TAIWANCHINA RECENT ECONOMIC_ POLITICAL_ AND MILITARY DEVELOPMENTS

Document Sample
TAIWANCHINA RECENT ECONOMIC_ POLITICAL_ AND MILITARY DEVELOPMENTS Powered By Docstoc
					   TAIWAN­CHINA:  RECENT ECONOMIC, 
 POLITICAL, AND MILITARY DEVELOPMENTS 
ACROSS THE STRAIT, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR 
            THE UNITED STATES 



                                      HEARING 
                                      BEFORE THE 

            U.S.­CHINA ECONOMIC AND SECURITY 
                            REVIEW COMMISSION 


      ONE HUNDRED ELEVENTH CONGRESS 
                                  SECOND SESSION 
                                      _________ 

                                  March 18, 2010 
                                      _________ 


                                       Printed for use of the 
    Un i t ed  St a t es­Ch in a  E con om i c  a n d  Secur i t y  Re vi e w  Com m i ssi on 
             Ava i l a bl e  vi a   t h e  Wor l d  Wi de  Web:     www. us cc. g ov 




    UNITED STATES­CHINA ECONOMIC AND SECURITY REVIEW COMMISSION 
                            W AS H INGT ON  :  AP R IL  2 0 1 0
    U.S.­CHIN A ECO NOMIC  AND SEC URIT Y  REVIEW  COMMISSION 


                    DANIEL M. SLANE,  Chairman 
               CAROLYN BARTHOLOME W,  Vice  Chai rman 

 Co mmissio ners: 
 DANIEL BLUMENTHAL                            Hon. WI LLI AM  A. REINSCH 
 PETER T.R. BROOKES                           DENNIS C. SHEA 
 ROBIN  CLEVE LAND                            PETER VIDENIEKS 
 JEFFREY FIEDLER                              MICHAE L R.  WESSEL 
 Hon. PATRI CK  A. MULLOY                     LARRY  M. WORT ZEL 

                MICHAE L R. DANIS,  Executi ve  Di rect or 
               KAT HLEEN J. MICHELS,  Associat e Director 

The  Commission  was  created  on  October  30,  2000  by  the  Floyd  D.  Spence  National 
Defense  Authorization  Act  for  2001  §  1238,  Public  Law  No.  106­398,  114  STAT. 
1654A­334 (2000) (codified at 22 U.S.C.§ 7002 (2001), as amended by the Treasury and 
General Government Appropriations Act for 2002 § 645 (regarding employment status of 
staff)  & § 648 (regarding  changing annual report due date  from  March to June), Public 
Law  No.  107­67,  115  STAT.  514  (Nov.  12,  2001);  as  amended  by  Division  P  of  the 
"Consolidated  Appropriations  Resolution,  2003,"  Pub  L.  No.  108­7  (Feb.  20,  2003) 
(regarding  Commission  name  change,  terms  of  Commissioners,  and  responsibilities  of 
Commission);  as  amended  by  Public  Law  No.  109­108  (H.R.  2862)  (Nov.  22,  2005) 
(regarding  responsibilities  of  Commission  and  applicability  of  FACA);  as  amended  by 
Division  J  of  the  “Consolidated  Appropriations  Act,  2008,”  Public  Law  No.  110­161 
(December  26,  2007)  (regarding  responsibilities  of  the  Commission,  and  changing  the 
Annual Report due date from June to December). 

 The Co mmissio n’s  full  chart er  is available at  www.uscc.go v.




                                             ii 
                                                   March 31, 2010 

The Honorable ROBERT C. BYRD 
President Pro Tempore of the Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510 
The Honorable NANCY PELOSI 
Speaker of the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. 20515 

DEAR SENATOR BYRD AND SPEAKER PELOSI: 

  We are pleased to transmit the record of our March 18, 2010 public hearing on “Taiwan­China: Recent 
Economic, Political, and Military Developments across the Strait, and Implications for the United States.” 
The  Floyd  D.  Spence  National  Defense  Authorization  Act  (amended  by  Pub.  L.  No.  109­108,  section 
635(a)) provides the basis for this hearing. 

   The  Commission  received  opening  testimony  from  Senator  Sherrod  Brown  (D­OH),  Congressman 
Lincoln Diaz­Balart (R­FL), and Congressman Phil Gingrey (R­GA). Each Member of Congress provided 
important perspectives on how the United States should react to recent developments in the Taiwan­China 
relationship. 

    Representatives from the Executive Branch provided the Commission with the Obama Administration’s 
perspective. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs David B. Shear testified 
that while the United States supports the remarkable progress in the cross­Strait relationship over the past 
two  years,  Washington remains  “opposed  to unilateral attempts  by  either  side  to  change  the  status  quo.” 
The United States, he said, continues to have “a strong security interest in doing all that [it] can to create an 
environment conducive to a peaceful and non­coercive resolution of issues between [Taiwan and China].” 
Deputy  Assistant  Secretary  of  Defense  for  Asian  and  Pacific  Security  Affairs  Michael  Schiffer  told  the 
Commission  that  it  appears  “Beijing’s  long­term  strategy  is  to  use  political,  diplomatic,  economic,  and 
cultural  levers  to  pursue  unification  with  Taiwan,  while  building  a  credible  military  threat  to  attack  the 
island if events are moving in what Beijing sees as the wrong direction.” 

   Expert witnesses described to the Commission recent developments in the military and security situation 
across  the  Taiwan  Strait.    Mr.  Mark  Stokes,  Executive  Director  of  the  Project  2049  Institute,  stated  that 
despite improvements in other areas of the relationship, Beijing’s “refusal to renounce the use of force” to 
resolve  the  Taiwan  situation  is  the  greatest  challenge  to  the  cross­Strait  relationship.    Mr.  David  A. 
Shlapak, Senior International Policy Analyst at The RAND Corporation, told the Commission that China’s 
military  modernization,  especially  its  “growing  arsenal  of  surface­to­surface  missiles  and  increasingly 
modern air force” are causing the cross­Strait military balance to tilt further in Beijing’s favor.  Dr. Albert 
S. Willner, Director of the China Security Affairs Group at CNA, described current and planned military 
modernization efforts of the Taiwan government, as well as key challenges Taiwan faces in attempting to 
strengthen its national defense capabilities. 

   Panelists agreed that while the growing economic integration between China and Taiwan is an important 
development in the cross­Strait relationship, it should be accompanied by a similar growth in U.S.­Taiwan 
economic  ties.    Dr.  Merritt  T.  (‘Terry’)  Cooke,  founder  of  GC3  Strategy  Inc.,  observed  that  economic 
interdependence  across  the  Taiwan  Strait  could  benefit  regional  stability,  but  only  when  balanced  by  a 
strong U.S.­Taiwan economic relationship.  Mr. Rupert Hammond­Chambers, President of the U.S.­Taiwan 
Business Council, similarly pointed out that ensuring strong trade relations between the United States and 
Taiwan  is the  best  way  to  balance  strengthening  economic  relationship  between  Taiwan and  China.    Dr. 
Scott L. Kastner, Associate Professor in the Department of Government and




                                                         iii 
Politics at the University of Maryland, testified that the United States should remain vigilant in regards to 
regional security, since greater cross­Strait economic integration could fail to reduce the chance for conflict 
between Taiwan and China. 

    Witnesses agreed that although recent progress in the cross­Strait relationship has occurred, the United 
States still has a role to play in ensuring that any remaining problems do not disrupt regional stability.  Mr. 
Randall  G.  Schriver,  President  and  CEO  of  the  Project  2049  Institute,  maintained  that  the  United  States 
needs  to  continue  to  support  Taiwan  in  its  dealings  with  China  and  urge  Beijing  to  renounce  the  use  of 
force against Taiwan.  Dr. Shelley Rigger, Brown Professor of Political Science at Davidson College, stated 
that the United States should continue to help “Taiwan to remain strong and confident” without “appearing 
to  [pull] Taiwan away  from  [China].”    According  to  Dr.  Richard  C.  Bush  III,  Director  of  the  Center  for 
Northeast Asian Policy Studies at The Brookings Institution, the two ways the United States can best help 
Taiwan are to ensure Taiwan’s military capabilities and to strengthen U.S.­Taiwan economic and trade ties. 

   Thank  you  for  your  consideration  of  this  summary  of  the  Commission’s  hearing.    We  note  that  the 
prepared  statements  submitted  by  the  witnesses  are  now  available  on  the  Commission’s  website  at 
www.uscc.gov.  The full transcript of the hearing will be available shortly. 

   Members  of  the  Commission  are  also  available  to  provide  more  detailed  briefings.    We  hope  these 
materials  will  be  helpful  to  the  Congress  as  it  continues  its  assessment  of  U.S.­China relations  and their 
impact on U.S. security.  Per statutory mandate, the Commission will examine in greater depth these and 
other issues in its Annual Report that will be submitted to Congress in November 2010.  If you have any 
questions  or  concerns,  please  have  your  staff  contact  Jonathan  Weston,  the  Commission's  Congressional 
Liaison, at (202) 624­1487. 

                                                  Sincerely yours, 




               Daniel Slane                                                    Carolyn Bartholomew 
               Chairman                                                       Vice Chairman 


cc: Members of Congress and Congressional Staff




                                                          iv 
                                   CONTENTS 
                                         _____ 

                            THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 2010 

     TAIWAN­CHINA:  RECENT ECONOMIC, POLITICAL, AND MILITARY 
    DEVELOPMENTS ACROSS THE STRAIT, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE 
                         UNITED STATES 


Opening remarks of Commissioner Patrick A. Mulloy  (Hearing Cochair)………  6 

Opening remarks of Commissioner Larry M. Wortzel (Hearing Cochair)……….  7 


                  PANEL I:  CONGRESSIONAL PERSPECTIVES 

Statement of Lincoln Diaz­Balart, a U.S. Congressman from the State of Florida..    2 
  Prepared statement……………………………………………………………….                                       3 
Statement of Sherrod Brown, a U.S. Senator from the State of Ohio…………….             9 
Panel I:  Discussion, Questions and Answers……………………………………..                         5, 12 


                  PANEL II:  ADMINISTRATION PERSPECTIVES 

Statement of Mr. David B. Shear, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East 
Asian and Pacific Affairs, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC………….  13 
Prepared statement……………………………………………………………….  17 
Statement of Mr. Michael Schiffer, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Asian 
and Pacific Security Affairs, U.S. Department of Defense, Washington, DC…….. 20 
  Prepared statement……………………………………………………………….  24 
Panel II:  Discussion, Questions and Answers…………………………………….  28 

                          PANEL III: MILITARY ASPECTS 

Statement of Mr. Mark Stokes, Executive Director, Project 2049 Institute, Arlington, 
Virginia…………………………………………………………………………….  42 
  Prepared statement……………………………………………………………….  43 
Statement  of Mr. David A. Shlapak, Senior International Policy Analyst, The 
RAND Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania…………………………………….  48 
  Prepared statement……………………………………………………………….  51 
Statement of Dr. Albert S. Willner, Director, China Security Affairs Group, CNA, 
Alexandria, Virginia……………………………………………………………….  51 
 Prepared statement……………………………………………………………….  53 
Panel III:  Discussion, Questions and Answers ………………………………….... 54


                                           v 
                        PANEL IV:  ECONOMIC ASPECTS 

Statement of Dr. Merritt T. Cooke, CEO, GC3 Strategy, Inc., Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania……………………………………………………………………..  67 
  Prepared statement………………………………………………………………  69 
Statement of Mr. Rupert Hammond­Chambers, President, U.S.­Taiwan Business 
Council, Arlington, Virginia……………………………………………………….  70 
  Prepared statement……………………………………………………………….  72 
Statement of Dr. Scott L. Kastner, Associate Professor, Department of Government 
and Politics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland…………………….72 
  Prepared statement……………………………………………………………….  75 
Panel IV:  Discussion, Questions and Answers……………………………………. 79 


                         PANEL V:  POLITICAL ASPECTS 

Statement of Mr. Randall G. Schriver, President and CEO, Project 2049 Institute, 
Arlington, Virginia………………………………………………………………… 93 
  Prepared statement………………………………………………………………  96 
Statement of Dr. Shelley Rigger, Brown Professor of Political Science, Davidson 
College, Davidson, North Carolina………………………………………………  100 
  Prepared statement………………………………………………………………  102 
Statement of Dr. Richard C. Bush III, Director, Center for Northeast Asian Policy 
Studies, The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC……………………………..  106 
  Prepared statement……………………………………………………………….. 109 
Panel V:  Discussion, Questions and Answers…………………………………….. 114 

ADDI T I ON AL  M AT E RI AL  S UP P LI E D  FO R  T HE   RE CO RD 

Statement of  Phil Gingrey, a U.S. Congressman from the State of  Georgia…….  126




                                         vi 
    TAIWAN­CHINA: RECENT ECONOMIC, 
  POLITICAL AND MILITARY DEVELOPMENTS 
 ACROSS THE  STRAIT, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR 
            THE UNITED STATES 
                                           _________ 



                           TH URS DAY,   M ARCH   1 8,   2010 


  U. S . ­ CHI NA  E CONOMI C  AND  S E CURI T Y  RE VI E W  COMMI S S I ON 
                                         Washi ng t on,   D. C. 


       T he  Co mmissio n  met   in  Ro o m  562,  Dir ksen  S enat e  Office 
Build ing ,  Washingt o n,   D. C.  at   9: 02  a. m. ,   Chair man  Daniel  M.   S lane,   and 
Co mmissio ner s  P at r ick   A.   Mu llo y  and  Lar r y  M.   Wo r t zel  ( Hear ing 
Co chair s) ,   pr esid ing. 


               PANEL  I:  CO NG RES S IO NAL  PERS PECTIVES 

          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Go o d   mo r ning .     I n  o ur   fir st 
p anel  t his  mo r ning ,   we'll  hear   fr o m  sever al  member s  o f  Co ngr ess. 
T o d ay  we'll  be  jo ined   by  S enat o r   S her r o d  Br o wn  fr o m  Ohio ,   and  t he 
fir st   speaker   will  be  Co ngr essman  Linco ln  Diaz­ Balar t   fr o m  Flo r id a. 
Unfo r t unat ely,   Co ngr essman  Gingr ey  fr o m  Geo r gia  will  no t   be  able  t o 
at t end. 
          Co ng r essman  Linco ln  Diaz­ Balar t   has  r epr esent ed  t he  21 st 
Dist r ict   o f  Flo r id a  since  1992.     He's  cu r r ent ly  a  senio r   member   o f  t he 
Ho u se  Ru les  Co mmit t ee  and  t he  Ranking  Member   o f  t he  S u bco mmit t ee 
o n  Legislat ive  and  Bu dg et   P r o cess.     He  is  also   Co ­ Chair man  o f  t he 
Flo r id a  Co ng r essio nal  Delegat io n,   Chair man  o f  t he  Co ngr essio nal 
Hispanic  Lead er ship  I nst it ut e,   and  a  Co ­ Chair   o f  t he  Co ngr essio nal 
Cau cu s  o n  T aiwan. 
          Co ng r essman,   we'r e  delight ed  t o   have  yo u  her e.     T hank  yo u  ver y 
mu ch.
                   S TATEM ENT  O F  LINCO LN  DIAZ­ B ALART 
       A  U. S .   CO NG RES S M AN  FRO M   TH E  S TATE  O F  FLO RIDA 

           MR.   DI AZ­ BALART :     T hank   yo u  ver y  much,   Co mmissio ner 
Chair man.     I t 's  a  p leasu r e  t o   be  wit h  all  o f  yo u,  and  I   t hank  yo u  fo r   yo u r 
wo r k   t hat 's  mo st   imp o r t ant ,   and   it 's  a  pr ivileg e  t o   be  her e  t his  mo r ning 
wit h  yo u   t o   spend  just   a  few  minut es  o n  t his  cr it ical,   cr it ical  issue. 
           I   was  p r ivileged  t o   visit   t he  Republic  o f  China,   T aiwan,   in  Apr il 
o f  last   year   t o   co mmemo r at e  t he  3 0t h  anniver sar y  o f  t he  T aiwan 
Relat io ns  Act ,   which  is,   as  yo u   kno w,   t he  co r ner st o ne  o f  U. S . ­ T aiwan 
Relat io ns.     T he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act   makes  clear   ho w  impo r t ant ,   ho w 
d ear ,   t he  secu r it y  o f  T aiwan  is  t o   t he  Co ng r ess  o f  t he  Unit ed  S t at es,   and 
t o   t he  peo ple  o f  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  t hus,   and  it   has  been  a  key  fact o r   in 
p r event ing   milit ar y  ag gr essio n  against   T aiwan. 
           I   was  pleased  when  t he  Obama  administ r at io n  anno unced  p lans  t o 
sell  weap o ns,   specifically  ant i­ missile  syst ems,   helico pt er s, 
minesweep ing  ships  and  co mmunicat io ns  equip ment   t o   T aiwan. 
Ho wever ,   we  believe  we  mu st   never   fo r g et   t hat   T aiwan's  t o p  p r io r it y 
r emains  t he  pu r chase  o f  mo d er n  air cr aft . 
           T he  U. S . ­ China  E co no mic  and  S ecu r it y  Review  Co mmissio n's 
2 0 09   r epo r t   t o   Co ngr ess,   explains  t he  t hr eat   t o   T aiwan's  abilit y  t o   live 
fr ee  o f  t hr eat   and   co er cio n  po sed  by  t he  P RC's  incr easing   milit ar y 
capabilit ies. 
           S pecifically,   in  r eg ar d  t o   air   capabilit ies,   t he  US CC  r epo r t   st at es­ ­ 
I   t hink  it 's  impo r t ant   t o   r eit er at e  it : 
           T he  su ccess  o f  seizing  air   super io r it y  is  cr it ical  in  det er mining   t he 
o u t co me  o f  any  lar g e­ scale  use  o f  fo r ce  against   T aiwan.     Over   t he  year s, 
T aiwan's  air   capabilit ies  r elat ive  t o   China's  have  begun  t o   shr ink. 
           And   lat er   t he  r epo r t   says: 
           I n  co nt r ast   t o   t he  g r o wing  size  and  qualit y  o f  t he  P LA's  fight er 
fo r ce,   T aiwan  has  no t   su bst ant ially  u pgr ad ed  it s  fight er   fo r ce  in  t he  past 
d ecad e  and   may  no t   do   so   in  t he  near   fut ur e.     Alt ho ug h  T aiwan 
r eq uest ed  t he  sale  o f  66   F­ 16  C/ D  fig ht er s  fr o m  t he  Unit ed  S t at es,   t hese 
air cr aft   wer e  no t   par t   o f  t he  Bush  administ r at io n's  Oct o ber   200 8 
no t ificat io n  t o   Co ng r ess  o f  U. S .   ar ms  sales  t o   T aiwan.     Alt ho ugh  t hese 
fig ht er s  ar e  st ill  desir ed   by  T aiwan,   it   is  unclear   whet her   t he  Obama 
ad minist r at io n  will  sell  t hese  o r   o t her   mo der n  air cr aft   t o   T aiwan. 
           T he  Janu ar y  21 ,   20 10,   U. S .   Defense  I nt elligence  Ag ency  r epo r t 
fu r t her   und er sco r es  t he  impo r t ance  o f  t hese  fight er s  t o   T aiwan's  secur it y 
wit h  it s  co nclusio n  t hat   T aiwan's  air   defense  is  sho wing  incr easing 
vulner abilit y  d ue  t o   it s  aging  fight er s  in  co nt r ast   t o   t he  P RC's  r ap idly 
incr easing  milit ar y  capabilit ies. 
           As  T aiwan's  fight er s  ag e,   mainland  China  co nt inues  t o   fo r t ify  it s 
milit ar y  p o st u r e  and   d evo t e  incr easing  p r o po r t io ns  o f  it s  GDP   t o 
mo der nizing  it s  weap o ns  while  co nt inu ing  t o   aim,   as  yo u  k no w,   o ver   a 
t ho u sand   missiles  d ir ect ly  at   T aiwan.
                                                       ­ 2 ­ 
          S ince  20 06,   t he  Legislat ive  Yu an  has  bud get ed  billio ns  o f  d o llar s 
fo r   t he  pur chase  o f  addit io nal  mo d er n  F­ 16s  t o   bo o st   T aiwan's  air 
d efense  cap abilit ies.     Meanwhile,   t he  p r o d uct io n  line  o f  F­ 16s  is 
schedu led   t o   clo se  o ver   t he  upco ming  year   t o   mak e  way  fo r   mo r e 
ad vanced  fight er s. 
          S o   t he  t ime  t o   pr o vide  t ho se  fight er s,   t he  mo der n  F­ 16s,   is  no w. 
T he  milit ar y  and  st r at egic  imper at ives  fo r   T aiwan  ar e  r eal.     I f  we  fail  t o 
sho w  t he  necessar y  r eso lve,   it   wo uld  mean  missing   a  significant 
o p p o r t unit y  t o   ensur e  peace  and  secu r it y  in  t he  Asia­ P acific  r eg io n, 
which  is  a  vit al  U. S .   int er est . 
          I n  addit io n  t o   being  ir r espo nsible,   I   believe  it   makes  no   sense  t o 
co nt inu e  t o   deny  T aiwan  mo der n  fight er   air cr aft .     Mainland  China  is 
g o ing  t o   pr o t est  anyway.     I n  fact ,   by  pr o t est ing  so   vo cifer o u sly  t o   t he 
weap o ns  sale  anno u ncement   o f  Januar y  29  o f  t his  year ,   t he  Co mmunist 
Chinese  ar e  seeking  t o   pr essu r e  t he  Unit ed   S t at es  int o   no t   selling 
ad vanced  fight er   planes  at   all  t o   T aiwan. 
          I 'd   also   lik e  t o   add r ess  ano t her   issue  o f  ut mo st   impo r t ance  t o   t he 
p eo p le  o f  T aiwan.     By  p ar t icip at ing   in  int er nat io nal  o r ganizat io ns, 
T aiwan  has  wo r k ed   d ilig ent ly  t o   co mbat   t he  int er nat io nal  iso lat io n  t hat 
Co mmu nist   China  has  t r ied   t o   imp o se  o n  it   by  bullying  and  t hr eat ening 
int er nat io nal  o r ganizat io ns  and  T aiwan's  allies. 
          I   have  o ft en  sp o ken  in  sup po r t   o f  T aiwan's  p ar t icipat io n  in 
int er nat io nal  o r g anizat io ns,   such  as  t he  Wo r ld   Healt h  Or ganizat io n,   and 
we  in  Co ngr ess  mu st   suppo r t   T aiwan  in  it s  cur r ent   at t emp t s  t o 
p ar t icipat e  in  t he  U. N.   Fr amewo r k   Co nvent io n  o n  Climat e  Chang e  and 
t he  I nt er nat io nal  Civilian  Aviat io n  Or ganizat io n. 
          Finally,   d ist inguished  Co mmissio ner s,   T aiwan  has  achieved ,   as  yo u 
k no w,   ext r ao r d inar y  eco no mic  su ccess  as  a  flo ur ishing  mar ket ­ based 
eco no my  and   has  o ne  o f  t he  highest   st and ar ds  o f  living  in  t he  wo r ld . 
But   t he  U. S . ­ T aiwan  fr iendship  r est s  o n  much  mo r e  t han  shar ed 
eco no mic  int er est s  o r   t r ade.     Ou r   fr iendship  st ems  fr o m  a  shar ed 
co mmit ment   t o   t he  fu nd ament al  ideals  o f  t he  r ules  o f  law  and  fr eedo m, 
as  well  as  o pp o sit io n  t o   t o t alit ar ianism. 
          We  in  t he  U. S .   Co ngr ess  must   co nt inue  t o   suppo r t   o u r   fr iend   and 
ally  T aiwan  in  all  o f  it s  cr it ical  p ur suit s. 
          I   t hank  yo u  fo r   yo ur   at t ent io n  and  ag ain  r eit er at e  my 
co mmendat io n  fo r   yo ur   har d  wo r k . 
          [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 

