling
II (ii)               50 - 59    Description of main      Limited evidence of       Basic knowledge of the     Evidence of directed    Adequate referencing       Adequate
[Acceptable Work]                issues and material      relevant application of   key principles and         reading                 and bibliography           presentation and
                                 only                     theory                    concepts only                                                                 structure,
                                                                                                                                                                  acceptable
                                                                                                                                                                  grammar and
                                                                                                                                                                  spelling
III                   40 – 49    Limited description of   Very limited evidence     Adequate knowledge         Limited evidence of     Limited referencing        Weak presentation
[Adequate Work]                  main issues and          of relevant application   of key principles and      reading                 and bibliography           and structure,
                                 material only            of theory                 concepts only                                                                 acceptable
                                                                                                                                                                  grammar and
                                                                                                                                                                  spelling
Fail                  35 – 39    Omission of some         Little or no evidence     Limited and or             Evidence of minimal     Inadequate                 Poor presentation,
(Marginal)                       relevant material        of relevant application   inconsistent               reading only            referencing and            structure, grammar
[Limited Work]                                            of theory                 knowledge and                                      bibliography               and spelling
                                                                                    understanding of key
                                                                                    principles and
                                                                                    concepts
Fail                  0 – 34     Insufficient and         No evidence of            Little or no evidence of   Little or no evidence   Little or no referencing   Unacceptable
[Unacceptable Work]              largely irrelevant       relevant application of   knowledge and              of reading              and bibliography           presentation,
                                 material                 theory                    understanding of the                                                          grammar and
                                                                                    key principles and                                                            structure
                                                                                    concepts



                                                                                      34
Generic Assessment Criteria – Qualitative-Based Work                                                                                                                Level 5
Classification        % Range    Content                 Application of            Knowledge and            Evidence of             Referencing and            Presentation,
                                                         Theory                    Understanding            Reading                 Bibliography               Grammar and
                                                                                                                                                               Spelling
I                     80 – 100   Extensive critical      Evidence of detailed,     Excellent knowledge      Evidence of reading a   Excellent referencing      Exceptional
[Outstanding Work]               evaluation and          relevant application of   and depth of             wide range of           and bibliography           presentation,
                                 synthesis of issues     theory, and/or            understanding of         supplementary                                      logically structured,
                                 and material which      empirical results,        principles and           sources                                            using correct
                                 includes original and   where applicable          concepts                                                                    grammar and
                                 reflective thinking                                                                                                           spelling
I                     70 – 79    Some critical           Clear evidence of         Comprehensive            Evidence of reading a   Comprehensive              Excellent, well
[Excellent Work]                 evaluation and          relevant application of   knowledge and depth      range of                referencing and            directed
                                 synthesis of issues     theory and/or             of understanding of      supplementary           bibliography               presentation,
                                 and material which      empirical results,        principles and           sources                                            logically structured,
                                 includes some           where applicable          concepts                                                                    using correct
                                 originality                                                                                                                   grammar and
                                                                                                                                                               spelling

II (i)                60 – 69    Evaluation and          Appropriate               Knowledge and sound      Adequate evidence of    Appropriate                Good presentation
[Good Quality Work]              synthesis of main       application of theory     understanding of         reading                 referencing and            logically structured,
                                 issues and material     and/or empirical          principles and           supplementary           bibliography               using correct
                                                         results, where            concepts                 sources                                            grammar and
                                                         applicable                                                                                            spelling
II (ii)               50 - 59    Accurate description    Occasional relevant       Knowledge and            Evidence of directed    Adequate referencing       Orderly
[Acceptable Work]                of main issues and      application of theory     understanding of key     reading and some        and bibliography           presentation,
                                 material with some      and/or empirical          principles and           supplementary                                      competently
                                 evaluation              results                   concepts only            sources                                            structured and
                                                                                                                                                               acceptable
                                                                                                                                                               grammar and
                                                                                                                                                               spelling
III                   40 – 49    Description of main     Limited evidence of       Basic knowledge and      Evidence of directed    Limited referencing        Weak presentation
[Adequate Work]                  issues and material     relevant application of   understanding of key     reading only            and bibliography           and structure,
                                 only                    theory and/or             principles and                                                              acceptable
                                                         empirical results         concepts only                                                               grammar and
                                                                                                                                                               spelling
Fail                  35 – 39    Omission of some        Very limited evidence     Limited and/or           Evidence of minimal     Inadequate                 Poor presentation,
(Marginal)                       relevant material       of application of         superficial knowledge    reading only            referencing and            structure, grammar
[Limited Work]                                           theory and/or             and understanding of                             bibliography               and spelling
                                                         empirical results         key principles and
                                                                                   concepts

