WOOLWICH OBSERVER - August 08, 2009

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					THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Design firm moves to new Arthur Street location.......................................»12
California training for local swimmer

NEWS |

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»14
VOLUME 14, ISSUE 31 SATURDAY, AUGUST 08, 2009 www.ObserverXtra www.ObserverXtra.com

Woolwich signs deal with fitness provider
Company will run centre; township to spend $135,000 to equip the facility
STEVE KANNON
Some 300 people will need to join the new fitness centre to cover operational costs when the Woolwich Memorial Centre opens next month. The township is budgeting on that number to pay for the $132,000 contract council this week awarded to the company that will run the training facility. Membership fees have been set at $480 per year ($40/month) for the time being, with 300 to 325 people needed off the start, recreation director Larry Devitt told councillors meeting Tuesday night. Personal Best Health and Performance Inc. of Caledon will be paid $11,000 a month to manage and staff the operation. Under the arrangement approved this week, the company will provide a fulltime fitness manager, part-time staff to cover weekday mornings and evenings and weekend hours, plus group instructors. In order to provide convenience and to entice potential members, the centre will be staffed much of the day while the WMC is open. “[T]he program will require time to build and develop a clientele, thus the need to hit the
See FITNESS page »02
PHOTO | MARC MIQUEl HElSEN

Rainy weather driving up costs, and slowing paving work
Township running deficits in water and wastewater funds due to inflow issue
STEVE KANNON
Not just a downer, this summer’s wet weather is also hitting Woolwich residents in the wallet, as the township runs deficits in its water and wastewater budgets. Poor conditions have also delayed paving projects. Through the first half of the year, the wastewater budget ran an $89,000 deficit, largely due to inflow and infiltration problems. Steady and constant rain sees water seep into the ground, finding its way into cracks in underground pipes and putting more water into the treatment plant than is billed for on the customers’ side of the meters. On the water side, a $30,000 deficit has arisen, in large part due to significant water loss in the Breslau system, the result of a leak in a source pipe owned by Waterloo Region. “This leak has been occurring for some time now, and our regional billings for the Breslau system increased three to four times the normal level,” said finance director Richard Petherick in a report presented Tuesday night to Woolwich council. In response to a question from Ward 3 Coun. Murray Martin, chief administrative officer David Brenneman said the leak in Breslau has yet to be fixed. In a later interview, manager of engineering operations Rod Kruger said the issue in Breslau is proving more complicated than, say, a broken watermain. The leak in one of the connections is not easily accessible – “It’s not an easy leak
See WEATHER page »02

in The AFTeRMATh OF The cOLLisiOn Emergency workers attempt to revive Archie McKee, 82, at the Church Street, Elmira scene where he was struck by a pickup truck while crossing the road. He was later pronounced dead at grand River Hospital.

Pedestrian dies after being struck by pickup truck
Victim was attempting to cross Church Street
MARC MIQUEL HELSEN
An 82-year-old pedestrian was struck and killed by a black Dodge pickup truck as he attempted to cross Church Street West in Elmira Thursday morning. The vehicle, being driven by a 52-year-old Elmira man, had been travelling westbound at the time. Emergency responders conducted CPR on the victim, whose body lay on the street in front of the Short Stop convenience store, but to no avail: the man was later pronounced dead at Grand River Hospital in Kitchener. The victim has been identified as Archie McKee. Although the investigation continues, police believe that neither alcohol nor excessive speed was a factor in this collision. The driver of the pickup was not injured in the collision. No charges have been laid at this time, said police spokesman Olaf Heinzel in a statement. A portion of Church Street, from Arthur to Walker streets, was closed for part of the day as the police traffic branch investigated the scene. “Anybody who hasn’t already spoken with police is asked to call us,” said Constable Scott Griffiths. Anyone with information is asked to call the traffic branch at (519) 650-8500, ext. 8856 or e-mail traffic@wrps.on.ca.

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2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Weather: Paving contractors backed up as rain delays work
» From cover

to fix.” Once it is repaired, the township can figure out the flow rate and how much it was overbilled by the region, eventu-

ally submitting a claim for compensation. The issue of inflow and infiltration (I&I) is an ongoing one that will take some time to tackle, he added.

Fitness: Centre should be ready
» From cover

PHOTO | MARC MIQUEl HElSEN

ground running with a service available to the public for as many hours a day as possible,” he said in a report to council. The contract is for one year. After that time, the township will review the arrangement to see if hours and staffing need to be adjusted upward or downward. As the program develops, shorter-term, family, fitness/aquatic and corporate rates will be investigated for inclusion as options. The deal with Personal Best Health requires the township to provide all equipment and supplies for the fitness centre. To that end, councillors also approved spending $135,000 with National Fitness Products of Canada for a variety of

training equipment. So far, the list features 20 pieces of cardio equipment, including nine spin bikes, three treadmills, two elliptical machines and three upright bikes. As well, there will be an assortment of free weights, and a studio featuring mats, stability balls and related equipment. A budget of $100,000 has been augmented by $53,000 from the Ontario Trillium Fund, leaving a surplus of $17,000. Noting the opening is approaching, Coun. Murray Martin questioned Devitt about the timelines for delivery and installation of the equipment. The recreation director said he’s been assured the facility will be ready to go prior to the official opening Sept. 12.

The township’s multimillion-dollar I&I program has addressed most of the major problems with the systems in Elmira and St. Jacobs, but there are certainly small leaks still to be tackled. “We’re not finished with I&I by a long shot – it’s an ongoing situation.” Current reconstruction work on Arthur,

Brubacher and Second streets in Elmira, for instance, will help, as will next year’s similar full-scale reworking of portions of Riverside Drive, Samuel and Ann streets. “The small things add up. Every little bit helps,” said Kruger. “Overall, the system is getting quite a bit better.” Aside from water and sewer issues, the engi-

neering department is also coping with delays to paving work due to the bad weather. Rain has backed up jobs all over the region, meaning contractors don’t know when they’ll be able to get to projects such as Riverside Drive West in Elmira, which was to have received a final layer of pavement by now. That project, which also includes parts of

Dunke Street North and Victoria Glen Drive, is now scheduled to get underway Aug. 17, weather permitting. While the rain has hampered paving projects, repairs and upgrades to the sidewalk network have gone on pretty much as scheduled, as working with cement in the rain is less problematic than asphalt, said Kruger.

MAGic MOMenTs Owen Anderson gets some help from a brave volunteer as he exhibits a few of his magic tricks at the Region of Waterloo library Agent 009 TD Summer Reading Club at Elmira’s St. james lutheran Church Thursday afternoon.

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LEADING OFF

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

“You learn a lot by talking to people.”
Milton Erb

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NEWS |

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HANDY-CRAFTS Although Wellesley’s Milton Erb started woodcarving seriously just 15 years ago, his ornate and elaborate pieces reflect his lifetime passion for working with wood. From wooden wrenches and pliers to steam engines and animal sculptures, Erb’s creations are the result of an eclectic imagination and dexterous hands.

PHOTOS | MARC MIQUEl HElSEN

Carving out a niche
Retirement fuels Wellesley man’s passion for woodcarving
MARC MIQUEL HELSEN
Just by looking at Milton Erb’s wood creations you might think he’s been at it for a lifetime: wooden bowls, totem poles measuring some six metres (20 feet), moose and wolf sculptures and wooden pliers made of a single piece of wood are just some of the many items that the Wellesley woodworker has fashioned out of ash, walnut, and maple since retiring 22 years ago. But while he has a lifetime of experience working with wood as a building trades carpenter, it’s only in the last 15 years or so that he’s been carving creations of a more artistic kind. “A little bit of everything,” says Erb in describing his selection of carvings.
O ! N T IC PEPUBL O E TH

Erb, who showcases and sells his creations at local festivals – he plans to attend a festival in Blythe in the coming weeks and the Apple Butter and Cheese Festival in Wellesley in September – is currently working on a wooden steam engine. The approximately two-foot (0.60-metre) creation is made of local walnut and maple wood. He’s working against time to be able to showcase the piece at the upcoming festivals, which he says are great for learning. “You learn a lot by talking to people.” With large, strong and steady hands, Erb is meticulous with his work: just a quick glance of a wooden moose sculpture reveals fine grooves resembling animal hair etched out of the soft wood.

His creations have caught the attention of many people, with word-of-mouth spreading news of his handiwork. Through a local contact, Erb was asked to create some wooden carvings for the altar at St. Clement’s Roman Catholic Church. His creations have

also caught the attention of the township, which is thinking of commissioning his services for the purpose of beautifying a tree near the gazebo in Wellesley. “He gave me the grand tour of his place, and it’s just amazing the stuff that he has

there,” says Wellesley Mayor Ross Kelterborn. “It’s not amateur stuff – unbelievable. He does deserve some recognition.” Retiring after some 42 years as a carpenter – a career he got into at the prompting of his father-in-law – Erb was then able to pick up the hobby of woodcarving. In his trade, Erb, who was born a few miles outside of Wellesley, was unable to spend too much time carving. But his retirement freed up some time and now he carves “quite a bit” in his home shop. “I just wanted to do it, just start,” he says. It seems the desire runs in the family as his brother also , carves, using the facilities of the seniors’ workshop in neighbouring Wilmot Township. “We just enjoy doing it.”

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4 | NEWS

» FROM THE EDITOR | STEVE KANNON
A tipped-over arbor. A few empty beer cans. The occasional bit of graffiti. Annoyances all, but we can probably count ourselves lucky that’s usually as bad as youth issues get in this community. Elsewhere, of course, youth crime is a much larger problem, with violence escalating. Again this week in Toronto, there were more shootings involving teens. While youth crime is largely on a downward slope, along with many other categories of criminal activity, the public perception says otherwise. Dr. Alan Leschied, a psychologist and professor in the Faculty of Education at the University of Western Ontario, notes that while youth crime numbers are dropping, the “lethality of incidents” is on the rise. Simply put, teen violence is more deadly. There was a time when schoolyard scuffles led to a bloodied nose or black eye at worst. Now it can mean a knife blade in the throat or a bullet hole in the chest. Such incidents feed the idea that youth crime is on the rise. That’s partly due to the real increase in the level of violence and, more shockingly, the number of girls now caught up in the trend. In the last dozen years, female violence rates have doubled, to eight per cent of teen violence numbers from four per cent, he says. “It’s still more than 90 per cent boys.

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Kids today: crime numbers down, but violence escalating
But [society] finds it extraordinary that girls can commit such acts.” Take the example of Melissa Todorovic, now 17, the Toronto teen who was just sentenced to life in prison for her part in the Jan. 1, 2008 stabbing death of 14-year-old Stefanie Rengel. Just 15 at the time, Todorovic spent months badgering her boyfriend, 17 at the time, to kill the girl she saw as a rival. The boy, known only as D.B., is now 19 and awaiting sentencing, also as an adult, for the murder. The Todorovic case was particularly shocking as it involved a teenage girl using sexual favours – and the threat of withholding them – over an extended period of time to badger her boyfriend into killing, Leschied explains. This kind of violence is less of an anomaly than it used to be. It was only 12 years ago that the entire country was shocked by what happened to Reena Virk, the 14-year-old Victoria girl who died after being swarmed and beaten by eight teens, seven of them girls. The case brought to the fore the issue of violence among teen girls. The incidents have been more numerous of late. In 2006 in Medicine Hat, Alberta, a 12-year-old girl and her 23-year-old boyfriend murdered the girl’s parents and her younger brother, 8. Also that year, two 14-year-old girls, a 12-year-old girl and a 15-year-old boy were arrested following the unprovoked beating death of a 34-year-old woman in Winnipeg. Last summer, three teenage girls in Halifax beat a 65-year-old woman in a public park. That incident was quickly followed by another in which another group of three teenage girls beat and tortured a fourth girl over a two-hour period. Still dwarfed by the number of acts undertaken by boys, violence committed by girls catches our attention nonetheless. The figures showing the trend are clear. Less obvious is why girls are becoming more violent. For Leschied, a combination of factors, including a change in girls’ image of themselves and less supervision in the home, are likely behind the trend. “Girls’ role models have changed – they’re a lot edgier,” he says, pointing to the evolution in “girl culture.” Taking on some of the aggressive qualities traditionally associated with boys, girls have also adopted some of the more problematic traits. With girl power comes the chance for more conflict in some instances. Even more troubling are incidents where the perpetrators come from good homes, such as is the case with Todorovic, where family and friends never saw it coming. “That’s every parent’s nightmare – that they did everything right, but something still went wrong … with their child.”

With Todorovic, however, the signs were there, as prosecutors were able to trot out e-mails and text messages showing the teenager spent months urging her boyfriend to kill Rengel. It’s impossible to know if more intervention into their daughter’s life – monitoring her computer and cell phone use, for instance – by Todorovic’s parents could have prevented the murder, but that kind of parental control might be what it takes to make a difference, Leschied suggests. “This case is … a reminder to parents that they need to be more intrusive than they’re comfortable doing.” Parents today seem less inclined to be invasive, to keep track of what their kids are doing, precisely at a time when technology provides far more avenues for teens to communicate and to keep secrets. While such measures, he says, can never reduce the likelihood of such acts occurring all the way down to zero, they could prove helpful. The old bit about “It’s 11 o’clock, Do You Know Where Your Kids Are?” needs to be updated to “Do You Know What Your Kids Are Up To?” … even if they are at home.

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THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Floradale dept. to get pair of new trucks

» WEllESlEY RECOgNITION

NEWS |

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Not willing to spend $235,000, Woolwich may opt to pay out $490,000 instead. When tenders for a new tanker truck for the Floradale fire station came in at $45,000 more than budgeted for, the department looked at purchasing a stock unit instead of having one built. going a step further, the township will look at combining a new tanker with a pumper truck scheduled to be replaced in 2010 at a budgeted amount of $300,000. For $490,000 – the combined budget amounts for both vehicles – the department should be able to source two new off-the-shelf trucks, fire chief Rick Pedersen told councillors this week. The township will now send out a request for proposals looking for new quotes.

Service to community nets him honour
Former mayor and roads superintendent, Frank Friedmann named senior of the year
JONI MILTENBURG
Having lived in Wellesley Township nearly all his life and worked for the township for 33 years, Frank Friedmann is a fitting recipient for the township’s senior of the year honours, say organizers of the award. Friedmann was mayor of Wellesley for nine years in the 1990s, but before that he spent 21 years as roads superintendent and served a term as councillor. He was born in Linwood and has lived there all his life except for a few years spent out west. His father, Simon, was a councillor and deputy reeve in the 1940s, and Friedmann developed an interest in municipal politics and how the township was run. “I suppose it was following in the footsteps of my dad – sometimes it runs in the blood,” he chuckled. In the 1950s, he had a hankering to go out west, where he got a job with surveyors working on the Trans Canada Highway in the Banff area. That job launched another lifelong interest in infrastructure and municipal works. After serving a term as councillor in the late 1960s, Friedmann got a job with the township’s roads department. He later decided to run for mayor in 1991 after he

Raffle out, auction in

The committee for the Calvary United Church car show has decided to scrap the raffle draw due to licence restrictions. The raffle will be replaced by a silent auction at the event that runs today (Saturday) from 3 to 7 p.m. in St. jacobs. All proceeds from the silent auction and barbecue will go towards materials for a house the church is building in Mexico.