                   Prep a red  S t a t emen t   of  Li n coln   Di az­ B alart 
                  A  U. S .   Con gressman   from  t h e  S t at e  o f  Flo ri d a 

         I was privileged to visit the Republic of China (Taiwan) in April of last year to commemorate the 
  th 
30  Anniversary  of  the  Taiwan  Relations  Act,  the  cornerstone  of  U.S.­Taiwan  relations.    The  Taiwan 
Relations Act makes clear how dear the security of Taiwan is to the Congress and the people of the United

                                                   ­ 3 ­ 
States, and it has been a key factor in preventing military aggression against Taiwan. 
          I was pleased when the Obama Administration announced its plan to sell weapons totaling about 
$6.4  billion  in  anti­missile  systems,  helicopters,  minesweeping  ships  and  communications  equipment  to 
Taiwan.    However,  we  must  not  forget  that  Taiwan’s  top  priority  remains  the  purchase  of  F­16  C/D 
fighters.           The U.S.­China Economic and Security Review Commission’s 2009 Report to Congress 
explains  the  threat  to  Taiwan’s  ability  to  live  free  of  threat  and  coercion posed by the PRC’s increasing 
military capabilities in the face of Taiwan’s waning capabilities.  Specifically in regard to air capabilities, 
the USCC Report states: 
          The success of seizing air superiority is critical in determining the outcome of any large­scale use 
          of force against Taiwan.  Over the years, Taiwan’s air capabilities relative to China’s have begun 
          to shrink (p241­42). 
And later: 
          In  contrast  to  the  growing  size  and  quality  of  the  PLA’s  fighter  force,  Taiwan  has  not 
          substantially  upgraded  its fighter force in the past decade and may not do so in the near future. 
          Although Taiwan requested the sale of sixty­six F­16 C/D fighters from the United States, these 
          aircraft were not part of the Bush Administration’s October 2008 notification to Congress of U.S. 
          arms sales to Taiwan.  Although these fighters are still desired by Taiwan, it is unclear whether 
          the Obama Administration will agree to sell these, or other, modern aircraft to Taiwan (p242). 
The  January  21,  2010  U.S.  Defense  Intelligence  Agency  report  further  underscores  the  importance  of 
these  fighters  to  Taiwan’s  security  with  its  conclusion  that  Taiwan's  air  defense  is  showing  increasing 
vulnerability  due  to  its  aging  fighters  in  contrast  to  the  PRC’s  rapidly  increasing  military  capabilities. 
As Taiwan’s fighters age, Mainland China continues to fortify its military posture and devote increasing 
proportions  of  its  GDP  to  modernizing  its  weapons  while  continuing  to  aim  over  a  thousand  missiles 
directly at Taiwan. 
          Since  2006,  Taiwan’s  Legislative  Yuan  has  budgeted  billions  of  dollars  for  the  purchase  of 
additional  F­16s  to  boost  Taiwan’s  air  defense  capabilities.    Meanwhile,  the  production  line  of  F­16s  is 
scheduled to close over the upcoming year to make way for the more advanced F­35 fighter. 
          The time to provide these fighters is now.  The military and strategic imperatives for Taiwan are 
real and urgent.  If we fail to show the necessary resolve, it would mean missing a significant opportunity 
to ensure peace and security in the Asia­Pacific region – a vital U.S. interest. 
          In addition to being irresponsible, it makes no sense to continue to deny Taiwan modern fighter 
aircraft.  Mainland China will protest anyway.  In fact, by protesting so vociferously to the weapons sale 
announcement  on  January  29,  2010,  the  Communist  Chinese  are  seeking  to  pressure  the  United  States 
into not selling advanced fighter planes. 
          I  would  also  like  to  address  another  issue  of  utmost  importance  to  the  people  of  Taiwan.    By

                                                       ­ 4 ­ 
participating  in  international  organizations,  Taiwan  has  worked  diligently  to  combat  the  international 
isolation  that  Communist  China  has  tried  to  impose  on  it  by  bullying  and  threatening  international 
organizations  and  Taiwan’s  allies.    I  have  often  spoken  in  support  of  Taiwan’s  participation  in 
international  organizations  such  as  the  World  Health  Organization,  and  we  in  the  U.S.  Congress  must 
support  Taiwan  in  its  current  attempts  to  participate  in  the  United  Nations  Framework  Convention  on 
Climate Change and the International Civil Aviation Organization. 
         Taiwan  has  achieved  marked  economic  successes  such  as  a  flourishing  market­based  economy 
and  one  of  the  highest  standards  of  living  in  the  world,  but  the  U.S.­Taiwan  friendship  rests  on  much 
more  than  shared  economic  interests  or  trade.    Our  friendship  stems  from  a  shared  commitment  to  the 
fundamental  ideals  of  the  Rule  of  Law  and  freedom,  and  opposition  to  totalitarianism.    We  in  the  U.S. 
Congress must continue to support our friend and ally Taiwan in its most critical pursuits. 




                     Pan el  I:     Di scu ssi o n ,   Q u est i on s  an d   An swers 

          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u,   sir .   I   do n't   kno w 
ho w  yo u r   t ime  is,   Co ng r essman  Diaz­ Balar t ,   bu t   wo u ld  yo u   have  t ime 
fo r   any  q uest io ns? 
          MR.   DI AZ­ BALART :     Yes.     Yes,   I   have  a  few  minut es,   sir . 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     I 'll  st ar t   if  I   may.     One  o f  t he 
co ncer ns  t hat   I 've  seen,   at   least   in  po licy  cir cles,   abo ut   advanced   fight er 
air cr aft   is  t hat   t hey  have  a  t endency  t o   su ppo r t   o ffensive  o per at io ns. 
Do   yo u  t hink  t hat   so me  st at ement   fr o m  T aiwan,   a  new  st at ement   abo ut 
t he  defensive  nat u r e  o f  it s  milit ar y  do ct r ine,   wo u ld  help  t he  climat e  in 
Washingt o n  t o   su ppo r t   t he  sale  o f  advanced  fight er   air cr aft ? 
          MR.   DI AZ­ BALART :     T hat 's  a  go o d   q uest io n.   I   t hink   it   cer t ainly 
sho u ld  be  evident  t o   anybo d y  who 's  an  o bser ver   o f  t he  sit uat io n,   t hat 
t he  d esigns  and  p o st ur e  o f  T aiwan  ar e  defensive,   t he  go als  o f  T aiwan 
ar e  defensive,   and   t hat   t he  r ealit y  t hat   we'r e  facing  no w  is  a  mainland 
China  t hat   is  po int ing  o ver   a  t ho usand   missiles  at   t he  island. 
          I   t hink   t hat   quest io ns  such  as  t hat ,   since  I   have  such  u lt imat e 
r espect   fo r   t he  int er nal  d ecisio n­ making  pr o cess  o f  t hat   demo cr acy, 
t ho se  decisio ns  o bvio usly  ar e  u p  t o   T aiwan.     I   t hink  it   is  evident 
eno u g h,   ho wever ,   t hat   t heir   designs,   t heir   go als,   ar e  clear ly  defensive  in 
nat ur e. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     T hank  yo u  ver y  mu ch, 
Co ngr essman. 
          I   t hink  successive  administ r at io ns,   bo t h  P r esident   Bush  in  his 
lat t er   year s  and  P r esident   Obama,   have  denied  no t   o nly  t he  F­ 16  C/ D 
sales  but   also   accept ing   a  let t er   o f  r equ est   t o   even  evaluat e  t he  F­ 1 6 
C/ D  sales,   and   no w  we  have  an  assessment   sent   t o   yo u   and  t he  Co ngr ess
                                                      ­ 5 ­ 
by  t he  Depar t ment   o f  Defense,   t hat   sho ws  a  clear   milit ar y  and  defense 
r eq uir ement ,   which  is  what   we'r e  supp o sed  t o   be  making  t hese  decisio ns 
based  upo n. 
           T her e's  a  t wo fo ld   qu est io n.     One  is  what   do   yo u   t hink   is  ho lding 
back   su ccessive  administ r at io ns  fr o m  selling  r equ ir ed  milit ar y  equip ment 
as  we'r e  su ppo sed  t o   do   under   t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act ? 
           T he  o t her   t hing  is  have  yo u  ever   seen  o r   have  yo u  ever   asked  fo r   a 
r isk  assessment   o f  what   it   wo u ld  mean  t o   U. S .   fo r ces  if  we  didn't   g o 
t hr o u gh  wit h  t he  sale  o f  F­ 16  C/ Ds? 
           MR.   DI AZ­ BALART :     Wit h  r egar d  t o   t he  fir st   quest io n,   I 'm  no t 
g o ing  t o   speculat e  as  t o   t he  decisio ns  o f  t his  o r   o t her   ad minist r at io ns.     I 
t hink ­ ­ and  t hat 's  why  I   st ar t ed   o ff  by  t alking  abo u t   t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns 
Act   as  t he  co r ner st o ne  o f  o ur   po licy­ ­ t he  law  in  t he  Unit ed  S t at es 
r eq uir es  t hat   weapo ns  be  o ffer ed   t o   T aiwan  t o   mak e  cer t ain  t hat   it   can 
live  wit ho ut   t he  t hr eat   o f  co er cio n. 
           T hat 's  what   I   want   t o   st r ess.  I   t hink  Co ngr ess  needs  t o   be 
st r essing   co nt inuo usly,   r eminding,   in  it s  o ver sight   cap acit y­ ­ becau se,   as 
yo u   k no w,   t he  t wo   fundament al  r o les  o f  Co ngr ess  ar e  leg islat ing  and 
o ver sight ­ ­ in  it s  o ver sight   cap acit y,   must   r emind   t he  administ r at io n  t hat 
t he  law  r eq u ir es  t hat   a  sufficient   d efensive  po st ur e  be  able  t o   be 
maint ained ,   cer t ainly  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  o ffer   t he  weapo ns  so   t hat   a 
su fficient   defense  po st ur e  can  be  maint ained,   a  cr edible  defense  po st ur e 
can  be  maint ained   by  T aiwan.     S o   I 'm  no t   go ing  t o   speculat e. 
           Wit h  r eg ar d  t o   yo u r   seco nd  quest io n,   it 's  an  excellent   po int ,   and   I 
will  be  act ing   o n  it ,   pu r su ant   t o   no t   yo ur   sug gest io n  bu t   yo ur   having 
br o ug ht   it   o u t ,   t hat   it 's  impo r t ant   t hat   we  kno w  t he  effect   and  p o ssible 
co nsequ ences  o n  o ur   fo r ces  o f  t he  o ngo ing  milit ar y  evo lving   sit uat io n. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     S ir ,   t hank  yo u  ver y  much  fo r 
yo u r   t ime­ ­ 
           MR.   DI AZ­ BALART :     T hank   yo u  ver y  much.     I t 's  been  my 
p r ivileg e. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:  ­ ­ and  yo ur   willingness  t o   be 
her e  and  yo u r   leader ship  o n  t his  issu e. 
           MR.   DI AZ­ BALART :     All  r ight .     T hank  yo u  all.     T hank  yo u  ver y 
mu ch.     T hank   yo u .     Bye­ bye. 

O PENING   REM ARK S   O F  CO M M IS S IO NER  PATRICK   A.   M ULLO Y 
                       H EARING   CO CH AIR 

         HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     We  want   t o   t hank  t he 
Co ngr essman  fo r   being  her e.     We'r e  go ing  t o   st ar t   o ur   o p ening 
st at ement s  no w,   and  t hen  t her e  might   be  a  sho r t   p er io d   befo r e  S enat o r 
S her r o d  Br o wn  ar r ives. 
         Co ng r essman  Ging r ey  was  planning  t o   be  her e,  bu t  his  sched ule 
no w  will  no t   p er mit   him  t o   be  her e.     S o   we'll  d o   t he  o pening  st at ement s, 
and   t hen  we  mig ht   t ak e  a  sho r t   br eak .
                                                 ­ 6 ­ 
           Go o d  mo r ning  and  welco me  t o   t his  year 's  t hir d  hear ing  o f  t he 
U. S . ­ China  E co no mic  and  S ecur it y  Review  Co mmissio n.     T o day's 
hear ing  will  addr ess  r ecent   develo p ment s  and  fut ur e  t r ends  in  t he  cr o ss­ 
S t r ait   r elat io nship,   and  what   t hese  develo p ment s  and  t r ends  may  mean 
fo r   t he  Unit ed  S t at es  o f  Amer ica. 
           S ince  t he  Chinese  Co mmunist   P ar t y  came  t o   p o wer   in  Oct o ber 
1 9 49 ,   T aiwan  has  been  a  key  fact o r   in  U. S . ­ China  r elat io ns.     Our 
Go ver nment   r eco g nized  t he  no n­ Co mmunist   go ver nment   o f  T aiwan  as 
t he  legit imat e  go ver nment   o f  all  o f  China  fo r  o ver   a  qu ar t er   o f  a 
cent u r y.     I n  19 79 ,   when  Washingt o n  fo r mally  est ablished  diplo mat ic 
r elat io ns  wit h  t he  P eo ple's  Republic  o f  China,   Co ngr ess  passed  t he 
T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act   t o   go ver n  o ur   r elat io ns  wit h  T aiwan. 
           T he  May  20 08  inau gur at io n  o f  T aiwan's  P r esident   Ma  br o u ght 
so me  significant   d evelo pment s  in  t he  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io nship.     Dir ect 
sea,   air ,   and   mail  links  bet ween  t he  t wo   have  no w  been  o fficially 
est ablished .     Cr o ss­ S t r ait   t r ade  co nt inues  t o   exp and ,   and   China  is  no w 
T aiwan's  lar g est   t r ading  p ar t ner . 
           T r ad e  bet ween  China  and   T aiwan  will  pr o bably  fur t her   expand  if 
t hey  sign  t he  E co no mic  Co o p er at io n  Fr amewo r k  Agr eement   which  is 
no w  being  neg o t iat ed .     T aiwan  is  t he  lar gest   fo r eign  invest o r   in  China. 
T hese  and  o t her   cr o ss­ S t r ait   develo pment s  will  affect   t he  Unit ed  S t at es 
and   it s  r elat io nship   wit h  bo t h  China  and  T aiwan. 
           We'r e  ver y  pr ivileged  t o   have  a  number   o f  exper t s  fr o m  t he 
ad minist r at io n,   academia  and  pr ivat e  o r g anizat io ns  who   will  app ear   her e 
t o d ay  and  will  help  u s  g et   a  bet t er   under st anding  o f  t he  implicat io ns  o f 
t hese  develo pment s. 
           I n  par t icular ,   we'r e  pleased   t o   have  member s  o f  Co ngr ess, 
Co ngr essman  Balar t   and  S enat o r   S her r o d   Br o wn  who   is  g o ing   t o   be 
her e. 
           We'r e  also   p r ivileged  t hat   we'r e  g o ing   t o   have  David  S hear ,   t he 
Dep ut y  Assist ant   S ecr et ar y  o f  S t at e  fo r   E ast   Asia  and   P acific  Affair s, 
and   Mr .   Michael  S chiffer ,   Dep ut y  Assist ant   S ecr et ar y  o f  Defense,   who 
ar e  g o ing   t o   pr esent   t he  Obama  administ r at io n's  per sp ect ive  o n  t he 
var io us  issues  t hat   t he  Co mmissio n  is  pr o bing   t o day. 
           I 'm  no w  t u r ning   t he  hear ing  o ver   t o   my  est eemed  co ­ chair , 
Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel,   fo r   his  o pening   st at ement . 

