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					                            NAME OF COMPANY




                        SAFETY MANUAL

                                 DATE




Revised: January 2011
WHAT THIS MANUAL IS ALL ABOUT

The FISIF has provided this safety manual to its members as a tool for
developing a Safety and Health Program to meet the needs of the individual
member. It is not intended to be a comprehensive safety program or meet all
OSHA guidelines.

This manual has been designed for you to implement those sections that apply
to you. Space has been provided in many sections in order to make it site-
specific by adding your own safety procedures or information. At a minimum,
a Safety and Health Program should include:
                    safety policy statement
                    safe work rules
                    safety and health training
                    safety inspections
                    accident investigations

We encourage all owners, managers and supervisory staff to participate in
making this safety manual a working document. Use it to improve your own
safety and health knowledge and to educate your employees to perform their
work safely.

Accidents happen even when we attempt to implement a good safe work
atmosphere. Therefore, we have developed a guideline for you to follow to
help return your employees to work as soon as possible and control the cost of
your claims.

The responsibilities in this manual will add very little to workloads. What is
added will be more than offset by the increase in productivity and the drop in
accidents.

Please call your FISIF Team if we can help you improve your Accident
Prevention Program or control your claims cost.
Index

                                               Section

Safety & Health Policy Statement                    1

Responsibilities & Accountabilities                 2
1. Owners/General Managers
2. Supervisors/Managers
3. Employees

Safety Rules & Regulations                          3
1. General Requirements
2. General Safety Rules
3. Safety Rules – Restaurants
   A. Food Preparation & Service Area
   B. Dish Washing Area
   C. Dining Area/Wait Persons
   D. Garbage, Trash Storage & Disposal Area
4. Safety Rules – Grocery & Supermarkets
   A. Meat Department
   B. Produce
   C. Bakery
   D. Deli
   E. Stock Department
   F. Receiving/Storage Areas
   G. Cashiers
   H. Baggers & Carryout
   I. Garbage, Trash Storage & Disposal Area
5. Safety Rules – Convenience Stores
   A. Robbery - Shoplifters
   B. Attendants – Cashiers
   C. Stocking
   D. Grill/Snack Bars
   E. Exterior
   F. Garbage & Trash
Index

                                                     Section

6. Safety Rules - Agribusinesses
   A. General Rules
   B. Barns, Workshops & Storage Yards
   C. Ladders & Raised Work Areas
   D. Machine Guarding
   E. Confined Spaces
   F. Vehicle Safety
   G. Forklifts & Powered Pallet Jacks
   H. Grain Handling
   I. Housekeeping
   J. Working with Livestock
   K. Calf Farms
7. Safety Rules – Home Health & Homemaker Services
   A. Personal Protection Equipment (PPE)
   B. Housekeeping
   C. Client Transfer & Assistance
   D. Change in Behavior, Dementia & Alzheimer’s
   E. Personal Security

Safety & Health Training                                   4
1. New Employee Orientation and Training
2. Basic Concepts
3. Safety Orientation
4. Responsibilities
5. General Safety & Health Training
   A. Supervisors/Managers
   B. Employees
Index

                                                                   Section

Safety Inspections                                                        5
1. Purpose
2. Responsibilities
3. General Requirements
4. What to Look For (Unsafe Conditions) and What to Look At (Unsafe Acts)
   A. Walking Surfaces
   B. Exits
   C. Lighting
   D. Electrical
   E. Fire Protection
   F. Machinery & Equipment
   G. Chemicals
   H. Material Handling Equipment
   I. Housekeeping
   J. Ladders
4. Safety Inspection Form

Accident Investigation                                                   6
1. Purpose
2. Responsibilities
3. Accident Investigation
   A. Get the Big Picture First
   B. Interview Most Knowledgeable People
   C. Put the Person at Ease
   D. Interview On-The-Spot
   E. Interviews Should be Private
   F. Get Individual’s Version
   G. Ask Necessary Questions at the Right Time
   H. Repeat the Story Once You Have Heard it.
   I. End Each Interview on a Positive Note
   J. Record Critical Information Quickly
   K. Drawings and Photos Sometimes Help
   L. Keep the Pipe-Line Open
4. Guidelines for Completing the Accident Investigation
5. Supervisors/Manager’s Accident Investigation Report
Index

                                                     Section

Claims Management                                         7
1. Purpose
2. Claims Reporting
   A. Immediate Claims Reporting
   B. Notice of Accident
   C. First Aid
   D. Supervisors/Manager’s Accident Investigation
   E. First Report of Injury or Illness
   F. Contact by the Claims Adjustor
   G. Establish a Schedule
3. Return-to-Work/Modified Duty
4. Workers’ Compensation Fraud

OSHA Compliance                                           8
1. OSHA Regulations
   A. OSHA Recordkeeping
   B. Hazard Communications
   C. Personal Protection Equipment (PPE)
   D. Fire Protection
   E. Emergency Preparedness
   F. Machine Guarding
   G. Lockout/Tagout
   H. Walking & Working Surfaces
   I. Powered Industrial Truck Safety (Forklifts)
   J. Bloodborne Pathogens
2. OSHA Resources

Drug & Alcohol Policy                                     9
1. Purpose
2. Policy
3. Drug & Alcohol Screen Authorization & Release
Index

                                                                Section

New Mexico Insurance & Safety Posting Requirements                    10
1. Purpose
2. Responsibilities
3. General Posting Requirements
   A. New Mexico Workers’ Compensation Administration
   B. New Mexico Environmental Department Occupational Health & Safety
      Bureau
Safety & Health Policy Statement   1
Name of Company



                      Safety & Health Policy Statement


                                  places the safety and health of our
guests/customers and employees as a priority in all we do in our daily work and
services performed. We recognize the responsibility we have to the
guests/customers we serve and you, our employees. At no time should the
safety and health to either be compromised.

                                 considers accident prevention an integral part
of an efficient and productive environment. We will operate in a manner that
promotes safety and health, while complying with all government regulations.
We will operate on the premise that accidents can and will be prevented.

Each manager/department head has the direct responsibility, authority and
accountability for promoting, implementing and enforcing our safety standards
for our employees.

Each employee has the responsibility to work in a safe and healthful manner
and to prevent injury to themselves, co-workers and our guests/customers.




Signature


Position


Date
Responsibilities & Accountabilities   2
Responsibilities & Accountabilities                                        2-1

Owners/General Managers
  1. Implement safety goals and objectives to develop a strong safety attitude
     and clear understanding of duties and responsibilities for each employee.
  2. Maintain adequate controls to assure that the safety improvement goals
     are met.
  3. Commit adequate resources to ensure that the Safety & Health Program
     is properly administered.
  4. Ensure established safety rules and regulations are followed.
  5. Investigate (or assist in the investigation of) all accidents within their
     facility(ies.)
  6. Assure regularly scheduled safety inspections are performed.
  7. Include safety on the agenda for all staff meetings.
  8. Ensure established housekeeping and sanitation standards are maintained.
  9. Assure the safety and health issues are communicated to all employees.
  10.Analyze problem areas and take corrective actions as needed.
  11.Assure safety training is provided to all employees and proper records are
     maintained.
  12.Provide and maintain adequate first aid supplies.

Supervisors/Managers
  1. Oversee and monitor the Safety & Health Program under the direction of
     the Owner/General Manger.
  2. Develop a strong safety attitude and clear understanding of duties and
     responsibilities for each employee.
  3. Maintain adequate controls to assure that the safety requirements are met.
  4. Commit adequate resources to ensure safety and health improvements are
     met.
  5. Ensure established safety rules and regulations are followed.
  6. Investigate (or assist in the investigation of) all accidents in their
     department(s.)
  7. Participate in conducting regularly scheduled safety inspections.
  8. Conduct regularly scheduled safety meetings.
  9. Ensure established housekeeping and sanitation standards are maintained.
Responsibilities & Accountabilities                                          2-2

   Supervisors/Managers - Continued
   10.Analyze problem areas and take corrective actions as needed.
   11.Assure safety training is provided to all employees and proper records are
      maintained.
   12.Administer specific policies to promote the implementation of the Safety
      & Health Program (performance review, disciplinary procedures, etc.)
   13.Assist in the administration of the claims function and return-to-work
      programs
   14.Provide and maintain adequate first aid supplies.

Employees
  1. Follow safe work procedures and take an active part in protecting
     themselves, their fellow employees and guests/customers.
  2. Understand the hazards and safety precautions to reduce or eliminate
     those hazards before undertaking any assignment.
  3. Report all unsafe conditions, practices and behavior to management, and
     make suggestions for their correction.
  4. Report all injuries to their supervisor and/or manager and obtain first aid
     or medical help without delay.
  5. Participate in the continuous improvement of the Safety & Health
     Program.
  6. Cooperate with the claims management process.
  7. Comply with written safety and health rules.
  8. Wear and maintain personal protective equipment (PPE) as required.
  9. Come to work each day mentally and physically capable of safely
     performing their duties.
  10.Maintain good housekeeping and sanitation throughout their work areas.
Safety Rules & Regulations   3
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                      3-1

General Requirements

These safety rules apply to all locations, all work activities and all personnel.
In addition, department rules may be formulated to prevent unsafe practices
and/or conditions.

All employees and managers are held strictly responsible for safe conditions
and work procedures in their areas of responsibilities.

    Owners/General Managers must assure the Safety Rules & Regulations
     are adhered to and enforced.
    Supervisors/Managers are responsible for educating, enforcing and
     reinforcing the Safety Rules & Regulations in their areas of
     responsibilities.
    Employees are responsible for adhering to the Safety Rules &
     Regulations in all tasks performed.

It is the employee’s responsibility to conduct himself/herself in a safe manner at
all times, not only for his/her own well-being and protection, but that of the
guests/customers and fellow employees.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                   3-2

                        GENERAL SAFETY RULES

All employees must follow company and regulatory safety policies and
procedures.

All employee injuries, no matter how minor, must be reported to management
at the time of the incident.

Report all potential hazards to management immediately.

Employees shall make recommendations to management on methods,
procedures or equipment to improve safety in the workplace.

All employees will be trained on and must wear and maintain personal
protective equipment (PPE) as required, including closed-toe shoes with clean,
non-skid soles for wet or slippery surfaces.

No employee shall attempt to operate tools or equipment without being trained
and authorized by management to do so.

No employee shall attempt to make unauthorized repairs, perform maintenance
or alter any machinery or equipment.

No employee shall tamper with, alter, purposely damage or remove any safety
protection devices.

Good housekeeping must be maintained at all times.

Clean-up excess water or other spills immediately. “Wet Floor” markers should
be used in all cases.

Non-slip floor mats will be used at all water sources, including ice machines,
sinks and slippery work surfaces.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                      3-3

                  GENERAL SAFETY RULES - Continued

Horseplay is not allowed under any circumstances.

Aisle and exit ways must be maintained open and accessible at all times.

Fire extinguishers and fire suppression controls must be accessible at all times.

Smoking is allowed only in designated areas. Smoking materials must be
disposed of in safety containers.

No loose jewelry shall be worn when working with machinery or equipment.

All paints, varnishes, thinners and other flammable liquids must be stored in
covered containers in an approved U.L. Listed cabinet.