PHOTO | jONI MIlTENBURg

GeTTinG his dUe linwood’s Frank Friedmann, whose service to the township included nine years as mayor, has been named Wellesley’s senior of the year.

It’s okay to bring the noise

For the third year, the Maryhill Palace will be the site of the Serbian Festival of Kitchener-Waterloo, as Woolwich council this week granted organizers an exemption from the township noise bylaw. The festival is set for Sept. 5 and 6, noon to 1 a.m. Some 1,000 to 2,000 people are expected to attend each day. “Every year we learn from the past ... to try to make it better each year,” said club president Ned Krayishnik. Under the terms of the exemption, amplified music must be reduced in volume at 11p.m., with all amplified noise to cease by 1 a.m. In a similar vein, an exemption from the noise bylaw was granted for the Aviation Expo & Air Show organized by the Waterloo-Wellington Flight Centre in Breslau. Organizers will be permitted to use amplified sound between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. on Aug. 29 and 30. It’s been 23 years since the flight centre last hosted an air show. “We’re tiptoeing back into the air show business,” WWFC general manager Bob Connors said.

was fired from the roads superintendent position over personality conflicts with the mayor of the day. Friedmann won that election and was re-elected for two more terms, until he stepped down in 2000. During his time as mayor, Friedmann presided over the expansion of the sewer system in Wellesley Village and the installation of new water systems in Wellesley and St. Clements. He also served through the

Harris years, when the provincial government was cutting back on spending and downloading services to the municipal governments. “It was a pretty hectic squeeze on for money … . It’s a little different today; they’re throwing money around pretty free and easy today he observed. ,” Friedmann still maintains an interest in both municipal politics and infrastructure, and he was glad to hear recent announcements of feder-

al and provincial funding for roads and bridges. “There’s a tendency to hold back on the large expenditure items because of money, of course, so I think it’s a good thing the senior levels of government are coming up with the money to catch up on the backlog of these things that has built up over the years.” Friedmann is still an active volunteer with the Linwood Lions Club, where he has run the annual hockey pool for the

last 15 years. He’s also on the board of directors for the Waterloo Wellington Community Futures Development Corporation, which offers assistance to rural businesses. Friedmann was invited to help with the organization when it was still in its infancy, and he said it’s been interesting to watch it grow. “To get in at the start and see it develop was really rewarding, and it’s going well today.”

Parking restrictions in the works for Centre St.
STEVE KANNON
Parking will be banned on a stretch of Elmira’s Centre Street under a plan that this week won tentative approval from Woolwich Council. Acting on residents’ concerns, the township is now drafting a bylaw to allow parking only on one side of the roadway between Church and Mill streets. The goal is to allow easier passage along the road, which offers little room to spare when cars are parked opposite each other on both sides of the street. As originally proposed by clerk Christine Broughton Tuesday night, the bylaw would have prohibited parking on a 50-metre portion south of Church Street. It’s there that the road is narrowest – typical streets have four metres for each of the two lanes of travel, whereas that southbound segment of it is just 3.2 metres wide. A pitch from residents, however, prompted councillors to clear a longer route. “Right now, you’d have a hard time getting a pickup truck through. A fire truck would never get through there,” said Jody Leis of 3 Centre St. Neighbour Doug Sherritt of 10 Centre St. called on the township to extend the no-parking zone from Church Street all the way to Mill Street, citing navigation issues and access problems for residents backing out of their driveways. Coun. Ruby Weber, who

supported the change along with the rest of her colleagues, questioned the need for people to be parking their cars on both sides of the road when the Mill Street parking lot is nearby . Councillors instructed staff to draft a new bylaw, circulating the proposal to area residents for feedback before bringing it back for a vote.

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6 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Regional energy groups look to make solar more accessible
MARC MIQUEL HELSEN
The power to reduce energy consumption and energy costs is in the sun mixed with a healthy dose of conservation. This will be the subject of Out Of The Dark: A Solar Information Night which will be held Aug. 13 at the Waterloo Memorial Recreation Complex. Organized by Community Renewable Energy Waterloo (CREW), a nonprofit group, and the Residential Energy Efficiency Project (REEP), the session will teach homeowners how they can harvest free energy from the sun. Visitors will learn about the Solar Initiative for Distributed Energy (SIDE), a program which includes a bulk purchase of solar technology options which generate domestic hot water or electricity, subsequently reducing energy costs paid by homeowners. Crucial to the program is the fact that the installations of the solar technology are made easy and seamless, with all permits and incentive applications managed by CREW’s preferred installers. All homeowners need to do is review a contract and sign up. The idea is to make the purchasing process as simple as buying a car. The difference, of course, resides in the fact that solar panels provide a return on investment, last for decades and reduce air pollution. “It makes buying a solar energy system for your house as simple as buying a car,” said Ted Sherk, coordinator of the SIDE initiative. “It’s basically about reducing all the barriers and making it easier and getting you the best possible price. … Our mission is to provide affordable and environmentally friendly solar energy.” Targeting residential homeowners, small businesses, faith groups and cooperatives, the SIDE project offers a number of options which will be addressed and explored at the information session on Aug. 13. Solar installers will be on-hand to give demonstrations and answer questions regarding these technologies, and various solar technologies will be discussed, including solar panels that generate electricity (photovoltaic or “PV”) and others that heat water (solar thermal). The event will also feature guest speakers including Jed Goldberg, president of Earth Day Canada, who will speak about community solar bulk purchases and how homeowners, churches and small businesses in the region can work together towards a future that is environmentally, socially and economically sustainable. In commemoration of the great blackout of 2003, the event will underscore the importance of energy consumption in homes and provide information on grants available through energy-saving renovations and upgrades. Visitors to the event will get a chance to learn how feeding electricity generated through solar power into the grid can help save on energy costs through the province’s Green Energy Act. While electricity typically costs homeowners 6¢ per kWh, the provincial government currently pays 42 ¢ per kWh to homeowners who produce electricity with their solar photovoltaic (or “PV”) panels and feed it into the grid. Soon, under the Green Energy Act, this rate is expected to double to a rate of 80.2¢ per kWh, dramatically reducing the time it should take homeowners to pay back the initial investment in the system to only 10-12 years, with a return on investment of eight to 11 per cent. Although solar panels play an important role in the shift towards the production of clean energy and the reduction of energy costs, people must also play a crucial role. “Solar power and conservation should always be used together – installing a solar system is like the crowning achievement that you can do after you’ve done as much as you can to conserve,” said Sherk, noting that most homes can achieve at least a 25 per cent reduction of energy consumption through home energy audits and basic efficiency upgrades such as installing energy-efficient light bulbs. “The cheapest kilowatt hour is the kilowatt hour saved … it’s cheaper to turn off the lights rather than buy a solar energy system to generate electricity,” said Sherk. For more information, visit www.crewzone. ca and www.reepwaterlooregion.ca.

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THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

NEWS |

» lAW & ORDER
» July 30
11:20 AM | Police were called to the scene of a collision involving two commercial trucks at the roundabout at Sawmill Road and Arthur Street near St. Jacobs. It appears that one of the drivers had stopped, waiting to merge, then entered the roundabout too soon, colliding with the other vehicle. There were no injuries. One driver was charged with ‘fail to yield the right of way’ and the other for failing to surrender inspection documents. 4:30 PM | There were no injuries and no charges following a collision involving a motorcycle and a minivan on Herrgott Road near Line 86 in Wallenstein. The van had been turning into a parking lot when it struck the motorcycle. Both vehicles were drivable.

7

Next time, it’ll be cheaper to come prepared
An officer conducting a traffic stop on Listowel Road in Elmira about 8 a.m. Aug. 3 noticed a bunch of Grand River Conservation Authority no-parking signs in the back seat of one driver’s vehicle. The 22-year-old man who was stopped eventually admitted to having taken the signs while at Conestogo Lake after running out of firewood. The police officer arranged for the individual to pay for the cost of the damage caused in this incident and issued a trespass charge.
Elmira. A fence surrounding the station was cut and entry gained. It is unknown exactly when the theft took place, and could have occurred any time between July 13 and 31. The estimated value of the stolen copper is $500. There were no reported injuries but the Corvette incurred serious front-end damage. 2:00 PM | A vehicle parked at Riverside Public School in Elmira was keyed with a sharp object. The black Cadillac Escalade was scratched some time between 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. The estimated value of the damage is $1,000. There are no suspects. was hanging around the complainant’s Young Street, St. Jacobs home. The complainant’s daughter, in the basement, could see the man’s legs from a window as he walked around the house. The doorbell was rung. A while later, the complainant left the home in a vehicle but then decided to return home. At this point the man turned around and headed the other way, taking off on a bicycle. The suspect was not located. last seen heading down Sunset Drive towards Voisin Crescent. The complainant then heard a vehicle take off in that area a short while later. 9:30 AM | A blue bicycle was abandoned on Flamingo Drive in Elmira. The boy’s 15-speed, a blue Triumph model, may be picked up by its rightful owner at the Elmira detachment. 11:30 AM | Police continue to investigate a possible animal cruelty incident after a dead cat was placed on the windshield of a vehicle while parked at Lobsinger Line and Herrgott Road in St. Clements. 7:00 PM | Several marijuana plants were found in a field near Weisenberg Road and County Road 12 in Woolwich Township. Area neighbours spotted an old brown Ford van that quickly left when they approached the area. It appears that that van had been seen in the area on several occasions.

»

August 4

»

August 3

»

August 1

»

July 31

1:00 PM | Some copper was stolen from a Waterloo North Hydro station at Oriole Parkway and Industrial Drive in

12:40 PM | A Corvette and a GMC pickup truck collided at Arthur and Church streets in Elmira. A Kitchener man at the wheel of the Corvette was charged with ‘careless driving’ after crashing his vehicle into an Elmira man’s pickup truck.

»

August 2

12:50 PM | Police received a report that a suspicious man with a bushy beard, wearing a grey shirt and sweatpants,

4:00 AM | A resident of Sunset Drive in St. Clements heard several car doors being opened and closed in the area. The complainant turned on some outdoor lights and yelled at a suspected thief, who ran off. A wallet with ID but no cash was taken. The suspect, who is believed to have been working with an accomplice, was described as being about 6’1” in height, thin, wearing a tank top, long shorts and flip flops. He was

12:50 AM | Some youngsters appear to have been attempting to break mirrors from vehicles in the area of Kressler Road and Lobsinger Line in Heidelberg. They eventually caused some $500 worth of damage. This area appears to have been the site of an ongoing problem with break-ins in recent weeks. 3:30 PM | Two youngsters about 12 to 13 years of age were spotted stealing butane and other items from Home Hardware on King Street in St. Jacobs. Police continue to investigate this incident and believe that it may be connected to last week’s arson at a St. Jacobs playground. 4:45 PM | A 41-year-old Welland driver was stopped at a stop sign on Union Street and Southfield Drive in Elmira when he was rear-ended by another vehicle, being driven by a 25-year-old Elmira man driving a black Jeep. The Elmira man was later charged with ‘careless driving.’

Drayton kicks off the fair season this weekend
JONI MILTENBURG
If you’ve ever watched the Olympics and boasted “I could do that,” the Drayton Fall Fair is your chance to put your muscles where your mouth is. Except instead of shot put and archery, you can try your hand at the bale toss and nail driving. The Wellington County Junior Farmers are organizing their first Farmers’ Olympics at the Drayton Fair this weekend. A new event for the fair, the competition will be divided into three age categories, with people competing in teams in events like bale rolling, cow milking and barrow race. There will be prizes for the top teams, and anyone who wants to take part can sign up on the day of the event. For the most part, the fair will see the return of old favourites like the tractor pull, midway, and animal shows. For the kids, there’s the Music Pups on Saturday, followed by children’s entertainer Erick Traplin. Gates open Friday at 5 p.m. with the midway and exhibits of crafts, crops and culinary arts. There will also be vendors on site selling crafts and jewellery, including a tea vendor this year. A demolition derby starts at 7 p.m. The show ring will be a busy place Saturday, starting with the heavy horse show at 11 a.m., followed by the goat show, dairy show and pet show. Outside of the ring, there will be a baby show, lawn tractor pull and square dancing. Saturday evening winds up with a tractor pull and beer garden. On Sunday, events kick off with the miniature horse show, beef show and sheep show. Entertainment for the afternoon will be supplied by a truck pull and the Junior Farmer Olympics. The theme for this year’s fair is “Christmas in August.” “It’s basically a summer wonderland, so a flurry of activity,” said Nina Becker, secretary of the Drayton Mapleton Agricultural Society. Admission to the fair is $10 for adults and $25 for the entire weekend; children 12 and under are free. The Drayton event kicks off a series of fallfairs-in-August in the area. Next up is the Hanover Fall Fair Aug. 14-16 (call 519-364-4443 for information), followed by the Grand River Fall Fair Aug. 15 and 22 (519-8468879) and the Palmerston Fall Fair Aug. 28-30 (519-343-3427).