Fail                  0 – 34     Insufficient and        No evidence of            Little or no knowledge   Little or no evidence   Little or no referencing   Unacceptable
[Unacceptable Work]              largely irrelevant      application of theory     and understanding of     of reading              and bibliography           presentation,
                                 material                and/or empirical          key principles and                                                          structure, grammar
                                                         results                   concepts                                                                    and spelling



                                                                                     35
Resources

Languages at Ulster have always been at the forefront of the adoption of new
technologies to enhance language learning and teaching. We were the first in the
UK to introduce satellite TV for teaching purposes in 1985, one of the first to develop
a médiathèque, making available all sorts of visual and written resources from the
target countries, and have been involved since 1987 in a number of externally
funded computer-based projects, notably the Computers in Teaching Initiative
project in language and linguistics and then the TLTP (Technology Enhanced
Language Learning) consortium lead by the University of Hull, from 1993-1997. This
involvement has involved the use of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL)
and has included the development of software and the introduction of language
classes along with computers. The use of satellite and media resources has
remained a key feature of our teaching, notably in our Multimedia Language
Learning Laboratories provision.

The Multimedia Language Learning Laboratories

Since 1999 the School has been developing its multimedia language learning
laboratories using this expertise, initially as a pilot project. This enterprise means
that all of the functions of the traditional audiotape based and video-based language
laboratories are united with those of the functions of the computer on individual
workstations. These computers are grouped together into classrooms. They enable
students to use the benefits of technology for the development of all of their
language skills. We were the first University in the UK to have this kind of distance
learning facility, and one of the first to have such a multimedia lab-based teaching
complex.

The Centre of Excellence in Multimedia Language Learning (CEMLL)

The multimedia laboratories and our teaching strategies within them formed the
basis for our successful Centres of Excellence in Teaching and Learning bid. We
were granted £825,000 over 5 years by the Department of Employment and
Learning in Northern Ireland to develop our recognised excellence in teaching in the
area of Multimedia Language Learning. We are working closely with the subject
centre for Language, Linguistics and Area Studies of the Higher Education Academy,
and other Universities, notably in Southampton and Portsmouth, to consolidate our
existing excellence in the teaching of languages using this technology. It is a
requirement of the funding that we disseminate our methods and approaches, not
only within our own institution, but to others and not only in languages, but in other
subjects. That process has been very successful and has shown interesting results.
What is clear is that we are the leaders in this kind of pedagogy in the UK and one of
the most advanced in Europe. The money granted has enabled the appointment of
two language technologists, one in French and one in Irish, as well as a learning
technologist to oversee the programme, and a technician to deal with the technical
challenges and innovations that are part of the project. Those linked to the project
are involved in further developing appropriate pedagogies for the CALL classroom.
The CEMLL indicates our commitment to innovation in teaching and learning.



                                          36
The Multimedia Resource Unit

In tandem with the development of the multimedia labs we have also established a
Multimedia Resource Unit at Coleraine. It brings together the facilities of our
pioneering Médiathèque, the Faculty‟s Film and Sound Resource Unit and the
resources of Media Studies in an excellent private practice space which permits the
viewing of live satellite TV, of archived DVDs and VHS tapes, and written material –
current magazines and newspapers. Its archives draw together a vast array of
material which can be accessed for both student and staff use. The emphasis in this
space is on private practice and independent learning.

Library services

The Library service at the University of Ulster holds over 700,000 books,
approximately 1,800 journal titles in print and more than 16,000 journal titles in
electronic format. In addition to this, the library also has a significant range of non-
book media such as DVDs, CDs, and microfilm. Electronic books are also
purchased, especially for high demand items. The Library at the University of Ulster
contains a substantial collection of material relevant to the teaching of Modern
Languages. It subscribes to a range of foreign language newspapers in both print
and electronic formats e.g. Le Figaro, Le Nouvel Observateur, El Païs and Die Zeit.
It also subscribes to a wide range of periodicals in print and electronic formats. The
following titles provide a small sample of the titles available to Modern Language
students and staff: French Cultural studies, Calico, Der Spiegel, Stern, the
International Journal of Iberian Studies and the Journal of Iberian and Latin
American Studies.