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all hazardous
chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand them. (Refer
to OSHA’s Hazard Communication Regulation.)
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                 3-4

                                Restaurants

Food Preparation & Service Area
1. All employees must wear slip-resistant footwear that provides good anti-
   fatigue support.
2. Floors are to be kept dry, clean and free from water and grease.
3. Non-slip mats with beveled edges should be maintained at dishwashing
   areas, pot sinks and ice machines.
4. Aisleways and traffic ways should be kept free from obstacles and
   obstructions.
5. Counters, steam tables and other equipment should be kept free from sharp
   corners.
6. Guards should be kept in place for cutting, chopping, slicing and grinding
   machines (automated or manual types.)
7. Employees will be trained to use equipment that their duties require them to
   use.
8. Employees will be trained to know the safeguards and hazards that pertain to
   each type and piece of equipment.
9. Report any equipment that is broken or unsafe to use to your manager
   immediately. Do not use unsafe equipment.
10.All electrical equipment shall have proper grounding.
11.All electric outlets at or near water sources shall be equipped with ground
   fault interrupters (GFI.)
12.Knives should be properly sharpened on a regular basis, and safely stored
   when not in use.
13.Lighting should be adequate and appropriately guarded.
14.Potholders should be used for handling hot pots and pans.
15.Handles of cooking utensils should be checked on a regular basis to insure
   they are tight.
16.Use a tamper or stomper to push meat into a grinder.
17.Assure all machines and equipment are turned off and unplugged before
   performing maintenance or cleaning.
18.Do not leave machines unattended when running.
19.Cutting attachments should be firmly fixed and guard in place before used.
20.Use a cut-resistant glove on the hand holding product being hand-cut, sliced
   or diced.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                    3-5

Food Preparation & Service Area - Continued
21.Use cut-resistant gloves on both hands when cleaning a slicing machine.
22.For deep fryer maintenance or cleaning, use safety mitts at all times, and
   assure the grease is cooled before cleaning or draining.
23.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.

Dish Washing Area
1. Slip-resistant footwear must be worn.
2. Floors are to be kept free from excessive water and spillage.
3. Heavy latex gloves with wrist extensions will be used when performing
   dishwashing duties. The cuffs should be turned down to keep hot water
   from running into them.
4. Adequate ventilation should be provided to remove steam and dampness.
5. Pans, dish tubs, racks and other obstacles should be kept out of traffic ways.
6. Broken dishware or glassware should be promptly and safely picked up
   using a broom and dustpan. Then dispose of them properly in a metal or
   heavy plastic container with lid.
7. Supplemental flooring should be in good repair and not create a tripping
   hazard.
8. Employees should be trained in the safe use of cleaning compounds and
   drying agents.
9. All electrical units and switches must be properly grounded.
10.All electric outlets at or near water sources shall be equipped with ground
   fault interrupters (GFI.)
11.Transport bus carts should be kept in good repair.
12.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.

Dining Area/Waitpersons
1. Service doors should be adequately marked to insure safe traffic patterns.
2. Slip-resistant shoes with full toe and heel covers must be worn.
3. Tray stands and service carts should be kept in good repair and not
   obstructing traffic.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                    3-6

Dining Area/Waitpersons - Continued
4. Floors should be kept free from food spillage, silverware, broken glassware,
   loose mats, torn carpets or other hazards.
5. Chipped or cracked dishware or glassware should be immediately disposed
   of in a proper manner.
6. Assure that your section is properly arranged with chairs pulled up to
   counters, tables and out of the aisleways. Lighting is adequate for you to
   perform your duties safely.
7. Never overload a tray. Assure that the dinnerware is within the lip of the
   tray. Make a second trip or ask for help when your order is too large for you
   to carry it safely to the guest’s table.
8. Consider the weight of the order, at no time should you lift or carry orders or
   materials over 25-pounds. When taking the order from the prep area, place
   and balance the order on the tray. Pull the tray slightly over the ledge, bend
   at the knees and place your shoulder under the tray. Slide it onto your
   shoulder, assure your grip, rise slowly and gain your balance before
   attempting to walk. Turn in the direction you want to go; do not twist your
   body.
9. Walk slowly and look where you are going. Wait for guests to pass before
   proceeding to your destination. When required to climb up or down stairs,
   stop briefly and assure the stairs are clear of materials and that you know
   where the step(s) begin and end. If possible, use the handrail.
10.Bend at your knees and slowly lower the tray onto the tray jack or edge of
   the table. At the table, secure the tray to prevent it from tipping over.
11.If you see or are otherwise aware of a spill, clean it up immediately or secure
   the area and get the proper equipment or person(s) to clean it.
12.Do not pick up broken glass with your hands, use a broom or brush with a
   dustpan to clean it up. Place broken glass in a heavy plastic or metal
   container with lid and labeled for broken glass.
13.When bussing a table, follow the same general procedures when picking up
   orders. Except, be aware that you will be required to bend further at table
   height to place the tray on your shoulder. Always place utensils on the tray
   or in a bus bin; do not leave them on the plates.
14.When bussing tables, place glasses on a separate tray unless they can be
   balanced safely. Do not stack glasses.
15.Do not use a chair for a ladder; get the proper safety step stool or ladder
   meeting the height/reach requirements.
16.Keep drawers and cabinet doors closed.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                 3-7

Dining Area/Waitpersons - Continued
17.Empty refuse containers before they overflow.
18.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.

Garbage, Trash Storage and Disposal Area
1. Disposal area should be kept free of broken glass, metal cans, food spillage
   and other debris.
2. Safe access should be maintained to garbage and trash containers.
3. Good lighting should be provided to and at trash containers.
4. Gloves are to be used when handling cans and broken glassware.
5. Employees should be trained in the safe use of steam jet or steam hoses.
6. Employees should be trained to safely operate compactors, using guards and
   protective devices. (No one under 18 years of age may operate compactors.)
7. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and the employees trained to read and
   understand them.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                  3-8

                        Grocery & Supermarkets

Meat Department
1. Employees should be trained to know the safeguards and hazards that pertain
   to each piece of equipment.
2. Only use equipment that you have been trained and are authorized to use.
3. Lighting should be adequate and appropriately covered.
4. Guards should be kept in place for cutting, chopping, slicing, sawing and
   grinding equipment.
5. Use a tamper or stomper to push meat into grinders.
6. Band saw blades should be guarded within one-half inch of the meat being
   cut.
7. Do not leave machines unattended while running.
8. Turn off, unplug and/or disconnect power to all machinery before clearing,
   cleaning or maintaining.
9. Assure all machinery is grounded properly.
10.All electrical outlets at or near water sources shall be equipped with ground
   fault interrupters (GFI.)
11.Slip-resistant footwear must be worn.
12.Use non-slip mats at machines, cutting tables, in coolers/freezers and at all
   water sources.
13.Clean-up spills and meat scraps immediately.
14.Use wet floor markers until the floor is dry.
15.Keep knives properly sharpened throughout the day and safely stored when
   not in use.
16.A cut-resistant glove should be worn on the hand holding the product when
   hand-cutting, slicing or dicing meat and on both hands when cleaning the
   meat slicer blades.
17.Do not place knives in sink water. A rack attached to the sink with the
   blades pointed downward should be used.
18.Aisleways and exits should be kept free of obstacles and obstructions.
19.Use carts for moving heavy and awkward materials. Get help to lift items
   over 35-pounds.
20.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                   3-9

Produce
1. Traffic areas and exits should be kept free of all obstructions.
2. Keep work areas, walk-in coolers and produce display areas free of scraps
   and other materials that may cause slips and falls.
3. Non-slip mats should be used in the receiving area, walk-in coolers and at all
   water sources.
4. Use squeegees and/or mops to direct ice and water to drains.
5. Knives should be properly sharpened and placed in sheaths when not in use.
6. Clean-up spills immediately and post “Wet Floor” markers until area is dry.
7. Use carts or hand trucks to move crates or other heavy objects. Get help to
   lift items over 35-pounds.
8. Lighting should be adequate and appropriately covered.
9. Slip-resistant footwear must be worn.
10.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.

Bakery
1. Employees should be trained to know the safeguards and hazards that pertain
   to each type and piece of equipment.
2. Slip-resistant footwear must be worn.
3. Floors are to be kept dry and free of debris, flour and grease.
4. Clean-up spills immediately and post “Wet Floor” markers until the floor is
   dry.
5. Guards should be kept in place for chopping, mixing and sifting machinery.
6. Turn off, unplug and/or disconnect power to equipment before clearing,
   cleaning or maintaining.
7. Potholders should be used when handling hot pots and pans.
8. Non-slip mats should be used at preparation tables, machinery and all water
   sources.
9. For deep fryer maintenance, cleaning and/or draining, wear safety mitts on
   both hands at all times and assure the grease is cooled.
10.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                  3-10

Deli
1. All employees should be trained to know the safeguards and hazards that
   pertain to each type and piece of equipment.
2. Slip-resistant footwear must be worn.
3. Guards should be kept in place for all equipment.
4. Turn off, unplug and/or disconnect power to equipment before clearing,
   cleaning or maintaining equipment.
5. A cut-resistant glove must be worn on the hand holding the product when
   hand cutting, slicing or dicing materials and on both hands when cleaning
   slicer blades.
6. Potholders should be used for handling hot pots and pans.
7. Handles of cooking utensils should be checked on a regular basis to insure
   that they are tight.
8. Non-slip mats should be used at preparation tables, stoves and all water
   sources.
9. Floors should be kept clear of all debris and spills. Post “Wet Floor”
   markers until the floors are dry.
10.Counters and other equipment should be kept free of sharp corners.
11.All electrical outlets at or near water sources shall be equipped with ground
   fault interrupters (GFI.)
12.Electric cords should be secured or ran overhead to reduce trip hazards.
13.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.

Stock Department
1. Hand-trucks, carts or pallet jacks should be used to transport boxed goods to
   the aisles. Items should not be staged in the aisles to allow a clear path.
2. Use safety stools or stairs to reach upper shelves. Do not stand on boxes,
   pallet jack or step on lower shelves.
3. Use self-retracting utility knives. Replace them if the blade dulls.
4. Do not pull the utility knife toward your body, and re-cover the utility knife
   blade when not in use.
5. Clean-up spills immediately and post “Wet Floor” markers until the floor is
   dry.
6. Clean-up broken glass with a broom and dust pan, placing the broken glass
   in a metal or heavy plastic container with a lid.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                3-11

Stock Department - Continued
7. Slip-resistant footwear must be worn.
8. Get help for lifting items weighing more than 35-pounds.
9. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.

Receiving/Storage Areas
1. The loading dock and receiving areas should be free of accumulated trash
   and other obstructions. Good housekeeping inside and outside should be
   maintained at all times.
2. Slip-resistant shoes must be worn.
3. Chocks should be placed under the rear wheels of trucks before entering
   them with a pallet jack or forklift.
4. Only trained and certified operators shall use forklifts. (Refer to OSHA’s
   Powered Industrial Truck Regulations.)
5. Forklifts should be inspected daily to assure they are safe to operate and be
   on a scheduled preventative maintenance program.
6. Hand-trucks, carts and dollies should be in good repair.
7. Hand-trucks, carts or other such equipment should be used for moving heavy
   or awkward materials. Get help when lifting over 35-pounds.
8. Only trained and authorized personnel should operate powered pallet jacks.
   (Refer to OSHA’s Powered Industrial Truck Regulations.)
9. Adequate lighting should be provided for night receiving and for entering
   semi-tractor trailers.
10.Non-slip mats should be used in walk-in freezers and coolers.
11.Only trained and authorized employees should operate compactors. (No one
   under the age of 18 years may operate these.)
12.Clean-up spills immediately and post “Wet Floor” markers until the floor is
   dry.
13.Paints, varnishes, thinners and other flammable liquids should be kept in
   covered containers in an approved U.L. Listed cabinet.
14.Aisles and exits must be kept clear of all materials at all times.
15.Exit doors must remain unlocked during business hours.
16.Safety goggles and gloves should be worn when using corrosive cleaners.
17.Due to possible adverse health effects, do not mix bleach with other cleaning
   materials.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                  3-12

Receiving/Storage Areas - Continued
18.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.