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8 | COMMENT & OPINION

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

» CARTOON
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The good news is the economy seems to be coming around, if only slightly The . bad news is that the downward pressure on incomes is likely to continue as it has through ups and downs for a few decades now. The majority of us have seen real incomes decline. Studies show the gap between rich and poor is growing, even during the best of economic conditions. In 2004, the average earnings of the richest 10 per cent of Canada’s families raising children were 82 times that earned by the poorest 10 per cent of families. That is approaching triple the ratio of 1976, when the ratio was around 31 times. The aftertax income gap has never been this high in at least 30 years, and it has been growing faster than ever since the late 1990s. Essentially, we’re spending more time at work, but 80 per cent of us are getting a smaller share of Canada’s growing economy Only the richest 20 per cent are experi. encing gains, and most of those gains are concentrated in the top 10 per cent. That richest 10 per cent of Canadian families is getting richer. They enjoyed a 30-per-cent earnings increase compared to a generation ago, the only group to experience such gains. This is creating a new

Middle class continues to erode
phenomenon in income distribution in Canada: the rich are breaking away from the rest of society, in a way not seen since such information began to be collected in 1976. The differences become stark when the study compares the top half of families with the bottom half: between 1976 and 1979, the bottom half of Canada’s families earned 27 per cent of total earnings. Between 2001 and 2004, their share dropped to 20.5 per cent of total earnings, even though they were working more. The poorest 20 per cent saw their share of the earnings pie drop from 4.5 per cent from the late 1970s to 2.6 per cent in the early 2000s. In sharp contrast, the top half of Canadian families saw their share of total earnings grow to 79.5 per cent from 73 per cent during that same time period. Most of the increase went to the very richest 10 per cent of families – their share of earnings grew to 29.5 per cent from 23 per cent of all earnings by Canadian families. The average Canadian household with children is clocking in almost 200 hours more each year compared to just a decace ago. Only one group of families didn’t put in more hours: the richest 10 per cent, on

average, didn’t increase their work hours between 1996 and 2004. Yet the group was along in seeing major increases in their earnings. In the past, income gaps were often the result of economic conditions and policies pushing more people into the ranks of the poor. In the latest boom, the rich are outpacing the pack to pull ahead. This is not automatically a bad thing, except that it increasingly comes at the expense of the poor and, to a growing extent, the middle class. “Canadians sense that economic prosperity is largely accruing to the rich, leaving the rest behind,” says a report compiled by TD Bank. “That perception is borne out by these statistics. Though the pie is much bigger, it is not even getting divided into the same (unequal) pieces as a generation ago. The pieces are getting more unequal, with those at the top getting an ever-bigger share of the pie — at the expense of those at the bottom, but, more surprisingly, also at the expense of the majority of Canadian families.” We will emerge from the current recession, but the real goal will be to reverse the downward pressure on the middle-class society that emerged in the post-war era.

» VERBATIM
“We have to prepare, I believe, as Canadian leaders working with Parliament, as if there is an H1N1 truck coming around the corner with serious implications for the health of many Canadians.” Manitoba Premier Gary Doer says the H1N1 virus could hit hard this fall

» THE MONITOR
The value of building permits totalled $5.2 billion in June, up 1% from May. The increase was attributable to gains in both residential and non-residential construction. The value of permits increased for the fourth consecutive month in the residential sector. Statistics Canada

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

COMMENT & OPINION |

» HARD TALK | RAFE MAIR

9

Questioning the rationale behind dropping atomic bombs
Thursday marked the 64th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima; tomorrow will be the same anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki. Over the years, there has been much written and said about these bombs and whether or not they were justified. One positive point we must make is the horror was so great that no one has dropped one since. The continuation of humanity depends on the lessons of six decades ago being remembered. When making judgments, it’s critical that one goes back, as best one can, to the mood of the moment. In August 1945, the worst war in history was ending. It was not only a soldier’s war but one where the public bore the brunt of the terrors of bombardment. The public had been inculcated with extraordinary doses of propaganda. As the Germans had de-humanized the Jews, so Americans – and Canadians – had done the same to the Japanese. They were yellow, slanty-eyed little SOBs who couldn’t do anything original and could only copy. They had weak eyesight which would not allow them to become decent aviators. Many an American found out that the Japanese could be very innovative indeed and, in their marvelous warplane, the Zero, could fly very well too. To this sense of contempt and hatred was added the horrors of the war practiced Japanese-style. The treatment of China, especially in the rape of Nanking, by the Japanese was unbelievably wicked. The Bataan Death March of American prisoners in the Philippines was indescribably brutal. The prison camps were inhuman. This added to the American hatred. The presence of the atom bomb wasn’t known to the public so, in the summer of 1945 after the European war was over, people generally believed that the taking of the Japanese Islands by force could cost up to a half a million American lives. If the decision whether or not to drop the bomb was left to the American public I doubt that more than a handful would have shown any mercy. In fact, neither the public in the UK nor in the United States had any qualms about the firebombing of Hamburg, the destruction of Dresden or the flattening of Tokyo. Harry Truman, who didn’t himself know anything about the bomb until he became president on Apr. 12, 1945, ordered the bombing and said later that he didn’t lose a moment’s sleep over it. There are, however, some troubling questions. Why weren’t the Japanese shown the power of the atom bomb by detonating it over the ocean? There are two answers given. First, what if it didn’t work? Secondly, the Americans only had two bombs. A more serious question is this: With the Russians entering the war, by the Yalta agreement, on Aug. 15, and with the destitute Japanese blockaded, why not simply starve them out? Here, too, there were a couple of answers. While getting the Russians into the Asian war seemed like such a good idea at Yalta and Potsdam, it didn’t look so hot an idea by August. The Russians had some scores to settle from the Russian-Japanese war of 1904-5 when the Japanese trounced them. With the bomb, the United States scarcely needed Russia in what the Americans deemed their sphere of influence. Should the Americans have used the bomb? I wrestle with this question because I’ve been to Hiroshima. I’ve seen the
See MAIR »10

» INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS | GWYNNE DYER

Fallout continues a year after conflict in South Ossetia
A year ago this week, Georgia attacked Russia. It was like Jamaica attacking the United States. It was such a foolish and foredoomed act that at first most people believed the Georgian propaganda blaming it all on the Russians. Surely Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili wouldn’t do something so utterly stupid. But he did – and he lost, of course. There are two hangovers from the weeklong war that still have not cleared up, however. One is the lingering impression in the West, left over from the way that Western media reported the conflict at the time, that the “Russian bear” has turned nasty and expansionist. The other is a promise to Georgia that should never have been made. In the year since the war, it has become clear that the Georgian attack, which sought to regain control of the breakaway territory of South Ossetia, was planned well in advance. The Russians only responded after their peacekeeping troops in South Ossetia came under Georgian attack, but the Georgians won the propaganda battle. Saakashvili painted the Russians as evil aggressors, relying on Cold War stereotypes: “Russia’s war on Georgia echoes events in Finland in 1939, Hungary in 1956 and Czechoslovakia in 1968,” he told the Washington Post in August 2008. It fitted Western preconceptions, so the media went along with it. So did U.S. presidential candidate John McCain, condemning Russia’s “violent aggression” and claiming that “Russian actions, in clear violation of international law, have no place in 21st century Europe.” Barack Obama was more circumspect, but in the midst of an election campaign he chose not to expose his flank to the Cold Warriors of the Republican Party by openly challenging their version of events. The other problem, from a European perspective, was then-U.S. president George W. Bush’s push to get Georgia and another former Soviet republic, Ukraine, admitted to the NATO alliance. These countries are to the south of Russia, not between it and Western Europe, and bringing them into the Western alliance would alarm and alienate the Russians. Yet there is no practical way that NATO could defend them if they got into a fight with the Russians. Indeed, this concern may have been the main motive behind the creation of a European Union commission to investigate the origins of the war. The commission is led by Swiss diplomat Heidi Tagliavini, who has served in the area as an observer, and it has been gathering evidence for almost a year now. If its conclusions blame the war on Georgia, as seems likely, they will not be unwelcome in Brussels. Some of those conclusions were leaked last spring to the German newsmagazine Der Spiegel, and they support the contention that Georgia deliberately concentrated its troops and launched a surprise attack on South Ossetia, with the aim of seizing control of the province before Russia could respond. Between 16,000 and 20,000 Georgian troops, all equipped with modern U.S. weapons, attacked the South Ossetian militia and about 1,000 Russian peacekeeping troops who were stationed there on the night of Aug. 7, 2008. Even the Georgian “peacekeeping” battalion that was also stationed in the province took part in the attack. The local capital, Tskhinvali, fell into Georgian hands within hours, and dozens of Russian troops were killed or injured. Moscow responded quickly, and a large Russian force, including heavy armour, was sent south from the Russian province of North Ossetia through the tunnel under the main Caucasus range (which the Georgians had failed to secure) on Aug. 8. In one more day Georgian troops had been driven out of South Ossetia, and the Russians even followed them some distance into Georgia proper before withdrawing again at the end of the month. Erosi Kitsmarishvili, Georgia’s former ambassador to Moscow and a former confidant of Saakashvili’s,
See DYER »11

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10 | COMMENT & OPINION

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Mair: Learn from history and never use a-bombs again
» From page 09

» OBSERVER Q&A
Do you think Ottawa should keep assets like Nortel in Canadian hands?

replica of the bomb nicknamed “Little Boy.” I’ve been in the museum and seen the granite step into which is etched the shadow of the man who was sitting there waiting for the bank to open. I’ve walked through the Peace Park and seen the mound of 10,000 souls, the last resting place of 10,000 mostly unidentified bodies. I’ve walked down the main road in the park where stands the building known as Atom Bomb Dome, the stripped, exposed ribs of that dome still intact. I’ve spoken to survivors and spent some time with the mayor of the city. It’s hard to do these things and be objective about the question at hand. Just as it

was difficult for those in 1945 to look that the matter objectively. I personally don’t think the bombs needed to be dropped. Certainly after what happened to Hiroshima it’s hard to justify Nagasaki. I think Japan was on the ropes soon to be hemmed in and blockaded by both American and Russian troops. I believe she would have been forced to surrender. The decision was taken and it no doubt saved many American troops. But I’m troubled when I consider that the lives of Japanese civilians weren’t a factor at all. As I said at the outset, at least the horror of these two horrifying examples of mass destruction have kept us – so far – from ever using them again.

“Yes. It’s a Canadian company, it should stay Canadian. If we sell everything out to the States and wherever else you’re not going to have anything left.”
» Harold Klooster

“Yes. … the Canadian and Ontario taxpayers paid to help develop that company, and now it’s going to go outside? That’s technology we’ve paid for, part of it anyway.”
» William Brydon

“Yes, I do. I think that Nortel was very much on the cutting edge of developing new technologies and we want to have a stake in that in the future.”
» Susan Bauman

“Yes. There’s too many other Canadian companies that are leaving Canada.”

» Irene Good

» THE VIEW FROM HERE | SCOTT ARNOLD

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THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

COMMENT & OPINION |

11

Dyer: Georgia has only itself to blame in aftermath of invasion
» From page 09

testified to the Georgian parliament last November that Georgian officials told him in April 2008 that they planned to start a war to recover Abkhazia, one of Georgia’s two breakaway regions, and had received a green light from the United States government to do so. He said the Georgian government later decided to start the war in South Ossetia, the

other region, and continue into Abkhazia. Both the evidence of observers on the ground and the testimony of disillusioned Georgian officials like Kitsmarishvili are driving the EU commission towards the conclusion that Russia merely responded to the Georgian aggression. It will be helpful to have an authoritative Western body acknowledge that Russia has

not undergone some fundamental change of strategy. The EU commission, whose report has been postponed until next month, will not formally recommend against Georgia joining NATO, but the implication there will also be clear. Nobody really believed that NATO would ever fight World War Three to save Georgia, even it were the innocent victim of Russian ag-

gression, but by attacking Russia Saakashvili got everybody off the hook. Retired British army colonel Christopher Langton, senior fellow for conflict and defence diplomacy at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, summed it up only weeks after the war. “Georgia’s dream is shattered, but the country can only blame itself for that.”

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BUSINESS
» ARTHUR STREET STOREFRONT
MARC MIQUEL HELSEN
What’s in a name? For Bonzai Design Group of Elmira, in ‘Bonzai’ exists a similarity between the ancient art of growing and cultivating aesthetic miniature trees and branding in today’s consumer driven world. “Branding is really no different than that – you can’t just turn around one day and say ‘I want my brand to be this and do it overnight; you have to really work at the different touch points and all the different areas within your business to establish that and it takes years to do that,” said Iles Guran, creative director at Bonzai Design Group – recently moved from Church Street to its new Arthur Street storefront location – likening the process of cultivating a miniature tree to that of creating a solid brand and trademark. “Nowadays there’s so many commodity products in the market it’s really hard to differentiate yourself,” said Guran, noting that in a market glutted by countless types of beers and automobiles, for example, it is crucial to help clients differentiate themselves and their products from the competition. That is Bonzai’s objective, to help the client build a brand that will help consumers understand the importance and value of creating an image that sets them apart from the competition. “We try to help clients identify a real, unique difference and then bring out a story – and by story I don’t necessarily mean a fictional type story – I just mean really explaining to the consumer what it is that you do and why they should buy from you.” The Elmira business offers corporate clients services in graphic design, or as Guran puts it “visual communications.” Bonzai helps clients establish, define or perfect their branding and its presentation to potential customers. That may include designing or redesigning catalogues, logos, websites or packaging.

12 | BUSINESS

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

»

Looking to make Bonzai a brand name
Elmira design firm specializes in helping companies develop the image they’ll present to the public

PHOTO | MARC MIQUEL HELSEN

BY DESIGN Darlene McMurdie and Iles Guran of Bonzai Design Group in Elmira are looking to help local businesses define themselves and their products through their branding. The graphic design company recently moved to its new Arthur Street location. “However you interact with your consumer or your client, we design and help you define all those touch points so that you develop a coherent story and message and brand out to the world.” Currently working with Drayton Entertainment, Bonzai has also done work for Samsung, Royal Bank, and GE. Bonzai has also done work for smaller companies around town including Schaaf Foods in Waterloo. One of the things that makes Bonzai unique, said Guran, is that the company does not focus on niche markets, whereas other companies do. That diversification helps keep the company fresh and on edge. “We find that by doing all kinds of difSee BONZAI »13

Don’t Lose Twice
RE-EVALUATE, REFOCUS AND REBUILD
“‘This Time is Different’ are among the most costly words in market history.”
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Demand for annuals and perennials that produce a reliable abundance of colour for the longest possible length of time is on a steep rise. To capture and hold attention, consider using a particular colour or colour combination that will echo throughout the garden. Blues and yellows, for example, or blazing shades of red and orange will make bold statements that will draw the eye through the space. Plant groups of the same flower for more impact.