O PENING   REM ARK S   O F  CO M M IS S IO NER  LARRY  M .   W O RTZEL 
                       H EARING   CO CH AIR 

       HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u,   Co mmissio ner 
Mu llo y,   and   I   want   t o   t hank   t he  wit nesses  t hat  will  be  her e  t o day  in 
ad vance  t o   help  us  under st and  t he  r ecent   d evelo pment s  acr o ss  t he 
T aiwan  S t r ait . 
       I n  ju st   a  few  sho r t   year s,   aspect s  o f  t he  r elat io nship   bet ween 
T aiwan  and  mainland   China  have  changed  no t iceably.     Official  and
                                               ­ 7 ­ 
u no fficial  meet ing s  bet ween  r epr esent at ives  fr o m  t he  t wo   g o ver nment s 
o ccur   wit h  so me  r egular it y. 
           T aipei  and  Beijing   have  signed  d o zens  o f  acco r ds  o n  var io us 
issu es  r anging   fr o m  financial  secur it y  co o per at io n  t o   fo o d   safet y.     And 
we  saw  examples  o f  t hat   last   year   when  we  wer e  in  Xiamen  dur ing  t he 
visit   t o   China. 
           P r esid ent   Ma  has  changed  t he  r het o r ic  o n  t he  r elat io nship  bet ween 
China  and   T aiwan,   and  all  o f  t his  has  played   a  par t   in  impr o ving  cr o ss­ 
S t r ait   r elat io ns. 
           Yet   p r o blems  r emain.     China  co nt inu es  t o   blo ck   what   is  g ener ally 
k no wn  as  "T aiwan's  sear ch  fo r   int er nat io nal  space. "    And  by  t his,   I   do n't 
mean  dip lo mat ic  r eco gnit io n  fo r   T aiwan;  r at her   t his  r efer s  t o   T aiwan's 
p ar t icipat io n  in  int er nat io nal  bo dies  wher e  de  jur e  st at eho o d   is  no t   a 
p r er eq uisit e. 
           I t 's  u nclear   whet her   t he  imp r o vement   in  t he  cr o ss­ S t r ait 
r elat io nship   is  du r able  and   co uld  sur vive  a  change  in  leader ship   in  eit her 
sid e  o f  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait .     What 's  cer t ain,   ho wever ,   is  t hat   t her e  is  no 
su bst ant ial  pr o gr ess  o n  r edu cing  milit ar y  t ensio ns  bet ween  t he  t wo 
sid es.     T he  t hr eat   fr o m  China  t o   T aiwan  has  no t   r edu ced ,   and   t he 
milit ar y  balance  co nt inues  t o   t ip  in  t he  mainland's  favo r   as  Beijing 
fu r t her   develo p s  it s  milit ar y  cap abilit ies. 
           I t   r emains  t o   be  seen  ho w  far   T aiwan  will  mo ve  t o   mo d er nize  it s 
o wn  milit ar y  and   ad dr ess  t he  shift ing  milit ar y  balance.     Cer t ainly, 
effo r t s  ar e  being  made. 
           T her efo r e,   t o d ay,   t he  Co mmissio n  will  examine  t he  cur r ent   cr o ss­ 
S t r ait   milit ar y  sit uat io n  and  fut ur e  t r ends.     We'll  lo o k  at   t he  eco no mic 
r elat io nship   bet ween  T aiwan  and  t he  mainland;  we'll  assess  t he 
d evelo p ing  p o lit ical  asp ect s  o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns. 
           Ou r   majo r   fo cus,   o f  co ur se,   is  co nsist ent   wit h  o ur   legislat ive 
mandat e  and   is  t o   exp lo r e  what   t hese  d evelo pment s  mean  fo r   t he  Unit ed 
S t at es  and  r eg io nal  st abilit y. 
           I   want   t o   t hank  all  o f  yo u  fo r   par t icipat ing .     I   also   want   t o   t hank 
t he  S enat e  Co mmit t ee  o n  Rules  and  Administ r at io n  fo r   let t ing  us  use 
t his  g r eat   hear ing  r o o m  and  o ur   excellent   st aff  t hat   did   a  g r eat   jo b  in 
p r epar ing  t he  hear ing. 
           We'll  no w  br eak  fo r   abo ut   eight   minut es,   I  ho p e,   unt il  S enat o r 
Br o wn  co mes  in,   and  please  do n't   wand er   t o o   far   fr o m  t he  ar ea  because 
when  he  co mes  in,   we  st ar t . 
           [ Wher eupo n,   a  sho r t   r ecess  was  t aken. ] 

    PANEL  I:     CO NG RES S IO NAL  PERS PECTIVES   ( CO NTINUED) 

       HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     S enat o r ,   t hank   yo u. 
       S enat o r   S her r o d  Br o wn  r epr esent ed  Ohio 's  13 t h  Dist r ict   in  t he 
Ho u se  o f  Repr esent at ives  fr o m  19 93  u nt il  2 006.     Dur ing   his  t ime  in  t he 
Ho u se,   he  was  a  fo unding  member   o f  t he  Co ngr essio nal  Cau cus  o n
                                             ­ 8 ­ 
T aiwan. 
         I n  20 07,   he  was  elect ed  t o   t he  Unit ed   S t at es  S enat e.     S enat o r 
Br o wn  is  cu r r ent ly  t he  Chair man  o f  t he  S enat e  Banking  Co mmit t ee 
S u bco mmit t ee  o n  E co no mic  P o licy  and   a  member   o f  t he  S enat e  T aiwan 
Cau cu s.     He  is  a  st r o ng  ad vo cat e  o f  t he  int er est s  o f  wo r king   peo ple  o f 
o u r   nat io n,   and  he's  been  a  gr eat   fr iend  and  sup po r t er   o f  t his 
Co mmissio n.     We'r e  ho no r ed   t o   have  him  t est ify  t o day. 
         T hank  yo u,   S enat o r ,   fo r   being  her e. 

                      S TATEM ENT  O F  S H ERRO D  B RO WN 
               A  U. S .   S ENATO R  FRO M   TH E  S TATE  O F  O H IO 

          S E NAT OR  BROWN:     T hank  yo u ,   Co mmissio ner   Mullo y,   and 
Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel,   and  all  o f  yo u,   t hank s. 
          I t 's  a  p leasu r e  t o   be  back  in  fr o nt   o f  yo u,   and  t hank s  fo r   yo ur 
ser vice  o n  incr easingly  impo r t ant   issues  t hat   o ur   co unt r y  faces  in  t er ms 
o f  nat io nal  secu r it y,   in  t er ms  o f  eco no mic  secur it y.     T hese  issues  get 
mo r e  int er est ing,   mo r e  co mplicat ed ,   and  mo r e  cr u cial  t o   o ur   nat io nal 
int er est s  just   abo u t   ever y  year . 
          I   co mmend   t his  Co mmissio n,   fir st   o f  all,   fo r   t ack ling   t he  t o ug h 
issu e  o f  t he  Unit ed  S t at es'  r elat io nship  wit h  bo t h  China  and  T aiwan  and 
t he  int er act io n  t hat   way.     T his  hear ing  is  no t   o nly  t imely  bu t   vit al  t o 
u nd er st anding  t he  r o le  o f  t he  U. S .   in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait s. 
          E ven  befo r e  ser ving  in  Co ngr ess  in  t he  Ho use  and   t he  S enat e,   t he 
r o le  o f  t he  U. S .   in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   has  been  a  per so nal  int er est   t o   me. 
  T he  p er so nal  int er est   became  mo r e  a  pr o fessio nal  p r er o gat ive  because 
o f  T aiwanese­ Amer ican  co nst it uent s  in  my  o ld  co ngr essio nal  dist r ict   and 
in  my  st at e. 
          T aiwan's  mir acle,   it s  t r ansit io n  fr o m  mar t ial  law  t o   demo cr acy,   as 
q u ickly  as  t hey  did ,   is,   I   wo n't   say  effo r t lessly,   but   as  smo o t hly  in  many 
ways  as  t hey  d id,   and   wit h  t he  eco no mic  vit alit y  t hat   t hat   island   nat io n 
was  able  t o   g ener at e,   was  no t hing  sho r t   o f  a  mir acle. 
          I t 's  o ne  o f  t he  gr eat   achievement s  o f  t he  20t h  cent ur y,   yet   it 's 
o ft en  o ver lo o k ed.     P eo ple  r eally  do n't   k no w  mu ch  abo ut   what   happened . 
  I   r emember   wat ching  t he  inaug ur at io n  fr o m  P r esident   Lee  t o   P r esid ent 
Chen  S hu i­ bian,   and   t hat 's  r eally  o ne  o f  t he  hallmar ks  o f  a  demo cr acy, 
being   able  t o   swit ch,   t o   have  a  peacefu l  t r ansit io n  o f  a  chief  execut ive, 
g o ing  fr o m  o ne  po lit ical  par t y  t o   ano t her ,   and   t o   do   it   as  smo o t hly  as 
t he  T aiwanese  did. 
          T hat 's  why  t he  U. S .   r o le  in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait ,   I   t hink,   is  so 
imp o r t ant .     I t 's  in  o ur   nat io nal  secur it y  int er est s  no t   t o   t ake  o ur 
at t ent io n  away  fr o m  China's  pr esence  ar o und  t he  wo r ld. 
          S enat o r   Du r bin  and  I   wer e  just   in  E ast   Afr ica  in  fo ur   co unt r ies 
which  ar e  imp o r t ant   t o   o u r   nat io nal  int er est s  and  ar e  fo ur   co unt r ies  t hat 
face  so me  o f  t he  biggest   challenges  o f  any  in  t he  wo r ld­ ­ S udan, 
E t hio p ia,   T anzania,   and   Co ng o ­ ­ and  we  saw  beginning,  no t   just
                                                   ­ 9 ­ 
beg inning,   but  a  hug e  Chinese  pr esence  in  t ho se  fo u r   co unt r ies  in  ways 
t hat   fr ank ly  g o t   o u r   at t ent io n. 
          When  yo u   lo o k  at   China's  p r esence  ar o und   t he  wo r ld ,   fr o m  t hese 
massive  invest ment s  in  unst able  Afr ican  co unt r ies,   t o   engag ing  in 
p r edat o r y  t r ade  p r act ices,   abo ut   which  we  ar e  so   familiar ,   just   pick ing 
t he  newsp aper   u p   ever yd ay  fr o m  t he  Wall  S t r eet   Jo u r nal  o r   any  o t her 
p aper ,   t o   at t emp t ing   t o   mo no p o lize  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait ,   all  o f  t hese  ar e 
cr u cial  issues  fo r   us. 
          T he  U. S .   must   be  clear   as  a  go ver nment   and   as  a  p eo p le  t hat 
fr eed o m  and  demo cr acy  fo r m  t he  pat h  t o   lo ng­ t er m  eco no mic  st abilit y 
and   pr o sper it y  fo r   T aiwan  and  all  nat io ns  aspir ing  fo r   independence  and 
au t o no my  and   self­ go ver nment .     T ho se  who   fight   fo r   t ho se  p r incip les 
sho u ld  kno w  t hat   t hey  will  be  suppo r t ed   by  t he  Unit ed   S t at es. 
          T he  U. S .   sho uld n't   t ur n  it s  back  t o   human  r ig ht s  like  fr eedo m  o f 
t he  p r ess,   fr eedo m  o f  speech,   fr eed o m  o f  r elig io n.     We  must   enco u r age 
and   fo st er   t ho se  who   wish  t o   live  fr ee  o f  o ppr essive  r egimes  no   mat t er 
wher e  t hey  live,   no   mat t er   ho w  difficu lt   t he  challenge. 
          Fo r   t he  p eo p le  o f  T aiwan,   we  sho uld   r eco gnize  it s  o wn  hist o r y 
and   we  sho uld   r eco gnize  it s  cu lt ur al  id ent it y.     T her efo r e,   we  must   view 
t he  issu es  bet ween  T aiwan  and  China  in  t he  co nt ext   o f  a  diplo mat ic 
r elat io nship   bet ween  t wo   so ver eign  nat io ns.     As  T aiwan's  clo sest   ally 
and   st r o ng est   sup p o r t er   o n  it s  r o ad   t o   demo cr acy,   t he  U. S .   sho uld 
co nt inu e  t o   p lay  a  leading  r o le  in  T aiwan  S t r ait   r elat io ns. 
          T aiwan  has  shaken  t he  t ent acles  o f  mar t ial  law  t o   have  fr ee  and 
d emo cr at ic  elect io ns.     I t   has  st r o ng   envir o nment al  and  labo r   t ies, 
so met hing  fo r   which  t his  co mmit t ee  has  spo k en  o ut   and  st o o d  fo r 
fo r ever ,   r eally  since  t he  cr eat io n  o f  t his  Co mmissio n. 
          T aiwan  plays  by  t he  r ules.     I t   sho uld  be  r ewar ded,   t her efo r e,   and 
enco u r aged.     T hat   is  simply  no t   happ ening.     T aiwan,   as  yo u  k no w,   is  no t 
a  member   o f  t he  Unit ed  Nat io ns.     T aiwan  is  no t   a  member   o f  t he  Wo r ld 
Healt h  Or ganizat io n.     I t   d o esn't   even  have  o bser ver   st at us  at   t he  Wo r ld 
Healt h  Or ganizat io n.     T his  is  despit e  t he  fact   t hat   it 's  a  wo r ld  lead er   in 
med ical  r esear ch.     I t 's  fo r med  a  healt h  car e  syst em  t hat   ser ves  vir t ually 
all  o f  it s  peo ple,   all  in  t he  last   decade  o r   so . 
          I t 's  a  nat io n  t hat   when  t her e  ar e  nat io nal  cat ast r o phes,   weat her 
cat ast r o phes,   nat u r al  d isast er s  ar o und   t he  wo r ld,   T aiwan  is  o ft en  o ne  o f 
t he  fir st   co u nt r ies  t o   send  in  well­ t r ained  medical  per so nnel  and 
assist ance. 
          T his,   no t   being   par t   o f  t he  WHO,   has  happened  despit e  t he 
co ncer ns  o f  all  nat io ns  t hat   disease  fr o m  S ARS   t o   H1N1   t o   so   mu ch  else 
fr eely  affect s  peo p le,   r eg ar dless  o f  geo g r ap hy  o r   gender ,   age  and 
nat io nalit y. 
          I   r emember   a  ver y  damaging   ear t hqu ake  in  T aiwan,   back,   I 
believe,   in  S ept ember   o f  1 99 9,   when  t he  wo r ld   assist ance  had  t o   await 
su pp o r t   and  ack no wled gement   fr o m  Beijing  befo r e  we  co uld  go   int o 
T aiwan.     Nat io ns  o f  t he  wo r ld   had  t o   get   t he  P eo ple's  Republic  o f
                                                   ­ 10 ­ 
China's  agr eement ,   ackno wledg ement   o f  an  ag r eement   befo r e  t hey  co uld 
act u ally  g o   in  and  help   T aiwan  dir ect ly.     T hat   simp ly  mak es  no   sense  fo r 
human  r ight s,   no   sense  fo r   t he  human  co nd it io n  in  any  way  we  lo o k   at 
t hat . 
          T aiwan's  leader s  ar e  no t ,   as  yo u   kno w,   affo r ded  fr ee  and  o pen 
t r avel  t o   t he  U. S .     T he  U. S .   do es  no t   have  an  ambassado r   t o   T aiwan 
d esp it e  t he  fact   it 's  o ne  o f  o u r   lar g est   t r ading  par t ner s.     No r   d o es 
T aiwan,   as  yo u   kno w,   have  an  ambassad o r   t o   t he  U. S . 
          23  millio n  p lus  T aiwanese  have  no   r epr esent at io n,   no   p r esence  in 
o u r   nat io n,   fo und ed  o n  t he  ver y  values  t hat   we  ackno wledge,   t hat   we 
have  fo ug ht   fo r ,   t hat   t hey  aspir e  t o .     T hese  injust ices  must   be  co r r ect ed . 
  T aiwan's  demo cr acy  is  yo ung,   it 's  st ill  gr o wing,   bu t   we  can't   let   it 
r ever t   back  t o   ways  o f  t he  p ast . 
          What   is  t he  co st   o f  g iving  up   fr eedo ms  and  so ver eignt y  in  an 
effo r t   t o   benefit   eco no mically  fr o m  China?    Many  in  T aiwan  have 
exp r essed  majo r   r eser vat io ns  wit h  t he  so ­ called  "E co no mic  Co o per at io n 
Fr amewo r k  Agr eement . "    T his  agr eement   co u ld  alt er   T aiwan's  eco no my 
fo r   decad es,   fur t her   blu r r ing  t he  lines  o f  nat io nalit y  and  ident it y, 
eco no mic  independence  and  eco no mic  d ependence. 
          E CFA  neg o t iat io ns  sho uld   no t   keep  it s  o wn  p eo p le  and  t r ading 
p ar t ner s  in  t he  d ar k.     I 've  lo ng  o p po sed  U. S .   t r ade  agr eement s  t hat   wer e 
neg o t iat ed   t o   give  t o o   mu ch  away  wit h  t o o   lit t le  in  r et ur n.     But   as 
fr u st r at ing   as  it 's  been,   as  wr o ng ­ headed  as  I   t hink  fr ee  t r ade 
ag r eement s  like  NAFT A  and   CAFT A  ar e,   and  sever al  o f  yo u  o n  t his 
Co mmissio n  have  sp o ken  o ut   and  been  leader s  in  fo r mulat ing  t he 
int ellect ual  fr amewo r k  ar o u nd  o p po sit io n  t o   t hese  agr eement s,   t he 
p r o cess  in  t he  Unit ed   S t at es,   at   least ,   has  been  o p en  and  su bject   t o 
co ng r essio nal  ap p r o val. 
          T he  Obama  ad minist r at io n  must   u r g e  t he  T aiwanese  go ver nment   t o 
be  p r u dent ,   t o   mak e  t he  neg o t iat io ns  co mp let ely  t r ansp ar ent ,   and  t o   t ake 
t he  inp ut   fr o m  t he  pu blic  and  fr o m  ind ust r ies.     T hat 's  what   demo cr acies 
d o . 
          China  may  have  o ver whelmingly  milit ar y,   diplo mat ic  and  eco no mic 
p o wer   o ver   T aiwan,   t his  co unt r y  o f  23   millio n,   ver sus  a  co unt r y  o f  1. 3 
billio n  no w,   but   China  lacks  t he  mo st   p o wer ful  fo r ce  available  t o   any 
nat io n,   and   t hat   is  t he  p o wer   o ver   t he  human  sp ir it   o f  t he  T aiwanese 
p eo p le. 
          Unit ed  S t at es  mu st   always  sid e  wit h  t ho se  who   enco u r age 
d emo cr acy  and   fr eedo m  and   p eace.   S pr eading  demo cr acy  and  fr eedo m  is 
so met hing  o ur   nat io n  has  made  par t   o f  o u r   mo r al  fabr ic  and   hallmar k 
and   fo cus  o f  o u r   nat io nal  st r at egy. 
          Ou r   r o le  in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   sho u ld  ensur e  t hat   China  emulat es 
t he  d emo cr at ic  values  o f  T aiwan,   no t   vice  ver sa,   wher e  we  allo w  T aiwan 
t o   emu lat e  o ppr essive  valu es  o f  China.     T he  p o licy  o f  t he  Unit ed  S t at es 
sho u ld  be  "One  China,   One  T ibet ,   One  T aiwan. "    T hat 's  t he  message  we 
sho u ld  send   t he  wo r ld .
                                                    ­ 11 ­ 
         T hank  yo u. 