Cashiers
1. Do not lift heavy items from the bottoms of grocery carts; use the price
   scanner when possible.
2. When more than one of the same item is in the cart, scan only one item and
   punch in the total number of that item to reduce cumulative trauma stressors.
3. When checking out a large order, try to change product groups to reduce the
   repetition of holding canned goods as much a possible. (Canned goods
   require extension of the fingers and forces of the hand muscle to hold them.)
4. Maintain non-slip anti-fatigue mats at your work station.
5. Keep your bank to a minimum with frequent cash and check deposits.
6. In the event of a holdup, give the assailant what they ask for, do not resist.
   As best as possible, concentrate on the physical characteristics and
   mannerisms to assist the police at a later time.
7. Under no circumstances should shoplifters or robbers be followed outdoors.
   Attempt to get automobile identification information from inside, if it is safe
   to do so.
8. Slip-resistant shoes must be worn.
9. Maintain good housekeeping practices in your area.
10.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.

Baggers & Carryout
1. Slip-resistant shoes must be worn.
2. Immediately pickup debris and clean spills.
3. Immediately place “Wet Floor” markers where they will not create trip
   exposures until area is dry.
4. Clean-up broken glass with a broom and dustpan and place in a metal or
   heavy plastic container with lid.
5. Do not overload bags to prevent tears.
6. Do not overload carts and assure the grocery items are secured in the
   containment areas provided.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                3-13

Baggers & Carryout - Continued
7. Push grocery carts, do not pull them. Keep clear vision of the direction cart
   is being pushed.
8. Carts with faulty casters or broken components should be taken out of
   service until repaired.
9. Always walk, do not run.
10.Do not climb into trucks or vans to load groceries for customers. Request
   the customer to lower the tailgate. Do not lift or lower heavy items over the
   tailgate or sides. Do not lift items above your chest.
11.When required to lift items from the lower shelf of carts, pull them forward,
   get a good grip on both sides of bagged or boxed item, lift with your legs,
   turn (do not twist) and lower them into the truck using your legs – push into
   position.
12.Get help to lift items over 35-pounds in weight or large awkward items.
13.When retrieving carts from the parking lots, limit the number of carts
   retrieved to reduce strains. Keep control.
14.Do not ride the cart(s) while retrieving them to the store.
15.Immediately report potholes, large concrete/blacktop cracks or other trip
   exposures to management.
16.Material safe data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all hazardous
   chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand them.

Garbage, Trash Storage & Disposal Area
1. Disposal area should be kept free of broken glass, metal cans and food
   spillage.
2. Safe access should be maintained to garbage and trash containers.
3. Good lighting should be provided to and from trash bins.
4. Leather gloves are to be used when handling cans and broken glass.
5. Slip-resistant shoes must be worn.
6. Employees should be trained in the safe use of steam jet or steam hoses.
7. Employees should be trained to safely operate compactors, using guards and
   protective devices. (No one under the age of 18 years shall operate
   compactors.)
8. Get help when lifting any trash over 35-pounds in weight.
9. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and the employees trained to read and
   understand them.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                   3-14

                             Convenience Stores

Robbery – Shoplifters
1. Always have a least two employees on duty.
2. Keep visibility to and from the cashier’s stations at all times – Both from the
   interior of the store and exterior from the gas pump areas and street.
3. Use the “Drop Safe” often on a regular basis. Follow company requirements
   for times and dollar amounts for drops from the cash register.
4. Post signs at the entry and cash register “Attendants do not have access to
   safes.”
5. Limit the size of currency accepted. For example, “We cannot accept bills
   over $20.00.”
6. Do not count cash at regular times or where customers can see.
7. In the event of a robbery – do not resist, give them the cash, be cooperative,
   listen carefully and follow the robber’s instructions. Do not make sudden
   movements and do let them know about potential surprises like other
   employees on duty.
8. In the event of a holdup, give the assailant what they ask for. Do not resist.
   As best as possible, concentrate on the physical characteristics and
   mannerisms to assist the police at a later time.
9. Do not chase or try to stop a robber or shoplifter. If safe to do so, attempt to
   get the automobile information from inside.
10.Do not carry guns or other weapons in the workplace.

Attendants – Cashiers
1. Slip-resistant footwear must be worn at work.
2. Keep your work area clear of cords, boxes and debris.
3. Secure electrical and phone cords under or to the counters to prevent a trip
   exposure.
4. Provide non-slip strips at the nosing to steps.
5. Maintain anti-fatigue mats at the cash registers. Assure they are laid flat and
   do not create a trip exposure.

Stocking
1. Slip-resistant footwear must be worn at work.
2. Keep aisles clear of boxes, loose items and debris. While stocking, keep
   containers and boxes against the shelving units.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                               3-15

Stocking - Continued
3. Debris, boxes and outdated or damaged product should be placed in
   containers or in carts. Do not over fill trash or pulled product containers.
4. Use self-retracting safety utility knives. Replace them when the blade
   becomes dull.
5. Cut away from your body when using a safety utility knife.
6. Use safety step stools for stocking high shelving. Do not stand on boxes,
   chairs, counters, shelving units or overturned milk crates.
7. When using a stepladder assure the ladder is on a level surface, the legs
   spread and spreaders set. Do not stand on the top two steps of the ladder.
8. Immediately cleanup spills and wet areas, and post “Wet Floor” markers
   until the area is dry.
9. Clean broken glass with a broom and dustpan. Place broken glass in a heavy
   plastic or metal container with lid before placing in the trash.
10.Stack product squarely on shelves or racks. Do not allow them to hang over
   the edges.
11.Keep entrances, aisles and walkways clear of promotional displays.
12.Keep exits, fire extinguishers and electric circuit breakers clear and
   accessible at all times.
13.All exits must be unlocked during business hours.
14.Rear and/or side exits should be equipped with interior latches only. Do not
   leave these doors open.
15.Follow proper lift procedures. Limit weights to 35-pounds or less, otherwise
   get help.
16.Do not block your vision when carrying product.
17.Use a cart for moving product as much as possible. Do not overload the cart
   by height or weight.
18.Material safety Sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all hazardous
   chemicals used for cleaning and maintenance. The employees must be
   trained to read and understand them.

Grill/Snack Bars
1. All employees must wear slip-resistant footwear that provides good anti-
   fatigue support.
2. Floors are to be kept dry, clean and free from water and grease.
3. Non-slip mats with beveled edges should be maintained at dishwashing
   areas, pot sink and ice machines.
4. Maintain non-slip mats at self-serve beverages and coffee service areas.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                               3-16

Grill/Snack Bars - Continued
5. Aisleways and traffic ways should be kept free from obstacles and
   obstructions.
6. Counters, steam tables and other equipment should be kept free from sharp
   corners.
7. Guards should be kept in place for cutting, chopping, slicing and grinding
   machines (automated or manual types.)
8. Employees will be trained to use equipment that their duties require them to
   use.
9. Employees will be trained to know the safeguards and hazards that pertain to
   each type and piece of equipment.
10.Report any equipment that is broken or unsafe to use to your manager
   immediately. Do not use unsafe equipment.
11.All electric equipment shall have proper grounding.
12.All electric outlets at or near water sources shall be equipped with ground
   fault interrupters (GFI.)
13.Knives should be properly sharpened on a regular basis, and safely stored
   when not in use.
14.Lighting should be adequate and appropriately guarded.
15.Potholders should be used for handling hot pots and pans.
16.Handles of cooking utensils should be checked on a regular basis to insure
   they are tight.
17.Assure all machines and equipment are turned off and unplugged before
   performing maintenance or cleaning.
18.Do not leave machines unattended when running.
19.Cutting attachments should be firmly fixed and guard in place before used.
20.Use a cut-resistant glove on the hand holding product being hand-cut, sliced
   or diced.
21.Use cut-resistant gloves on both hands when cleaning a slicing machine.
22.For deep fryer maintenance or cleaning, use safety mitts at all times, and
   assure the grease is cooled before cleaning or draining.
23.Material safety data sheets (MSDS) must be readily available for all
   hazardous chemicals on-site, and employees trained to read and understand
   them.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                3-17

Exterior
1. Keep drives, parking areas, trash areas and walkways in good repair.
2. Be watchful of ice, snow, oil and gas spills. Keep drives and walkways clear
   and clean.
3. Have gasoline and oil absorbent material available and use it immediately.
   Place the absorbent in a covered metal container, not the regular trash.
4. Secure the concrete curb stops and paint them yellow.
5. Keep drives, parking areas and walkways clear of debris. Empty trash
   containers regularly to prevent overfilling.
6. Properly and conspicuously, post the location of emergency gasoline shut-
   off buttons. Keep immediate access to these at all times.
7. Maintain good lighting for drives, parking areas, walkways and trash
   containers.
8. Assure barrier posts are provided at both ends of gasoline pump islands, in
   front of natural gas meters, electric service inlets and along LPG tanks and
   filling areas.
9. No smoking should be allowed near gasoline pumps, and “No Smoking”
   signs posted. Only smoke in designated areas and place cigarette butts in
   approved containers.

Garbage & Trash
1. When lifting trash bags from container and carrying them to trash bins, keep
   them away from your body as broken glass or other sharp items may have
   been discarded into them.
2. Disposal areas should be kept free of broken glass, food, grease spillage or
   other debris.
3. Keep a safe access to and from garbage and trash containers.
4. Good lighting should be provided to and at trash areas.
5. Leather gloves should be worn when handling trash.
6. Employees should be trained to safely use steam jet or steam hoses.
7. Employees should be trained to safely use compactors. (No one under the
   age of 18 years may operate compactors.)
8. Get help when lifting and emptying trash over 35-pounds in weight.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                3-18

                               Agribusinesses

General Rules
1. Appropriate boots or ankle high boots that are fully laced and tied should be
   worn by all employees. Water resistant boots may be required for some
   operations.
2. Use other required personal protection equipment (PPE) for the job/task
   being performed:
       Wear your eye protection when exposed to dust, sparks or flying
          particles.
       Wear your face protection when exposed to sparks, flying particles or
          molten splatter.
       Wear your face protection when exposed to chemical agents from
          splashes, fumes or vapors and laser or arc welding.
       Wear your hearing protection when working in any area or with
          equipment that requires you to shout to be heard.
       Appropriate gloves should be worn to prevent cuts, scrapes, burns,
          punctures, blisters, or chemical burns.
       Respirators should be worn that are specified to prevent breathing
          harmful dust, mists or fumes. Fit tests are required to assure
          respiratory exposures do not leak under or around the equipment.
3. Report all unsafe conditions including work areas, broken or defective
   equipment and aggressive animals to management. Do not use unsafe or
   unguarded equipment.
4. Avoid working in excessive heat as much as possible. Drink plenty of water
   or other liquids (not alcohol) prior to and during work.
5. Be aware of the potential for severe weather. If severe weather conditions
   exist:
       Get or stay inside and as much as possible stay away from windows,
          doors and skylights.
       Stay inside if in an enclosed tractor or other equipment equipped with
          rubber tires.
       Stay away from metal objects like pipes, wire fences or machinery.
       Do not use the phone and unplug electrical equipment.
       If outside, stay away from trees or other tall objects. Find low ground,
          squat with your head between your knees.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                     3-19

Barns, Workshops & Storage Yards
1. Maintain good housekeeping in all work areas.
2. Keep aisles, stairs and exits clear of materials, tools and debris at all times.
3. Clean-up spills immediately or post warnings to prevent you or others from
   slipping.
4. Place and stack materials on shelving neatly and squarely.
5. Place oily rags in covered metal containers – preferably UL Listed types.
6. Store flammable liquids in UL Listed flammable liquids storage cabinets.
   Only use UL Listed containers for transporting flammable liquids.
7. Keep all compressed gas cylinders secured from tip over in an upright
   position in garages, shops, barns and on trucks.