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63 ARTHUR STREET S., ELMIRA

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

» FOOD FOR THOUGHT | OWEN ROBERTS

BUSINESS |

13

Journalists facing ethical hurdles and challenges
When it comes to the media, farmers are on both the giving and receiving end of society’s concerns. For example, when farmers use a new technology or adopt a certain environmental approach, they find out through the media how it’s being received publicly. In this way, the media serves a crucial feedback role. But the farm media in particular serves another important role for farmers – that is, it communicates to them new findings on the latest in safe and efficient production practices. Those practices mirror popular concerns over what people eat and how they want to interact with their environment. Members of the media, farm or otherwise, face constant ethical questions about what they report, and how they report it. That’s clear to varying degrees when you read the newspaper, listen to broadcasts, watch television news or log on to the Internet. For example, a reporter gets the facts, analyzes them as objectively as possible and takes an angle, which drives the headline and the story’s composition. But what to omit from a story can be as ethical a decision as what to include. Media consumers don’t see the amount of influence facing journalists who are making such decisions. Influence is enormous, and comes from a multitude of sources, including special interest groups, advertisers and publishers and even other journalists. And in the farm media, it appears to be intensifying. For the past six months, I’ve been involved in conducting an ethics research study of more than 130 agricultural journalists in the U.S. and Canada. My research colleagues and I presented our findings earlier this week at the Agricultural Media Summit in Fort Worth, Texas. The U.S. portion of the study was a 20-year benchmark. It began in 1988, when farm journalists there were surveyed about their opinions on influence and ethics. The same survey was repeated in 1998 and for consistency, again last fall. However, 2008 marked the first time Canadian journalists were surveyed, so while the American portion can show trends, the Canadian study is a snapshot of how journalists feel now. The results were eye opening. Regardless of what side of the border journalists were on, at least 80 per cent of them said advertiser influence on editorial content is a serious concern, either harming the profession or a problem in some cases. The biggest anxiety was over pressure from publishers and editors to please advertisers, and biased reporting from becoming too close to the sources that were covered. Other concerns were about reporters injecting their own point of view into the news, possibly compromising objectivity. Another revealing finding was a rise in the inherent difficulties of being objective, a fundamental matter in journalism. Between 80-90 per cent of the respondents said challenges to this staple of the profession were harming it, or were a problem in some cases. One of the research team members wondered if this rise was due to increasing activity by citizen journalists or bloggers. Their whole sector began because some citizens figured their views weren’t being adequately represented by the existing media. Those views may be subjective. However, there’s room for optimism. Many U.S. journalists said that although influence still exists, their publications have an increasing regard for ethics. Publishers have created policies that nix free meals, gifts and trips that could influence editorial decisions behind the scenes. And advertisers are making fewer threats to withdraw advertising when they’re displeased with certain stories. As the way we receive news continues changing and the battle for advertising intensifies, these issues are sure to figure prominently with all journalists, and have an impact on readers on and off the farm.

Bonzai: Room for growth
» From page 12

ferent work it really keeps us open to new ideas and new influences,” he said, adding that the company is now seeking business from smaller local companies, starting with Elmira and then branching out through the townships and into the Kitchener, Waterloo, and Cambridge areas. Guran said that Bonzai is working to spread the word that to acquire professional graphics

services, local companies can hire local help rather than venture out to Toronto. Bonzai’s recent move to the downtown area reflects growth and a capacity for further growth in the company’s business. Having grown from a one-man company, Bonzai now also employs Guran’s colleague Darlene McMurdie, and will likely hire another employee in the fall. In an economic cli-

mate where downsizing seems to be the norm, some agencies like Bonzai appear to be picking up more business, said Guran. Some clients are turning to smaller agencies for their marketing needs as they deal the same marketing needs but also with smaller budgets. And often, it’s the smaller agencies which are “a little bit more cost-effective yet quicker and more agile to compete in this type of economy.”

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14 | SPORTS

SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Team reunities to celebrate championship season

» FUNDRAISING DRIVE

»

Jean Renault Golf Classic set to tee off
Now in its 15th year, event is a major fundraiser for WCS’ violence prevention program

JONI MILTENBURG
The 15th is supposed to be the crystal anniversary, but turf will be just fine for Jean Renault – the Jean Renault Golf Classic, that is. The tournament, now in its 15th year, is a fundraiser for Woolwich Community Services. Taking place next Thursday, it’s named in honour of Jean Renault, the driving force behind the family violence prevention program. The program has been in place since 1991, but it took Renault several years to get it up and running. “Jean was really a tremendous lady here in this community,” said WCS executive director Don Harloff. “It took a lot of effort on her part to get to that point.” The golf classic is a major fundraiser for the
See GOLF »15

JUVENILE FUN Members of the 1983/84 Juvenile hockey team reunited in Elmira last weekend to celebrate the 25th anniversary of winning the OMHA championship. Ready for a round at Elmira Golf Club are, back row, Jamie Neeb, Don Uhrig, Jim Williams, Dwayne Martin, Tony Kreutzer, Steve Jacobi and Dave Schlitt. In front are Ray Kuntz and Marv Schaus.

Camp takes swimmer to a higher level
West Montrose girl, 11, dives right in to her passion for synchronized swimming
the water and making it look effortless. But both are gruelling sports that require extenWhat do synchronized swim- sive cross-training in differming and mixed martial arts ent disciplines. In the case of synchronized have in common? Not a thing, at first glance. swimming, athletes spend One is a full-contact fighting years working on diving, sport; the other involves per- flexibility, acrobatics, ballet, M&T Business Card figures in breath control, forming preciseAd:Layout 1 04/03/09 10:22 AM Page 1 swimming

JONI MILTENBURG

and strength training. All of those elements were on the agenda for 11-year-old Jordan Shantz of West Montrose, who took part in a high performance camp in California this week. She spent five days in Walnut Creek, California, training with coaches from the U.S. national and

Olympic teams. Speaking from a hotel room in California, a tired Jordan said the 10 and 11-hour days at the camp were worth it. “I found that the coaches that were coaching us, they were very supportive of us and they always gave us good
See SWIMMER »18

PHOTO | JONI MILTENBURG

JORDAN SHANTZ

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

SPORTS |

» THE NOT-SO-GREAT OUTDOORSMAN | STEVE GALEA

15

Choosing the right friend crucial in hunting for bear
With summer’s end practically in sight, I am once again gearing up for hunting season. The first hunt I have planned is a bear hunt up in around Marten River. That begins near the end of the month. Planning for a bear hunt, of course, is not as easy as just packing your bow or rifle and a few hunting clothes and driving north. One of the things you need to decide is what to hunt the bear with. Do you use a longbow, compound bow, crossbow, slug gun, or rifle? Each has its merits. For example, you need to be very close, say within 15 yards to use the long bow effectively With my compound, I . could get within 30 yards and still feel comfortable. My crossbow would allow for 40 yards of separation between the bear and me and the slug gun about 75. Lastly, the rifle would afford a buffer of at least 100 yards and a quick follow up shot. Right now I’m leaning towards the compound bow because I believe a 30yard lead would be all I need given my ground speed and excellent acceleration when I’m around bears. Regardless of the hunting tool chosen, eventually you have to walk up to the apparently lifeless bear and poke it with a stick, however. This is to ensure that it is actually dead and not just faking it in order to get you to come closer. This, more than anything, is why you always invite a friend to accompany you on a bear hunt. Yes, when not poking bears, he can run the camera and record the hunt. But the truth is, any good friend’s major role is to poke the bear after the shot. Most rookie hunters don’t give this much thought. They think that any old friend would do. But sadly, they’re mistaken. In fact, if you choose the right friend you’ll be a whole lot safer. First and foremost, I look for a friend who possesses a longer than average reach and lower than average IQ. This is important since, with your standard 36-inch pointy stick, there is a safer degree of separation between your pal and a potentially angry, wounded bear. The low IQ allows you to convince him to poke at it. Many times, from my vantage point 30 yards back, I have been concerned about shorter-armed friends, to the point where I have actually left the site in order to find them longer sticks with which to poke the bear, although, I’m sad to say, this is rarely appreciated at the time. Which leads me to the fact that a good bear-hunting buddy must have a steady temperament. There’s no use both of you being nervous. That person should also have reflexes that are slow as molasses. The last thing you want is to have Usain Bolt poking a bear for you. Think of how awkward it would be if you had to sprint away and, when you arrived at the tree you were going to climb, he was already sitting in the best branches. Believe me, stuff like this can strain the best of friendships. Personally, I prefer to hunt with someone who is just a little more considerate than that. Of course, it’s also fun to have a jittery partner for when you finally determine it’s safe enough to growl behind him. Nothing breaks up the tension of a situation like this better than the hilarity of a six-foot leap straight up. The worst part of all this is that once you find competent help they rarely come back for two years in a row. Which just goes to show you that good friends are hard to find.

Golf: Tournament still has spots available
» From page 14

Medal collecting
Norm Green returned home to St. Clements last week with another medal to add to his collection. Green brought home a gold medal from the Canadian Blind Lawn Bowling championships, held in Windsor. Green bowls in the B2 category, for people with less than five per cent vision. He took the gold in a best of five series against a bowler from New Brunswick, scoring 15-21, 21-18, 21-15, 11-21, 21-11.

family violence prevention program, with funds directed specifically toward prevention initiatives in local schools. Students learn about healthy relationships: how to play together and date together. “The message is basically how to get along with one another,” Harloff said. The classic is a four-person team

scramble, the same format as previous years. Dinner is included in the cost of registration, and there are lots of prizes and contests during the day. There is also a silent auction with items donated by local businesses, including a Blackberry and hot air balloon ride. “It has been very successful the last few years; we’ve raised anywhere from $12,000 to $15,000 and we’re

looking to raise something like that again this year,” Harloff said. The Jean Renault Golf Classic takes place at Conestoga Country Club on Aug. 13, with tee-off time at 1 p.m. There are still spaces available for more golfers; for more information, call Megan Brubacher or Don Harloff at 519-669-5139. They are also looking for donations and hole sponsors.

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16 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Know whaT To do To fighT ThE h1n1 flu Virus
The H1N1 flu virus is a respiratory illness that causes symptoms similar to those of the seasonal flu (fever and cough, runny nose, sore throat, body aches, fatigue and lack of appetite). All strains of flu can be dangerous; however, good infection prevention measures can help protect you and others if this virus begins to spread rapidly in Canada. W 3 ash your hands often and  

thoroughly—for at least 20 seconds—in warm, soapy water or use hand sanitizer. sleeve, not your hand.

C 3ough and sneeze in your  K 3 eep common surfaces and 

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3290_PHAC_ENG_05_10x14.indd 1

7/22/09 4:21:15 PM

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

SPORTS |

17

Woolwich U-14 team claims international soccer tourney
MARC MIQUEL HELSEN
It wasn’t quite the World Cup, but for a group of local soccer players, the Schwan’s USA Cup tournament in Minnesota July 21-25 was pretty close. Featuring 841 teams from some 13 countries battling it out on a total of 52 fields, the American tourney was a sight to see. Claiming the under-14 title was more than just icing on the cake for the Woolwich Whitehawks. “I think we snuck up on a lot of people; they didn’t know how good the little team from Canada [was] – they kept saying, ‘where’s Woolwich?’” explained manager Richard Hughes of the tournament that featured club teams from Canada, the United States, Mexico, Brazil and Sweden, among others. “It was just absolutely amazing. It was probably the best team effort I’ve ever seen – they were on fire, they didn’t make mistakes. They really wanted it.” Before clinching the cup title in a 4-2 tilt against Blackhawks United from Minnesota, the Whitehawks trudged through a round-robin tourney getting , better as the games drew on. In the round robin, the Hawks started with a 3-2 come-frombehind win; they followed that up with a 0-0 draw and put a cap on the qualifying round with a formidable 11-0 triumph in game three. Those 11 goals were enough to squeeze the team into the A division of the elimination round via goal-differential. “We had absolutely no idea what we were going to be up against,” said Hughes. “It was a great experience for the girls,” he added, noting that the team’s performance improved as the tournament wore on. The players “were on fire” by their third match. In the quarter-final, the Whitehawks were down 1-0 with about five minutes left to go. But the team was able to tie it up, eventually forcing a round of penalty kicks. Again, the squad squeezed through, but this time on the strength of a 4-2 edge in the penalty-kick round. In the semi-finals, the Whitehawks faced off against a very worthy adversary: an Illinois team (Ela Blue) with a professional, full-time coach. But the Hawks took no note, scoring early and defeating the team 4-0. “They pulled together as a team and played fantastically ,” said Hughes of his players. In the final round, the Whitehawks defeated one of the tournament’s most touted teams, Blackhawks United from Minnesota, by a score of 4-2. But it didn’t come easy The . Woolwich side took an early 3-0 lead only to see the American team push hard to come within one point. In the final minutes of the game, just as the Blackhawks thought of orchestrating a comeback, the Woolwich squad added another ball to the onion bag, making it a 4-2 final. For the team from Woolwich the tournament win and the ambience of a well organized, televised contest that, at times, took place in a stadium seating 20,000, was a unique and fun experience – both athletically and personally – said the manager. “We sort of said to them, ‘the first thing is we’re going to go and play some soccer, the second thing is we’re going to do some team-building, and the third thing is we’re going to have some fun,’ and that’s exactly the way it worked out.” The tournament surely added some fuel to the Whitehawks’ fire: the team boasts a perfect 9-0 record so far in regular season play in the South West Region Soccer League, where it regularly faces off against teams from Cambridge, Kitchener, Owen Sound, Orangeville and Stratford. While the team possesses a skilled defence and some artful forwards – the team has scored 38 goals and given up just four – Hughes notes that individual skill is not the only reason the team is doing so well. “I think it’s a combination of a couple things: first of all we have some very good athletes, but there’s no bickering on the team …the girls all get along. “The girls come hungry to practice, they want to practice, they want to learn and when they are hanging out together, it’s not like six girls over here and six girls over there – they all mingle.” Every player plays an important role on a squad where the ruling philosophy holds that all areas and positions on the field are integrated and interdependent. “We don’t highlight goal scorers on our team. Our forwards understand that it’s their job to kick the ball in the net; they understand that we’re very effective defensively [have] a very , good goalie, very good defence. The team gets the forwards the ball, and they put it in.”

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18 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Swimmer: Prepared to tackle all the work needed to excel
» From page 14

corrections that were very helpful,” she said. Jordan, who is going into Grade 6 at Conestogo Public School, has been doing synchronized swimming for three years. Her parents, Sherrie and Bryan, installed a pool four years ago and watched Jordan put together dances and routines in the water. Sherrie hunted around and found a week-long synchro camp for her to try. “I got hooked, I just loved it,” Jordan said. Jordan swims and trains with the KW Synchro Club, spending 12 to 15 hours a week in the pool and doing dry-

land training. Synchronized swimming only looks effortless; underneath the wide smiles, swimmers are propelling themselves rapidly around the pool, lifting and throwing their teammates and forming precise figures in time to the music – while often holding their breath for several minutes at a time. Her hard work has paid off; she competed at the national level last year and in April she survived two tough qualifying rounds to make the Team Ontario 12 and under ‘A’ team. The 12 and under team isn’t a competitive team, but it offers the girls the

opportunity to train at a higher level. After three days swimming together in Newmarket, she flew with 23 other girls from her team and the 13-15 ‘B’ team to California. The girls from Ontario trained alongside 50 other swimmers from all over the United States, including Alaska. “You get to meet people from all over America, and you got to know the different styles of coaching and judging that they do in America,” Jordan said. In addition to picking up pointers on American judging, Jordan also made new friends at the camp. “Now once she starts

up again and goes to meets, they look forward to running into all the girls they meet at different clubs,” Sherrie said. While the rest of the team flew back to Ontario on Wednesday, Jordan stayed behind an extra day to do some sightseeing with her mom and younger brother Riley. Not that Jordan is looking for a break from the long hours in the pool. “They’re always fun,” she said. “I like the feeling of swimming, and when I’m competing I can just feel that I’m doing my best and knowing that my coaches support me. I’m really just happy to be there.” STAYING IN SYNC Eleven-yearold Jordan Shantz of West Montrose during competition. Shantz was recently named to Team Ontario’s 12 and under ‘A’ squad.