                    Pan el  I:     Di scu ssi o n ,   Q u est i on s  an d   An swers 

          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u ,   S enat o r . 
          I   kno w  ho w  busy  yo u r   schedu le  is.     Do   yo u  want   t o   t ake  any 
q u est io ns  if  p eo p le  have  any? 
          S E NAT OR  BROWN:     I 'm  willing.     I   always  am  wit h  yo u,   bu t   I 
k no w  yo ur   sched ule  is  also   bu sy  so   it 's  up  t o   yo u. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     I f  any  o f  t he  Co mmissio ner s 
have  any  qu est io ns  fo r   t he  S enat o r ,   he  can  t ake  t hem.     Yes. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     T hank  yo u  fo r   t hat   excellent 
and   I   t hink  inspir ing  t est imo ny.     I t 's  r eally  t er r ific. 
          As  yo u  kno w,   a  co up le  o f  t he  issues  t hat   t he  administ r at io n  faces 
no w  inclu de  t he  sale  o r   po t ent ial  sale  o f  t he  F­ 16  C/ Ds  t o   T aiwan,   as 
well  as  so me  o t her   issues  t hat   yo u  ment io ned  o n  int er nat io nal  space. 
          We've  seen  and  been  pr o vided  wit h  a  Do D  assessment   o n  t he 
r eq uir ement s  fo r   bet t er   air   defense  fo r   T aiwan,   and  t he  r equir ement 
seems  clear ,   but   I 'm  wo nder ing  if  yo u've  ever   seen  anyt hing  like  a  r isk 
assessment   t o   U. S .   fo r ces  sho u ld   we  no t   go   fo r war d  wit h  t he  sale  t o 
T aiwan  o f  F­ 16   C/ Ds  o r ,   so met hing  co nt r ar y,   t he  impr o vement   t o   t he 
U. S .   st r at eg ic  p o st u r e  o r   milit ar y  p o st ur e  if  we  do   go   fo r war d   wit h  t he 
sale  o f  F­ 16   C/ Ds? 
          S E NAT OR  BROWN:     Co mmissio ner   Blu ment hal,   t hank  yo u. 
          I 've  no t   seen  t he  classified  assessment ,   and  I   co uldn't   co mment ,   I 
g u ess,   if  I   had,   but   I   have  t ho ug ht   a  lo t   abo u t   t his,   and  I   t hink  t hat   t he 
P r esident   mad e  t he  r ight   d ecisio n.     I   t hink   t his  is  illust r at ive  o f  much  o f 
Amer ican­ T aiwanese  r elat io ns  and  much  o f  Amer ican­ China  r elat io ns, 
t hat   almo st   what ever   a  pr esid ent   cho o ses  t o  do   t o   no t   co mbat   o r   even 
co nfr o nt   China,   bu t   t o   eng age  wit h  China,   if  it 's  no t   exact ly  what   t he 
Chinese  want ,   t he  fur o r   o ver   it   is  fair ly  amazing  t o   me  each  t ime. 
          I   g uess  I   lo o k   at   t he  Chinese  r eact io n  t o   t hat   as  o ne  o f  t wo   t hings 
p ar t icu lar ly  t hat   t he  Obama  ad minist r at io n  has  do ne  t hat 's  r ecent ly 
ang er ed   t he  Chinese,   t he  F­ 16  sale  and  t he  meet ing   wit h  Dalai  Lama, 
and   I   just   find  it   int r igu ing,   but   I   also   find  it   wo r r iso me  because  d o es 
t hat   mean  t hat   we  do n't   "co nfr o nt , "  is  pr o bably  t he  r ig ht   wo r d­ ­ I 'm 
cho o sing   my  wo r ds  car efully­ ­ co nfr o nt   t he  Chinese  o n  t he  issue  o f 
cu r r ency,   which  is  in  t hat   sense  bigger   t han  all  o f  t hese  issu es,   at   least 
big ger   t o   t he  aver ag e  Amer ican? 
          I   t hink  it   kind  o f  beg s  t he  q uest io n;  t hat 's  no t   a  dir ect   answer   t o 
yo u r   qu est io n.  I   d o n't   k no w  t he  answer   p r ecisely,   bu t   I   t hink   t hat   t he 
ad minist r at io n,   unfo r t u nat ely,   because  o f  China's  bellico sit y­ ­ I 've  always 
want ed  t o   u se  t hat   wo r d   in  a  co ngr essio nal  hear ing­ ­ I   lear ned  it   in 
co lleg e­ ­ because  o f  China's  bellico sit y  o n  dar n­ near   ever yt hing ,   o ur 
P r esident   seems  a  bit   r est r ict ed  o n  ho w  many  t imes  he  can  do   anyt hing 
t hat   wo u ld  be  seen  as  co nfr o nt at io nal  t o war ds  t he  Chinese.
                                                     ­ 12 ­ 
         I n  t hat   sense,   I   t hink  o ur   r elat io nship  bilat er ally  wit h  China  is 
u niqu e  t o   China,   p er io d ,   but   it 's  so met hing  t hat  we  sho uldn't   co wer .     We 
sho u ldn't   co wer   as  a  r esu lt   o f  t hat   bilat er al  r elat io nship. 
         HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     I   sho u ld  no t e  t hat   t he 
Co mmissio n  in  set t ing   u p  t o d ay's  hear ing  ask ed  t he  US T R  t o   co me  in  t o 
t alk   abo u t   t he  E CFA  and  t heir   views  o n  t hat .     We  have  S t at e  her e  and 
we  have  Do D  her e,   but  unfo r t u nat ely  t he  US T R  was  unable  t o   at t end. 
         S E NAT OR  BROWN:     Well,   it 's  a  t iny  lit t le  o ffice,   Co mmissio ner 
Mu llo y. 
         HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Any  o t her   qu est io ns  fo r   t he 
S enat o r ?    S enat o r ,   t hank  yo u  so   mu ch  fo r   yo u r  st at ement   and  fo r   being 
her e. 
         S E NAT OR  BROWN:     T hank s  fo r   yo ur   ser vice,   all  o f  yo u . 
T hank s.     T hanks  fo r   yo u r   quest io ns. 

              PANEL  II:     ADM INIS TRATIO N  PERS PECTIVES 

          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     On  t his  panel  we'r e  go ing   t o 
hear   fr o m  t he  Administ r at io n's  per spect ive,   and  we'r e  delig ht ed  t o 
welco me  David   S hear .     T hank  yo u  fo r   being  her e  again.     We  appr eciat e 
yo u r   help   t o   t his  Co mmissio n.     He's  t he  Deput y  Assist ant   S ecr et ar y  o f 
S t at e  fo r   E ast   Asian  and   P acific  Affair s. 
          We  also   welco me  Michael  S chiffer ,   who   is  t he  Depu t y  Assist ant 
S ecr et ar y  o f  Defense  fo r   E ast   Asian  and   P acific  S ecu r it y  Affair s. 
          We  have  mo r e  co mment s  t o   int r o d uce  t hem  abo ut   t heir 
t r emendo u s  backg r o und   and  t heir   ser vice  t o   t he  co unt r y  o ver   a  number 
o f  year s,   bu t   I   wo n't   go   int o   all  t hat .     I   welco me  t hem. 
          I   will  no t e  fo r   t he  r eco r d  t hat   we  did   invit e  US T R  t o   app ear 
t o d ay.     T hey  r ecent ly  lo st   t heir   Assist ant   US T R  fo r   China  Affair s,   who 
left   his  po sit io n,   and  t hey'r e  sho r t ­ st affed  r ight   no w  so   t hey  wer e  u nable 
t o   be  her e,   but   I   want ed  t o   put   t hat   o n  t he  r eco r d  t hat   we  did   invit e 
t hem. 
          T hank  yo u,   and   Mr .   S hear ,   if  yo u'll  st ar t . 

     S TATEM ENT  O F  DAVID  B .   S H EAR,   DEPUTY  AS S IS TANT 
     S ECRETARY  O F  S TATE  FO R  EAS T  AS IAN  AND  PACIFIC 
   AFFAIRS ,   U. S .   DEPARTM ENT  O F  S TATE,   WAS H ING TO N,   DC 

          MR.   S HE AR:     T hank   yo u  ver y  much,   Co mmissio ner   Mullo y, 
Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel,   Chair man  S lane.     T hank  yo u  ver y  mu ch  fo r   t he 
o p p o r t unit y  t o   appear   befo r e  t he  Co mmissio n  t o d ay. 
          As  yo u  may  have  hear d ,   t he  Lo s  Angeles  Do dger s  and   t heir   t wo 
T aiwan­ bo r n  player s  have  just   finished  a  hu gely  su ccessful  exhibit io n 
ser ies  in  T aiwan  in  which  t he  Do dger s  and  t he  lo cal  all­ st ar s  sp lit   t he 
ser ies.     Back  ho me,   t he  fat e  o f  o u r   Washingt o n  Nat io nals  depends  in 
p ar t   o n  t he  r et ur n  t o   fo r m  o f  T aiwan­ bo r n  pit cher   Wang  Chien­ ming ,
                                                  ­ 13 ­ 
who   wo n  19   g ames  fo r   t he  Yankees  o nly  t wo   year s  ago . 
            T he  fact   t hat   t he  U. S .   and  T aiwan  ar e  int er act ing  at   t his  level 
d emo nst r at es  in  a  small  bu t   t elling   way  t he  st r o ng,   unshakable  t ies 
bet ween  o u r   t wo   p eo ples. 
            Fo r   mo r e  t han  40   year s,   t he  Unit ed  S t at es’  "o ne  China"  p o licy 
based  o n  t he  t hr ee  U. S . ­ China  Jo int  Co mmuniq ués  and  t he  T aiwan 
Relat io ns  Act   has  g uided  o u r   r elat io ns  wit h  T aiwan  and  t he  P eo p le's 
Rep u blic  o f  China. 
            We  d o   no t   su p po r t   T aiwan  independence.     We  ar e  o pp o sed   t o 
u nilat er al  at t empt s  by  eit her   side  t o   change  t he  st at us  q uo .  We  insist 
t hat   cr o ss­ S t r ait   d iffer ences  be  r eso lved  peacefu lly  and  acco r d ing   t o   t he 
wishes  o f  t he  p eo p le  o n  bo t h  sides  o f  t he  S t r ait . 
            Ou r   p o licy  has  help ed  pr o pel  T aiwan's  pr o sper it y  and  demo cr at ic 
d evelo p ment   while  at   t he  same  t ime  allo wing  us  t o   nu r t ur e  co nst r uct ive 
r elat io ns  wit h  t he  P RC.     Our   appr o ach  spanning  eight   ad minist r at io ns 
has  help ed   cr eat e  an  envir o nment   co nducive  t o   pr o mo t ing  peo ple­ t o ­ 
p eo p le  exchanges,   exp anding  cr o ss­ S t r ait   t r ade  and   invest ment ,   and 
enhancing  p r o sp ect s  fo r   t he  peaceful  r eso lu t io n  o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait 
d iffer ences. 
            Co nt inued  pr o g r ess  in  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns  is  cr it ically  impo r t ant 
t o   t he  secur it y  and  p r o sper it y  o f  t he  ent ir e  r egio n  and   is  t her efo r e  o f 
vit al  nat io nal  int er est   t o   t he  Unit ed  S t at es. 
            Wit h  r eg ar d  t o   r ecent   cr o ss­ S t r ait   develo pment s,   we  have 
wit nessed   r emar k able  p r o gr ess  in  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns  in  t he  near ly  t wo 
year s  since  T aiwan  P r esident   Ma  Ying ­ jeo u  t o o k  o ffice.     I n  his  inaugur al 
ad dr ess,   P r esid ent   Ma  called   o n  t he  P RC  "t o   seize  t his  hist o r ic 
o p p o r t unit y  t o  achieve  peace  and  co ­ pr o sper it y. "  He  pledg ed  t hat   t her e 
wo u ld   be  "no   r eunificat io n,   no   independ ence,   and  no   war "  d ur ing  his 
t enur e. 
            At   t he  end   o f  20 0 8,   P RC  P r esident   Hu  Jint ao   r esp o nd ed  wit h  a 
sp eech  in  which,   amo ng   o t her   t hing s,   he  called  fo r   t he  co nclu sio n  o f  an 
ag r eement   o n  eco no mic  co o per at io n,   pr o po sed  t hat   t he  t wo   sides 
d iscuss  what   he  called  "pr o per   and  r easo nable"  ar r angement s  fo r 
T aiwan's  par t icipat io n  in  int er nat io nal  o r g anizat io ns,   and   r aised  t he 
p r o spect   o f  a  mechanism  t o   enhance  mut ual  milit ar y  t r ust ,   o r   what   we 
mig ht   call  co nfid ence  and   secu r it y­ bu ilding  mechanisms. 
            Fo llo wing  P r esid ent   Hu's  speech,   t he  P RC  dr o pp ed   o bject io ns  t o 
T aiwan's  par t icip at io n  as  an  o bser ver  t o  t he  May  20 09  Wo r ld  Healt h 
Assembly,   which  is  t he  sup r eme  d ecisio n­ making  bo dy  o f  t he  Wo r ld 
Healt h  Or ganizat io n. 
            T his  expansio n  o f  T aiwan's  int er nat io nal  space  co incid ed   wit h  a 
d ip lo mat ic  t r uce  in  which  T aiwan  and   t he  P RC  have  fo r   t he  fir st   t ime 
ceased  co mpet ing   fo r   diplo mat ic  r eco gnit io n.  I n  2008 ,   semi­ o fficial 
t alk s  bet ween  T aiwan  and  t he  P RC  r esu med .     T he  t wo   sid es  agr eed   in 
br o ad   t er ms  t o   discu ss  t he  r elat ively  easy,   pr imar ily  eco no mic  issues 
fir st ,   r eser ving   mo r e  d ifficult   po lit ical  issu es  fo r   lat er .
                                                  ­ 14 ­ 
           As  a  r esult   o f  t alks  in  20 08  and  20 09,   t he  t wo   sides  est ablished 
d ir ect   scheduled   flight s,   pr o vid ed  fo r   dir ect   shipping  and  p o st al 
ser vices,   est ablished  a  fr amewo r k   fo r   financial  co o per at io n  and 
invest ment ,   and   ag r eed  t o   incr ease  t o ur ism  and  enhanced  law 
enfo r cement   co o per at io n.  We  expect   t he  t wo   sides  will  nego t iat e  an 
E co no mic  Co o p er at io n  Fr amewo r k  Agr eement   t his  year . 
           E nt husiasm  fo r   pr o gr ess  in  t he  cr o ss­ S t r ait   d ialo gue  has  been 
t emp er ed  by  caut io n  and  debat e  o n  bo t h  sid es  o f  t he  S t r ait .     S o me 
mainlander s  fear   t hat   t he  T aiwan  side  will  p o ck et   P RC  decisio ns  no w 
and   elect   fut ur e  leader s  who   ar e  less  flexible  t han  t he  cur r ent   T aiwan 
ad minist r at io n.     T he  T aiwan  public,   while  suppo r t ive  o f  act io ns  t o 
enhance  cr o ss­ S t r ait   st abilit y,   is  caut io us  o f  mo ves  t hat   co uld   be  seen  t o 
co mp r o mise  T aiwan's  so ver eignt y,   which  r emains  an  emo t io nally­ 
char g ed   issue  o n  bo t h  sides. 
           As  p eo p le  o n  bo t h  sides  o f  t he  S t r ait   co nsider   fu t ur e  eco no mic 
st ep s,   st r o ng  co ncer ns  r emain  o n  bo t h  sid es  o f  t he  P acific  abo ut   P RC 
milit ar y  mo d er nizat io n  and   dep lo yment s.     T he  P RC  r efuses  t o   r eno unce 
t he  use  o f  fo r ce  r eg ar ding  T aiwan.     P RC  leader s  have  st at ed  in  explicit 
t er ms  t hat   Beijing  co nsider s  T aiwan's  fut ur e  a  co r e  nat io nal  int er est , 
and  t hat  t he  P RC  wo uld  t ake  milit ar y  act io n  in  t he  event   T aiwan  wer e  t o 
fo r mally  declar e  ind ep endence  o r   t o   t ak e  st ep s  t o   ir r evo cably  blo ck 
u nificat io n. 
           T he  P RC's  unnecessar y  and  co unt er pr o duct ive  milit ar y  build ­ u p 
acr o ss  t he  S t r ait   co nt inues  unabat ed   wit h  est imat es  o f  mo r e  t han  1, 100 
missiles  po int ed   in  T aiwan's  dir ect io n.   T hese  and  o t her   d eplo yment s 
acr o ss  fr o m  T aiwan  dilu t e  Beijing 's  st at ed   d evo t io n  t o   t he  peacefu l 
handling   o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns. 
           Let 's  lo o k  br iefly  at   t he  U. S .   r o le  in  cr o ss­ S t r ait   engag ement .     As 
I   st at ed   at   t he  o ut set ,   o ur   "o ne­ China"  po licy  is  based  o n  t he  t hr ee  Jo int 
Co mmu niqu és  and   t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act .     We  ar e  also   guided   by  t he 
u nd er st anding  t hat   we  will  neit her   seek  t o   mediat e  bet ween  t he  P RC  and 
T aiwan  no r   will  we  exer t   pr essu r e  o n  T aiwan  t o   co me  t o   t he  bar gaining 
t able. 
           While  t he  Unit ed   S t at es  is  no t   a  dir ect   par t icip ant   in  t he  disput e 
bet ween  t he  P RC  and   T aiwan,   we  have  a  st r o ng  int er est   in  do ing  all  we 
can  t o   cr eat e  an  envir o nment   co ndu cive  t o   a  peaceful  and  no n­ co er cive 
r eso lu t io n  o f  t he  issu es  bet ween  t hem.  T his  ad minist r at io n  welco mes 
t he  incr eased  st abilit y  in  t he  S t r ait   and  t he  up sur g e  in  T aiwan­ P RC 
eco no mic,   cu lt u r al  and   p eo ple­ t o ­ peo ple  co nt act s.     T hese  co nt act s  help 
fu r t her   peace,   st abilit y  and   pr o sper it y  in  t he  ent ir e  E ast   Asia  r eg io n. 
           We  app laud   t he  co u r age  sho wn  by  P r esident   Ma  in  r est o r ing  U. S . 
t r u st   and   r ever sing   t he  d et er io r at io n  in  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns.     We 
sho u ld  no t   be  alar med   by  mainland­ T aiwan  r appr o chement   as  so meho w 
d et r iment al  t o   U. S .   int er est s,   as  lo ng   as  decisio ns  ar e  made  fr ee  fr o m 
co er cio n. 
           Fu t u r e  st abilit y  in  t he  S t r ait   will  d ep end  o n  an  o pen  dialo gu e
                                                     ­ 15 ­ 
bet ween  T aiwan  and  t he  P RC,   fr ee  o f  fo r ce  and  int imidat io n  and 
co nsist ent   wit h  T aiwan's  flo ur ishing   d emo cr acy.     I n  o r d er   t o   engage 
p r o d uct ively  wit h  t he  mainland   at   a  pace  and  sco pe  t hat   is  po lit ically 
su pp o r t able  by  it s  p eo p le,   T aiwan  need s  t o   be  co nfident   in  it s  r o le  in  t he 
int er nat io nal  co mmu nit y,   it s  abilit y  t o   defend  it self  and  p r o t ect   it s 
p eo p le,   and   it s  p lace  in  t he  glo bal  eco no my. 
          T he  Unit ed  S t at es  has  a  co nst r uct ive  r o le  t o   play  in  each  o f  t hese 
t hr ee  key  ar eas.     P ar t ly  because  o f  U. S .   effo r t s,   T aiwan  is  a  member   and 
fu ll  par t icipant   in  k ey  bo dies  su ch  as  t he  Wo r ld  T r ade  Or g anizat io n,   t he 
Asian  Develo p ment   Bank ,   and   AP E C.     We  believe  t hat   T aiwan  sho uld 
also   meaningfully  par t icip at e  in  o r ganizat io ns  wher e  it   canno t   be  a 
member .
          T aiwan  must   be  co nfident   t hat   it   has  t he  physical  capacit y  t o 
r esist   int imidat io n  and  co er cio n  in  o r der   t o   engage  fu lly  wit h  t he 
mainland.     We  will  st and  by  o ur   co mmit ment   t o   pr o vide  T aiwan  wit h 
d efense  ar t icles  and  ser vices  in  such  quant it y  as  may  be  necessar y  t o 
enable  T aiwan  t o   maint ain  a  sufficient   self­ defense  capabilit y. 
          Ou r   decisio n  t o   no t ify  Co ngr ess  o n  Januar y  2 9  o f  ar ms  sales  t o 
T aiwan  wo r t h  $ 6. 4  billio n  co nt inues  a  po licy  t hat   has  been  fo llo wed  by 
su ccessive  administ r at io ns  fo r   mo r e  t han  30  year s.   T his  decisio n  was  a 
t angible  example  o f  o ur   co mmit ment   t o   meet   t he  o bligat io ns  sp elled   o ut 
in  t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act . 
          T aiwan  P r esident   Ma  has  made  it   clear   t hat   T aiwan  desir es  t o 
st r eng t hen  it s  eco no mic  t ies  wit h  t he  Unit ed   S t at es  and   o t her   t r ade 
p ar t ner s  at   t he  same  t ime  t hat   it   p ur sues  eco no mic  ag r eement s  wit h  t he 
mainland,   su ch  as  t he  p r o p o sed   cr o ss­ S t r ait   E co no mic  Co o per at io n 
Fr amewo r k  Agr eement . 
          T he  Unit ed  S t at es  is  t he  lar gest   fo r eig n  invest o r   in  T aiwan,   and 
T aiwan  is  o ur   t ent h  lar g est   t r ading  par t ner ,   lar g er   t han  I t aly,   I ndia  o r 
Br azil.  I n  any  r o bu st   t r ad ing  r elat io nship,   t her e  is  so me  fr ict io n,   and 
u nfo r t unat ely  we  have  faced   so me  challeng es  o ver   beef  expo r t s  t o 
T aiwan  in  t he  p ast   sever al  year s.     We  wo uld  like  t o   r einvigo r at e  t he 
U. S . ­ T aiwan  eco no mic  agend a  t hr o u gh  o ur   Bilat er al  T r ade  and 
I nvest ment   Fr amewo r k  Agr eement   pr o cess,   r ed uce  t r ade  bar r ier s  and 
incr ease  U. S . ­ T aiwan  t r ade  and  invest ment   t ies. 
          Ho w  t he  evo lving  r elat io nship  bet ween  T aiwan  and   t he  P RC 
d evelo p s  d ep ends  o n  t he  will  o f  t he  leader ship  and  t he  peo ple  o n  bo t h 
sid es  o f  t he  S t r ait .     T he  sco p e  o f  fut u r e  eco no mic  and  po lit ical 
int er act io n  will  be  d et er mined  in  co njunct io n  wit h  T aiwan's  well­ 
est ablished ,   t hr iving  d emo cr at ic  pr o cesses. 
          As  I   no t ed  pr evio usly,   bo t h  sides  agr eed  t o   add r ess  t he  so ­ called 
"easy"  issu es  fir st ,   p r imar ily  in  t he  r ealm  o f  eco no mic  and  cult ur al 
exchang es.  T he  t wo   sides  have  yet   t o   face  t he  mo r e  d ifficult   p o lit ical 
and   milit ar y  issu es.     We  ar e  never t heless  enco ur ag ed  by  pr o g r ess  t o   dat e 
and   co nfident   t hat   o ur   lo ng ­ st anding  ap pr o ach  t o   t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   will 
enhance  p r o spect s  fo r   fur t her   st ep s  t o   peacefully  manage  t his
                                                 ­ 16 ­ 
co mp licat ed  r elat io nship. 
         T hanks  ag ain  fo r   t he  o pp o r t unit y  t o   t est ify  t o day  o n  t his 
imp o r t ant   t o pic,   and   I   lo o k  fo r war d   t o   yo ur   quest io ns. 
         [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 