Ladders & Raised Work Areas
1. Assure ladders are in good repair and are of appropriate height to safely
   reach work areas. Do not over reach. Never use the top rungs or step of a
   ladder to stand on.
2. Stepladders should be set on level ground with the spreader set.
3. Extension ladders should extend 3-feet above roof or work platforms and be
   tied-off to allow safe exiting and climbing back onto them.
4. Always face the ladder when climbing up, down or working from it. Do not
   jump from a ladder or raised work area.
5. Fixed ladders to storage areas, storage bins or other objects over 20-feet in
   height must have secure metal (not wire) cages.
6. All raised work or storage areas over 4-feet from the ground level should
   have hand railings 42-inches in height with mid-rail and toe board.

Machine Guarding
1. Full enclosure guarding must be provided on all belts and pulleys, gears,
   nip-points, ends of relay shafts, point of operation and hot spots such as
   exhaust pipes or motors.
2. Assure machinery and equipment are turned off and the power is
   disconnected before removing guards to clear, clean, service or repair them.
   Place a lock on the power source to prevent others from activating it before
   the equipment is safe to use.
3. Assure stored energy has come to a complete stop and in a safe position
   before beginning any work.
4. Assure all guards are in place before connecting power and turning the
   machine back on.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                  3-20

Machine Guarding - Continued
5. Do not wear loose clothing or jewelry when operating machinery or making
   repairs.

Confined Spaces (Grain Bins, Silos, Tanks, Manure Pits, etc.)
1. All confined spaces must be marked as “Dangerous” to keep untrained
   people out of them.
2. Never enter a confined space unless fully trained and authorized to do so.
3. Always assure adequate oxygen levels are within the confined space before
   entering them.
4. Assure all flammable, poisoned air and dust have been removed from
   confined spaces before entering them.
5. Do not smoke or use spark producing equipment in or around confined space
   entries.
6. Do not enter a confined space if standing liquids or slick surfaces are
   present.
7. Always wear an attached life line when entering a confined space. Assure
   appropriate rescue retrieval equipment is in place.
8. Always have an attendant available at the confined space entry. The
   attendant should NEVER enter the confined space to attempt to rescue.
   They should call for help immediately.
9. Refer to OSHA’s Confined Space Entry Regulations for more specific
   requirements.

Vehicle Safety
1. Follow all state and local driving regulations.
2. Do not operate farm equipment on public roads without attaching a clear
   “Slow Moving Vehicle” emblem.
3. Farm equipment being driven on public roads should assure a safe passing
   lane is available for on coming traffic and to allow safe passing of vehicles
   traveling in the same direction.
4. Always check hitch connections and secure loads before moving.
5. Pull loads and take turns and curves slowly.
6. Do not use cell phones, eat or drink while driving – keep both hands on the
   wheel.
7. Keep vehicle cabs free of debris and other loose items.
8. Never walk behind or between trucks or equipment. Walk around them.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                  3-21

Vehicle Safety - Continued
9. Never jump from the cab or other elevated surfaces. Use handrails to enter
   and exit the truck or other farm or construction equipment.
10.Assure non-slip steps to truck, farm and construction cabs are in place and
   kept clean of mud and debris.
11.Only trained and authorized employees may operate farm or construction
   equipment.

Forklifts & Powered Pallet Jacks
1. Only trained and certified operators may drive a forklift or powered pallet
   jack. (Refer to OSHA’s Powered Industrial Truck Regulation.)
2. Never drive up to someone in front of a fixed object.
3. Always look over both shoulders before backing.
4. Drive in reverse if your vision is blocked in front.
5. Always drive with your forks lowered and tilted back slightly.
6. Assure loads are secure and square before moving.
7. Never allow another employee to ride on the forks, or use the forks as a lift.
   (Lift cages must provide 42-inch railings on all sides with mid-rail and
   toe board and must be securely secured to the mast.)
8. Forklifts and powered pallet jacks should not enter truck boxes or drive onto
   truck flatbeds until squarely and securely in place. (Trucks are to be
   chocked or otherwise secured.)
9. The forklift operator should always lower the forks to the ground, turn off
   power and remove the key before getting off the forklift.
10.All temporary or seasonal employees that will be allowed to operate
   forklifts must be tested and recertified annually. This must be
   documented.
11.Pedestrians must be aware of forklift traffic and be warned when backing or
   coming to a blind corner or other visual impairments.
12.Pedestrians should always use designated walkways and doors for safe
   travel.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                  3-22

Grain Handling
1. Hot work including electric or gas welding, cutting, brazing or similar flame
   producing procedures should be performed following OSHA’s “Hot Work
   Regulations” by either employee or contractor.
2. Hot work requires that at minimum fire extinguishers be immediately
   available to extinguish sparks or small fires at the worksite and that a person
   is assigned to stay in the area that the work was performed for at least 1-hour
   to assure no fires begin due to smoldering metal or sparks.
3. Due to the fact that bucket elevators create fire and explosion potentials,
   bucket elevators must have an opening to the head pulley for inspection,
   maintenance and cleaning.
4. Bearings should be mounted externally to the leg of the bucket elevators or
   provided with vibration, temperature or other monitoring of the condition of
   bearings mounted inside the elevator.
5. All mechanical, electrical, dryers, steam processors, dust collectors and
   bucket elevators must be on a preventative maintenance program to keep
   equipment free of fuel and ignition sources. The proceeding equipment
   must have at least annual inspections with the dates of the inspection
   documented and maintained.
6. Equipment found to be malfunctioning or operating below designed
   efficiencies must be taken out of service until repairs are made.
7. During the cleaning, servicing or maintenance of equipment, OSHA’s
   Lockout/Tagout Regulations must be followed.
8. Wear a dust respirator and safety glasses when loading grain or
   commodities.

Housekeeping
1. A written housekeeping program must be developed and implemented. This
   should include dust removal from ledges, floors, equipment, other exposed
   surfaces and enclosed areas containing grinding equipment.
2. Grain spills must be cleaned immediately to reduce slip and fall potentials.
3. Use of compressed air for cleaning is not permitted unless all ignition
   sources (electrical, mechanical and heat) are positively turned off and
   equipment cooled.
4. An emergency action plan must be developed and all employees trained to
   follow it. The plan must be in writing if there are 10 or more employees.
5. The plan should include distinct alarms, evacuation procedures and a
   designated congregation place after the evacuation.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                3-23

Working with Livestock
1. All animals can be dangerous if wild, worked up or hot. Work them slowly.
   Work with a partner as much as possible
2. Be aware that cattle and horses can kick. Keep a safe distance between you
   and the animal.
3. Do not run a horse if walking them will get the job done
4. Do not bring a horse to a quick stop on hard or slick surfaces.
5. Always have an escape route for you and/or your horse when working cattle.
6. Be aware of weather conditions that affect your work area such as mud,
   snow, ice, lightning, heat, cold or high winds. Adjust your work to prevent
   accidents and illnesses.
7. Dress appropriately for the work to be done and the weather conditions. No
   loose clothing, jewelry or neck scarves should be worn.
8. Moving slowly and quietly gets the best results and is safest for you and the
   animals.
9. Turn animals at an angle. When working from the ground, use your pole or
   stick with both hands. When not directing livestock, keep the pole at the
   side of your body in an upright position. Do not prod animals.
10.When working in pen areas, never throw a gate open or closed toward an
   animal.
11.Use your gate blocks to secure gates while moving them from a pen to alley.
12.Assure the gate is latched across the alley to prevent animals from turning
   back.
13.Never let animals into an alleyway without warning other employees.
14.If in an alley while animals are being driven through them, stay calm and
   against the fence to allow the animals to pass on the far side of the alley.
15.Do not sit on fences, gates, feeders or alleyways at any time.
16.Pens should be maintained and groomed to keep walking surfaces level and
   clear of excess manure and wet areas as much as possible.
17.Never stand in a loading chute while a vehicle is backing up or pulling away
   from it.
18.Always be aware of bulls in pens and their position and temperament.
   Immediately report any aggressive behaviors demonstrated by bulls to
   management.
19.Aggressive bulls should immediately be removed from pen areas and
   isolated until removed from the premises.
20.Absolutely NO HORSEPLAY will be tolerated.
21. No weapons should be brought into the worksite.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                3-24

Calf Farms
1. Slip-resistant boots must be worn. All footwear should be water resistant.
2. Maintain good housekeeping in the pasteurization, bottle filling and storage
   areas at all times. Cleanup spills immediately.
3. Rewind and place hoses on a hose reel when not in use.
4. The bottle wagon should be equipped with secure handholds and have non-
   slip running boards for employees to ride. Non-slip material should be
   extended onto wheel well covers.
5. Wash mud from bottle wagons outside before entering the bottle fill area.
6. Tractor operators pulling bottle wagons should not drive faster than 10-miles
   per hour. Drive slowly and take corners in a wide arc. Only the operator
   shall ride on the tractor.
7. No employee is allowed to get on or off a bottle wagon when it is moving.
8. Feeders should look at the ground area before getting off a tractor or bottle
   wagon. Make sure you do not step into a hole or onto rocks. Watch for ice.
9. The aisleways between calf pens must be kept in good repair and debris
   maintained out of them at all times.
10.Employees should walk, not run, to retrieve loose calves.
11.If calves have wondered too far from their pen, have them loaded into a
   trailer – do not attempt to carry the calf for long distances.
12. Use good body mechanics when lifting a calf back into a pen. If a gate is
   available on a pen, use it. Get help if the calf is too heavy or too hard to
   handle.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                  3-25

                 Home Health & Homemaker Services

Personal Protection Equipment (PPE)
1. All employees are required to wear fully enclosed (heel & toe) slip-resistant
   footwear. No sandals or flip-flops are to be worn.
2. All employees should wear disposable gloves while providing medical and
   personal care to clients.
3. In the event employees are working with a client with a communicable
   disease such as hepatitis, disposable gloves should be worn while providing
   all services. The gloves should be changed between each task being
   performed.
4. When working with clients who have a respiratory illness, wear a respirator
   that is medically approved for the disease(s) present. Assure the employees
   know how to properly fit the respirator to their face.
5. Hand washing with hot water and soap must be performed between all tasks.
   If using a hand sanitizer, limit the use to 4 or 5 sanitations. Then wash your
   hands with soap and hot water and then apply lotion to prevent skin
   breakdown and cracking.
6. Wear heavy “rubber” or vinyl gloves when cleaning toilets or cleaning urine
   or feces from floors or furniture. Keep the cuffs of the gloves turned
   outward to prevent contaminated water from leaking into the glove.
7. Wear safety glasses with side shields when pouring or spraying acidic or
   caustic cleaning materials.
8. A cut-resistant glove should be worn on the hand holding the product being
   hand-cut, sliced or diced. Knives should be kept sharp as a sharp knife is
   safest to use.