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Hawkesville Community Centre Sports Pad
SEALED TENDERS, clearly marked as to contents shall be received by the undersigned, until 2:00 p.m.,

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for the construction of a new outdoor sports pad at the Hawkesville Community Centre, 3521 Broadway St., Hawkesville ON. in accordance with the tender documents. Tender forms and specifications may be obtained by contacting Brad Voisin, Director of Recreation, Township of Wellesley at the address below. The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. Township of Wellesley 4639 Lobsinger Line R.R. 1 St. Clements, Ontario N0B 2M0 Tel: Fax: 519-699-4611 519-699-4540

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THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

CLASSIFIED DEPT.
HELP WANTED COMING EVENTS

CLASSIFIEDS | SERVICES | REAL ESTATE | FAMILY ALBUM |

519.669.5790 | 1.888.966.5942
FAX | 519.669.5753 EMAIL | sales@ObserverXtra.com

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craft, 8 ft. $500 o.b.o. 519698-2806. » Light Green Ultra Suede Chesterfield (lounge). 1 year old. Reason for selling too big. 519-669-2574. » Whirlpool Duet Sport front load washer and dryer with pedestals. New August 2, 08. Paid $1800; moving, must sell - $1200 o.b.o. Call 519-210-0505.

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10 CHURCH ST. WEST

ELMIRA
inside an icon building, 500 to 2200 sq. ft. for retail or offices. Reasonable rent. Call:

DOWNTOWN

FOR LEASE

* Machine Shop * Welding/Fabricating * Office Equipment *

AUCTION
— to be held ON SITE at —

• Manufacturing of Landscape & Snow Removal Equipment • Custom Manufacturing and Machining • Agricultural, Industrial, Transportation & Construction Equipment Repairs
100 Union St., Elmira, ON Toll Free 1.877.467.3478
www.reistindustries.com

Proform Custom Machine Inc

We have been instructed by the BDO Dunwoody Trustees, for Proform Custom Machine Inc to liquidate their equipment onsite.

Sat. Aug 15th 9:30am
2- Topwell CNC Verticle Milling Machines 2- First Verticle Milling Machines 2- Erlo HD Drilling Machines Runmaster Metal Lathe /w Digital Fuho VBS20 Metal Bandsaw 2- Chevalier/Frejoth Surface Grinders FARO (Titanium) Control Station Granite Inspection Table *Inspection Tools * Tool Grinder 10 Test Racks (Air) * Collets, Drills & Tooling 5-Lincoln/L-Tec Mig Welders (1ph) * Hyd Power Pack 5 Memco AC/DC Welders (1ph) * Band Cutoff Saw 14- Work Benches /w 6” Vises * Grinders Torch * Steel Inventory * CLARK Elec Forklift OFFICE => 6+ Computer/Servers * Ricoh Copier * Canon Fax * Meridian Phones * 5+ Desk & Work Stations Stacking Chairs * Folding Tables * Bookcases * Time Clock 5+ Chairs * 2-4dr Fireproof Lat File Cabinets * etc.

805 Boxwood Dr., Cambridge

519.669.1501

HELP WANTED
accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, Quickbooks experience. Send resumes to fax #, 519-669-1790.

» General Office Work, » Tent Trailer, 1976 Star-

Vendor inquiry - 519.669.0334

519-590-4110

CHILD CARE

» Mother Available for after schools day care. Personal references available, central to both schools. Nursing home experience. Pat, 519669-1981.
HEALTH CARE

HAY & STRAW

» Lose Weight Now! For over 28 years and in 70 countries, Herbalife is currently helping 60 million people worldwide live healthier lives through good nutrition and diet programs. Whether you suffer from allergies, menopause, diabetes or whether you ar e looking for a weight-loss program that works, we have scientifically proven products that can help you. Since I’ve been on the Herbalife program, I have gained incredible amount of energy and I’ve lost weight. I feel absolutely fantastic, and you can too! Name, John. Nutritional Health Success Coach, email: bwmfg@ bellnet.ca or phone 519669-4719.
FOR SALE

» Wanting to buy alfalfa off the field. 519-699-4184 RENTALS or 519-575-8441. » Condo For
AUTOMOTIVE

SLT Mega Cab 4X4. 5.7L Hemi, auto. All SLT options. Including trailer tow package, trailer tow mirrors, tow hooks, box liner, pwr driver seat and more. One owner. Only 64,000 kms. $24,900. Voisin Chrysler 519-669-2831. » Wanted to purchase 1996 - 2008 import vehicle needing repairs. Any condition. Call 519-837-3843.

» 2006 Dodge Ram 1500 SERVICES

AUTOMOTIVE

COMPUTERS

Elmira’s LARGEST selection
of major brand computers

Grants
519-577-3251

Hands On Therapy

» Corn Silage - approximately 400 tons. Stored in upright silo. Call 519570-8989. » Dis N Dat Treasures open every Thurs. and Fri., 10-6. 15 Dunke St., Elmira, 519-669-5005. » NEW MATTRESS SETS all sizes, great quality, great prices! Household items, pots, dishes, Tupperware, footwear, toys, baby items, large selection of good used “Living Books”. Many items on sale - up to 50% off ! Nearly New Centre, 5116 Ament Line, Linwood. (519) 698-0088. Tues Friday 9-5, Sat 9 - 3.

» 1999 Chev Tracker SUV, silver/grey, 2.0 engine, 4 door, power locks/windows, automatic, 155,000 kms, new rocker panels, E-tested, original owner, good condition. $2700 o.b.o. 519-6643859. » 2001 Dodge Caravan Sport. 3.3L V6, auto, fully loaded 7 passenger van. 170,000 kms. finished in inferno red/taupe interior. You Certify You Save. $4,500. Voisin Chrysler 519-669-2831. » 2002 Dodge Gr. Caravan Sport. 3.3L V6 auto. Full load including alum., road wheels, rear heat/ air, pwr, driver seat. One owner. never seen winter. Only 108,900 kms. $7,900. Voisin Chrysler 519-669-2831. » 2005 Dodge Caravan SE. 3.3L V6, auto, fully loaded 7 passenger van. One owner, all original. Only 90,000 kms. Finished in butane Blue/gray interior. All this for only $9,900. Voisin Chrysler 519-669-2831. » 2006 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad 4X4 SLT. 5.7L MDS Hemi, auto, all SLT options including trailer tow group, box liner, pwr. driver seat. Only 73,000 kms. Finished in Mineral gray/gray interior. $22,900. Voisin Chrysler 519-669-2831.

Rent - 2 bdrms, hdwd floors & newer carpet. “Pine” rec. room & 2 pc. 4 appli. incl. NO pets or smokers. Avail. Oct. 1. (or sooner) $825. Call 519-669-8629. » Elmira - 2 bedroom town house. Please, no smoking, no pets. $875. plus utilities. Suitable for quiet tenants. Call 519743-7479, one parking space included. » Shop Bay For rent. 1160 sq.ft., 8 x 10 overhead door, man door, 2 pc bathroom, separate utilities, some outside parking. Available Sept. 1. Call 519-669-2317 (please leave message). » Wellesley - House For Rent 3 bedroom, 11/2 baths, $900 + utilities. Parking included. Available Sept. 1. Call 519656-3098 ext. 26.

at 80 Oriole Pkwy, Elmira. Friday and Saturday, AuGARAGE SALES gust 14 & 15, 9 a.m - 5 p.m. » Moving Sale Sat. Aug. All household items in8th, 7:30 a.m. - 2 p.m., cluding furniture, antiques, 29 Peter St. St. Clem- dishes, and tools. Prices ents. Household goods, as marked, reasonable oftools, bed linens, fabrics, fers accepted. House is antiques. Rain Date Sat. also for sale, $247,000. For more house informaAug. 15. tion email linda.sanmiya@ hartlinggr oup.com

Not accepting new clients at Elmira o ce as of August 5, 2009.

COMPUTERS LAPTOPS MONITORS and SERVICE
Come see our showroom at:

PARTIAL LIST ONLY

No Buyer’s Premium!!
Check WEBSITE for Photos of Major Equipment VIEWING: Friday August 14th, 2009 - 1pm to 4pm TERMS: $500 Cash Deposit Required on Each Major Item, or as announced!

M.R. Jutzi & Co
www.mrjutzi.ca

112 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira Crescent r ra

519-648-2111

519-669-5551

PHOTO CONTEST

GARAGE SALES

GARAGE SALES
Tupperware Consultants inventory sale. Friday August 21, 1 - 8 p.m. 350 Arthur St. S. Elmira. » Downsizing/Moving Yard sale. Sat. Aug. 8, 8 a.m - 12 noon. 4 Nighthawk Lane, Elmira. Household items and small tools - some new in packaging.

» ESTATE SALE on site » M u l t i

www.

.com

www.

.com

» FREE Online Classifieds » Exclusive Blogs » FREE Email Updates » Community Event Listings » Flickr Photo Galleries » Updated Every Friday

TRADES & SERVICES

» House Keeper available. Dependable, reasonable rates, years of experience, references. Pat 519-669-1981.
LOST & FOUND

Your source for online local news.
519.669.5790

» FOUND - Atom B 2009 Ball Hockey Medallion. Found on King St. N. in St.. Jacobs on Sunday, July 19. Call or stop by the Observer to claim. 519-669-5790 x107. 20 B Arthur St. N., Elmira

IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH.
ADVERTISING POLICY | All advertising is accepted subject to the Publisher’s discretion. The Publisher will not be responsible for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occured. Please check your ad on the first day of publication. The Observer’s responsibility, if any, is limited to the charge for the space for one insertion only.

AD RATES | Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 Extra Words 20¢/word | Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 Extra Words 30¢/word | Bold Headline Add $1.00 /line | Display Ads are quoted individually.
PLACING A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone | fax from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. Email queries to classifieds@woolwichobserver.com 24/7 - email will be replied by next business day. All classified ads are prepaid by Visa | MasterCard | Debit | Cash | Cheque unless on account. Deadline is Thursdays by 10am.

20 | CLASSIFIEDS | SERVICES | REAL ESTATE | FAMILY ALBUM

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Community Information Page
THE TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH
"Proudly remembering our past; confidently embracing our future." P.O. BOX 158, 24 CHURCH ST. W. ELMIRA, ONTARIO N3B 2Z6 WEBSITE: www.woolwich.ca TEL: 519-669-1647 or 519-664-2613 FAX: 519-669-1820

AFTER HOURS EMERGENCY: 519-575-4504

NOTICE OF COMPLETE APPLICATION AND PUBLIC MEETING
Tuesday September 1, 2009 7:00 p.m. Township Council Chambers • 24 Church Street West, Elmira
Regarding Hawk Ridge Homes Inc. - Zone Change 9/2009 and Draft Plan of Subdivision 30T- 09701 Tanem Developments - Zone Change 11/2009 and Willard and Lorraine Martin - Zone Change 12/2009
Take Notice that in accordance with the Planning Act, R.S.O., 1990, as amended, the Township of Woolwich has received complete applications for the above noted proposed Zoning By-law amendments as detailed below. Please be advised that Notice of a Complete Application does not indicate whether the municipality is in support of, or in opposition to the proposals. That determination will be made at a later date. The Township of Woolwich will hold a Public Meeting, under Sections 34 and 51 of the Planning Act, to consider the following zone change applications and draft plan for a subdivision plan. No decision will be made at this meeting; its purpose is to provide additional information to the public and agencies and to receive comments and information from them. Any persons may attend the public meeting and make written and / or verbal representation either in support of or in opposition to the proposed applications. Hawk Ridge Homes Inc. Zone Change 9/2009 and Draft Plan of Subdivision 30T- 09701 The Township has received a Zone Change application and Draft Plan of Subdivision submission from Hawk Ridge Homes Inc. for the property located at 36-68 Union Street in Elmira (see Map 1). The property is designated Residential and Ancillary Use and Restricted Land Use Area in the Township’s Official Plan and is zoned Residential Mixed Medium Density (R-4) and General Industrial – Urban (M-2). A portion of the M-2 zoning, which contains a storm drain at the north end, is subject to Floodway (FW) and Flood Fringe (FF) provisions in the Zoning By-law. The 3.2 hectare property also contains a single family dwelling. The Zone Change application proposes to rezone approximately 2.3 ha of the lands to Residential – Mixed High Density with Design Guidelines (R-5A) and the remaining 0.9 ha to Open Space (O-2). The proposed O-2 zoning would essentially apply to the portion of the lands within the Floodway area, adjacent to the storm drain. The effect of the Zone Change application is to facilitate the development of a residential subdivision, which consist of 26 single detached and 18 semi-detached dwelling units (total 44 units) fronting along a newly created municipal road that connects to First Street. Bauman Street and College Street would also connect to the proposed new street. Tanem Developments - Zone Change 11/2009 The Township has received a Zone Change application from Kuntz Topsoil Sand and Gravel Ltd. on behalf of Tanem Developments Ltd. for the property located at 889 Bridge Street West (see Map 2). The 55 hectare property is designated Rural Land Use and Restricted Land Use Area in the Township’s Official Plan and is zoned Agricultural (A) and Extractive (E) with sitespecific provisions to allow a topsoil screening operation as an ancillary use to the aggregate operation within a 1.0 ha area. The Temporary Use By-law for the topsoil screening operation is in effect until November 28, 2009. The purpose of the application is to extend the Temporary Use By-law for an additional three year period to permit the importation and processing of topsoil as an ancillary use to the existing aggregate operation, subject to the same site specific regulations. The property contains an accessory shed and two silos and is located adjacent to the City of Waterloo. Willard and Lorraine Martin - Zone Change 12/2009 The Township has received a Zone Change application from Ervin and Melinda Martin on behalf of Willard and Lorraine Martin for an 18.6 hectare property located at 1071 Cedar Spring Road (see Map 3). The property is designated Rural Land Use and Restricted Land Use Area in the Township’s Official Plan and is zoned Agricultural (A) with site specific provisions permitting a mobile home as a Temporary Use until July 13, 2009. The purpose of the application is to extend the Temporary Use By-law for an additional three-year period to allow the mobile home to remain on the property. Please Note: APPEALS: Draft Plan of Subdivision If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at the public meeting or make written submissions to the Regional Municipality of Waterloo in respect of the proposed plan of subdivision before the approval authority gives or refuses to give approval to the draft plan of subdivision: a) the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, to the Ontario Municipal Board; and b) the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to do so. Individuals are requested to submit a written outline of any oral submissions made at the Public Meeting to the Township Clerk. NOTIFICATION: If you wish to be notified of the decision of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo in respect of the proposed plan of subdivision you must make a written request to the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, Attn: Brenna MacKinnon, Manager, Greenfield Planning, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener, Ontario N2G 4J3 For the reason that the Regional Municipality of Waterloo is calling the public meeting, additional information regarding Plan of Subdivision 30T-09701 is available at Planning, Housing and Community Services Department, Regional Municipality of Waterloo, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener, Monday to Friday between 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Zoning Amendment If a person or public body that files an appeal of a decision of the Council of the Township of Woolwich in respect of the proposed zoning by-laws does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Council of the Township of Woolwich before the proposed zoning by-law amendments are passed: a) the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Township of Woolwich to the Ontario Municipal Board; and b) the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to add the person or public body as a party. NOTIFICATION: If you wish to be notified of additional Township public meetings or Township staff reports regarding these applications you must make a written request to Engineering and Planning Services at the Township of Woolwich at the address shown at the top of this page. If you cannot attend the meeting, you can express your concerns/ comments about the proposed change in writing to the Township of Woolwich. Any comments received on or before August 25, 2009 (Note that this date is before the public meeting) will be included in a report prepared by Engineering and Planning Services and presented at the Public Meeting. Any comments received after the Public Meeting, but prior to Council making a decision on the applications, will also be considered. The personal information accompanying your submission is being collected under the authority of the Planning Act and may form part of the public record which may be released to the public. Questions about this collection should be directed to the Records and Freedom of Information Officer at 519-669-6005 or 519-664-2613 ext. 6005. MORE INFORMATION: The public may view planning documents and background material relating to these applications at the Township of Woolwich, Engineering and Planning Services Department between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, or on the Township website at www.woolwich.ca. Questions or written submissions may be directed to: Township of Woolwich John Scarfone, Manager of Planning Engineering and Planning Services Department Box 158 24 Church Street West Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6 Telephone: 519-669-1647 / 519-664-2613, extension 6037 or email: jscarfone@woolwich.ca Dated at the Township of Woolwich this 8th day of August, 2009

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Community Information Page
THE TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH
"Proudly remembering our past; confidently embracing our future."