The new University Portal is the gateway to the range of online services including
the library catalogue, electronic databases, subject guides and electronic journals.
Logging on via the Portal provides devolved Athens authentication for e-resources.
Library resources on the Portal can be found on the Learning Resources tab. Most
of these resources are available to registered users either on or off-campus using
any computer with a connection to the Internet. A range of adaptive technology is
available to ensure accessibility for students with disabilities. Outside the Portal, the
Library Home page can also be viewed at Url: http://library.ulster.ac.uk/


Library Catalogue
http://libcat1.ulster.ac.uk/TalisPrism/

The Library catalogue is available from any computer which has an internet
connection. It can be used to search for material held in any of the campus LRCs.


Document Delivery

Registered Staff and students can access material not held at Ulster using the
Document Delivery service. Undergraduate and taught postgraduate students may
request up to four items per week. Research students and staff may request up to
eight items per week.

                                           37
Databases
http://library.ulster.ac.uk/electronic/

The Library provides access to a wide range of databases, both bibliographic and full
text. These databases are used to enable staff and students to find information
relating to their area of subject interest. Databases are normally accessed with the
devolved Athens authentication provided by the University Portal. The vast majority
of the databases are available on and off campus twenty-four hours a day.
Databases provide access to journal literature, online newspapers and reference
works.

Electronic Journals
http://tdnet.com/ulster_athens

The Library uses TDNet to provide access to its growing collection of Electronic
Journals. Athens authentication is automatically provided by logging on to the Portal
or by accessing the Library Service Point within WebCT. E-journals are available
both on and off campus. Many of these are relevant to the study of Modern
Languages, for example: The Modern Languages Association Bibliography, Web of
Science, British Humanities Index, ASSIA and a number of other databases in
related subject areas. Most of the databases use Athens authentication and are
therefore available both on and off campus.

Faculty Subject Guide
http://library.ulster.ac.uk/arts

The Faculty of Arts Subject Guide is the main source of information for staff and
students about library resources and services to support teaching and research in
the Faculty. The Arts Subject Guide provides pointers to sources of information for
all subjects taught and will be the main source of information about any new library
resource or service relevant to the Faculty. Subject Guides are available for French,
German, Spanish and Chinese.

Support for students

The Library provides a comprehensive user education programme to support users
at all levels. Classes are delivered to small and large groups and on an individual
basis. These sessions are tailored to suit the specific needs of the group and range
from induction to research level. Increasingly subject classes include a „hands on‟
element involving e-journal searching and topic searching on databases. A wide
range of documentation to support users is also available, for example there are
checklists for each subject area and user guides to support the use of databases.

Subject support staff can be contacted at the LRC Information desks, by phone or by
email. It is also possible to submit a subject enquiry electronically to a member of the
Library Support team by using the online subject enquiry form at
http://talis.ulster.ac.uk/enq.htm. A member of the Library support team for Arts
will contact the user to assist with their enquiry.



                                          38
Photocopying, Printing and Scanning

Each LRC provides a self-service photocopying facility as well as both black and
white and colour printers. The Library service also operates a scanning service
within the terms of the University‟s Copyright and Scanning Licence. This means that
Reading List material owned by the University (i.e. held by the Library) can be
scanned and accessed by the students via their online Reading lists on the Library
Service Point within WebCT.




                                        39
DEALING WITH PROBLEMS

Academic Problems - What to Do if Things Go Wrong

If you have not been attending seminars regularly, or not handing in written work, the
module co-ordinator or the Course/Subject Director will usually write to you asking
for some explanation. Do not ignore such letters because this may have serious
consequences for your academic progress. If you have some genuine explanation
for poor attendance or failure to submit written work, the module co-ordinator and the
Course/Subject Director will be prepared to listen and may well be in a position to
offer some sound practical advice. In any case it is much easier to sort out problems
if you keep your seminar tutor and/or your adviser of studies informed of your
difficulties as they arise. If you have any doubts about whom you should see or what
you should do in case you face problems affecting your academic work, do not
hesitate to approach any member of staff - they will all be able to offer you advice.
However, certain categories of academic and personal problems and issues can only
be dealt with by consulting particular members of staff. A number of these are listed
here, together with the various procedures you should follow in specific cases.

Lecturers/tutors

If you have any problems relating to the material studied in a particular module, you
should approach, in the first instance, your lecturer/tutor. This can best be done at
the end of a class - some seminar tutors work part-time, and they may be rather
difficult to contact outside their allocated teaching time. If your lecturer/tutor is a
fulltime member of staff, you can contact him or her during their office hours
(information as to when these are will normally be displayed on their notice boards).
Alternatively, you may always ask your tutor for an appointment; arrangements in
this respect can be made via the Irish secretary. The seminar tutor will be happy to
discuss your problems and to offer advice on the contents of the module, study
methods, assessment procedures, and so on.