Housekeeping
1. Do not lift or move furniture, storage boxes or other materials weighing 35-
   pounds or move.
2. When making beds, bend at your knees, secure the mattress, lift with your
   legs and back, tuck the sheets in and lower the mattress into place by
   lowering it slowly using your leg muscles.
3. Lifting should always be performed using safe lift procedures that you have
   been trained in. Remember your safe lift zone is mid-thigh to mid-chest.
   Do not lift overhead.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                 3-26

Housekeeping - Continued
4. When lifting, do not twist or turn. Stand-up and then move your feet in the
   direction you want to go.
5. Push heavy or awkward items whenever possible using your leg muscles and
   keeping your back straight.
6. Do not pickup broken glass with your hands. Use a broom or brush and
   dustpan to cleanup the area. Place broken glass into a metal or hard plastic
   container with lid for disposal.
7. Always lift trash from a container keeping the trash bag away from your
   body. You do not know if broken glass, metal lids or hypodermic needles
   have been placed in the trash.
8. When carrying trash to the garbage container or trash bin, carry it away from
   your body. You do not want the wind to blow it against your body. If too
   heavy or overfilled, do not attempt to move it unless you can safely separate
   it.
9. Never climb onto chairs, furniture, counters, stepstools or ladders to perform
   cleaning or light maintenance such as changing light bulbs.
10.Before cleaning any small appliance, assure it has been turned off, it has
   come to a complete stop and/or is cooled. Then unplug it to assure you are
   not caught in moving parts, burned or receive an electric shock.
11.Never attempt to clear materials from a vacuum cleaner until you have
   turned it off, assured all parts have stopped moving and it is unplugged.
12.Do not use electric appliances if the electric cord is damaged in any way or
   the ground plug is missing.
13.When mopping a floor, do small areas at a time and assure the floor is dry
   before moving on.
14.Clean-up any water, grease or spilled food product immediately. Assure the
   area is dry before leaving.
15.Outside the home, be aware of holes, rocks, wet areas, ice and frost. Watch
   where you step.
16.Assure all cleaning equipment, supplies and materials are secured and
   maintained out of walkways. Put them away after using them.
17.Assure acidic or caustic cleaners are stored on lower shelves – never at or
   above eye level.
18.Flammable liquids should be stored on metal shelves and preferably in metal
   cabinets.
19.Always keep chemicals in their original containers and assure they are
   properly labeled. Read the labels to assure you use them safely.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                  3-27

Housekeeping - Continued
20.Bleach is one of the most dangerous cleaning agents in the home. Never add
   bleach to a drain to remove odors until you have thoroughly ran water down
   the drain. (Adding bleach to any drain cleaner can immediately create
   chlorine gas that can cause damage to your eyes, throat or lungs and may
   cause death.)
21.Use precaution when adding bleach to wash machines, dishwashers, other
   equipment or water. Bleach spills and splashes can cause skin burns and
   damage to your eyes.
22.Before cleaning, pickup and secure all throw rugs, clothing, papers, etc. to
   prevent trip exposures.
23.Assure pets are maintained out of your work area to prevent you from
   tripping over them.
24.At any sign of aggressive behavior by a client’s pet, request the client to
   secure them in a cage, room or outside where you will not have to be
   exposed to them.
25.If the client takes insulin or other injectable medications, assure they have
   and properly use a sharp’s container for the safe disposal of hypodermic
   needles. The sharp’s container should be changed if ¾ full or more. (The
   client should return the sharp’s container to their doctor or pharmacy for safe
   disposal. Do not place them in personal trash containers.)
26.If a used hypodermic needle is found on the premises, request the client to
   place it in a sharp’s container – needle first. Do not recap hypodermic
   needles. (If no sharp’s container is onsite, place the hypodermic needle in a
   metal or very heavy plastic container with a lid, seal it and label it as
   HAZARDOUS.)

Client Transfer & Assistance
1. In an effort to keep our clients independence and mobility at their highest
   level, allow the client to perform as many transfers from bed and chairs, and
   to walk as they physically and safely can do so.
2. Standby assistance while performing transfers from one position to another
   and to walk should be provided as a safety measure. When providing
   standby assistance, communicate with the client that you are there if they
   need help. Get their feedback as to the assistance needed.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                    3-28

Client Transfer & Assistance - Continued
3. Before providing standby assistance for either transfers or walking, make
   sure the floor areas are clear of clothing, bedding, furniture or other items.
   Put yourself in a position that you do not impede their mobility efforts.
4. Assure you are well balanced to help the client if needed. As much as
   possible, allow yourself, as well as the client, plenty of room to perform the
   transfer without putting either of you at danger.
5. Center your body so you can effectively use your leg muscles to catch, lift or
   pull the client to a safe position. Do not attempt to catch or take the clients
   full weight if they can be reseated onto a bed or chair. Continue to
   communicate with the client.
6. If the client cannot stand without assistance, use a gait belt to bring them to a
   stable standing position. Assure the gait belt is properly secured on the
   client and they place their hands on your shoulders during the assistance.
   Follow the use of gait belt procedures in which you have been trained.
7. A gait belt should be used to help a client walk if they are unstable or are
   subject to falling or loosing muscle control. Follow the use of gait belt
   procedures in which you have been trained.
8. If clients are unable to stand to move from one surface to another, have them
   use a slide-board when possible. Assure the chair or bench they will be
   moving to is secured in place to prevent it from sliding.
9. Before assisting clients to shower or use of the toilet, make sure handrails
   are in place and securely fastened to the wall. Horizontally or vertically
   mounted handrails make it easier for clients to use and assist with the service
   being provided.
10.During and after showering, the client should use the handrails to assist to
   enter, exit and be washed and dried.
11.Use a shower chair for clients with any balance, mobility or physical
   strength issues.
12.Clients that need assistance getting on and off a toilet should have a raised
   seat with attached handrails. These limit the distance of assistance in
   sitting/standing and allow you the caretaker to use better body mechanics
   while transferring them.
13.Assure non-slip strips or surfaces are in showers and tubs and that they are
   in good repair and well secured to the surface.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                   3-29

Client Transfer & Assistance – Continued
14.If a client cannot position themselves in bed or slide down in bed, use a slip
   sheet to reposition them in bed and onto pillows. (Nylon slip sheets reduce
   the forces you need to exert to position a client, but also reduce possible skin
   abrasions to the client. A nylon slip sheet should be removed from under the
   client after you have repositioned them.)
15.Know your physical limits. If you are unable to safely provide standby
   assistance or transfer a client, immediately let your management know. Do
   not put yourself or the client at risk of injury.
16.If a client falls to the floor and cannot get up by themselves, immediately
   call 911 for assistance and notify management. As much as possible, make
   the client comfortable and keep reassuring them. Keep them talking and
   awake if they hit their head in the fall.
17.If a client requires a Hoyer Lift to be transferred, assure you and the client
   have been trained to use it.

Change in Behavior, Dementia & Alzheimer’s
1. Immediately notify management in sudden and/or gradual changes in
   behavior. The client may need to see their doctor as there may be medical
   reasons causing the change in behavior.
2. Any and all verbal, threatening or physical behaviors should be reported to
   management immediately. Do not attempt to argue with or restrain the
   client. As much as possible keep yourself out of harms way.
3. When arriving on-site, assure the client’s home is being maintained as
   usual. Check that stoves, heaters and security devices are being used safely.
   Report changes of “forgetfulness” to management.
4. Before leaving a client’s home, remind them of safety issues if any
   “forgetfulness” events occurred.
5. Clients with Dementia diagnosis need extra assistance to provide and
   conduct essential living functions. For their and your safety, communicate
   with the client as to what they and you will be doing and provide reminders
   for them throughout the service being performed.
6. Use redirection techniques for wondering, inappropriate behaviors or
   emotional outbursts. As much as possible keep yourself at a safe distance
   from the client unless invited into their space.
7. Clients with Alzheimer’s diagnosis should be approached in a clam and
   quiet manner. This helps keep the client calm and stable and you from being
   attacked.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                                   3-30

Change in Behavior, Dementia & Alzheimer’s - Continued
8. Clients with Alzheimer’s need more space maintained between others and
   themselves. (The rule of thumb is 3-feet or arms length.) Entering this
   space quickly may cause the client to hit, kick, scratch or bite to protect
   themselves.
9. Do not force clients with Alzheimer’s to do something. Ask them if they
   would “like to               ?” If yes, then proceed. If no, leave them at
   what they are doing (unless it is unsafe) and approach them later. This may
   be a few minutes to an hour.
10.When providing personal services to, for or with a client, continually
   communicate what you are doing and what you want them to do to prevent
   aggressive changes in behavior. No surprises even if you provide the service
   on each visit.
11.Alzheimer’s clients that need transfer or walking assistance are subject to
   going “limp” without notice. Assure you are using all of the proper body
   mechanics, assistance aids or tools and are consciously ready for this to
   occur to prevent injury.
12.Our clients are supposed to be able to take medications on their own or with
   minimal direction. Under no circumstance should you place your fingers in
   a client’s mouth to provide medication or assure it was swallowed.
13.Keep knives, scissors, needles or other sharp items in a locked cabinet or
   drawer. Immediately place these back in a locked area after using them.

Personal Security
1. Upon arriving at a client’s home, stay in your car with the windows and
   doors locked if anything looks or feels wrong.
2. Call for a police safety visit and call your client to keep their doors locked
   until the police arrive.
3. While parked at a client’s home, always keep your car doors locked and
   windows closed.
4. Try to park where your car is visible from inside and to neighbors.
5. While at the client’s home, keep the doors locked.
6. Do not open the door for strangers. Upon arriving, ask the client if they are
   expecting visitors or packages to be delivered. Know who and what to
   expect.
7. When taking trash out, be aware of your surroundings. When back inside,
   relock the door.
Safety Rules & Regulations                                             3-31

Personal Security - Continued
8. Have your car keys in your hand when leaving the client’s home. Check the
   floor and backseat before you get into your car.
9. When arriving or leaving when it is dark, be especially careful for your
   safety.
Safety & Health Training   4
Safety & Health Training                                                      4-1

The purpose of this section is to provide all employees with continued safety
and health training that affects the safe performance of their assigned work.

New Employee Orientation and Training

Accident Prevention depends mostly on the initial training and motivation of
new employees. Such employees must be taught how to work safely, must
know potential hazards and have a desire to work safely.

A new employee begins to learn skills and develop attitudes the first day on the
job. First impressions about the company, the management, other employees
and safety are important and lasting. That’s why safety training and
motivation must begin on the first day of employment.

Basic Concepts in safety training creates in each new employee an instinctive
awareness for safety. If this is achieved, employees will instinctively plan for
safety in their routine day-to-day work.

They will be expected to:
1. Inspect tools and work areas for hazards.
2. Prepare for the unexpected by wearing proper protective equipment, using
   proper safety equipment and knowing what to do in case of an emergency.
3. Tell others in the area what they are doing unsafely.
4. Follow safety rules.
5. Stay alert for changing conditions.
6. Feel free to inform management about unsafe conditions, acts or behaviors,
   and recommend alternative safe work procedures, equipment and training
   needs.