FAMILY ALBUM
STAG & DOE STAG & DOE

CLASSIFIEDS | SERVICES | REAL ESTATE | FAMILY ALBUM |

21

P.O. BOX 158, 24 CHURCH ST. W. ELMIRA, ONTARIO N3B 2Z6 WEBSITE: www.woolwich.ca

TEL: 519-669-1647 or 519-664-2613 FAX: 519-669-1820

AFTER HOURS EMERGENCY: 519-575-4504

TENDER ADVERTISEMENT
MAPLE STREET SURFACE WORKS TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH ELMIRA WARD TENDER 2009-25
Sealed Tenders, clearly marked as to contents, will be received by the owner, at 24 Church Street, Elmira, Ontario until 2:30pm Local Time, on: Wednesday, August 19, 2009 For the replacement of sidewalk, boulevard and road surface on Maple Street in Elmira. The tenders will be opened publicly the same day at 2:35p.m. ESTIMATED MAJOR ITEM QUANTITIES: Concrete Curb and Gutter Hot Mix Pavement Concrete Sidewalk Boulevard Restoration

Marlene Koster & Nick Kuepfer

STAG & DOE for

August 8, 2009 Carriage Hall 26 Snyder Ave. S., Elmira

Stag & Doe
Prizes, Games & Food!

Caitlin Draper & Brian Clemmer
Saturday August 15, 2009
Lions Hall, Elmira 8:00pm - 1:00am
DJ • Late Night Snack • PRIZES! Tickets $10 Photo ID Required
ANNIVERSARY

Come Out For A Great Night... 8:00pm - 1:00am
$10.00

465 m 365 tonnes 510 m2 500 m2

BIRTH NOTICE
Welcome Taelyn Miya Mackenzie!

Plans, Specifications, and Tender Forms may be obtained at the office of Gamsby and Mannerow Limited, 975 Wallace Avenue North, Listowel after 1:00pm on August 10, 2009. A tender deposit in the amount of $15,000 shall accompany all tenders, in the form of a certified cheque or Bid Bond. The successful bidder will be required to furnish a 100% Performance Bond and a 100% Labour and Materials Payment Bond for the total value of the contract. The lowest or any tender will not necessarily be accepted. Construction is anticipated to commence by September 14, 2009 and be totally complete by October 16, 2009.
OWNER The Township of Woolwich 24 Church Street West Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 Mr. Rod Kruger, Manager of Engineering Operations Tel: 519-664-2613 ext. 6029 Fax: 519-669-4669 Email: rkruger@woolwich.ca CONSULTING ENGINEER Gamsby and Mannerow Limited 975 Wallace Avenue North Listowel, ON N4W 1M6 Zoltan L. Tako, C.E.T. Tel: 519-291-9339 Fax: 519-291-5172 Email: zoltan@gamsby.com

Born on July 29/09 weighing 8lbs. 3oz. Proud parents are; Mommy & Daddy, Amber Truax & Aaron Eurig; Grandparents, James & Shirl Truax of Elmira & Arnie & DeeDee Eurig of Mt. Forest

& Many More to Come!

A Decade of Marital Bliss

IN LOVING MEMORY

August 07, 1999

THANK YOU

FAMILY ALBUM

Amanda Dawn MacDonald
(nee Cowan)

Feb. 7, 1977 - Aug. 12, 2007

COMMUNITY CHALLENGE DAY
FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
The Township of Woolwich is participating in both of these challenges: Power reduction on August 14, refereed by IESO Per capita pledges between now and August 14th at 8:00 p.m. By taking the online pledge you create your own personal conservation plan from among 100 ways to conserve in everyday life. So the goal is to have as many residents as possible from the Township of Woolwich take the pledge, thus saving energy while also improving our odds of winning the per capita challenge. You can also pledge by calling the toll-free pledge number 1-877-261-1133. For more information call 519-669-6010.

CANCER is so limited.... It cannot cripple love, It cannot shatter hope, It cannot corrode faith, It cannot eat away peace, It cannot destroy confidence, It cannot kill friendship, It cannot shut out memories, It cannot silence courage, It cannot invade the soul, It cannot reduce eternal life, It cannot quench the Spirit, It cannot lessen the power of the resurrection.
Lovingly remembered, Steve, “Mommy”, Martin & Tanis, Cheryl & Murray, Clarke and nieces & nephews.

BOERNER, DONNA The late Donna Boerner and her family wish to express their sincere appreciation to their relatives, friends and neighbours for all of their kindness, expressions of sympathy and caring during Donna’s illness. All the cards of condolences, flower arrangements and baked items echoed your kind thoughts and memories of a wonderful wife, mother and grandmother. Special thanks for the excellent care provided by the CCAC team. Sincerely Randy, Jason & Fran, Shannon & Lisa, Brayden, Griffen, Nicholas and Conrad Boerner.

Share The Good News!
With a Family Album Ad in the Observer

» Anniversary » Birthday » Engagement » Stag & Doe » Thank you » Birth Notice » and a lot more....
For as little as...

$
Call

23
+GST

519.669.5790
ext 104

IN PRINT | ONLINE IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

22 | CLASSIFIEDS | SERVICES | REAL ESTATE | FAMILY ALBUM

HOME HUNTERS
First Time Buyer? Buy with Paul and receive a Complete buyers package

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

519.669.5790 | 1.888.966.5942
FAX | 519.669.5753 EMAIL | sales@ObserverXtra.com

Support your local schools. Buy or list your home with Paul.
OPEN HOUSE
216 PARK AV. ELMIRA | SUN AUG 9, 2 4PM
NEW LISTING | $339,900

KITCHENER This gorgeous backyard with inground pool is all you need. Roof ‘05, ceramic tile & carpet lower level/ marble bar, 3 pc bath ceramic shower/glass door all in 2009. air/furnace ‘09. hardwd ‘01. wood & electric replace. Kitchen ceramic/island. WELLESLEY Lovely century home in the quaint villiage of Wellesley. Completely renovated, gas replace, old pine oors. Cathedral ceiling in Master Bedroom. Patio/deck, Main oor laundry .

NEW PRICE

$639,000

WOW! 12.9 ACRES. 2800 sq. ft. bungalow, 4 bedrooms, main oor master bdrm, main oor laundry, patio/deck, hot tub, walkout basement, detached workshop, backs on to greenbelt, waterfront property. MLS.
ELMIRA Why buy a Resale Home when you can build your dream home on this 50’ lot. Hardwood & ceramic throughout main oor, maple kitchen cabinets, 4 bedrooms, master has walkin closet and ensuite.

»

$369,900

DON’T MISS THIS HOME. Finished top to bottom. Basement consists of large nished recrm. (roughin for bar) 2pc. bath & storage room. Main r. o ers hardwd. throughout (ceramic in foyer) open concept, 2nd r. family rm, ensuite. Fenced backyard w/ recently built pergola and stone patio

$209,000

$374,000

Paul Martin
SALES REPRESENTATIVE
EMAIL: paul@remaxsolidgold.biz

$489,000

ST. CLEMENTS Prime location, 4 bedroom bungalow, oak kitchen cabinets, cedar lined cath ceiling family room, main oor laundry & master bedroom, Patio, deck, 616 sq. ft. heated workshop w/ extra circuts. MLS. RECREATIONAL LOT! 6.5 acres on the Conestogo River. Excellent camping and/or seasonal property ideal. Services (gas, telephone, hydro) available at road side Line 86. MLS.

$489,900

MODEL HOME BY VERDONE. Custom built bungalow w/ ‘loft’, mn r master, luxury ensuite, hardwd rs., 10’ ceilings, great rm w/ 4 walkouts backing onto greenspace, open kitchen with pantry and breakfast bar. $30,000 in upgrades. ELMIRA Quality at every corner throughout this beautiful home, 4 bedrm, 3 bathrm. Maple kitchen, extra height ceilings, cozy family rm with gas replace, mstr bdrm w/ deluxe ensuite, double garage. MLS.
ELMIRA Retirement at its best, Let Huron Homes build this beautiful bungalow for you. It features 2 bedrooms on main oor and if you like 2 more in the basement, along with a large recroom. Double garage. backs on to green belt.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated ADDRESS: 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo
DIRECT....519-503-9533 HOME ....519-669-3074 OFFICE ...519-888-7110
$189,000

What’s your Home worth? Call Paul for your Free Market Evaluation
Introducing... HURON HOMES INC.
45’ and 50’ lots available in Elmira. Several plans available in bungalow or 2 storey models, or will build to suit.

$439,000

$359,000

BRESLAU 2100 sq. ft. almost brand new beauty! Open concept mn r, large kitch. (upgraded cabinets), extra large patio dr, 3 large bdrms, loft area on second r, master ensuite boasts large windows, whirlpool tub and walkin closet.

$349,000

You’ve come to the right place to find a home!
TEAM

McNeil

CURIOUS ABOUT YOUR HOME’S VALUE IN THIS CURRENT MARKET?

ELMIRA REAL ESTATE Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage SERVICES

519-669-3192

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

TWIN CITY REALTY INC.
sold@clickthathouse.com

519-579-4110 OFFICE

BROKERAGE

CALL US TODAY FOR A FREE CURRENT MARKET EVALUATION
www.elmirarealestate.ca
Melanie McNeil - Sales Representative Peri Moyer - Client Care Manager
BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record SHANNA ROZEMA Broker. DARREN ROMKEY Sales Rep. LAURIE LANGDON Sales Rep. DALE KELLER Sales Rep. MONIQUE BRUBACHER Sales Rep.

Warren McNeil - Sales Representative

THIS WEEK'S FEATURE PROPERTIES

0 ,90 19 $4

Build Your Dream
from $299,900

00 9,9 7 $3

OPEN HOUSE - SAT & SUN 2-4 PM
42 ROBERTA STREET, ELMIRA
$332,250 ELMIRA | 1360 sq ft

PARADIGM HOMES

OPEN HOUSE | Sat & Sun 1-4PM MODEL HOME - 51 Ridgeview Dr.

Call to view by Appointment
MODEL HOME for sale! Priced well below replacement! Gorgeous 3 bedroom, 2 bath bungalow featuring c/air, c vac, gas fireplace, luxury ensuite, m/f laundry, sep. dining room, stunning kitchen w/pantry, hardwood & tile floors, Partly finished basement. Unbelievable value 30 mins to K-W. A must see. MLS.

OPEN HOUSE | SAT & SUN 1-4PM MODEL HOUSE VIEW BY APPOINTMENT

Model Bungalow, open concept plan, appliances and upgrades. All mainfloor conveniences, great location - walking distance to amendities. Call for details or appointment to view. MLS.

NEED LOTS OF SPACE? Rarely found oversized

51 RIDGEVIEW DR. DRAYTON
Large Lots only 30 minutes from Waterloo, Only 4 lots left! Model Home available for sale, 10 plans to choose from, Quality standard features include: 9’ ceilings on main floor, 200 amp service, Fruit Cellar, Ceramics, Ensuite & Main or Upper Laundry

backsplit with double garage & big backyard. Features 3+1 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, super spacious kitchen with island open to huge family room. Lower level finished with recroom, bedroom & bath. Lots of space for a growing family. Much bigger inside than it appears. A must see!

tastefully decorated home features hardwood flooring throughout main level, maple and oak cupboards, stainless steel fridge and stove, main floor laundry, shaded deck and covered front porch, wood stove and tons of country charm! MLS.

$203,900 DRAYTON | This quaint,

5 bEDROOMS

FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS AT

filled with warmth. Hand hewned 1998 log home, open concept, soaring ceiling, character, walkout finished basement. This picturesque property is welcoming you. Fenced paddock, 3 box stall shelter; 24 x 32 workshop/garage with loft. NEW MLS.

$454,000 MOOREFIELD | Stunning and

RECIPE FOR A HAPPY FAMILY

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

HOME HUNTERS
519-669-1544 24hrs
17 Church St. W., Elmira
Independently Owned and Operated

CLASSIFIEDS | SERVICES | REAL ESTATE | FAMILY ALBUM |

519.669.5790 | 1.888.966.5942
FAX | 519.669.5753 EMAIL | sales@ObserverXtra.com

www.thefreyteam.com

BROKERAGE

519-669-2772

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

PRIVATE SALE

»

23

Len Frey

THE FREY TEAM
frey@golden.net

Mildred Frey
BROKER MANAGER

Wendy Taylor
BROKER**

Mary Lou Murray
SALES REPRESENTATIVE

JULIE HECKENDORN Broker Res: 519-669-1068 Res: 519-669-8629
MVA Residential

BRAD MARTIN Broker of Record

ALLI NORRIS Sales Rep. Cell: 519-577-6248

BILL NORRIS Sales Rep. Cell: 519-588-1348

TRACEY WILLIAMS Sales Rep. Cell: 519-505-0627

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

wendy@thefreyteam.com

marylou@mmrealestate.ca

$399,000

2.800 Sq. Ft. Extensively Remodeled Stone House on 2 acres c/w newer great room addition wood & ceramic floors, new roof, 30 x 40 out building, Drayton.