 Prep ared   S t at emen t   of  Davi d   B .   S h ear,   Dep u t y  Assi st an t   S ecret a ry 
   o f  S t at e  for  Ea st   Asi an   an d   Paci fi c  Affai rs,   U. S .   Dep art men t   o f 
                                  S t a t e,   Wash i n gt on ,   DC 

Commissioner  Molloy,  Commissioner  Wortzel,  and  members of the Commission, thank you for inviting 
me  to  appear  before  you  today.    I  appreciate  the  opportunity  to  discuss  recent  economic,  political,  and 
military developments across the Taiwan Strait and review the implications of those developments for the 
United States. 
           Before I begin my formal remarks, I would like to let those of you who may not have heard know 
that the Los Angeles Dodgers, with their two Taiwan­born players, pitcher Kuo Hong­chih and shortstop 
Hu  Chin­long,  have  just  finished    a  hugely  successful  exhibition series in Taiwan in which the Dodgers 
and the local all­stars split the series.  Back home, the fate of our Washington Nationals depends in part 
on the return to form of Taiwan pitcher Wang Chien­ming, who won 19 games for the Yankees only two 
years ago.   I think the fact that the U.S. and Taiwan are interacting at this level demonstrates, in a small 
but telling way, the strong, unshakable ties between our two peoples. 
           For more than thirty years, the United States' "one China" policy based on the three U.S.–China 
Joint Communiqués and the Taiwan Relations Act has guided our relations with Taiwan and the People's 
Republic of China.  We do not support Taiwan independence.  We are opposed to unilateral attempts by 
either  side  to  change  the  status  quo.    We  insist  that  cross­Strait  differences  be  resolved  peacefully  and 
according to the wishes of the people on both sides of the Strait.   We also welcome active efforts on both 
sides to engage in a dialogue that reduces tensions and increases contacts of all kinds across the Strait. 
           Our policy has helped propel Taiwan's prosperity and democratic development while at the same 
time  it  has  allowed  us  to  nurture  constructive  relations  with  the  PRC.    We  believe  that  our  approach, 
spanning  eight  administrations,  has  helped  create  an  environment  conducive  to  promoting  people­to­ 
people exchanges, expanding cross­Strait trade and investment, and enhancing prospects for the peaceful 
resolution of cross­Strait differences.  Continued progress in cross­Strait relations is critically important to 
the  security  and  prosperity  of  the  entire  region  and  is  therefore  a  vital  national  interest  of  the  United 
States. 

Recent Cross­Strait Developments 
          We  have  witnessed  remarkable  progress  in  cross­Strait  relations  in  the  nearly  two  years  since 
Taiwan  President  Ma  Ying­jeou  took  office.      Before  commenting  on  what  this  progress  means  for  the 
United States, allow me to chronicle some benchmarks over the last two years.  Soon after his March 2008 
election, President Ma dispatched Vice President­elect Vincent Siew to meet PRC President Hu Jintao at 
the  April  2008  Boao  Forum  in  Hainan,  and  later  that  month  President  Hu  met  with  Taiwan’s  honorary 
KMT chairman Lien Chan in Beijing.  In his inaugural address, President Ma called on the PRC “to seize 
this  historic  opportunity  to  achieve  peace  and  co­prosperity.”    He  pledged  that  there  would  be  “no 
reunification,  no  independence,  and  no  war”  during  his  tenure.    President  Ma  also  proposed  that  talks 
with  the  PRC  resume  on the basis of the “1992 consensus,” by which both sides agree that there is only 
one China but essentially agree to disagree on what the term “one China” means. 
          At  the  end  of  2008  President  Hu  responded  with  a  speech  in  which,  among  other  things,  he 
called  for  the  conclusion  of  an  agreement  on  economic  cooperation;  proposed  that  the  two  sides discuss 
“proper  and  reasonable”  arrangements  for  Taiwan’s  participation  in  international  organizations;  and 
raised  the  prospect  of  a  mechanism  to  enhance  mutual  military  trust,  or  what  we  might  call  confidence 
and  security  building  mechanisms  (CSBMs).    Following  President  Hu’s  speech,  the  PRC  dropped 
objections  to  Taiwan's  participation  in  the  World  Health  Organization's    (WHO)    International  Health 
Regulations,  which  allows  the  WHO  to  disseminate  health­related  information  directly  to  Taiwan
                                                      ­ 17 ­ 
authorities instead of having to go though the PRC government.  In May of 2009 Taiwan was invited to 
participate  as  an  observer  in  that  year's  annual  meeting  of  the  World  Health  Assembly,  the  WHO’s 
executive body. 
           This  expansion  in  Taiwan’s  “international space” coincided with a “diplomatic truce” in which 
Taiwan  and  the  PRC  have  for  the  time  being  ceased  competing  for  diplomatic  recognition  from  the  23 
countries with which Taiwan has formal diplomatic relations. 
           These developments helped evoke the generally positive atmosphere surrounding the resumption 
of semi­official talks between Taiwan’s Straits Exchange Foundation (SEF) and the PRC’s Association for 
Relations  Across  the  Taiwan  Strait (ARATS).  The two sides agreed in broad terms to address the easy, 
primarily economic issues first, reserving more difficult, political issues for later.  SEF and ARATS met in 
June  and  November  of  2008  and  in  April  and  December  of  2009,  concluding  numerous  agreements 
designed to promote closer economic and social ties. 
           As  a  result  of  the  talks,  the  two  sides  established  direct,  scheduled  flights;  provided  for  direct 
shipping  and  postal  services,  established  a  framework  for  financial  cooperation  and  investment;  and 
agreed  to  increased  tourism  and  enhanced  law  enforcement  cooperation.    Last  year,  nearly  one  million 
mainlanders  visited  Taiwan.    The  two  sides  are  now linked by 270 direct flights per week.  The PRC is 
Taiwan's largest trading partner with cross­Strait trade totaling close to $110 billion in 2009, according to 
Taiwan  statistics.    We  expect  that  the  two  sides  will  sign  an  Economic  Cooperation  Framework 
Agreement (ECFA) sometime this year, with the next round of talks scheduled for the end of this month. 
           Enthusiasm  for  progress  in  cross­Strait  dialogue  has  been  tempered  by  caution  and  debate  on 
both sides of the Strait.  Some mainlanders fear that the Taiwan side will pocket PRC decisions now and 
elect future leaders who are less flexible than the current Taiwan administration.  The PRC leadership no 
doubt  also  must weigh with caution Taiwan­related decisions that could become controversial in the run 
up  to  the  Communist  Party  succession  in  2012.    Nevertheless,  in  a  press  conference  this  week,  Chinese 
Premier  Wen  Jiabao  stated  that  the  PRC  is  willing  to  let  the  people  of  Taiwan  "benefit  more"  than  the 
PRC from a proposed ECFA agreement via tariff concessions and an "early harvest" of  tariff cuts.  Wen 
said  he  believes  cross­Strait  problems  will  eventually  be  solved  and  that  he  has  a  strong  wish  to  visit 
Taiwan someday. 
           The Taiwan public, while supportive of actions that enhance cross­Strait stability, is cautious of 
moves  that  could  be  seen  to  compromise  Taiwan’s  sovereignty,  which  remains  an  emotionally  charged 
issue  on  both  sides.    Opponents  of  cross­Strait  progress  in  Taiwan  took  to  the  streets  to  demonstrate 
against  PRC  ARATS  chief  Chen  Yunlin  when  he  visited  Taiwan  in  November  2008  and  again  in 
December 2009. 
             As people on both sides of the Strait consider future economic steps, strong concerns remain on 
both  sides  of  the  Pacific  about  PRC  military  modernization  and  deployments.    The  PRC  refuses  to 
renounce  the  use  of  force  regarding  Taiwan.    PRC  leaders  have  stated  in  explicit  terms  that  Beijing 
considers Taiwan’s future a "core" national interest and the PRC would take military action in the event 
Taiwan were to formally declare independence or to block steps that would irrevocably block unification. 
The PRC’s unnecessary and counterproductive military build­up across the Strait continues unabated, with 
estimates of more than 1,100 missiles pointed in Taiwan's direction.  Although tensions have substantially 
abated,  and  there  is  no  reason  that  Beijing  would  prefer  to  use  force  against  Taiwan,  these  and  other 
deployments  across  from Taiwan dilute Beijing’s stated devotion to the peaceful handling of cross­Strait 
relations. 

The U.S. Role in Cross­Strait Engagement 
         As stated above, our "one China" policy is based on the three U.S.­PRC Joint Communiqués and 
the Taiwan Relations Act.  We are also guided by the understanding that we will neither seek to mediate 
between  the  PRC  and  Taiwan,  nor  will  we  exert  pressure  on  Taiwan  to  come  to  the  bargaining  table. 
While the United States is not a direct participant in the dispute between the PRC and Taiwan, we have a 
strong security interest in doing all that we can to create an environment conducive to a peaceful and non­ 
coercive resolution of issues between them. 
         This  Administration  therefore  welcomes  the  increased  stability  in  the  Strait  and  the  upsurge  in 
Taiwan­PRC economic, cultural, and people­to­people contacts.  The many billions of dollars that Taiwan
                                                       ­ 18 ­ 
companies  have  invested  in  the  mainland  have  played  an  important  role  in  the  PRC's  economic 
performance over the last decade.  Taiwan's trade, investment and other economic ties with the PRC are 
helping  the  island  recover  from  the  past  year's  economic  downturn,  and  a  solid  recovery  is  expected  in 
2010.      Enhanced  cultural,  economic  and  people  to  people  contacts  help  further  peace,  stability  and 
prosperity in the East Asian region. 
          We  applaud  the  courage  shown  by  President  Ma  in  restoring  U.S.  trust  and  reversing  the 
deterioration  in  cross­Strait  relations  that  took  place  during  the  years  prior  to  his  inauguration.      We 
should not be alarmed by Mainland­Taiwan rapprochement as somehow detrimental to U.S. interests, as 
long as decisions are made free from coercion. 
          Future stability in the Strait will depend on open dialogue between Taiwan and the PRC, free of 
force  and  intimidation  and  consistent  with  Taiwan's  flourishing  democracy.    In  order  to  engage 
productively  with  the  mainland  at  a  pace  and  scope  that  is  politically  supportable  by  its  people, Taiwan 
needs to be confident in its role in the international community, its ability to defend itself and protect its 
people, and its place in the global economy.   The United States has a constructive role to play in each of 
these three key areas. 
Taiwan's role in the international community 
          The  United  States  is  a  strong,  consistent  supporter  of  Taiwan's  meaningful  participation  in 
international  organizations.    We  frequently  make  our  views  on  this  topic  clear  to  all  members  of  the 
international community, including the PRC.  Partly because of U.S. efforts, Taiwan is a member and full 
participant in key bodies such as the World Trade Organization, the Asian Development Bank and APEC. 
 We believe that Taiwan should also be able to participate in organizations where it cannot be a member, 
such as the World Health Organization, the International Civil Aviation Organization and other important 
international  bodies  whose  activities  have  a  direct  impact  on  the  people  of  Taiwan.      We  were  gratified 
that after more than a decade of efforts, Taiwan was able to attend last year's World Health Assembly as 
an observer.  We hope Taiwan will be invited again this year and in the future. 
Military to Military Engagement With Taiwan 
          Taiwan must be confident that it has the physical capacity to resist intimidation and coercion in 
order to engage fully with the mainland.   The provision by the United States of carefully selected defense 
articles and services to Taiwan, consistent with the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA) and based on a prudent 
assessment of Taiwan's defensive requirements, has bolstered that capacity.   We will continue to stand by 
our commitment to provide Taiwan with defense articles and defense services in such quantity as may be 
necessary  to  enable  Taiwan  to  maintain  a  sufficient  self­defense  capability.      Our  decision  to  notify 
Congress on January 29 of the approval of arms sales to Taiwan worth $6.4 billion continues a policy that 
has  been  followed  by  successive  Administrations  for  more  than  30  years.    This  decision  was  a  tangible 
example of our commitment to meet the obligations spelled out in the TRA. 
          The excellent working relationships we have with Taiwan were further cemented in August 2009 
when  the  U.S.  was  able  to  respond  quickly  to  Taiwan's  requests  for  assistance  following  Typhoon 
Morakot.  Through USAID, we released emergency assistance funds to the Taiwan Red Cross to help deal 
with  the  crisis.    PACOM  dispatched  heavy  lift  helicopters  to  Taiwan  to  engage  in  relief  work  and  sent 
several loads of needed relief materials.  These actions again demonstrated our lasting friendship with the 
people of Taiwan and our willingness to lend a hand when Taiwan needed our help. 
          While  we  continue  to  bolster  Taiwan’s  confidence,  we  also  express  to  the  PRC  our  strong 
concern over continued lack of transparency in its military modernization and its rapid buildup across the 
Strait. 
Expanding U.S.­Taiwan Economic Ties 
          Finally, closer economic relations are clearly in the interest of both the United States and Taiwan. 
  Taiwan  President  Ma  has  made  it  clear  that  Taiwan  desires  to  strengthen  its  economic  ties  with  the 
United  States  and  other  trade  partners  at  the  same  time  as  it  pursues  economic  agreements  with  the 
mainland,  such  as  the  proposed  cross­Strait  Economic  Cooperation  Framework  Agreement.      The 
Administration  has  the  same  goal.    We  would  like  to  reinvigorate  the  U.S.­Taiwan  economic  agenda, 
reduce trade barriers and increase U.S.­Taiwan trade and investment ties. 
          Taiwan  is  one  of  our  most  important  trade  and  investment  partners.    The  United  States  is  the 
largest foreign investor in Taiwan with cumulative direct investments of over $21 billion.  Taiwan is our
                                                      ­ 19 ­ 
   th 
10  largest trading partner, larger than Italy, India or Brazil, with trade amounting to over $46 billion last 
year.      We  hope  bilateral  trade  can  grow  substantially  in  2010  as  both  the  United  States  and  Taiwan 
recover from last year's economic downturn. 
           The United States and Taiwan signed a Trade and Investment Framework Agreement (TIFA) in 
1994.   The TIFA is our main channel for bilateral trade consultations.   Through the TIFA we have been 
able  to  resolve  many  difficult  trade  issues  and  deepen  our  economic  cooperation.    We  have  had  many 
successes,  including  our  work  together  in  the  area  of  enforcement  of  intellectual  property  rights,  where 
Taiwan has made great strides. 
           In any robust trade relationship there will be some friction, and unfortunately, in recent months 
we  have  faced  some  significant  challenges  over  beef.    But  the  Administration  remains  committed  to 
making  progress  on  this  and  other  important  trade  issues,  revitalizing  our  TIFA  process,  and  exploring 
new initiatives to expand our bilateral economic relationship. 

The Future 
          How the evolving relationship between Taiwan and the PRC develops depends on the will of the 
leadership  and  the  people  on  both  sides  of  the  Strait.        The  scope  of  future  economic  and  political 
interaction  will  be  determined  in  conjunction  with  Taiwan's  well­established,  thriving  democratic 
processes. 
          As I mentioned above, both sides agreed to begin talks by addressing the easy issues first.  These 
tend  to  be  in  the  realm  of  economic  and  cultural  exchanges,  although  I  expect  that  the  negotiation  to 
conclude  an  ECFA  will  be  a  challenge  on both sides.  The two sides have yet to face the more difficult, 
political and military issues.  We are nevertheless encouraged by progress to date, and confident that our 
long­standing  approach  to  the  Taiwan  Strait  will  enhance  the  prospects  for  further  steps  to  peacefully 
manage this complicated relationship. 
          Thank  you  for  the  opportunity  to  testify  today  on  this  important  topic.    I  look  forward  to  your 
questions. 

          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u ,   Mr .   S hear . 
          Mr .   S chiffer . 