Safety Orientation of new employees must be given on the first day they
report to work. This orientation shall be given personally by management and
will include a review of the company and department safety rules.
Safety & Health Training                                                    4-2

General Safety & Health Training

Responsibilities

    Owners/General Mangers assures that all levels of employees receive
     meaningful safety and health training to continually improve the safety
     performance of their operations and to meet regulatory compliance. And,
     to provide the resources necessary to accomplish the training.
    Supervisors/Managers will actively participate in safety training for self-
     improvement and the improvement of their direct report employees.
     Also, recommend safety and health training needs to the Owner/General
     Manager.
    Employees will actively participate in training programs and processes.
     They will provide meaningful critique of the training to management.
     They are also responsible for identifying specific safety training needs,
     and bringing them to the attention of management.

Safety & Health Training
At a minimum, safety training should include the following:
     Supervisors/Managers
       Safety Management Practices
       Hazard Identification and Correction
       Accident Investigation
       Workers’ Compensation (Employer and Employee Rights)
       Ergonomics/Cumulative Trauma Disorder Management
       Return-To-Work Program Planning
       Regulatory Compliance (Refer to Section 8)
     Employees
       Job Specific Safety and Health Exposure Controls
       Standard Operating Procedures
       Unsafe Condition/Act Reporting
       Accident Reporting
       Return-To-Work Policies and Procedures
       Rights Under Workers’ Compensation
       Regulatory Compliance That Effects Their Work
Safety Inspections   5
Safety Inspections                                                          5-1

Purpose
The purpose of this section is to provide guidelines for planned safety
inspections.

Responsibilities
Owners/General Managers are to provide visible support for the inspection
process and periodically participate in those.

Supervisors/Managers are to make daily inspections of assigned work area(s)
and take immediate steps to correct unsafe conditions and work practices. Also
conduct at least monthly safety inspections, make appropriate
recommendations, follow-up on outstanding recommendations and report
findings to upper management.

Safety Committee Representatives are to make assigned safety inspections,
report findings to management, and recommend safety procedures, equipment
and/or training. And, immediately report unsafe conditions, acts or behavior to
management as observed or made aware of.

General Requirements
Safety inspections should be planned with goals and objectives. Planned
inspections mean two things; first, know what to look at; second, know what to
look for. Additionally, any previously identified items that remain uncorrected
should be re-addressed.

A good place to start is to know what accidents or trends have occurred and as
much as possible the contributing “causes” of the accidents.

Documentation of inspections, recommendations and completion of each
recommendation should be maintained.
Safety Inspections                                                           5-2

The following are some of the more common items to be considered when
conducting a facility safety inspection. You may want to add other questions
that are specific to your operation.

What to Look For (Unsafe Conditions) and What to Look At (Unsafe Acts)

Walking Surfaces
   Are they clean and clear of materials that may cause slips or trips?
   Are they in good repair (no holes, cracking, raised areas, etc.)?
   Are aisles properly lined/marked and storage kept out of aisleways?
   Are non-slip mats being used in areas with wet or slippery floors?
   Are non-slip mats in good repair, not creating a tripping hazard?
   Are stair treads in good repair?
   Are stairs provided with good, secure handrails?
   Are de-icing agents used at parking, entry and dock areas when needed?
   Are mezzanines protected with walls or railings at least 42-inches in
     height with mid-rail and toe boards?

Exits
    Are they properly identified with lighted exit and directional signs?
    Are they clear and accessible at all times?
    Are they unlocked during business hours?

Lighting
    Is lighting adequate for all aisleways and exits?
    Is there good lighting for all work areas?
    Are stairs well lighted?
    Is exterior lighting good in parking lots, entryways, receiving areas and
      trash areas?
    Is good lighting provided for docks and semi-tractor trailer entry?
Safety Inspections                                                         5-3

Electrical
    Are extension cords in good repair and used only on a temporary basis,
       not permanently?
    Are the ground plugs properly maintained for all electrical equipment and
       tools?
    Are electric outlets at sinks and wet areas equipped with ground fault
       interrupters (GFI)?
    Are circuit breaker doors closed and latched?
    Are circuit breakers clear of materials and accessible in the event of an
       emergency?
    Are lights in coolers, freezers and over food preparation areas properly
       covered?
    Are lights and electrical controls in dusty or flammable atmospheres in
       appropriate U.L. Listed enclosures
    Do exterior electrical switches and outlets have appropriate covers?

Fire Protection
    Are an adequate number and type of fire extinguishers available?
    Are fire extinguishers and automatic fire extinguishing systems on an
      annual service and maintenance contract?
    Are the extinguishers readily available, not blocked?
    Are fire extinguishers checked monthly by a competent person to assure
      they are in good working condition?
    Has training been provided so that your employees know how to
      affectively use a fire extinguisher in an emergency?
    Are sprinkler controls identified and kept clear of all materials?
    Is at least an 18-inch clearance maintained between sprinkler heads and
      stored materials? This is the minimum distance to be maintained.
    Are sprinkler heads and automatic fire suppression nozzles free of grease,
      lint and dust?
Safety Inspections                                                       5-4

Machinery & Equipment (Fixed & Mobile)
   Does all machinery and equipment have positive grounding?
   Are guards in place for gears, sprockets, pulley systems and at the point
     of operation?
   When cleaning, clearing or servicing machinery, is the power turned off,
     unplugged and/or disconnected?
   Are lockout/tagout procedures followed when cleaning, servicing or
     maintaining equipment?
   Are trained and authorized employees operating, servicing or maintaining
     the equipment?
   Are non-slip mats provided at the machine operator’s workstation?

Chemicals
   Are bulk chemicals properly labeled with the content, hazards and
     protection methods?
   Are chemicals that have been transferred to workstation containers
     properly labeled?
   Are chemical storage areas well arranged with corrosives on the lower
     shelves?
   Are flammable liquids safely stored in UL Listed safety containers or
     covered metal containers in a UL Listed safety cabinet?
   Is personal protection equipment (PPE) readily available and being used
     for handling chemicals?
   Are chemicals stored away from food items?
   Have your employees been trained in chemical safety (OSHA’s Hazard
     Communication Program)?

Material Handling Equipment
   Are hand trucks, carts and other material handling equipment in good
      repair? This includes wheels and casters.
   Are powered pallet jacks operated by trained and authorized employees?
   Are forklift operators trained, certified and authorized to operate this
      equipment?
   Are forklifts inspected daily before use and records maintained of each
      inspection?
   Are forklifts on a scheduled preventative maintenance program?
Safety Inspections                                                        5-5

Material Handling Equipment - Continued
   Are material handling devices being used rather than employees lifting
      and carrying stock?
   Are dock, staging and storage areas in good repair and well lighted?
   Are storage racks in good repair and not over-loaded?
   Are employees trained to lift properly and follow those procedures?

Housekeeping
   Is housekeeping excellent throughout the facility (inside and outside)?
   Is broken glass cleaned-up with a broom/brush and dustpan, and properly
     disposed of in a heavy plastic or metal container with lid?
   Are adequate waste containers provided?
   Are compactor operators trained and authorized to operate compactors?
     (No employee under the age of 18 years may operate compactors.)

Ladders
   Are ladders and safety stairs in good repair and checked on a regular
     basis?
   Are ladders or safety stairs used to reach upper shelves?
   Are ladders or safety stairs readily available for employees to use?
   Are ladders and safety stairs stored in a manner to prevent them from
     being damaged?
   Are stepladders set up properly and not leaned against a wall when in
     use?
   Are ladders of appropriate height to allow employees to work while three
     or more rungs from the top?
   Are extension ladders tied off to prevent them from slipping when
     employees climb or work from them?
   Extension ladders should extend as least 3-feet above roofs or platforms
     for employees to safely get on and off them.
   Are fixed ladders in good repair and well supported to buildings, tanks or
     other objects?
   Are fixed ladders over 20-feet in height equipped with safety cages?
   Have employees been trained to use ladders safely?
                                      SAFETY INSPECTION FORM

Location:                                                                                Date:
Completed by:                                                                 Title:
This is intended to guide supervisors/managers and others who regularly inspect the workplace and should not be
considered a complete list of hazards.
Note: If not satisfactory, indicate suggestions for improvement at the bottom of this page.

                             Satisfactory                      Satisfactory                           Satisfactory
                             Yes No N/A                        Yes No N/A                             Yes No N/A
Material Handling                           Machinery                         Fire Doors
Conveyors                                Guards in place                Operating mechanism        
Mechanical assist                        Emergency stops                Doors blocked              
Hand trucks                              Lockout/tagout        
Power trucks                                                               First Aid
Storage racks                       
                                    Elevated Mezzanines                       First aid kit              
                                    & Platforms                               Emergency eyewash
Ladders                             Structurally sound                     stations                   
Side rails, steps, rungs         Clear of obstructions                  Records                    
Safety feet                      Handrails                         
Tie-off or equivalent            Toe boards                             Housekeeping
Storage                                                                    Aisles                         
                                    Electrical Installations                  Stairs                         
Floors                              Wiring                                 Floors                         
Worn surfaces, holes, etc.       Outlets                                Material storage               
Slippery                         Positive grounding                     Waste disposal                 
Non-slip mats in wet areas       Extension cords                        Outside areas                  
Aisles lined/marked              Panels closed                     
Clean and clear                                                            Personal Protective
                                    Hoists                                    Equipment (PPE)
Stairways                           Controls function                         Hand protection                
Handrails                        properly                               Eye & face protection          
Well-lighted                     Limit switch                           Foot protection                
Fire enclosures and                 Condition of cables,                      Hearing protection             
doors work properly              ropes, chains, slings                  Protective clothing            
Tread defects                    Scheduled inspection                   Respirators                    

Parking Lot(s) &                        Lighting                              Special Inspections
Outside Walks                           General illumination               Boiler/machinery           
Holes/obstructions                   Shadows on work areas              Fire protection            
Walkways marked                     
Lighted                              Other                                 Other
Snow and ice                                                                                       
                                                                                                      
                                                                                                      

                                                 Recommendations

     Recommendation                                      Who is responsible?               Completion Date

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Accident Investigation   6
Accident Investigation                                                          6-1

Purpose
The accident investigation is used to determine the causes of accidents so
effective steps can be taken to prevent a recurrence. Accident investigations
also provide information essential to making and analyzing the company’s total
accident experience. In addition, an investigation of one accident may bring to
light unsafe acts and conditions, which have not yet caused an accident.

Responsibilities
Owners/General Managers have the ultimate responsibility for conducting or
seeing that accident investigations are performed.

Supervisors/Managers must complete the accident investigation as soon as it is
reported and review select accident investigation reports as part of their facility
meetings.

Employees are responsible for reporting all injuries and accidents to
management at the time of occurrence. Failure to report an injury or accident is
a violation of company policy and may subject the violator to disciplinary
action, up to and including dismissal.
Accident Investigation                                                       6-2

Accident Investigation

  A. GET THE BIG PICTURE FIRST
     It’s imperative as an investigator to see for yourself what the scene of the
     accident or its environment looks like, in order to have a visual picture of
     what you will be discussing and gathering information on. If practical, it
     is always good to get the “BIG PICTURE” of what everything related to
     the accident looks like before you start any serious discussion of “WHAT
     HAPPENED”? Just a few moments of visual orientation before starting
     will give you a better idea of where to start, and with whom to start.