Call 519-638-5562 or 519-895-6036 for more info or an appointment to view.

NEW PRICE $689,000
MOOREFIELD | Almost 5 acres warehouses, lumber yard with retail store. Approx. 1/2 of yard is paved. Loading dock, repair shop w/ air lines. Great for retail + large storage area required for business. Selling land and building only. MLS Call Len Frey.

greAt fAmiLy Home 4 level backsplit offers a huge kitchen w/ open concept to family room w/ stone fireplace & lge. windows. Office & den in lower level. 2 baths. Dble. Garage, concrete driveway neW mLs. $349,000.

mAtUre Lot backs to greenspace. Main floor family room, office & laundry. Walkout bsmt. w/2 sliding doors & extra-high ceilings. Inground pool. large deck w/hot tub. Most windows updated. neW mLs $399,000.

BY THE NUMBERS
EASY

$645,000
WEST MONTROSE | Pride of ownership throughout this custom built executive Bungalow. 17’ ceilings, infloor heating on both levels, gourmet kitchen with built-in appliances, lots of windows overlooking a large entertaining deck & large backyard. Part finished walkout basement with extended family potential and more! MLS Call Mary Lou.

$1,190,000
WOOLWICH TWP. | 50 acre farm located 4 minutes north of Waterloo at the edge of St. Jacobs. Large all brick house setup as a multi family with 3 units. Large barn easily converted to storage for cars etc., Detached workshop. This property has endless opportunities. Great investment. MLS Call Len Frey.

cHArming older home. Updated eat-in maple kitchen. Large dining rm. Main flr. laundry. 2 bathrooms. Hdwd. floors. 3 bdrms. & large room in fin. attic. 2 tiered deck. mLs. $249,900.

BAcking to fArmLAnD custom built bungalow, better than new! Hardwood/ceramics. Open concept. W/o to partially covered patio. 3rd bdrm & bthrm finished in basement. mLs $389,000.

MEDIUM
pArk-Like groUnDs. 11 acres, mixed bush, pond! Lovely updated bungalow w/ great room. Min’s from Elmira/K-W & Guelph. mLs $595,000.
DrAyton 2-storey - backing to parkland! Eat-in kitchen w/ island & w/o. Finished bsmt w/gas fireplace. C/A and vac. Shows well! mLs. $284,900. BUiLD yoUr DreAm Home on 1 acre site, sloping to the south. Located on the edge of Goldstone. mLs. $110,000. eXisting cHUrcH! Seating capacity 175+. Steps to investment property 5 plex, always fully occupied! Lots of downtown. Ideal for office, lofts, parking. Shows a good return on etc. C-1 Zoning. mLs $549,000. your investment! mLs $479,000.

$355,000
SIDEROAD 15 | Quiet country property on over 5 acres of wooded area. Huge eat-in kitchen overlooking family room with heat stove. Deck to rear yard off kitchen. Detached workshop 30 x 30. Great for the handy man!! MLS. Call Mildred or Len Frey.

$236,000
Great 3 bedroom, 2 bath starter located on mature, tree lined street. Walking distance to junior public school and downtown. Updated kitchen, wiring, plumbing. Roof done in 2007. Great rear yard for the kids. Backs to greenspace. MLS. Call Wendy Taylor to view.

www.thurrealestate.com

$110,000
LOT FOR SALE | Goldstone building lot. Level 100 x 264 ft. lot. Located on well-maintained gravel road 200 ft from paved highway. Property backs to farmland. Hydro and phone available. 15 minutes to Elmira, 5 minutes to Drayton. MLS Call Wendy Taylor for more info.

1300 SQ. FT - $9.00 SQ. FT. NET
FOR LEASE | Great location in Birdland Plaza. Previously used as Herbal One. New renovations. All other units in plaza occupied. Laundry, Hair Dresser/ Spa, Pizza, Convenience store, etc. Busy location with lots of parking. Available immediately unit is vacant. MLS. Call Mildred Frey.

Tell your realtor the Observer sent you!
Office:

519-570-4447 Cell: 519-722-4497
Victor Elgawly Jim Reitzel Sales Representative Broker of Record

HARD

victor@victorelgawly.com www.victorelgawly.com
Independently Owned and Operated

$749,000 $359,900
CONESTOGO | 3300 Sq. ft. renovated older home in desired Town of Conestogo. Large lot with studio detached garage. Many updates. A must see! MLS. To view call Mildred Frey.

GOLDSTONE | Great Country property at the edge of Moorefield, 3 bedrm. bungalow, finished basement with fireplace, 12 x 16’ wood deck, 14’6” x 24’ detached workshop with hydro. 48.79 total acres, 34 tillable tile drained, 2 acres building site + 4.25 acres zoned for future residential, 7.5 acres zoned for future industrial development. Great investment property. MLS. Call Len Frey.

FANTASTIC UPGRADES Built by Virina Homes, 4 bdrms, 3 baths, 2 storey home. Main flr formal dining rm, 2nd flr laundry. M/ bdrm with luxurious 5 pc ensuite. Natural stone tiles (Travertine) & maple hrdwd flrs, stairs & railing. Gourmet Maple kitchen family rm with corner gas fireplace. Modern lighting throughout, TARION Warranty. 2350 sq. ft. 50’ lot frontage. MLS. $420,000.

G RIN FFE O

ES NC LIA P AP EE FR

SAT & SUN 2 - 4PM 34 CORAL GABLES CRES., ELMIRA

OPEN HOUSE

www.

.com

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. You already have a few numbers to get you started.

24 | CLASSIFIEDS | SERVICES | REAL ESTATE | FAMILY ALBUM

SERVICE PROS
AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVE

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

EXPERT ADVICE | QUALITY SERVICES LOOK UP A PROFESSIONAL.
AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

»
TIRE

Auto Tech Inc.
Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.
Accredited Test & Repair Facility

THOMPSON’S

Complete Collision Service

AUTO CLINIC
21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE
24 Hour Accident Assistance

Body Maintenance

WHERE TIRES
SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.
Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

at

ARE A

519-669-4400
21 HOWARD AVE., ELMIRA
(Behind the old Trylon Building)

519-669-7652

FAX: 519.669.3210

519.669.8330
519.669.8917
AFTER HOURS

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

1-800-CARSTAR
519-669-3373
33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3373
33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

Call Us At

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

519-669-3232

BICYCLES

BOOKKEEPING
“ The Small Business Advantage”

CARPENTRY

CHAUFFER SERVICE

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS GET YOUR BICYCLES READY
With an expert spring tune up
$

20
$

Advantage
bookkeeping
• Personal Tax Returns • Accounts Receivable/Payable • Complete Payroll Services • PST • GST • Reconciliations, Commissions, Year End, Etc. • New Business Start-Ups • On-Site Service Available

Custom Homes • Cottages • Additions • Shingling + Siding

AIRPORTS CHAUFFER SERVICES
We will drive you and your party(ies) in YOUR CAR To the airport, return your car to your driveway and pick you up on your return.
Waterloo Int’l. $20.00 – Pearson $45.00 Hamilton - $35.00 Buffalo - $105.00 One – Way Trip Cost - Plus your gas Book early – avoid disappointment

parts extra

tune up goes to “Fit for the Future” fundraiser campaign.
Tel: 519-669-5537
22 Church St. W., Elmira

5 from each

GROSHAW BROS. CARPENTRY
JOHN GROSHAW 7449 8th Line Drayton, ON

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

208 Arthur St. S. advantagebookkeeping@rogers.com

519.210.0191

519-669-5588 (cell) 519-897-6238

519-590-3098
CRANE CUSTOM FRAMING

CONCRETE

CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS

CONSTRUCTION

MARWIL
CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
Residential & Agricultural
Driveways • Sidewalks •Curbs Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI
Concrete Foundations Limited
YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

CONSTRUCTION INC.
commercial • industrial
• Concrete removal & replacement • Siding work up to 66’ high •Pole Structures •Remodeling & restoration

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd.
• 14 ton BoomTruck • 35 ton Mobile Crane

GENERAL CONTRACTING

YOU NAME IT: WE FRAME IT!
PHOTO
www.elmiraphoto.com
E L M I R A

Call For An Estimate

519-664-9999
ST. JACOBS

Willis Martin Drayton, ON

519-638-2699

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914

Marty Trapp
RR#1 Elmira

519-846-9066
fax: 519-846-9319

24 Hour Service 7 Days A Week

519-669-FILM

57 Arthur St. S., Elmira

THE REAL DEAL
P L A C E S O F FA I T H
LOCAL CHURCH
building relationships with God, one another and the world

To place a Service Pros ad contact: ads@ObserverXtra.com or Call 519-669-5790
HEARING ASSISTED WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE SUNDAY SCHOOL

SERVICES DIRECTORY

NURSERY PROVIDED

SUNDAY, AUGUST 9, 2009

Calvary United
St. Jacobs
48 Hawkesville Rd. • 519-664-2311

Welcome to

Upbeat Family Worship & Sunday School 10:00 am

Wheelchair accessible • Nursery Care provided • Hearing Assisted

Sunday, August 9, 2009 10:00 am “The Reality of Spiritual Warfare”
200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296
Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

SUNDAYS, 8:30 & 11:00AM WEDNESDAYS, 7:00PM (with Childrens’ Programs) IMPACT YOUTH (GR 7-12): Fridays, 7:30pm TWENTY20 (GRADS & TWENTIES): Visit www.kcf.org/twenty20 for details

Critical People
Sundays @ 10:30am John Mahood PS

“Making Faith Live”
Sunday Worship 9:30 am - 10:30am

Pastors Steve & Beth Fleming

850 Sawmill Rd, Bloomingdale 744-7447 www.kcf.org

5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459
www.elmiracommunity.org

2 First St., Elmira • 519-669-5030

Trinity United Church
ELMIRA
Minister: Summer Worship Rev. Dave Jagger June 28 - Sept. 6 10 a.m. at Trinity Sunday School During Worship

Sundays @ 10:30am Life Lessons for the iPod Generation This week: iServe
REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER. 290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

Bloomingdale Mennonite Church
Sundays - 9:45 am Family Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday School for all ages www.bloomingdalemennonite.com

St. Teresa
No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am
Mass times are:

Catholic Church

Visit our website at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St., North • Church Office 519-669-5560 “Our mission is to love, learn and live by Christ’s teachings”

1151 Snyder’s Flat Rd., Bloomingdale • 519-745-2411

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

WORD-UP

SOLUTION FOUND ON PAGE 27

»

CLASSIFIEDS | SERVICES | REAL ESTATE | FAMILY ALBUM |

25

CREATED EXCLUSIVELY FOR THE OBSERVER

©2009

ACROSS 1. ___ President 6. Burst 11. Drops on blades 14. Marks in ancient transcript meaning not to be thought of as genunine 15. Blood carrier 16. Baseball stat 17. Deprive of value for payment 19. Delivery vehicle 20. Most artful 21. Family man? 23. “Yum!” 25. Jottings 26. Distance to something that is closest 30. Length x width, for a rectangle 31. Certain berth 32. Come from behind 35. Fabrication 38. Bad end 39. In a lather 40. Bridle parts 41. Double curve 42. Turn red or yellow, say 43. Public transportation vehicles 44. “Get ___!”

46. Campus life 48. “Green ___” 50. Table part 52. Careful and accurate 54. Ride, so to speak 59. Chop (off) 60. Characteristic of a traitor 62. Bat wood 63. Perfect, e.g. 64. Lace tip 65. “Didn’t I tell you?” 66. Like Cheerios 67. Beginnings

DOWN 1. 1960’s London subculture 2. Brother of Cain 3. Moore of “G.I. Jane” 4. ___ vera 5. Cathedrals and large churches 6. Cal. col. 7. Detail 8. Annoyed and irritable 9. Increase, with “up” 10. Built of stone or brick 11. Sap of life or energy 12. Clear, as a disk 13. Desires 18. Flight data, briefly 22. “For shame!”

24. ___ throat 26. Au naturel 27. A long narrative poem telling of a hero’s deeds 28. The mark ‘ 29. “Losing My Religion” rock group 30. Matterhorn, e.g. 33. Absorbed, as a cost 34. Kind of cycle 36. Any thing 37. “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto) 39. ___ Master’s Voice 40. Sir, less formally 42. Itallian rice 43. Mad 45. “___ Town Too” (1981 hit) 47. Small salmon 48. Book of maps 49. Decided 50. Bond, for one 51. New moon, e.g. 53. Used as fertilizer, animal feed & plastics 55. Anger 56. ___-bodied 57. Coaster 58. Adjusts, as a clock 61. Clinton, e.g.: Abbr.

SERVICE PROS
CARPET CARE CUSTOM COVERS & REPAIRS

TO PLACE A SERVICE PROS AD CONTACT: ads@ObserverXtra.com OR CALL 519-669-5790
DECORATING GLASS SERVICES
SINCE 1961

PAINTING

»

Read’s Decorating

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS
1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

GLASS SYSTEMS INC.

BIRMINGHAM
PAINTING & DECORATING

GLEN

15% OFF
RENOVATION CLEAN UPS!
Call for Details
Coupon holds no cash value. Valid July, August, September 2009.

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

Boat Covers | Air Conditioning Covers | Small Tarps Storage Covers | BBQ Covers | Awnings & Canopies Replacement Gazebo Tops | Golf Cart Encolsures & Covers
•Ratches, Hooks, Straps, Webbing etc. •Canvas, Vinyl, Polyester, Acrylic Fabrics

Specializing in Paint & Wallcoverings
For all your home decorating needs

FREE ESTIMATES
• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

General Repairs

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING • WALLPAPERING
OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE!

519.595.4830
Poole, ON

519-669-3658
27 Arthur St. S., Elmira

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104
FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

519-669-1131

HOME RENOVATIONS

HOLISTIC SERVICES

LANDSCAPING

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping
www.completecarpetcare.ca

Elm Elm Elmira Holistic Solutions

E.H.S
BUILD IT • FIX IT • DISPOSE OF IT INTERIOR & EXTERIOR MAINTENANCE

Susan Nikyuluw R.N.C.

NEW LOCATION
115 Bristow Creek JULY 1, 2009

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

CALL RICK 519-210-0108 08
r-bygrave@rogers.com

Decks • Sheds • Garden & Retaining Walls Decorative Stonework & Much More FR ESTIMEE

• Reflexology Therapy • Polarity Therapy • Bio impedance & Diet Analysis • Detox Programs / Detox Mud Wraps • Hot Stone / Chair Massage • Lymphatic Drainage Massage • Jin Shin Acupressure • Nutrition & First Line Therapy

S REASON ABL RATES E

ATE

For appointments or information please call Susan at

519-500-1087 OR 519-210-0150
LAWN MAINTENANCE
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

LAWN & GARDEN MAINTENANCE
ER RS OVYEA 10

LAWN MAINTENANCE

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Post Holes Augered
Book your summer projects now!