   S TATEM ENT  O F  M ICH AEL  S CH IFFER,   DEPUTY  AS S IS TANT 
S ECRETARY  O F  DEFENS E  FO R  AS IAN  AND  PACIFIC  S ECURITY, 
                U. S .   DEPARTM ENT  O F  DEFENS E 
                           W AS H ING TO N,   DC 

           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     T hank  yo u,   Mr .   Chair man,   Madam  Vice 
Chair man,   member s  o f  t he  Co mmissio n.     I 'd   like  t o   t hank  yo u  also   fo r 
t he  o p po r t unit y  also   t o   ap pear   befo r e  yo u   t o day. 
           I   will  fo cus  my  r emar k s  o n  t he  milit ar y  dimensio n  o f  t he  cr o ss­ 
S t r ait   r elat io nship  and   t he  imp licat io ns  fo r   t he  Unit ed  S t at es.     T he 
balance  in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   is  a  cr it ically  impo r t ant   t o pic  t hat   has  a 
st r o ng  bear ing   o n  o u r   endur ing   int er est s  in  and  co mmit ment   t o   peace 
and   secu r it y  in  t he  Asia­ P acific  r egio n,   and   I   co mmend  t he  Co mmissio n 
fo r   it s  co nt inu ed   int er est   in  t hese  mat t er s. 
           T he  Obama  administ r at io n  is  fir mly  co mmit t ed  t o   o ur   o ne­ China 
p o licy  based  o n  t he  t hr ee  Jo int   U. S . ­ China  Co mmuniq ués  and  t he  T aiwan 
Relat io ns  Act . 
           T his  is  a  po licy  t hat   has  endu r ed  acr o ss  eight   administ r at io ns, 
t r anscend ed   p o lit ical  par t ies,   and   has  ser ved  as  a  co r ner st o ne  o f  o ur
                                                      ­ 20 ­ 
ap pr o ach  t o   Asia  fo r   o ver   t hr ee  decades.     P r esident   Obama  was  ver y 
clear   o n  t his  po int   d ur ing   his  t r ip  t o   China  last   No vember   in  saying   t hat 
we  will  no t   chang e  t his  po licy  and   t his  app r o ach. 
           Wit hin  t he  Depar t ment   o f  Defense,   we  have  a  special 
r espo nsibilit y  t o   mo nit o r   China's  milit ar y  d evelo pment s.     Under   t he 
T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act ,   we  ar e  char ged  wit h  maint aining  t he  cap acit y  o f 
t he  Unit ed   S t at es  t o   r esist   any  r eso r t   t o   fo r ce  o r   o t her   fo r ms  o f 
co er cio n  t hat   wo uld   jeo par dize  t he  secur it y  o r   t he  so cial  o r   eco no mic 
syst em  o f  t he  peo ple  o f  T aiwan. 
           We  ar e  also   char g ed  wit h  making  available  t o   T aiwan  defense 
ar t icles  and  ser vices  in  such  q uant it y  as  may  be  necessar y  t o   enable 
T aiwan  t o   maint ain  a  sufficient   self­ defense  capabilit y.     We  t ak e  t hese 
o blig at io ns  ver y  ser io u sly. 
           As  I   kno w  member s  o f  t his  Co mmissio n  ar e  awar e,   t he  P eo ple's 
Rep u blic  o f  China  is  pu r su ing  a  lo ng­ t er m  co mpr ehensive  t r ansfo r mat io n 
o f  it s  ar med  fo r ces  fr o m  a  mass  ar my  d esigned  fo r   at t r it io n  war far e  o n 
it s  o wn  t er r it o r y  t o   o ne  capable  o f  fight ing  and  winning  sho r t   d ur at io n, 
hig h  int ensit y  co nflict   alo ng   it s  per ip her y  against   high­ t ech  ad ver sar ies. 
           T he  pace  and  sco pe  o f  China's  milit ar y  mo d er nizat io n  and 
d evelo p ment   has  incr eased  in  r ecent   year s.     Ho wever ,   t he  t r anspar ency 
and   o p enness  wit h  which  Beijing   is  pur suing  t his  build ­ up  co nt inues  t o 
lag .     Alt ho u g h  we  assess  t hat   China's  abilit y  t o   sust ain  milit ar y  po wer   at 
a  dist ance  r emains  limit ed,   it s  ar med  fo r ces  co nt inue  t o   d evelo p  and 
field   ad vanced   milit ar y  t echno lo gies  t o   supp o r t   ant i­ access  and  ar ea 
d enial  st r at eg ies,   as  well  as  t ho se  fo r   nuclear ,   space,   and  cyber war far e. 
           T hese  develo p ment s  ar e  changing  t he  r egio nal  balance  o f  po wer 
and   may  have  implicat io ns  beyo nd  t he  Asia­ P acific  r eg io n  as  well. 
           Regar d ing   T aiwan,   o ur   assessment   is  t hat   it   appear s  t hat   Beijing's 
lo ng ­ t er m  st r at egy  is  t o   use  po lit ical,   diplo mat ic,   eco no mic  and  cu lt u r al 
lever s  t o   pu r su e  unificat io n  wit h  T aiwan,   while  bu ild ing  a  cr edible 
milit ar y  t hr eat   t o   at t ack  t he  island   if  event s  ar e  mo ving   in  what   Beijing 
co nsid er s  t o   be  t he  wr o ng  d ir ect io n. 
           Beijing  app ear s  pr epar ed  t o   defer   t he  use  o f  fo r ce  fo r   as  lo ng  as  it 
believes  lo ng­ t er m  u nificat io n  r emains  po ssible.     Ho wever ,   it   fir mly 
believes  t hat   a  cr edible  t hr eat   is  essent ial  t o   maint ain  co ndit io ns  fo r 
p o lit ical  pr o gr ess,   and  in  t his  r egar d   we  co nt inue  t o   see  t he  milit ar y 
balance  as  shift ing  in  Beijing’s  favo r . . 
           I n  t his  r eg ar d,   we  co nt inu e  t o   see  t he  milit ar y  balance  acr o ss  t he 
S t r ait   as  shift ing  in  Beijing's  favo r .     T his  unr elent ing  milit ar y  build ­ u p 
has  co nt inu ed  ir r espect ive  o f  t he  r ecent   r ed uct io ns  in  t ensio ns  acr o ss 
t he  S t r ait   due  t o   P r esident   Ma's  init iat ives. 
           I n  assessing  t he  cr o ss­ S t r ait   milit ar y  balance,   it 's  impo r t ant   t o 
co nsid er   bo t h  Beijing's  cap abilit ies  t o   co nduct   o ffensive  o per at io ns  as 
well  as  T aiwan's  defensive  capabilit ies. 
           I n  t er ms  o f  Beijing's  capacit y  fo r  o ffensive  o per at io ns  in  t he 
T aiwan  S t r ait   r eg io n,   we  co nt inue  t o   see  t he  majo r it y  o f  t he  P LA's
                                                  ­ 21 ­ 
ad vanced  eq u ipment   being  deplo yed   t o   t he  milit ar y  r egio ns  o pp o sit e 
T aiwan.     I n  t his  co nt ext ,   Beijing  co nt inues  t o   field  advanced  sur face 
co mbat ant s  and  submar ines  t o   incr ease  it s  capabilit ies  fo r   ant i­ sur face 
and   ant i­ air   war far e  in  t he  wat er s  sur r o u nding  T aiwan. 
          S imilar ly,   advanced  fig ht er   air cr aft   and  int egr at ed  air   defense 
syst ems  dep lo yed  t o   bases  and  gar r iso ns  in  co ast al  r egio ns  incr ease 
Beijing's  abilit y  t o   gain  air   su per io r it y  o ver   t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   and  t o 
co nd u ct  o ffensive  co unt er ­ air   and  land  at t ack  missio ns  ag ainst   T aiwan 
fo r ces  and  cr it ical  infr ast r uct u r e. 
          Beijing  has  also   deplo yed  o ver   1, 000  sho r t ­ r ange  ballist ic  missiles 
and   a  gr o wing  number   o f  lo ng­ r ange  land   at t ack   cr u ise  missiles  t o 
g ar r iso ns  o pp o sit e  t he  island  t o   enable  st and­ o ff  at t acks  wit h  p r ecisio n 
o r   near ­ pr ecisio n  accur acy. 
          T hese  capabilit ies  ar e  being  sup plement ed  by  gr o wing  capabilit y 
fo r   asymmet r ic  war far e,   includ ing  special  o per at io ns  fo r ces,   space  and 
co u nt er ­ sp ace  syst ems,   and  co mp ut er   net wo r k   o per at io ns. 
          I n  r esp o nse  t o   t hese  chang ing   dynamics  in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait ,   t he 
au t ho r it ies  o n  T aiwan  have  u nd er t ak en  a  ser ies  o f  r efo r ms  designed   t o 
imp r o ve  t he  island's  capacit y  t o   d et er   and  defend  against   an  at t ack   by 
t he  mainland. 
          T hese  includ e  invest ment s  t o   har d en  infr ast r uct ur e,   build  u p  war 
r eser ve  st o cks,   and  imp r o ve  t he  ind ust r ial  base,   jo int   o per at io n 
capabilit ies,   cr isis  r espo nse  mechanisms,   and   t he  o fficer   and  no n­ 
co mmissio ned   o fficer   co r ps. 
          T hese  impr o vement s  o n  t he  who le  have  r einfo r ced  t he  nat ur al 
ad vant ages  o f  island  d efense. 
          I n  a  sig nificant   mo ve  last   year ,   T aiwan  became  t he  fir st   milit ar y 
o u t sid e  t he  Unit ed   S t at es  t o   publish  a  Quadr ennial  Defense  Review,   o r 
QDR.     T aiwan's  QDR,   as  well  as  T aiwan's  Defense  Whit e  P aper ,   o ut line 
a  r o ad   map  o f  invest ment s  fo r   t he  fut ur e,   par t icular ly  in  t he  ar ea  o f 
o r g anizat io nal  r efo r ms,   fo r ce  st r uct u r e  adjust ment s,   t r ansit io ning  t o   an 
all­ vo lunt eer   fo r ce,   and   ad vancing   jo int   o per at io ns  acr o ss  t he  sp ect r u m 
o f  d efense  o per at io ns. 
          T his  appr o ach  t r anscend s  t r adit io nal  ser vice  r ivalr ies  t o   develo p 
an  int egr at ed   fo r ce  t hat   t ak es  advant age  o f  T aiwan's  st r engt hs  and  uses 
inno vat ive  app r o aches  as  fo r ce  mult iplier s. 
          T he  incr easing  so phist icat io n  o f  t he  t hr eat   t o   T aiwan  po sed  by  t he 
fo r ces  ar r ayed   acr o ss  it   fr o m  t he  mainland  calls  fo r   gr eat er   at t ent io n  and 
co nsid er at io n  o f  asymmet r ic  co ncept s  and  t echno lo gies  t o   maximize 
T aiwan's  endur ing   st r engt hs  and  advant ages.     Last ing  secu r it y  canno t   be 
achieved  simply  by  pu r chasing  advanced   har d war e. 
          Deplo ying   maneuver able  weapo n  syst ems,   t aking  fu ll  ad vant age  o f 
T aiwan's  geo gr aphical  ad vant ages  and   mak ing  u se  o f  camo uflage  ar e 
ways  T aiwan  can  deg r ade  P RC  t ar get ing.     Fur t her mo r e,   incr eased 
har d ening  o f  T aiwan's  defense  infr ast r uct ur e  will  make  it   mo r e  co st ly 
fo r   t he  P RC  t o   at t ack   it .
                                                  ­ 22 ­ 
           T hese  and   o t her   asymmet r ic  ap pr o aches  can  ser ve  t o   co mplicat e 
t he  P RC  decisio n  calculus  and  enhance  d et er r ence  o f  co nflict . 
           As  S ecr et ar y  Gat es  has  st at ed ,   "Amer ican  engagement   in  Asia 
r emains  a  t o p  pr io r it y  fo r   us.     Our   alliances  and  par t ner ships  ar e 
st r o nger   and  o ur   r elat io nships  ar e  always  mat ur ing  and  evo lving  t o 
r eflect   chang ing   t imes.     Far   fr o m  fr o zen  in  a  Co ld   War   par adigm,   o ur 
p r esence  in  Asia  is  designed   t o   meet   o u r   mut ual  challenges  in  t he  21 st 
cent u r y. " 
           I n  t his  co nt ext ,   U. S .   po licy  wit h  r esp ect   t o   T aiwan  is  a  subset   o f 
o u r   lar g er   p o licy  wit hin  t he  Asia­ P acific  r egio n,   which  is  r o o t ed  in  o ur 
net wo r k  o f  alliances  and  par t ner ships  co mbined   wit h  a  fo r ce  pr esence 
t hat   is  d esigned   t o   enable  r espo nses  t o   a  var iet y  o f  co nt ing encies, 
whet her   t hey  ar e  nat ur al  o r   manmade. 
           As  st at ed   at   t he  beginning  o f  t his  t est imo ny,   t he  Unit ed  S t at es  is 
co mmit t ed  t o   fulfilling   it s  o blig at io ns  und er   t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act , 
and   o n  Januar y  29 ,   t he  Obama  ad minist r at io n  anno u nced   it s  int ent   t o 
sell  T aiwan  $ 6. 4  billio n  wo r t h  o f  defensive  ar t icles  and  ser vices.     T his 
d ecisio n  was  based   so lely  o n  o ur   jud gment   o f  T aiwan's  defensive  need s. 
           Fo llo wing  t he  Mar ch  2008   elect io ns  o n  T aiwan,   t he  secur it y 
sit u at io n  in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   ent er ed  a  per io d  o f  r elaxed  t ensio ns. 
Bo t h  Beijing  and  T aipei  have  embar k ed  o n  a  pr o gr am  o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait 
exchang es  int ended   t o   exp and  t r ade  and  o t her   eco no mic  link s  as  well  as 
p eo p le­ t o ­ peo ple  co nt act s.     T he  Unit ed  S t at es  welco mes  t hese  t r ends  as 
t hey  co nt r ibu t e  t o   a  gr eat er   and  mo r e  dur able  st abilit y  in  a  r egio n  t hat 
has  a  hist o r y  o f  vo lat ilit y. 
           Desp it e  t hese  po sit ive  develo pment s,   ho wever ,   Beijing's  sust ained 
invest ment   in  an  incr easing ly  capable  ar med  fo r ce  acr o ss  fr o m  T aiwan 
co nt inu es  t o   shift   t he  milit ar y  balance  in  it s  favo r . 
           T he  lo ng st anding  U. S .   po licy,   as  enshr ined  in  t he  T aiwan 
Relat io ns  Act ,   co nt inues  t o   play  an  impo r t ant   r o le  in  maint aining 
st abilit y  and  det er r ence  o f  co nflict   in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   by 
d emo nst r at ing   t o   Beijing  t hat   it   canno t   achieve  it s  unificat io n  go als  by 
co er cio n  o r   fo r ce. 
           We  t ak e  o u r   r esp o nsibilit ies  in  t his  r esp ect   ser io u sly.     A  T aiwan 
t hat   is  st r o ng,   co nfid ent   and  fr ee  fr o m  t hr eat s  o f  int imidat io n,   in  o ur 
view,   is  a  T aiwan  t hat   is  best   p o st ur ed  t o   discuss  and  adher e  t o 
what ever   fut ur e  ar r ang ement s  t he  t wo   sides  o f  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   may 
p eaceably  agr ee  o n. 
           I n  fact ,   t his  p o licy  ser ves  as  an  impo r t ant   enabler   o f  imp r o vement s 
in  t he  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io nship   becau se  it   helps  t o   cr eat e  t he  co ndit io ns 
wit hin  which  t he  t wo   sides  can  engage  in  peacefu l  dialo gue. 
           Mo r eo ver ,   t he  pr eser vat io n  o f  peace  and  st abilit y  in  t he  T aiwan 
S t r ait   is  fu ndament al  t o   o ur   lar ger   int er est   o f  pr o mo t ing  peace  and 
p r o sper it y  in  t he  Asia­ P acific  r egio n  at   lar g e. 
           I n  co nt r ast ,   a  T aiwan  t hat   is  vulner able,   iso lat ed,   and  under   t hr eat 
wo u ld   no t   be  in  a  po sit io n  t o   r eliably  d iscuss  it s  fu t u r e  wit h  t he
                                                    ­ 23 ­ 
mainland  and  may  invit e  t he  ver y  ag gr essio n  we  wo uld  seek  t o   det er , 
jeo p ar dizing   o ur   int er est s  in  r egio nal  peace  and  pr o sp er it y. 
         T he  Depar t ment   o f  Defense  will  co nt inue  t o   mo nit o r   milit ar y 
t r ends  in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   and   is  co mmit t ed  t o   wo r king  wit h  t he 
au t ho r it ies  o n  T aiwan  as  t hey  pur sue  d efense  r efo r m  and  mo der nizat io n 
t o   impr o ve  t he  island's  abilit y  t o   d efend  it self  against   an  at t ack  fr o m  t he 
mainland. 
         Or g anizat io nal  r efo r ms,   jo int   o p er at io ns,   har dening  and  lo ng ­ t er m 
acqu isit io n  management   ar e  all  sig nificant   st eps  t hat   will  enhance 
T aiwan's  secur it y  o ver   t he  lo ng  t er m.     As  t his  pr o cess  mo ves  fo r war d , 
t he  ad minist r at io n  is  eq ually  co mmit t ed,   and  co nsist ent   wit h  t he  T aiwan 
Relat io ns  Act ,   t o   co nsu lt   wit h  Co ng r ess  appr o pr iat ely  if  and   when  we 
mo ve  fo r war d   wit h  ad dit io nal  sup po r t   and  assist ance  t o   T aiwan. 
         Mr .   Chair man,   Madam  Vice  Chair man,   member s  o f  t he 
Co mmissio n,   I   wo uld   like  t o   t hank  yo u  fo r   t he  o p po r t unit y  t o   ap pear 
befo r e  yo u  t o day,   and  I   lo o k   fo r war d  t o   any  quest io ns  yo u   may  have. 
         [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 

Prep ared   S t a t emen t   o f  M i ch ael  S ch i ffer,   Dep u t y  Assi st an t   S ecret a ry 
   o f  Defen se  for  Asi an   an d   Paci fi c  S ecu ri t y,   U. S .   Dep art men t   o f 
                              Defen se,  Wash i n gt on ,   DC 

Mr. Chairman, Madame Vice Chairman, and Members of the Commission, I would like to thank you for 
the opportunity to appear before you today to offer testimony from the Administration on recent economic, 
political,  and  military  developments  in  the  Taiwan  Strait  and  their  implications  for  the  United  States.  I 
will  focus  my  remarks  on  the  military  dimensions.  From  our  perspective  at  Defense,  the  balance  in  the 
Taiwan  Strait  is  a  critically  important  topic  that  has  a  strong  bearing  on  our  enduring  interests  in  and 
commitments  to  peace  and  stability  in  the  Asia­Pacific  region,  and  I  commend  the  Commission’s 
continued interest in these matters. 

The  Obama  Administration  is  firmly  committed  to  our  One­China  policy  based  on  the  three  joint  U.S.­ 
China  communiqués  and  the  Taiwan  Relations  Act.  This  is  a  policy  that  has  endured  across  eight 
Administrations, transcended political parties, and has served as a cornerstone of our approach to Asia for 
over three decades. President Obama was very clear on this point during his trip to China last November 
in saying that we will not change this policy and approach. 

Within  the  Department  of  Defense  we  have  a  special  responsibility  to  monitor  China’s  military 
developments  and  deter  conflict.  And,  under  the  Taiwan  Relations  Act,  not  only  are  we  charged  with 
maintaining the capacity of the United States to resist any resort to force or other forms of coercion that 
would  jeopardize  the  security  or  the  social  or  economic  system  of  the  people  of  Taiwan,  we  are  also 
charged  with  working  with  our  interagency  partners  to  make  available  to  Taiwan  defense  articles  and 
services  in  such  quantity  as  may  be  necessary  to  enable  Taiwan  to  maintain  a  sufficient  self­defense 
capability. 

We  take  this  responsibility  seriously.  A  Taiwan  that  is  strong,  confident,  and  free  from  threats  or 
intimidation, in our view, would be best postured to discuss and adhere to whatever future arrangements 
the  two  sides  of  the  Taiwan  Strait  may  peaceably agree upon. In fact, this policy serves as an important 
enabler  of  improvements  in  the  cross­Strait  relationship  because  it  helps  to  create  the conditions  within 
which the two sides can engage in peaceful dialogue. Moreover, the preservation of peace and stability in 
the  Taiwan  Strait  is  fundamental  to  our  larger  interests  of  promoting  peace  and  prosperity  in  the  Asia­
                                                      ­ 24 ­ 
Pacific  writ  large.  In  contrast,  a  Taiwan  that  is  vulnerable,  isolated,  and  under  threat  would  not be in a 
position to reliably discuss its future with the mainland and may invite the very aggression we would seek 
to deter, jeopardizing our interests in regional peace and prosperity. 

Assessing the Military Balance 

The Secretary of Defense is required to report to Congress annually his assessment of military and security 
developments involving the People’s Republic of China. An important part of this assessment involves our 
perspectives on Beijing’s strategy toward Taiwan, the military capabilities China is deploying opposite the 
island,  and  any  challenges  to  Taiwan’s  operational  capabilities  for  deterrence.  Although  we  are  in  the 
process of finalizing and coordinating this document, the core trends with respect to the military balance 
across the Strait that have persisted in recent years remain unchanged. 