  B. INTERVIEW MOST KNOWLEDGEABLE PEOPLE
     The first major step in a typical accident investigation would be to find
     out what happened from the most knowledgeable people involved. This
     could be one or more employee, including the injured person. A few
     proper questions should identify those who are knowledgeable and (by
     nature of circumstance) those who should have the best knowledge.
     Certain techniques involved with the interviewing process produce much
     better results than others.

  C. PUT THE PERSON AT EASE. Circumstances dictate how important
     this step may be. In case of serious accidents or other loss-related
     incidents, there may be deep concern, anxiety and actual fear. A simple,
     sincere explanation of the real purpose of the investigation can help to
     assure the individual that no one is “out to get” him or her. A friendly,
     understanding and appreciative manner can work to establish an
     atmosphere that encourages cooperation.

  D. INTERVIEW ON-THE-SPOT. One of the biggest temptations of a busy
     investigator is to conduct accident investigations in an office. However,
     there is a great advantage in having initial discussions at the scene of the
     accident whenever practical. Experience shows that the actual scene
     assists both the interviewer and the person being interviewed to more
     accurately related circumstances and details. There are situations and
     circumstances where the privacy of an office or out-of-the-way place is
     best for conducting accident discussions and developing details.
Accident Investigation                                                         6-3

  E. INTERVIEWS SHOULD BE PRIVATE. To obtain accurate, unbiased
     information, an effort should be made to have your first discussion with
     each knowledgeable person as private as possible. When conflicts are
     discovered in information, the investigator should re-interview
     individuals separately, to verify the facts. Interviews in the presence of
     other witnesses should be held as the last recourse to resolve conflicts in
     information.

  F. GET INDIVIDUAL’S VERSION. The investigator must be careful not
     to lead the person being interviewed into giving anything but their own
     version. The individual should be instructed to relate exactly what he/she
     knows. The investigator should interrupt as little as possible and never
     make judgment remarks like, “That was sure the wrong thing to do.” Let
     the individual “tell it like it was” and if something isn’t clear, try to wait
     until his/her story is finished to ask questions.

  G. ASK NECESSARY QUESTIONS AT THE RIGHT TIME. To avoid
     putting the individual on the defensive, questions during the initial
     interview should be as few as possible. Find out “what happened” and
     “what was done”; if “why” questions must be asked, wait until you have
     all other information. The investigator should avoid asking questions
     that can be answered with a “yes” or “no” and try to ask open-ended
     questions whenever possible.

  H. REPEAT THE STORY ONCE YOU HAVE HEARD IT. When the
     witness has given you their version, repeat it back. This has three values.
     First, it will assure your proper understanding of what he/she said;
     second, it will give the individual a chance to hear what was said, so that
     any misunderstandings can be corrected; and third, the investigator can
     learn what was meant, as well as what was said.

  I. END EACH INTERVIEW ON A POSITIVE NOTE. If a contribution
     has been made to your understanding of the accident under discussion, let
     the person know. Express your appreciation for any ideas that come
     from the interview that could prevent or control future, similar events.
     Above all else, make sure you conclude the interview with a thank you.
Accident Investigation                                                        6-4

  J. RECORD CRITICAL INFORMATION QUICKLY. Depending on the
     nature of the accident being investigated, it may only be necessary to
     make good outline notes (possibly tape recorded) during the interview.
     Record such items as names, dates, locations, times, numbers,
     dimensions, etc. A complete report can be written promptly after the
     interview has been completed. Attempting to write a complete word-for-
     word account as it is related is very disruptive and can result in failure to
     get many important details. On the other hand, in cases of death and
     disability, fire and explosion, etc., there may be legal needs that can only
     be met by writing a word-for-word statement as the interview is
     conducted. A written “witness” report may be requested from each of the
     knowledgeable people.

  K. DRAWINGS AND PHOTOS SOMETIMES HELP. Since conditions
     change quickly, a photograph of the scene, taken as soon after the event
     as possible, can sometimes be a valuable reference. Accurate
     measurements of various aspects of the area can be vital, with or without
     photographs.

  L. KEEP THE PIPE-LINE OPEN. Encourage people to contribute
     additional facts they might remember or hear from someone else. The
     investigator needs to recognize the value difference between hearsay and
     eyewitness accounts. The good rapport established by the simple
     techniques already discussed will encourage a continued free flow of
     voluntary information after official interviews and investigations have
     been conducted. Information that appears of value must be followed-up
     to determine its accuracy.
     GUIDELINES FOR COMPLETING THE ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

                         INSTRUCTIONS

1) THIS IS A GUIDE TO BE USED AND COMPLETED FOR ALL
   OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES. IT IS DESIGNED TO BE COMPLETED BY THE
   EMPLOYEE’S SUPERVISOR/MANAGER.

2) WHEN INVESTIGATING THE ACCIDENT AND COMPLETING THIS
   REPORT, KEEP THE FOLLOWING IN MIND:

             DO                              DON’T

   DISCUSS THE ACCIDENT            CONDEMN THE EMPLOYEE
    WITH EMPLOYEE IN                COMPLAIN ABOUT HAVING
    PRIVATE, WHEN POSSIBLE           TO COMPLETE THIS REPORT
   MAKE THE EMPLOYEE FEEL           (ESPECIALLY TO THE
    COMFORTABLE                      EMPLOYEE)
   EXPRESS SINCERE INTEREST        ASSUME ONCE YOU HAVE
    IN THE SITUATION                 DETERMINED CAUSE(S) OF
   VISIT THE SCENE OF               ACCIDENT THAT YOUR JOB
    OCCURRENCE                       IS OVER
   INTERVIEW WITNESSES
   COMPLETE THE REPORT
    WITH CLEAR CONCISE
    STATEMENTS COVERING ALL
    PERTINENT DETAILS
   RECOMMEND ACTION(S) TO
    CORRECT THE CAUSE(S) AND
    DO ALL YOU CAN TO SEE
    THAT THEY ARE
    IMPLEMENTED


3) ALL ACCIDENTS ARE TO BE INVESTIGATED IMMEDIATELY AND NO
   LATER THAN 24-HOURS AFTER OCCURRENCE. THIS COMPLETED
   REPORT MUST BE DISTRIBUTED TO UPPER MANAGEMENT WITHIN
   24-HOURS. IF COMPLETE DETAILS ARE NOT AVAILABLE, MARK
   REPORT “PRELIMINARY” AND SUBMIT SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT
   WITHIN THREE (3) WORKING DAYS.



AFTER CAREFULLY READING THE INSTRUCTIONS ABOVE, COMPLETE
                          THE
              ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION FORM
  SUPERVISORS/MANAGER’S ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORT

   Injury Involved                    Incident – No Injury Involved
                                                              a.m.
WHEN       Date of accident:                  Time:           p.m. Day of week:

           Was the report to the supervisor/manager delayed?                    Yes No
           If Yes, why?
                             (Must be completed within shift of accident)
           Was the employee incident report completed?                          Yes No

WHO        Injured person:                                      Job title:

           Department:                         Length of employment:              Age:

           Was employee performing regular duties at time of accident?           Yes No
           If No, what are the employee’s regular job duties?

           Was employee trained to perform the task resulting in injury? Yes No
           Last training date:

INJURY     Nature/extent of injuries and severity:


WHERE      Exact location where accident occurred:


WHAT       Type of           1. Fall from elevation            7. Repetitive actions,
           Accident          2. Fall same level                   aggravation
           (Circle           3. Struck by                      8. Electrical contact
           definitions for   4. Caught in, under or            9. Fumes, dust, gas,
           what - may           between                           caustics, etc.
           be more than      5. Laceration, cut,               10.Chemical contact,
           1 cause)             puncture                          dermatitis
                             6. Overexertion –                 11.Motor vehicle
                                push, pull, lift,              12.Other (provide details)
                                lower, carry, hold


HOW        Description of accident (Detail what employee was doing, how he/she
           was doing it and what physical objects, tools, machines,
           environmental conditions, structures or equipment were involved).
           OBSERVE ACCIDENT SITE – ASK QUESTIONS



                                                                                  Page 1 of 2
     SUPERVISORS/MANAGER’S ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORT

WHY             Check accident causes below and comment fully here:


                             ACCIDENT CAUSE ANALYSIS

ENVIRONMENTAL (Unsafe Conditions)                       PERSONAL (Unsafe Acts)

1. INADEQUATE SAFEGUARDS                         1. BODILY CONDITIONS
   Lack of handling or safety devises;              Emotional upset, fatigue; intoxication;
   unsafe design; unguarded machinery               illness; lack of strength

2. IMPROPER OR DEFECTIVE                         2. LACK OF SKILL OR KNOWLEDGE
   EQUIPMENT                                        Improperly trained; inexperience;
   Poorly maintained equipment; worn,               uninformed; unaware; etc.
   cracked, broken, rough, slippery

3. HAZARDS OF LOCATION                           3. ADEQUATE SKILL OR
   Poor layout; congestion; insufficient            KNOWLEDGE
   space for storage; poor lighting, etc.           Chance taking; unauthorized use of
                                                    equipment; failure to use safety or
                                                    control devices

4. POOR HOUSEKEEPING                             4. IMPROPER APPAREL
   Improper piling or placing; clutter,             Lack of personal protective equipment
   spillage or breakage                             (PPE); loose sleeves, jewelry, etc.

5. NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED                      5. NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED

PREVENTION              Immediate actions taken to prevent similar accidents:
                        1.
                        2.
                        3.
                        What should be done and by whom to prevent recurrence of this
                        type of accident?
                                What                  By Whom                 When
                        1.
                        2.

MEDICAL                 First aid:            Employee being sent to:
                        Doctor:
                        Drug test performed: Yes No If No, Why?
                        Hospital:                          Date/Time:
                        Return to work date:               Time:

Supervisors/Manager’s Signature:                                      Date:
Owners/General Manger’s Signature:                                    Date:
                                                                                Page 2 of 2
Claims Management   7
Claims Management                                                            7-1

Purpose
Claims management provides guidelines for claims reporting, early medical
care, assures the injured employee is properly cared for and returns to their
regular job duties as soon as possible.
                Your best cost control is to prevent accidents.

Claims Reporting
   A. IMMEDIATE CLAIMS REPORTING
      The workers’ compensation claim should be reported to the FISIF
      claims department as soon as possible after the injury or illness is
      reported to the employee’s supervisor/manager.

      Controlling the cost of workers’ compensation claims means
      immediate reporting of all claims to the claims adjuster. *
      Call 1-800-288-0893 or 298-9095 in the Albuquerque area.
      Fax: 1-505-298-9094                    On-line: www.fisif.com

   B. NOTICE OF ACCIDENT
      The injured employee must complete the “Notice of Accident” form.
      The employer must have a supply of these available. Even if the
      employee does not think the accident caused an injury, it is best to
      have him/her complete a “Notice of Accident” form for any and all
      accidents. Have the employee complete, sign and date the Waiver of
      Medical Attention Form if they do not want to go for medical
      attention following the accident.

   C. FIRST AID
      Provide first aid or send the employee to your FISIF authorized
      physician for treatment. If it is an emergency, get emergency care
      immediately.

*The insurance industry studies show that claims reported three (3) days
after an accident could increase the cost of those claims by 25%. Claims
reported seven (7) days after an accident increased those cost by 40% or
more. In addition, claims reported within ten (10) days resulted in 22%
going to litigation while delays over thirty (30) days had 47% go to
litigation.
Claims Management                                                       7-2

  D. SUPERVISORS/MANAGER’S ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION
     Complete the Supervisors/Manager’s Accident Investigation Report
     (Refer to section 6.) Copies of this report should be sent to your
     FISIF claims adjuster. The information included in the accident
     investigation will help the claims adjuster understand and manage the
     claim.