Complete Lawn Maintenance Snow Plowing & Removal

Lawn Maintenance Landscaping Snowplowing Ice Control
Telephone

519-669-9081

Murray & Daniel Shantz
PHONE:

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134

ALMA, ONTARIO

519.669.1188

27 Brookmead St., Elmira

Jeff Basler
Owner|Operator

Mobile

519-505-0985
ever-green@sympatico.ca

We call Elmira home but we service the surrounding area.

26 | CLASSIFIEDS | SERVICES | REAL ESTATE | FAMILY ALBUM

Q. IAYF: What is it? Who wants it? Who needs it? Who’s got it? Who’d dearly love to have no part of it? A. It stands for “Information at Your Fingertips,” longtime motto of the information industry, or as the cooler geeks now call it, IAYF, says Paul McFedries in IEEE Spectrum magazine. Wondering if that restaurant you see while driving is any good? Ask you car’s GPS system. Somebody at dinner claims Dustin Hoffman was in Star Wars? Look it up on your iPhone’s Internet Movie Database. The point is, IAYF went from pie-inthe-sky to data-in-your-smartphone seemingly overnight. Many of us are only now beginning to realize how much findability (Googleability) the world’s data has. he age of “ambient findability” is the ability to find anyone or anything from anywhere at any time! Once info becomes so

Obesity making “bigger” a real growth industry
ubiquitous we cease to notice it, it becomes what one geek termed “everyware.” Expect at some point to see a privacy backlash, with people realizing that info about THEM is also everywhere. Now the new elite will be the “unGoogleables,” who’ve never posted anything online using their real name -- no comments, no blog posts, no newsgroup rants, no Web pages. So, asks McFedries, want a can’tmiss business idea for the future? Start a company specializing in “Google scrubbing,” i.e., removing all traces of a person from Google’s servers, then “let me know when you’re a going concern and I’ll look you up on my iPhone.” Q. What can you do today about your health 30 years from now, and for this one there’s no need for pills, diets, special exercise regimens? A. Just remain optimistic and affirmative about coming old age, advises social psychologist Becca Levy in Science magazine. When nearly 400 healthy adults under age 50 answered questions about whether old people are “absent-minded” or “less intelligent,” Levy and colleagues found that the subjects with worse-than-average age stereotypes were themselves later more likely to have heart attacks or strokes at younger ages. For example, 30 years after filling out the questionnaire, 25% of those with negative attitudes had had a cardiovascular event compared with only 13% of those with positive attitudes. Apparently, people who expect bad things to eventually come their way make themselves more susceptible to stress as those later years arrive. Or as Levy put it, “old age is not for pessimists.” Q. What recent epidemic is having BROAD impact on many in the U.S., possibly even to the grave? A. The growing “obesity epidemic.” One of its much- publicized results is the need for bigger seats on airlines; less well known is the increase in back injuries to paramedics who now must often lift overly heavy people, said the “Charleston Daily Mail” in Standards and Their Stories, edited by

» STRANGE BUT TRUE | BILL & RICH SONES

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

Martha Lampland and Susan Leigh Star. “There really is not an area untouched by this trend,” said Scott McSparran, medical director for a New York group of coffin manufacturers, who have seen the interior width of standard-sized wooden caskets go from 22 inches to 24 inches. “We don’t want to give the appearance of the deceased being crammed into a casket.” Also because of today’s bigger bodies, some hospitals have considered switching from their drawer system to a refrigerated room where the deceased can be wheeled in on litters. Some morgues have also had to renovate their labs. If Americans keep adding on weight, eventually cemeteries will need to redesign as well, requiring bigger burial plots, fewer bodies in mausoleums and not as many spaces in a family plot, said Ernie Heffner of Heffner Funeral Homes. (Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com)

PAINTING

SERVICE PROS
PAINTING PLUMBING PLUMBING
20 years experience
Over 15 Years Experience

519.669.5790 | 1.888.966.5942
FAX | 519.669.5753 EMAIL | sales@ObserverXtra.com

ROOFING

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

Mike
PAINTING

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS!
BRUBACHER LTD.

YOUR
C.J.

Steve Co.
Steve Jacobi
ELMIRA

INC

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

AMOS
R O O F I N G
• Repairs • Churches
Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

SELF STORAGE

»

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

• Specializing in residential re-roofs

For all your Plumbing Needs.
24 HOUR SERVICE

Various sizes & rates

519-669-2251
36 Hampton St., Elmira

519.669.9160

Cell: 519.998.4094

519-669-3362
SERVICE

19 First St. E., Elmira

Call sCott seiling for YOUR FREE ESTIMATE. CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR your free estimate. BooK noW YOUR ROOFING DONE BEFORE WINTER BOOK NOW! HAVE for your summer installation
OFFICE

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

519-669-3652

519.698.2114 • 519.746.4544
In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

Call

519-669-4964
TOWING

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

SEPTIC

SIGNAGE | VINYL & DIGITAL

SAWMILL

graph x ltd.

Portable Sawmill
Got Logs? Need Lumber?

Septic Tank Cleaning
Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

Signs & Banners
• Free Estimates •Tree Trimming and removal • Aerial Bucket Truck • Stump Grinding • Arborist evaluations • Fully insured and certified

www.remingtongraphfix.com

TOWING AND RECOVERY
FOR YOUR UNWANTED SCRAP VEHICLES CARS, TRUCKS OR VANS WE PAY CASH WITH FREE TOWING PLEASE CALL

Vehicle Lettering Logos & Graphics Large format printing Decals & Safety Stickers

BILL SCHENKEL

CASH PAID

519-664-1809
1600 King St. N., Unit #18

519.648.3056

call

519-648-3004

Waterloo Region • Wellington County

or

519-896-7700
TOPSOIL
LOCNEW ATI ON

ST.JACOBS

www.biobobs.com

FAST, FRIENDLY SERVICE AT COMPETITIVE PRICES!

Franks Planks

519-568-8666

SERVICE DIRECTORY

TREE REMOVAL
•Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location •Climb with Ropes to Avoid Injury From Spurs •Hedge trimming •Branch Chipping •Stump Grinding •Based in Floradale

WINDOW COVERINGS

THIS SPACE FOR RENT
Call Donna at ext 104

Triple Mix • Top Dressing Screened Top Soil • Sands Gravels • Natural River Rock
NEW N IO LOCAT

T R

E

E

raperies & Blinds • Curtain Hardware Custom D

519.669.5790 | 1.888.966.5942 www.ObserverXtra.com

889 Bridge St. E. Waterloo
(Corner of Bridge & McMurray)

519-888-1007

Pick-up or Delivery

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin

40 Memorial Ave, Elmira

519-669-8309

THE OBSERVER | Saturday, August 08, 2009

IN MEMORIAM

EVENTS CALENDAR »
CLASSIFIEDS | SERVICES | REAL ESTATE | FAMILY ALBUM |
“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

27

Kleensweep
Carpet Care
Rugs and Upholstery
West Montrose, ON
COLLEEN

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Home Auto Life

In loving memory of our precious Mom, Gramma, and Wife who left us for Heaven August 10, 2008. You are the heart of our family and we still ache as we miss you so much. We remember your cheerful smile, laughter, loving care, energy, generosity and kindness. We miss your genuine interest in our lives, as you loved each of us as your best friend. You always enjoyed the times when the whole family was together. We look forward to being with you again in Heaven where your bright smile and unconditional love will greet us. We love you so much! Lorne, Craig, Kelly, Christine, Val, Lori, Luke, Joe, Bryan, David, Abby, Mark, Clay, Tia and Nicolas.

METZGER, Florence

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates

DENTURE
Allen Morrison, Agent/Owner
Allen Morrison Insurance Inc.
25 Industrial Drive, Elmira, ON N3B 3K3 Bus.:519.669.2632 Fax: 519.669.4282

Since 1987 - DentureTech Since 1995 - Denturist

Investments Group

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

Business Farm

Cell: 519.581.7868

T. 519.669.2033

519-699-4641
www.freybc.com

FREE CONSULTATION

• Total Denture Care Travel

After Hours Emergency Services: 1-800-465-2667

www.cooperators.ca • Same Disability Day Service

Email: allen_morrison@cooperators.ca

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

AUGUST 8

» Pancake Breakfast at the Alma Community Hall from 8-11 a.m.; $4/adult; $2/ child. All proceeds to the Alma Community Recreation Association (ACRA) playground fund. For more information, contact Doug at 519-846-0764. » Dinaosaurs, Rocks, Minerals and more. Open daily, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.; free; Earth Scineces Museum, University of Waterloo, Waterloo; 519-888-4567, ext. 32469.
AUGUST 9

DENTURE
Vinolea Jahandari DD

Denture
519.669.1535
KITCHENER

on Repairs and Relines • Metal Partial - Soft Relines • Implants Since 1987 - DentureTech • DENTURE SPECIALIST Since 1995 - Denturist

DEATH NOTICES
DICKIESON, Barbara Jean (nee Pylack) WAGLER, Melvin Noah

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR
MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS
• Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

• ELMIRA Total Denture Care • Same day service on repairs and Ave., 15 Memorialrelines Since 1987 - DentureTech • Elmira Metal Partial - Soft Relines 1995 - Denturist (Behind BankSPECIALIST of Montreal) • DENTURE

» Second Annual Drayton Singspiration and Fellowship. Guest gospel singers, musicians, and group hymn singing at Drayton Centennial Park, north of the main intersection from 2-4:30 p.m. Bring a lawn chair. For more information, call Ruth at 519-669-3699.
AUGUST 12

FREE CONSULTATION 519.744.9770
ELMIRA • Total Denture Care KITCHENER 519-669-1535 519-744-9770 • Same Day Service 15 Memorial Ave., Elmira (behind Bank of Montreal) on Repairs and Relines • Metal Partial - Soft Relines • Implants • DENTURE SPECIALIST

– Of Drayton passed away suddenly on Thursday, July 30, 2009 in her 74th year.
MARTIN, Carol Simeon B.) (Mrs.

– Called home to her Heavenly Father on Wednesday, July 29, 2009, in her 75th year. Carol (White) Martin of St. Jacobs.
MARQUARDT, Jack A.

– Passed away on Wednesday, July 29, 2009, at London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital. Melvin resided in Millbank and was born 66 years ago in Wellesley Township.
WEBER, Lovina Emanuel) (Mrs.

» Birds of Prey – at St. Jacobs Branch Library, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. With birds from the Canadian Raptor Conservancy. Owls, eagles, hawks and more. Recommended for ages 3 and up. Tickets $3 each or 2 for $5. Everyone must have a ticket to attend the show. For more information call St. Jacobs Branch Library at 519-6643443. » Official Agent 009 Graduation Party – Join us for the official graduation party with the Region of Waterloo Library Agent 009 TD Summer Reading Club. It’s party time! Make your official Agent 009 ID badge and maybe win a prize. St. Clements Branch Library, 1:45-2:30 p.m., call 519-699-4341; Linwood Branch Library, 3:304:15 p.m., call 519-689-2700 for more information.
AUGUST 13

Wonderful 519.669.1535
ELMIRA

Elze’s
Vinolea Jahandari DD

W

15 Memorial Ave., Elmira
KITCHENER

Wines

(Behind Bank of Montreal)

519.744.9770

– ON Wednesday, July 29, 2009, at Hamilton General Hospital. Jack Marquardt of RR1 Alma. Beloved husband of the lat Fay (Wilson) Marquardt (2000).

- Peacefully, on Tuesday, August 4, 2009 at RR3, Listowel, Lovina (Gingrich) Weber, in her 93rd year.

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.
P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

A Fine Wine Establishment

519.669.5105

TOTAL
HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

» Official Agent 009 Graduation Party – Join us for the official graduation party with the Region of Waterloo Library Agent 009 TD Summer Reading Club. It’s party time! Make your official Agent 009 ID badge and maybe win a prize. St. Jacobs Branch Library, 3:30-4:15 p.m., call 519-664-3443; Elmira Branch Library, 10:3011:30 a.m., call 519-669-5477, Bloomingdale Branch Library, 1:45-2:30 p.m., call 519-743-3151 for more information.
AUGUST 14

519.669.0799

29 Church St. W., Elmira

»CROSSWORD SOLUTIONS

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

» Official Agent 009 Graduation Party – Join us for the official graduation party with the Region of Waterloo Library Agent 009 TD Summer Reading Club. It’s party time! Make your official Agent 009 ID badge and maybe win a prize. Wellesley Branch Library, 2:15-3 p.m., call 519-656-2001 for more information. » Cold Plate Dinner – turkey, ham and three salads; 6 p.m., Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St. E., Elmira, downstairs.
AUGUST 15

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby?
It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess.
Elmira & Surrounding Area

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

» Drayton Christian Reform Church fundraising concert; 4 p.m. Six bands, by donation. Bring lawn chairs, food tent, rain or shine. Proceeds going to help fund trip to the Dominican to build a school.
AUGUST 16

elmirawelcomewagon@sympatico.ca

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

» Kidspark storytelling, games, music, puppet show, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free admission, Victoria Park, Kitchener.
AUGUST 19

SANYO CANADIAN
»SUDOKU SOLUTIONS
EASY MEDIUM

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

» Maryhill Peach Social at the Maryhill Community Centre beginning at 5 p.m. BBQ fare served with fresh salads, homemade shortcake topped with fresh peaches and ice cream. Beverages available. Face painting, silent auction and fun social time. Rain or shine. Call Dolly at 519-648-2416 or Sandra 519-648-2939 for more information.
AUGUST 28

519.669.2884
Summer is Coming!
21 Industrial Dr., Elmira

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

» Kids Day at Waterloo Buskers Carnival – children’s entertainment, activities, noon to 5 p.m.; free admission. King Street, Waterloo.
AUGUST 29

RETAIL STORE RETAIL STORE

» Much Music Retro Dance for National Service Dogs. Wellesley Community Centre, 8 p.m. – 1 a.m. Tickets $12 single; $20 couple. For tickets and more information call Tammy at 519-656-1038.
SEPTEMBER 12

MEDIUM EASY

HARD MEDIUM EASY

• Electrical Supplies • New Vacuums • All Vacuum Repairs • Parts & Accessories • All makes and models • Hand Vacs to Central Vacs
9 CHURCH STREET EAST, ELMIRA

» Pancake Breakfast at the Alma Community Hall from 8-11 a.m.; $4/adult; $2/ child. All proceeds to the Alma Community Recreation Association (ACRA) playground fund. For more information, contact Doug at 519-846-0764.

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217
Home: 519.747.4388 Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities.

519.669.8362

Submit calendar listings to info@observerxtra.com

Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

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