Module Co-ordinators

If you have any other, non-academic problems relating to a particular module (to do,
for example, with timetable clashes, allocation to a seminar group, access to books,
short-term extensions on your written work, and so on), the person to contact is your
module co-ordinator. He or she would normally also be happy to answer any queries
you might have in connection with the academic side of the module: its contents,
assessment procedures, and so on. However, it might sometimes be easier to
address these in the first instance to the seminar tutor: in some modules the module
co-ordinator might just not have enough time to deal with queries from all the
students, sometimes in excess of a hundred people, doing his or her module.
Needless to say, when the module co-ordinator is at the same time your seminar
tutor, he or she is your first port of call irrespective of the nature of your particular
query. All module co-ordinators are full-time members of staff, so they can be
contacted either after a lecture or seminar, or during their office hours, or by
appointment.



                                           40
Advisers of Studies

All students on taught courses are assigned to advisers of studies, whose role it is to
offer to their advisees‟ general academic and personal guidance throughout their
course of study. You would contact your adviser on matters such as, for example,
what modules to choose in any given semester, where to turn for advice in case of
academic or financial difficulties, and what to do if you have failed to submit an essay
or missed an examination. You will be given the name of your adviser of studies at
registration or during the first week of Semester 1, and you will be expected to
contact him or her around that time to talk about how you plan to organise your work
throughout the academic year. You are encouraged to talk to your adviser about
your progress; he or she will also be happy to discuss with you matters such as
study methods and examination skills. You should also bring to the attention of your
adviser any medical or other problems that may affect your work; he or she will be
pleased to provide you with information about the range of support available from,
e.g., Student Services, Chaplaincy, Careers Advisory Service, and so on. Needless
to say, your adviser will always, if requested, assist you in making arrangements if
you need to seek specialist advice or help.

Course/Subject Director

The Course/Subject Director is responsible for the day-to-day running of the course,
and it is to him or her that you would normally turn to discuss any major problems
with relation to your work, particularly those that are not specific to individual
modules and are beyond the remit of your adviser of studies. The Course/Subject
Director will deal with issues such as long-term extensions and late submission of
work, absence from class tests and/or examinations, resits and resubmissions, and
so on. The names of the Course/Subject Directors for other programmes are
available from the Faculty Office.

Dean

On very rare occasions, and only in cases of very serious problems, you may have
to discuss matters with the Head of the Faculty, the Dean, Professor Pól Ó
Dochartaigh (tel. 028 70324517). You will always need to make an appointment, via
the Dean‟s secretary.




                                          41
The University’s Web Portal




What is the Portal?

A web portal is a gateway site to a collection of online resources. Typically, portals
provide personalised information, features and applications to their users, and are
customisable according to users' needs.

The University Portal is the central access point to information relevant to your
pursuits and interests at Ulster.

The Portal is also a communication tool that will allow users to receive information
targeted according to their role at the University (student, academic, or employee).

The University Portal... your online gateway to University information and services
including WebCT, Banner Student Record System, Library Account, PDS, Athens,
Microsoft Live@edu and more!

Logging into the Portal

Enter Your Net ID and Password

Username:


Password:
                         _c28B867D1-4B8 submit

Forgot your password?

 Login



First time logging in?



CAS Credentials

students - student ID number e.g. B00345678.

associates - associate number e.g. a1234.

For students, your password is your 'network password'. This is the same password
you would use to log on to LRC computers.

                                                 42
           UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER

           FACULTY OF ……………………………………………………………………..

           Coursework Submission Sheet
                                                                                                                                     University Date
                       This sheet must be completed in full and attached to the front of each item of assessment
                                                                                                 Stamp
                                                                                      before submission to [XXX]

                      Student‟s Name ...............................................................................................................

                      Registration No ................................................................................................................

                      Course Title .....................................................................................................................

                      Module Code/Title ...........................................................................................................

                      Lecturer............................................................................................................................

                      Date Due..........................................................................................................................

                      (NB: Latest hand-in time is [XXX] on the due date unless otherwise advised)

                      Submitted work is subject to the following assessment policies:

           1          Coursework must be submitted by dates as specified by the [Course/Subject]
                      Committee.

           2          Students may seek prior consent from the [Course/Subject] Director to submit
                      coursework after the official deadline; such requests must be accompanied by a
                      satisfactory explanation, and in the case of illness by a medical certificate.