  E. FIRST REPORT OF INJURY OR ILLNESS
     File the First Report of Injury or Illness with the FISIF claims
     department. To complete the report, the following information is
     needed:
      Employee’s name, address, telephone number
      Employee’s social security number
      Date of accident, date reported and date of hire
      Job title and duties being performed
      Description of accident
      Description of injury and body part(s) affected
      Physician/Hospital referral with phone numbers
      Other information that is relevant

        This information must be faxed to FISIF claims department at
        (505) 298-9094 or provided on-line at www.fisif.com.

  F. CONTACT BY THE CLAIMS ADJUSTER
     The claims adjuster will make contact with the claimant, treating
     physician and the employee’s supervisor/manager, or any other
     designated persons within 24-hours (Monday through Friday) or as
     soon as possible.

  G. ESTABLISH A SCHEDULE
     The supervisor/manager should establish a schedule to make contact
     with the claimant, treating physician(s) and claims representative to
     assure the claim is being effectively managed and the employee will
     return-to-work as soon as possible.
Claims Management                                                      7-3

Return-to-Work/Modified Duty
 When possible, provide return-to-work or modified duty that meets the
  physician’s work restriction as soon as possible.
 Develop a list of tasks for each job description/department to assist in
  returning the employee to work as soon as possible. These must be in
  writing.
       Describe tasks to be performed and the work requirements to
         complete the tasks, i.e. weights to be lifted, sitting, standing,
         walking, etc.
       Modify these as necessary and/or use change in assignments
         during the workday to meet restrictions; including part-time
         assignments
 Supervisors and managers should assure that the employee works within
  their restrictions as described by the treating physician. (The employee
  must be made aware that restrictions are a 24-hour restriction, not just
  while at work.)
 Document violations in following defined work restrictions or refusal to
  perform the work provided. And, report refusal to follow defined work
  restrictions to your FISIF claims adjuster.
 The return-to-work/modified duty should be modified during the healing
  process by the physician to prepare the employee to be able to come back
  to their full duties as soon as possible.
 No return-to-work/modified duty should last longer than 90-days. If the
  employee has not been released to full duty by the physician in that time
  frame, consult with your FISIF claims adjuster for alternatives.
Claims Management                                                       7-4

Workers’ Compensation Fraud
Insurance Fraud is a Felony. If you believe you have information or
evidence of workers’ compensation fraud, call the toll-free Food Industry
Fraud Hotline at 1-800-288-0893. You may remain anonymous. The arrest
and conviction of those involved in workers’ compensation fraud have
increased dramatically. It’s more likely that a prison term, large fines and
restitution will be part of the picture for those who commit this crime.

As another service by the Food Industry Self Insurance Fund of New
Mexico to help reduce your costs, Fraud Posters (English and Spanish) are
provided to display so all employees will be reminded that, “Workers’
Compensation fraud doesn’t pay.”
OSHA Compliance   8
OSHA Compliance                                                          8-1

This section will provide an overview of the regulations that may apply to all
FISIF members with ten (10) or more employees. The Hazard
Communications regulation (item B under the OSHA regulations below)
applies to all employers in New Mexico.

OSHA Regulations
  A. OSHA Recordkeeping – accident and illness recording requirements.
  B. Hazard Communications – chemical safety including the use of
     Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), handling, storage, spill clean up
     and disposal.
  C. Personal Protection Equipment – eye, face, hand, foot and body.
     (Hearing protection and respiratory protection have their own specific
     regulations.)
  D. Fire Protection – includes the proper number and type of fire
     extinguishers, placement, maintenance and training for employees to
     use them affectively.
  E. Emergency Preparedness – includes planning and training for the
     employees’ safety in the event of fire, tornado, severe weather,
     electrical outages, violence in the workplace, etc.
  F. Machine Guarding – requires the employer to assure all machine
     gears, sprockets, belt and pulley systems and the point of operation
     are properly guarded to keep employees from being injured when
     working with or near equipment and machinery.
  G. Lockout/Tagout – requires the employer to assure that all power
     sources are affectively off and cannot be re-energized until the
     equipment and/or machinery are safe to be put back in service. This
     regulation requires procedures for cleaning, servicing, repairing and
     oiling/adjusting.
  H. Walking & Working Surfaces – this regulation applies to floors, stairs,
     ladders, outside walkways and mezzanines.
  I. Powered Industrial Truck Safety – explains forklift and powered
     pallet jack safety, work procedures, training and maintenance
     requirements.
  J. Bloodborne Pathogens – this regulation applies to all companies. The
     regulation defines the precautions to be taken by persons providing
     medical, personal care, first aid or emergency care.
OSHA Compliance                                                       8-2

OSHA Resources

For a copy of the entire OSHA regulations or information on one or more of
the regulations listed above, contact:

      New Mexico Environmental Department
      Occupational Health & Safety Bureau
      PO Box 26110
      Santa Fe, NM 87502

      Telephone number – (505) 827-4230

The Occupational Health & Safety Bureau also provides free consultations
to employers with less than two hundred (200) employees. By providing
this service, they do require the employer to agree to follow their OSHA
recommendations.
Drug & Alcohol Policy   9
Drug & Alcohol Policy                                                     9-1
        (SAMPLE DRUG & ALCOHOL POLICY)

Name of Company


Purpose
We aim to provide and promote a drug-free and safe working environment
for employees and customers/guests. We prohibit the unlawful manufacture,
distribution, dispensation, possession or use of a controlled substance
anywhere within the workplace. Violations of this policy will lead to
corrective action, up to and including immediate termination of employment
and/or participation in a substance abuse rehabilitation or treatment program.

Policy
In order to have a drug-free workplace, employees are required to report to
work in an appropriate mental and physical condition to perform their jobs
in a safe and satisfactory manner. It is a violation of this policy for any
employee to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs while on the job. For
purposes of this policy, a “drug” is defined as any of the following:
        Any illegal medication or controlled substance
        Any alcoholic beverage
        Any legal prescription medication if it is used illegally

The legal use of prescribed drugs is permitted on-the-job if it does not impair
the employee’s ability to perform the essential functions of the job
effectively and in a safe manner, and does not endanger others in the
workplace. For purposes of this policy, “on-the-job” is defined as:
        When an employee is on our property, including, but not
          limited to, parking lots, offices, work areas and lounges at any
          time.
        When an employee is driving or riding as a passenger in one of
          our company vehicles or other motorized equipment.
        When an employee is driving or riding as a passenger in a
          privately owned vehicle on company business.
        When an employee is representing our company while
          conducting official business in another location.
Drug & Alcohol Policy                                                    9-2

We will perform a drug and/or alcohol test and evaluation for an employee
under the following circumstances:
       As a condition of initial employment or re-employment.
       When reasonable suspicion exists to believe that an employee
         has engaged in drug or alcohol-related misconduct.
         Reasonable suspicion of drug and/or alcohol use shall include,
         but not necessarily be limited to, the following:
         o Direct observation of drug and/or alcohol use or the
             possession of drugs and/or alcohol.
         o A pattern of abnormal conduct or erratic behavior that
             adversely affects work performance, but not limited to
             abnormal coordination, appearance, behavior, speech or
             odor.
         o Arrest or conviction of drug related offense, or the
             identification of an employee as a focus of a criminal
             investigation concerning illegal drug use, possession,
             manufacture or trafficking.
       After any accident requiring medial attention. This includes
         the injured person(s) and any employee(s) contributing to the
         accident.
       As a condition of continued employment or reinstatement after
         an incident of drug and/or alcohol related misconduct, on or
         off the job.

When an employee is asked to submit to drug or alcohol testing, he/she shall
be informed of the reason he/she is being asked to submit to a test. Refusal
constitutes insubordination and is grounds of discipline up to and including
termination of employment.

The test results will be kept confidential and maintained in employee health
files. If an employee tests “positive”, the employee may have a portion of
the same sample re-tested at his or her own expense.
Drug & Alcohol Policy                                                    9-3

An employee with “positive” results will be placed on leave pending the
completion of an investigation, if appropriate. Employees who violate this
policy are subject to disciplinary action, including, but not limited to,
termination. In the event of a violation, we may, at our discretion, permit
the offending employee at his/her own expense, to elect enrollment in an
approved substance abuse/rehabilitation program in lieu of discipline. In
such cases, continued employment shall depend on successful completion of
the program and, at our discretion, an agreement to submit to random
testing, with any positive test resulting in immediate termination.

The employee must provide written verification that he/she has completed a
treatment program which is satisfactory to us. While participating in a
treatment program, employees may use sick and paid time off benefit hours.
If eligible, family medical leave may be utilized. The employee is
financially responsible for all treatment costs, including all testing
(excluding initial tests), follow-up and aftercare costs.

An employee on family medical leave who attends and successfully
completes a rehabilitation program, will be restored to an equivalent position
with equivalent pay, benefits and other terms and conditions of employment
upon his/her return. There is no guarantee that the employee will be
returned to their original job.

An employee who is not eligible for family medical leave will be placed on
unpaid medical leave with no guarantee that a position will be available
upon his/her return from leave.

For information on agencies that are available to provide assistance to
employees and their families, please call:
 Alcoholic Anonymous                                     (505) 266-1900
 Narcotics Anonymous                                     (505) 260-7195
 Center on Alcoholism Substance Abuse & Addiction (CASAA)
   through the University of New Mexico                   (505) 768-0150
                   DRUG & ALCOHOL SCREEN
                  AUTHORIZATION & RELEASE


Name of Company



By signing my name to this form, I consent to submit to the screening tests
for the substance(s) listed below, and I authorize the physicians to release
the results of my tests solely to my employer. I also release the physician
and my employer from any and all liability of any kind resulting from the
testing procedure or the transfer of information obtained there from.




Date                            Employee’s Name – Please Print


                                Employee’s Signature


Date                            Witness Signature


Testing may include but not limited to the testing for the presence of:
Alcohol (ethyl)
Amphetamines
Barbiturates
Benzodiazepines
Cannabinoids (marijuana)
Cocaine
Methadone
Methaqualone
Opiates and/or Derivatives
Phencyclidine (PCP)
Propoxyphene
New Mexico Insurance & Safety
Posting Requirements            10
New Mexico Insurance & Safety Posting Requirements                      10-1

Purpose
The purpose of this section is to provide a brief outline of each employer’s
requirements for posting specific notices and data.

Note: the regulations are subject to change based on new or revised
regulations.

Responsibilities
      Owners/General Managers must assure the required postings are
        made and that the postings are placed in a conspicuous place in
        which all employees can read them.
      Supervisors/Managers must assure the postings are maintained in a
        manner that all employees can read them, and provide
        interpretation to questions regarding the posting if requested by
        employees.

General Posting Requirements
      New Mexico Workers’ Compensation Administration
           1. Workers’ Compensation Act Poster
           2. Workers’ Compensation Carrier Notification
           3. Notice of Accident Forms
           4. Preferred Physician Name & Address

       New Mexico Environmental Department Occupational Health
        & Safety Bureau
          1. Job Safety & Health Protection (Available in Spanish)
          2. You Have a Right to Job Safety & Health…It’s the Law
          3. OSHA Form 300A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and
             Illnesses (February 1st through April 30th) for the prior
             year

				
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