The People’s Republic of China is pursuing a long­term comprehensive transformation of its armed forces 
from  a  mass  army  designed  for  attrition  warfare  on  its  own  territory  to  one  capable  of  fighting  and 
winning short duration, high intensity conflict along its periphery against high tech adversaries. The pace 
and scope of China’s military developments has increased in recent years; however, the transparency and 
openness with which Beijing is pursuing this build­up continues to lag. Although we assess that China’s 
ability  to  sustain  military  power  at  a  distance  remains  limited,  its  armed  forces  continue  to develop and 
field advanced military technologies to support anti­access and area denial strategies, as well as those for 
nuclear, space, and cyber warfare. These developments are changing regional military balances and have 
implications beyond the Asia­Pacific region. 

As  the  People’s  Liberation  Army’s  (PLA)  modernization  has  progressed, the improved capabilities have 
given  Beijing’s  military  and  civilian  leaders  increased  confidence  in  surveying  the  broader  strategic 
landscape for applications of military force in defense of the PRC’s expanding interests. However, even as 
the  PLA  explores  new  roles  and  mission  sets  that  go  beyond  immediate  territorial  considerations,  we 
believe that the primary focus of the PLA build­up remains oriented on preparing for contingencies in the 
Taiwan Strait. 

It appears that Beijing’s long­term strategy is to use political, diplomatic, economic, and cultural levers to 
pursue unification with Taiwan, while building a credible military threat to attack the island if events are 
moving in what Beijing sees as the wrong direction. Beijing appears prepared to defer the use of force for 
as  long  as  it  believes  long­term  unification  remains  possible.  However,  it  firmly  believes  that  a  credible 
threat is essential to maintain conditions for political progress, and in this regard we continue to see the 
military balance as shifting in Beijing’s favor. This unrelenting military buildup continues irrespective of 
the  reductions  in  tensions  due  to  President  Ma’s  cross­Strait  initiatives.  In  assessing  the  cross­Strait 
military  balance,  it  is  important  to  consider  Beijing’s  capabilities  to  conduct  offensive  operations  and 
Taiwan’s defensive military capability. 

In terms of Beijing’s capacity for offensive operations in the Taiwan Strait region, we continue to see the 
majority of the PLA’s advanced equipment being deployed to the military regions opposite Taiwan. In this 
context, Beijing continues to field advanced surface combatants and submarines to increase its capabilities 
for  anti­surface  and  anti­air  warfare  in  the  waters  surrounding  Taiwan.  Similarly,  advanced  fighter 
aircraft and integrated air defense systems deployed to bases and garrisons in the coastal regions increase 
Beijing’s ability to gain air superiority over the Taiwan Strait, and conduct offensive counter­air and land 
attack  missions  against  Taiwan  forces  and  critical  infrastructure.  Beijing  has  also  deployed  over  1,000 
short range ballistic missiles and growing numbers of long­range land attack cruise missiles to garrisons 
opposite the island to enable stand­off attacks with precision or near­precision accuracy. These capabilities 
are  being  supplemented  by  a  growing  capability  for  asymmetric  warfare,  including  special  operations 
forces, space and counter­space systems, and computer network operations. 

We have limited insights into Beijing’s actual contingency planning for military operations in the Taiwan
                                                      ­ 25 ­ 
Strait,  but based on observed capability investments, we believe that if the mainland were to elect to use 
military  force against Taiwan, the PLA would be tasked to rapidly degrade Taiwan’s will to resist while 
simultaneously dealing with any third party intervention on Taiwan’s behalf in a crisis. As a part of this 
effort,  the  PLA  is  building  the  military  capability  to  execute  multiple  courses  of  action  in  any  future 
Taiwan Strait crisis. Courses of action could include: 

Quarantine or Blockade. Traditional maritime quarantine or blockade operations would have the greatest 
impact on Taiwan, at least in the near­term. However, the PLA Navy would have great difficulty imposing 
and probably today could not enforce either in the face of resistance or outside intervention. In response, 
the  PLA  has  discussed  in  military  academic  literature  potential  lower  cost  alternatives  such  as  air 
blockades, missile attacks, and mining to obstruct harbors and approaches. Beijing could also attempt the 
equivalent  of  a  blockade  by  declaring  exercise  or  missile  closure  areas  in  the  approaches  to  ports,  to 
achieve the effect of a blockade by diverting merchant traffic. In any of these cases, however, there is risk 
that  Beijing  would  underestimate  the  degree  to  which  any  attempt  to  limit  maritime  traffic  to  and  from 
Taiwan would trigger countervailing international pressure and military escalation. 

Limited  Force  or  Coercive  Options.  Beijing  may  also consider a variety of disruptive, punitive, or lethal 
military  actions  in  a  limited  campaign  against  Taiwan,  likely  in  conjunction  with  overt  and  clandestine 
economic  and  political  activities.  Such  a  campaign  could  include  computer  network  or  limited  kinetic 
attacks,  including  by  special  operations  forces,  against  Taiwan’s  political,  military,  and  economic 
infrastructure to induce fear on Taiwan and degrade the populace’s confidence in the Taiwan leadership. 

Air  and Missile Campaign. Beijing may also consider limited ballistic and cruise missile attacks against 
air defense systems, including air bases, radar sites, missiles, space assets, and communications facilities. 
These  attacks  could  support a campaign  to degrade Taiwan’s defenses, neutralize Taiwan’s military and 
political leadership, and possibly break the Taiwan people’s will to fight. 

Amphibious Invasion. The PLA today is capable of accomplishing various amphibious operations short of 
a  full­scale  invasion  of  Taiwan.  With  few  overt  military  preparations  beyond  routine  training,  the  PLA 
could  launch  an  invasion  of  small  Taiwan­held  islands  such  as  the  Pratas,  or  Itu Aba. An invasion of a 
medium­sized,  defended  offshore  island,  such  as  Mazu  or  Jinmen  is  also  within  the  PLA’s  capabilities. 
Such  an  invasion  would  demonstrate  military  capability  and  political  resolve,  and  achieve  tangible 
territorial  gain  while  showing  some  measure  of  restraint.  However,  this  kind  of  operation  includes 
significant, if not prohibitive, political risk because it could galvanize the Taiwan populace and generate 
international opposition. 

In terms of a larger scale amphibious operation, the most prominent among the PLA’s options is a Joint 
Island  Landing  Campaign,  which  envisions  coordinated,  interlocking  campaigns  for  logistics,  air  and 
naval  support,  and  electronic  warfare.  The  objective  would  be  to  break  through  or  circumvent  shore 
defenses,  establish  or  build  a  beachhead,  transport  personnel  and  materiel  to designated landing sites in 
the north or south of Taiwan’s western coastline, and launch attacks to split, seize, and occupy key targets 
and/or  the  entire  island.  Success  would  depend  upon  air  and  sea  supremacy,  rapid  buildup  and 
sustainment  of  supplies  on  shore,  and  uninterrupted  support.  An  invasion  of  Taiwan  would  strain  the 
untested  PLA  and  almost  certainly  invite  international  intervention.  These  stresses,  combined  with 
attrition and the complexity of urban warfare and counterinsurgency (assuming a successful landing and 
breakout), make amphibious invasion of Taiwan a significant political and military risk for China. 

Taiwan’s Defense Priorities 

In response to these changing dynamics in the Taiwan Strait, the authorities on Taiwan have undertaken a 
series  of  reforms  designed  to  improve  the  island’s  capacity  to  deter  and  defend  against  an  attack  by  the 
mainland.  These  include  investments  to  harden  infrastructure,  build up war reserve stocks, and improve 
the  industrial  base,  joint  operations  capabilities,  crisis  response  mechanisms,  and  the  officer  and  non­
                                                      ­ 26 ­ 
commissioned officer corps. These improvements, on the whole, have reinforced the natural advantages of 
island defense. 

In a significant move last year, Taiwan became the first military outside of the United States to publish a 
Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR). Taiwan’s QDR, as well as Taiwan’s Defense White Paper, outlines a 
road map of investments for the future, particularly in the areas of: organizational reforms, force structure 
adjustments, transitioning to an all volunteer force, and advancing joint operations across the spectrum of 
defensive operations. This approach transcends traditional service rivalries to develop an integrated force 
that takes advantage of Taiwan’s strengths and uses innovative approaches as force multipliers. 

With respect to the personnel reforms, President Ma’s commitment to transition to an all volunteer force 
is  a  monumental  undertaking,  involving  organizational  adjustments  in  personnel  recruitment,  troop 
training, logistics preparations, benefits and rights, mobilization mechanisms and retirement plans. At the 
conclusion  of  this  process  by  2014,  Taiwan  envisions  an  elite, professional force capable of undertaking 
major readiness and combat missions. 

Taiwan also has begun to implement a long range acquisition planning and management process designed 
to  ensure  an  efficient  procurement  process  that delivers real joint military capability. By developing this 
approach,  Taiwan  will  be  able  to  prioritize  investments  in  its domestic defense industries and forecast a 
better  plan  for  future  acquisitions  from  external  sources  –  which  is  particularly  challenging  for  Taiwan 
given  that  its  unique  political  status  yields  few  options  for  foreign  sources  of  defense  technologies  and 
weapons systems. 

In addition to organizational and process reforms to optimize Taiwan’s acquisition process, the increasing 
sophistication of the threat to Taiwan posed by the forces arrayed across from it on the mainland calls for 
greater  attention  and  consideration  of  asymmetric  concepts  and  technologies  to  maximize  Taiwan’s 
enduring  strengths  and  advantages.  Lasting  security  cannot  be  achieved  simply  by  purchasing  advanced 
hardware.  Deploying  maneuverable  weapons  systems,  taking  full  advantage  of  Taiwan’s  geographical 
advantages,  and  making  use  of  camouflage  are  ways  Taiwan  can  degrade  PRC  targeting.  Furthermore, 
increased hardening of Taiwan’s defense infrastructure will make it more costly for the PRC to attack it. 
These  and  other  asymmetric approaches can serve to complicate the PRC decision­calculus and enhance 
deterrence of conflict. 

The Role of U.S. Policy 

As Secretary Gates has stated, “American engagement in Asia remains a top priority for us. Our alliances 
and partnerships are stronger, and our relationships are always maturing and evolving to reflect changing 
times.  Far  from  frozen  in  a  Cold  War  paradigm,  our  presence  in  Asia  is  designed  to  meet  our  mutual 
challenges in the 21st century.” In this context, U.S. policy with respect to Taiwan is a subset of our larger 
policy  within  the  Asia­Pacific  region,  which  is  rooted  in  our  network  of  alliances  and  partnerships 
combined with a force presence that is designed to enable responses to a variety of contingencies, whether 
they are natural or man­made. 

As  stated  at  the  beginning  of  this  testimony,  the  United  States  is  committed  to  fulfilling  its  obligations 
under  the  Taiwan  Relations  Act,  and  on  January  29,  the  Obama  Administration  announced  its intent to 
sell Taiwan $6.4B worth of defense article and services. This decision was based solely on our judgment 
of Taiwan’s defense needs:

     ·    60 UH­60 Blackhawk Utility Helicopters. Utility helicopters fill an immediate need for Taiwan’s 
          military to respond to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations. In wartime, the UH­ 
          60 would provide essential mobility capabilities to move troops and equipment around the island.



                                                      ­ 27 ­ 
    ·    2  PAC­3  firing  units,  one  training  unit,  and  114  missiles.  Delivering  this  system  completes 
         Taiwan’s request for upgraded PAC­3 missile defense systems. These systems will be integrated 
         into Taiwan’s missile defense grid.

    ·    Technical support for Taiwan’s C4ISR system. This support will help Taiwan develop improved 
         battlefield awareness through an integrated air, sea, and ground defense picture.

    ·    2  OSPREY­class  mine­hunters.  Mine­hunting  vessels  will enable Taiwan to keep key ports and 
         shipping lanes open in the event of blockade by mining.

    ·    12  Harpoon  telemetry  missiles.  These  training  missiles  will  improve  Taiwan’s  ability  to  meet 
         current and future threats of hostile surface ship operations. 

However,  the  extent  of  our  obligation  does  not  end  with  arms  sales.  As  part of our defense and security 
assistance to Taiwan, we are constantly engaged is evaluating, assessing and reviewing Taiwan’s defense 
needs,  and  in  this  regard,  we  continue  to  work  with  our  partners  on  Taiwan  to  advise  and  assist  their 
modernization  efforts.  The  Department  of  Defense  leads  strategic  level  discussions  with  the  Taiwan 
Ministry  of  National  Defense  on  defense  modernization,  PACOM  leads  operational  and  strategic  level 
discussions  with  the  Taiwan  Ministry  of  National  Defense,  and  PACOM’s  component  commands  lead 
tactical level discussions with their counterpart services to improve Taiwan’s defensive capability. 

Conclusion 

Following  the  March  2008  elections  on  Taiwan,  the  security  situation  in  the  Taiwan  Strait  entered  a 
period  of  relaxing  tensions.  Both  Beijing  and  Taipei  have  embarked  on  a  program  of  cross­Strait 
exchanges  intended  to  expand  trade  and other economic links, as well as people­to­people contacts. The 
United States welcomes these trends as they contribute to a greater and more durable stability in a region 
that  has  a  history  of  volatility.  Despite  these  positive  developments,  however,  Beijing’s  sustained 
investment  in  an  increasingly  capable  armed  force  across  from  Taiwan  continues  to  shift  the  military 
balance in its favor. 

In light of these dynamics, longstanding U.S. policy, as enshrined in the Taiwan Relations Act, continues 
to  play  an  important  role  in  maintaining  stability  and  deterrence  of  conflict  in  the  Taiwan  Strait  by 
demonstrating to Beijing that it cannot achieve its unification goals by coercion and force. 

The Department of Defense will continue to monitor military trends in the Taiwan Strait and is committed 
to working  with  the  authorities  on  Taiwan  as they pursue defense reform and modernization to improve 
the  island’s  ability  to  defend  against  an  attack  from  the  mainland.  Organizational  reforms,  joint 
operations,  hardening,  and  long  term  acquisition  management are all significant steps that will enhance 
Taiwan’s  security  over  the  long­term.  As  this  process  moves  forward,  this  Administration  is  equally 
committed,  and  consistent  with  the  Taiwan  Relations Act, to consult with Congress appropriately if and 
when we move forward with additional support and assistance to Taiwan. 

Mr. Chairman, Madame Vice Chairman, and Members of the Commission, I would like to thank you for 
opportunity to appear before you today. 