           3       Coursework submitted without consent after the deadline will not normally be accepted
                   and will therefore receive a mark of zero.
           I declare that this is all my own work and does not contain unreferenced material copied
           from any other source. I have read the University’s policy on plagiarism and understand
           the definition of plagiarism. If it is shown that material has been plagiarised, or I have
           otherwise attempted to obtain an unfair advantage for myself or others, I understand that I
           may face sanctions in accordance with the policies and procedures of the University. A
           mark of zero may be awarded and the reason for that mark will be recorded on my file.

           Student’s Signature ……………………………………….. Date …………………………..



COURSEWORK RECEIPT – Not valid unless stamped

Student‟s Name ...............................................................................................................

Module Code and Title ...................................................................................................
           It is your responsibility to retain this receipt.




                                                                                   43
                            UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER

                     RECORD OF PLAGIARISM OFFENCE

Student’s Name:


Student’s Registration number:


Module Code and Title:


Module Co-ordinator:


Tutor:


Date assignment submitted:


Date plagiarism detected:


Is this the student’s first offence? YES/NO
(All offences prior to first formative advice are considered as a first offence. In
the case of a number of offences prior to advice, this may be noted below but
has to be considered a first offence.)

If no, please state number of previous offences:

Date of interview:


Interviewer(s):

Comments:



Penalty imposed (refer to Framework of Penalties for Plagiarism Offences,
taking account of date of first formative advice):


Form completed by:                                 Date:

                                        44
Leave of Absence Policy

General Regulations for Students

Regulation 9 states that „Students may apply in accordance with rules approved by
the Senate for a period of leave of absence from their programmes of study or
research. Applications shall be considered on behalf of the Senate by the board of
the faculty or the Research Degrees Committee which, in granting leave of absence,
may prescribe that the student may be required on resumption of studies to repeat
any part of the programme of study or research, or that the point of resumption be
not decided until the time of the student‟s return.‟

Policy

Leave of absence is granted at the discretion of the Faculty following consideration
of the particular circumstances of a student. It is granted for a period requiring an
interruption to a student‟s registration such that the student would not complete the
semester/year and its assessments. (Shorter periods of absence, which are not
likely to affect progress, should be managed through the Notification of Absence
system and/or in accordance with the consideration of extenuating circumstances.)

Normally a request should be approved for no more than one year in the first
instance, which may be renewed for a maximum of a further year. After that, the
student should be withdrawn but may apply for readmission, under the APL
regulation, to an appropriate stage in the course, at a later date, when he/she is
ready to resume studies. (This is preferable to maintaining an ongoing commitment
to a student, when the course may develop significantly over a period of time or be
withdrawn, and the student‟s prior knowledge may no longer be current or relevant.)

Process

Applications for leave of absence should be submitted in writing to the Course/
Subject Director in the first instance, and supported by documentary evidence where
appropriate. A Student Record Amendment Form should be completed and
processed by the Faculty when the leave of absence is granted by or on behalf of
the Faculty Board.

Return to Study

The student should contact the Course/Subject Director in good time before his/her
return to study. The Course/Subject Committee may require evidence of the
student‟s fitness to resume studies.

A former student who wishes to be re-admitted to a course, should submit an
application form including, as applicable, a request for exemption.          The
Course/Subject Committee may require evidence of the student‟s fitness to resume
studies.




                                         45
Dates of Attendance / Examinations / Vacations 2010/11



Introductory period     Monday 13 September 2010 - Friday 17 September 2010


Autumn Semester         Monday 20 September 2010 – Friday 21 January


Christmas vacation      Monday 13 December 2010 – Monday 3 January 2011


Examinations begin      Wednesday 5 January 2011


Spring Semester         Monday 24 January 2011 – Friday 27 May 2011


University Closed       Thursday 17 March 2010
(St Patrick‟s Day)


Easter vacation         Monday 18 April 2011 – Friday 29 April 2011


University Closed       Monday 2 May 2011
(May Day)


Revision week           Tuesday 3 May 2011 – Friday 6 May 2011


Examinations begin      Monday 9 May 2011


Summer Semester         Monday 25 July 2011 – Friday 16 September 2011


Examinations begin      Monday 5 September 2011


Supplementary Exams     Wednesday 17 August 2011 – Thursday 25 August 2011




                                     46
Disclaimer

Details of the course are set out in this Handbook. The University will use all
reasonable endeavors to deliver the course in accordance with this description.
However the University does not provide education on a commercial basis and is
largely dependent on public and charitable funds, which the University has to
manage in a way which is efficient and cost-effective, in the context of the provision
of a diverse range of programmes to a large number of students. The University
therefore reserves the right to make variations in the content or method of delivery or
assessment or other changes if such action is reasonably considered necessary by
the University in the context of its wider purposes.




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posted:10/22/2011
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