                  PANEL  II:     Di scu ssi on ,   Q u est i on s  an d   An swers 

       HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u ,   Mr .   S chiffer . 
       We'r e  go ing   t o   have  five­ minut e  qu est io n  per io ds,   and  since  we 
have  a  lo t   o f  Co mmissio ner s  wit h  quest io ns,   we'll  t o  t r y  and   st ick  wit h
                                                     ­ 28 ­
t his    t ime  fr ame.     S o ,   fir st ,   Co mmissio ner   Blu ment hal. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     T hank   yo u   bo t h  fo r   yo ur 
ser vice. 
           I   k no w  yo ur   d ep ar t ment s  ar e  do ing  gr eat   t hings  o n  t his  issue.     I t 's 
mu ch  easier   t o   be  in  my  po sit io n  and  lo b  har d  q uest io ns  t han  it   is  t o   be 
in  yo u r   po sit io n  and  mak e  po licy,   but   no net heless  I   will  t ake  my 
p o sit io n  and  lo b  har d  q uest io ns.     I   ho pe  t hey'r e  no t   t o o   har d . 
           I   have  t wo   fo r   Mr .   S hear   and  o ne  fo r   Mr .   S chiffer .     T he  fir st   is,  I 
t hink   it   makes  a  lo t   o f  sense  t hat   we'r e  fo r   basically  a  p o licy  o f  p eacefu l 
r eso lu t io n  wit ho ut ,   well,   fr ee  fr o m  co er cio n.     But   t her e  seems  t o   be  an 
inco nsist ency  in  yo ur   t est imo ny  because  yo u  said  we'r e  no t   fo r 
ind ep endence  but   we'r e  fo r   peaceful  r eso lut io n  t hat   t he  t wo   sides  decide 
u p o n. 
           S o   wo u ld   we  be  fo r   a  peaceful  nego t iat ed  independence? 
           MR.   S HE AR:     We  do   no t   su ppo r t   T aiwan  ind ep end ence.     Our   o ne­ 
China  p o licy  is  based   o n  t he  t hr ee  Co mmuniq ués  and  t he  T aiwan 
Relat io ns  Act . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     But   even  if  t hey  nego t iat ed 
p eacefully?    Becau se  t hat 's  inco nsist ent   wit h  a  peacefu l  r eso lut io n  t hat 
t he  t wo   sides  co me  t o . 
           MR.   S HE AR:  Well,   t he  ult imat e  r eso lut io n  o f  issu es  acr o ss  t he 
T aiwan  S t r ait   will  be  bet ween  t he  T aiwan  peo ple  and  t he  peo ple  o n  t he 
mainland. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     S o   ho w  can  we  r emo ve­ ­ 
           MR.   S HE AR:     We'll  leave  it   t o   t hem. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:  When  yo u  say  we'r e  no t   fo r 
ind ep endence  t o   beg in  wit h,   ho w  can  yo u  t hen  say  t hat   we'r e  fo r 
p eaceful  r eso lu t io n  and  what   t he  t wo   d ecid e  o n  because  t hen  we'r e 
r emo ving   an  o p t io n?  I f  t he  t wo   sides  decide,   lik e  so   many  o t her s  who 
have  had  t er r it o r ial  dispu t es,   t o   a  peacefully­ nego t iat ed  ind ependence, 
co mmo nwealt h,   o r   so met hing  like  t hat ,   we'd  be  against   t hat ? 
           MR.   S HE AR:     I   und er st and  t he  lo gic  o f  yo ur   po sit io n,   bu t   t he  fact 
is  t hat   t he  po licy,   as  I   have  st at ed  it ,   has  wo r ked   fo r   30  year s.     I t  has 
maint ained   peace  and  st abilit y.     I t 's  helped   maint ain  peace  and  st abilit y 
acr o ss  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait ,   and  I   t hink  it   will  co nt inue  t o   do   so   in  t he 
fu t u r e.  Ho w  t he  issues  acr o ss  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   ar e  r eso lved  ar e 
u lt imat ely  up   t o   t he  peo ple  o n  bo t h  sides  o f  t he  S t r ait . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     S o   we  can  sur mise  t hat 
what ever   t hey  co me  u p  wit h,   we'll  su ppo r t  it  if  it 's  peacefu l. 
           T he  o t her   q u est io n  I   had  is  fo r   bo t h  o f  yo u,   and  t hen  a  quest io n 
fo r   Mr .   S chiffer .     One  is  can  we  r eally  say  t hat   t hey'r e  nego t iat ing   even 
no w  fr ee  fr o m  co er cio n  when  yo u  bo t h  t est ified  abo ut   t he  co nt inued 
u nabat ed  milit ar y  bu ild ­ up   acr o ss  t he  S t r ait ?  Ar en't   t hey  st ill,   even 
t o d ay,   neg o t iat ing  wit h  a  gun  p o int ed  against   t heir   head   in  t he  case  o f 
T aiwan?
           MR.   S HE AR:     I f  I   may,   I   t hink  it 's  a  mat t er   o f  co nfidence,   and
                                                    ­ 29 ­ 
lead er s  o n  T aiwan  t ell  u s  it 's  a  mat t er   o f  co nfidence,   and   t hat   co nt inu ed 
U. S .   sup p o r t   fo r   T aiwan  as  well  as  co nt inued  U. S .   ar ms  sales  help  give 
t hem  t he  co nfid ence  t o   eng ag e  wit h  t he  mainland,   and  I   t hink   t hat 's  t he 
fu ndament al  issu e  her e,  co nfidence. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     Do   we  ever   pr ess  t he 
mainland  t o ­ ­ it 's  har d   t o   nego t iat e  in  co nfidence,   ju st   as  a  gener al 
mat t er ,   I   t hink,   if  t he  o t her   sid e  has  no t   r eno unced  t he  use  o f  fo r ce 
ag ainst   yo u .     Do   we  ever   push  t he  Chinese  t o   r eno unce  t he  u se  o f  fo r ce 
and   nego t iat e  in  co nfidence  and   t ake  d o wn  it s  milit ar y  fo r ces  so   t hey 
co u ld   act ually  nego t iat e  fr ee  o f  co er cio n? 
          MR.   S HE AR:     We  have  expr essed  o ur   co ncer n  wit h  r egar d   t o   t he 
Chinese  milit ar y­ ­ t he  P RC  milit ar y­ ­ bu ild­ up  o n  t heir   side  o f  t he  S t r ait 
r ep eat ed ly,   and  o ur   ap pr o ach  t o   issu es  o n  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   fo r   o ver   30 
year s  no w  has  been  o n  t he  basis  o f  p eaceful  r eso lut io n. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     But   is  it   bo t h  o f  yo ur 
assessment s  t hat   t hey  ar e  no w  nego t iat ing  fr ee  o f  co er cio n? 
          MR.   S CHI FFE R:     I   guess  I   wo uld  go   o ff  t he  st at ement   t hat 
P r esident   Ma  mad e  aft er   t he  anno uncement   o f  o ur   ar ms  sale  packag e  o n 
Janu ar y  29 ,   wher e  he  st at ed  t hat   he  was  t hankful  fo r   t he  packag e  and 
t hat   it   did   pr o vid e  him  wit h  t he  co nfidence  t hat   he  feels  t hat   he  need ed 
t o   be  able  t o   eng ag e  in  d iscussio ns  acr o ss  t he  S t r ait . 
          T his  is  o bvio u sly  an  issu e  t hat   we  have  t o   pay  clo se  and 
co nt inu ing  at t ent io n  t o ,   and  as  t he  milit ar y  balance  acr o ss  t he  S t r ait 
chang es­ ­ it 's,   as  yo u   k no w,   a  ver y  d ynamic  balance­ ­ we  have  t o   make 
su r e  t hat   we  ar e  do ing  o u r   ut mo st   t o   assur e  t hat   T aiwan  can  co nt inu e  t o 
have  t he  co nfidence  t hat   it   need s  t o   be  able  t o   eng age  wit h  t he 
mainland. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     Ho w  mu ch  t ime  do   I   have 
left ? 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     20   seco nd s. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     2 0  seco nds.     Okay.     I   wo uld 
ju st   ask   in  my  last   2 0  seco nd s  if  t her e's  any  way  we  can  get   so me  kind 
o f  u nclassified,   o r   classified,   I   suppo se,   r isk  assessment   t o   U. S .   fo r ces 
if  T aiwan  d o es  no t   have  t he  adequ at e  air   capabilit y  t o   d efend  it s  o wn 
air sp ace? 
          T hank  yo u  ver y  much  fo r   yo ur   answer s. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
          Co mmissio ner   S hea. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     My  qu est io n  wo n't   be  as  t o u gh  as 
Dan's,   bu t   I 'll  ask   it .     Lat er   t o d ay,   we'r e  go ing  t o   hear   fr o m  P r o fesso r 
S helley  Rigger   fr o m  David so n  Co lleg e,   and   she  wr it es  t he  fo llo wing : 
          "T he  Unit ed  S t at es  and  T aiwan  have  lo ng  shar ed  t he  po sit io n  t hat 
wit ho ut   r o bu st   milit ar y  defenses,   T aip ei  will  lack  t he  co nfid ence  t o 
neg o t iat e  wit h  Beijing.     Fo r   t hat   r easo n,   imp r o ving  eco no mic  and 
p o lit ical  r elat io ns  acr o ss  t he  S t r ait   no t   o nly  is  co nsist ent   wit h  co nt inu ed 
ar ms  sales  bu t   d ep ends  o n"­ ­ depends  o n­ ­ "co nt inued  ar ms  sales.   I n
                                                    ­ 30 ­ 
ad dit io n,   a  shar p   change  in  t he  milit ar y  balance  in  t he  S t r ait   wo uld 
d est abilize  t he  r eg io n.     I nst abilit y  is  no t   co nducive  t o   bet t er   r elat io ns. " 
          Do   yo u  ag r ee  wit h  t hat   st at ement ? 
          MR.   S CHI FFE R:     I   believe,   as  I   put   it   in  my  st at ement ,   we  view 
t he  ar ms  sales  as  a  necessar y  enabler   t hat   allo ws  fo r   t hese  po sit ive 
d evelo p ment s  t o   go   fo r war d .     S o   br o ad ly  speak ing,   yes. 
          MR.   S HE AR:  Yes. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     Okay.     S o   yo u  feel  t hat   in  o r der   fo r 
T aiwan  t o   engag e  wit h  t he  P RC  o n  eco no mic,   cu lt ur al,   even  po lit ical 
mat t er s,   t hey  need  t o   have  t he  secur it y  t hat   gr o ws  o ut   o f  a  st r o ng 
milit ar y  defense  p o st ur e  vis­ à­ vis  t he  P RC?  I s  t hat   co r r ect ? 
          MR.   S HE AR:     T hat   is  co r r ect . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     I n  o ur   r ep o r t   last   year ,   we  had   a 
sect io n  o ut lining   t he  var io u s  fo r ces  o f  T aiwan  ver sus  t he  var io us  fo r ces 
o f  t he  P RC,   and   it   d o esn't   lo o k  like  a  ver y  fair   balance.  Do   yo u  t hink 
we'r e  at   t he  po int   wher e  t he  balance  is  so   shift ing  t o war ds  t he  P RC  t hat 
we'r e  r isk ing   having   inst abilit y  in  t he  r egio n? 
          MR.   S CHI FFE R:     T his  is  a  qu est io n  t hat ,   as  yo u  kno w,   we  ar e 
co nst ant ly  g r appling   wit h  at   t he  Depar t ment   o f  Defense.     And  we  ar e 
co nst ant ly  assessing  and   r eassessing  acr o ss  ever y  single  p o ssible 
d imensio n  t he  nat ur e  o f  t he  shift ing  balance  o f  fo r ces  and  what 's 
necessar y  t o   assur e  t hat   T aiwan  has  t he  go o d s,   t he  ser vices,   and  t he 
capabilit ies  t hat   it   needs  t o   be  able  t o   d efend  it self  and   t o   d et er   at t ack 
by  China. 
          I t 's  no t ,   as  yo u  kno w,   a  simple  q uest io n  t o   answer   because  t her e 
ar e  cir cu mst ances  in  which  asymmet r ic  T aiwan  cap abilit ies  pr o vide  it 
t he  abilit y  t o   effect ively  det er   and  d efend.     Given  t he  nat ur e  o f  t he 
Chinese  milit ar y  build­ up ,   given  t he  nat ur e  o f  t he  island  o f  T aiwan,   it s 
d emo g r ap hic  co nst r aint s,   t he  p hysical  co nst r aint s  t hat   it 's  under ,   we'r e 
never   go ing   t o   have  a  symmet r ic  balance­ ­ 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     Right . 
          MR.   S CHI FFE R:  ­ ­ acr o ss  t he  S t r ait .     S o   t he  quest io n  is  making 
su r e  t hat   T aiwan  has  a  sufficient   capabilit y  t o   be  able  t o   det er   and 
d efend ,   and   t hat 's  what   we  seek  t o   do . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     Well,   help  me  under st and­ ­ ho w  yo u 
g r app le  wit h  t his  issue?  I 've  never   wo r ked  at   t he  Defense  Dep ar t ment , 
but   I   imagine  if  I   wer e  wo r king  at   t he  Defense  Depar t ment ,   I   wo uld  say 
T aiwan  need s  mo r e,   mo r e  milit ar y,   mo r e  secur it y,   but   what   o t her   fact o r s 
g o   int o   a  decisio n  whet her   t o   accep t ,   fo r   example,   t he  let t er   o f  r equest 
o n  t he  F­ 16 s? 
          What   ar e  t he  o t her   t hings  t hat   yo u  co nsider   when  making   t ho se 
t yp es  o f  decisio ns? 
          MR.   S CHI FFE R:     Well,   I   will  answer   t hat   in  t he  F­ 16  so r t   o f 
co nt ext   a  lit t le  bit   mo r e,   mo r e  sp ecifically,   because  I   t hink   it 's  a  go o d 
case  st u dy.     I   d o n't   t hink   t her e  is  any  quest io n  t hat   T aiwan  faces  a 
challenge  t o   it s  d o minance  o f  it s  air sp ace.     I   t hink   t hat 's  no t   news.
                                                  ­ 31 ­ 
T hat 's  been  a  sit u at io n  t hat 's  exist ed  fo r   quit e  awhile  and  which  we've 
been  co ncer ned   wit h  fo r   q uit e  awhile. 
           Bu t   t he  q uest io n  t hen  beco mes  what 's  t he  r ight   answer   t o   t hat ,   t o 
t hat   qu est io n?    What 's  t he  r ight   answer   t o   t hat   challenge?    And 
answer ing   t hat   q u est io n­ ­ and  wish  it   wer e  simple­ ­ r equ ir es  lo o king  at   a 
who le  r ang e  o f  capabilit ies.     I t 's  no t   just   what   plat fo r m  t hey  have;  it 's 
also   a  qu est io n  o f  do   t hey  have  r u nway  r epair   kit s;  do   t hey  have 
har d ened   hang ar s? 
           I f  we'r e  g o ing   t o   ship  a  bunch  o f  planes  o ver   t o   T aiwan  t hat   t hey 
can't   act ually  ever   use  in  co mbat   because  t his  is  a  "but   fo r   t he  nail  t he 
ho r sesho e  was  lo st , "  "bu t   fo r   t he  ho r sesho e,   t he  k ingd o m  was  lo st "  so r t 
o f  sit u at io n  t hat   d o esn't   necessar ily  mak e  sense. 
           I f  t her e  ar e  o t her   pr io r it ies  t hat   T aiwan  also   has  t o   pay  at t ent io n 
t o   t hat   wo u ld  beco me  u nbalanced   by  co ncent r at ing  t o o   much  in  o ne  ar ea 
t hat   wo uld  cr eat e  o t her   vulner abilit ies,   eit her   equ al  o r   gr eat er ,   t hat 
T aiwan  wo uld   have  t o   face,   and   t hat   we  wo uld  have  t o   co mpensat e  fo r , 
we  need   t o   figu r e  o u t   ho w  t o   best   p r io r it ize  all  o f  t hese  challeng es,   and 
so   o n  and  so   fo r t h. 
           I t 's  ver y,   ver y  co mplicat ed  set   o f  quest io ns,   as  I   said,   t hat   cut 
acr o ss  a  number   o f  d iffer ent   d imensio ns  as  we  assess  t he  t hr eat   and 
challenges  t hat   T aiwan  faces,   t he  needs  t hat   t hey  have,   t o   be  able  t o 
co u nt er   t ho se  challeng es  and   t o   be  able  t o   have  co nfidence  in  t heir 
abilit y  t o   do   so ,   and  t ho se  ar e  t he  so r t s  o f  qu est io ns  t hat   we  ar e 
co nst ant ly  cycling  t hr o ug h  int er nally,   discussing  wit h  t he  aut ho r it ies  o n 
T aiwan,   so   t hat   we  can  get   a  bet t er   sense  o f  t heir   view  o f  t he  issues  and 
wo r k ing  t o   t r y  t o   co me  up   wit h  t he  r ig ht   set   o f  answer s. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u ,   Mr .   S chiffer . 
           Co mmissio ner   Fied ler . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     T hank  yo u. 
           Act ually  I   t ho u ght   t hat   bo t h  yo ur   t est imo nies  wer e  a  ver y  clear 
st at ement   o f  U. S .   int er est s,   and   in  t he  case  o f  Mr .   S chiffer   o n  t he 
d efense  sid e,   p er haps  t he  clear est   t hat   I 've  hear d. 
           And   I   no t e  o ne  new  t hing,   and  t hat   is  yo ur   explicit   discussio n  o f 
asymmet r ic  co u nt er   t o   China,   in  a  d efense  sense,   which  has  no t   been 
p ar t   o f  t he  discu ssio n  excep t   fo r   t he  asymmet r ic  st r at egy  China  emplo ys, 
access  denial,   in  t he  p ast ,   and   I   t hink   I   agr ee  wit h  yo u   mo r e  t han  a  lit t le 
t hat   it 's  no t   simply  a  quest io n  o f  F­ 16s;  it 's  a  q uest io n  o f  maybe  ho w 
many,   fo r   what   pu r po se,   and  in  co mbinat io n  wit h  what   else? 
           S o   I 'm  mo r e  enco ur aged  by  t he  asymmet r ic  discussio n  and  less 
d isco ur aged  by  t he  fact   t hat   we  haven't   been  selling  t hem  t he  F­ 16s. 
T hat 's  ju st   a  per so nal  so r t   o f  o p inio n. 
           On  t he  co er cio n  side,   I   was  a  lit t le  mo r e  disappo int ed­ ­ I   was 
hap p y  aft er   yo u r   t est imo ny,   and  t hen  a  lit t le  mo r e  d isappo int ed   in 
r espo nse  t o   Dan's  qu est io n  o n  t he  co er cive  at mo spher e,   but   I   d o 
u nd er st and  t hat   yo u  all  have    dip lo mat ic  r o les.     But   I   t hink  we  sho uld  be 
clear   t hat ,   and  I   t hink   o ne  o f  yo u  st at ed   o r   bo t h  o f  yo u,   t hat   t he  Chinese
                                                      ­ 32 ­ 
believe  t hat   t hey  need   t he  milit ar y  cap abilit y  t o   co nt inue  nego t iat io ns. 
           Do   yo u  believe  t hat 's  because  t hey  fear   t hat   t he  DP P   co uld   win 
ag ain  so o n  and   t her efo r e  sq uand er   away  what   t hey  believe  is  t heir 
ad vant age  in  nego t iat ing   wit h  t he  Ma  ad minist r at io n? 
           MR.   S HE AR:     As  I   said   in  my  st at ement ,   I   t hink  so me  peo p le  o n 
t he  P RC  sid e  d o   fear   t hat   t he  cu r r ent   administ r at io n  o n  T aiwan  may 
p o ck et   so me  co ncessio ns  made  by  t he  P RC,   and  t hen  T aiwan  wo uld  elect 
less  flexible  leader s  in  t he  fut u r e.     I   t hink  t he  Chinese,   t her e  ar e  Chinese 
who   ar e  ver y  co ncer ned   abo ut   t hat .     I   t hink  o ne  r easo n  fo r   t he 
d eplo yment s  o n  t he  P RC  sid e  is  t hat   t hey  wish  t o   det er   a  declar at io n  o f 
T aiwan  ind ependence. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     I 'm  go ing  t o   igno r e  t he  seco nd 
p o int ,   t he  declar at io n  o f  independence,   because  t hat   may  be  t he  r ed   flag 
in  fr o nt   o f  t he  bu ll,   but   it 's  much  mo r e  gener ically  pr o blemat ic,   i. e. ,   t he 
Chinese  ar e  afr aid   o f  demo cr acy  in  T aiwan. 
           I t 's  no t   ju st   a  co nt r ast   necessar ily  bet ween  t he  DP P   and   t he  KMT . 
  I t 's  also   a  co ncer n  t hat   ano t her   KMT   leader   wo uldn't   be  as  willing  t o 
neg o t iat e  as  P r esident   Ma  has  been. 
           T hat   seems  t o   be  lik e  an  endless  pr o blem.   T he  Chinese  ar e  never 
g o ing  t o   be  co mp let ely  o r   even  p ar t ially  co mfo r t able  wit h  demo cr acy. 
T hat 's  mo st   cer t ainly  t he  case  o n  t he  mainland.     S o   I   do n't   see  an  end  t o 
t hat   p r o blem,   and   t her efo r e  t he  defensive  issu es  co me  t o   fo r e  vis­ à­ vis 
t he  Unit ed   S t at es  and  o ur   p o licy. 
           Just   t o   p ut   t he  co er cive  at mo sp her ics  int o   human  co nt ext ,   and   I 
u nd er st and  why  yo u  mig ht   no t   be  able  t o   t alk  number s  because  o f 
classificat io ns,   but   China  unleashing   a  co mbinat io n  missile­ ar t iller y 
bar r ag e  o n  t he  small  island   o f  T aiwan  wit h  a  co ncent r at ed  p o pulat io n, 
d esp it e  yo u r   co mment   abo ut   pr ecisio n  weapo nr y,   has  t o   invo lve  t he  lo ss 
o f  inno cent   life. 
           Have  we  ever   d o ne  any  est imat es  whet her   t hat   is  minimal, 
su bst ant ial,   if  yo u  d o n't   want   t o   use  nu mber s? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     We  have  lo o ked  at   a  number   o f  scenar io s,   and 
wit ho ut   being   able  t o   g o   int o   any  d et ails  her e  as  I 'm  sur e  yo u  can 
imag ine,   d ep ending  u po n  t he  nat u r e  o f  t he  so r t   o f  Chinese  st r ike  t hat 
o ne  wo uld  imag ine  and   what   weapo ns  ar e  used,   ho w  many,   when,   and 
wher e,   yo u   have,   t her e's  a  wid e  var iet y  o f  p o ssible  o ut co mes  in  t er ms  o f 
t he  d amage  assessment . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Wid e  and  invo lving  significant   lo ss 
o f  life? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     Again,   dep ending  upo n  exact ly  what   t he 
scenar io   is  t hat   yo u 'r e  lo o king  at ,   t her e's  a  wide  var iet y  o f  o ut co mes. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Ho w  mu ch  t ime  do   I   have? 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T en  seco nds. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Okay.     I   yield  back  t o   Mr .   Mu llo y. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank   yo u,   Co mmissio ner 
Fiedler .
                                                      ­ 33 ­ 
           Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Well,   t hank  yo u  bo t h  fo r 
ap pear ing   and   fo r   t he  clear   explanat io ns  o f  U. S .   po licy  and   o bligat io ns 
u nd er   t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act   in  yo ur   st at ement s.     T hat 's  ver y  helpful. 
           Mr .   S chiffer ,   o n  p ag e  t hr ee  o f  yo ur   wr it t en  t est imo ny,   yo u  ar g u e 
t hat   t r adit io nal  mar it ime  quar ant ine  o r   blo ckade  o per at io ns  wo u ld  have 
t he  g r eat est   imp act   o n  T aiwan  in  t he  near   t er m. 
           I n  t he  p ast ,   t he  Republic  o f  China  has  so ught   t o   acquir e 
su bmar ines  t o   meet   t hat   t hr eat .     U. S .   ar ms  sales  have  significant ly 
st r eng t hened  T aiwan's  ant i­ submar ine  war far e  capabilit ies. 
           Wher e  do   we  st and  t o d ay  o n  T aiwan's  st at ed   need   fo r   su bmar ines? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     T hat 's  a  mat t er   t hat   we'r e  co nt inuing  t o   assess 
and   lo o k  at . 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     I   yield  my  t ime. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank   yo u,   Co mmissio ner 
Wo r t zel. 
           Co mmissio ner   Videniek s. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Go o d  mo r ning,   gent lemen.     I 've 
hear d   t he  sales  pack age  ment io ned ,   $6 . 4   billio n.     T he  defense  bu dget   is 
$ 9 . 3  billio n.     Ho w  ar e  t hey  go ing   t o   pay  fo r   it ?    Ho w  was  t he  number 
d evelo p ed ?    I n  t hat  $6. 4  billio n,   ar e  t he  t hr ee  P at r io t   missiles­ ­ at   almo st 
a  billio n  bu ck s  apiece— includ ed?  Who   develo ped   t his  packag e  and  ho w 
r ealist ic  is  it ? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     Well,   as  yo u   k no w,   t his  was  an  ar ms  sales 
p ack ag e  t hat   was  develo p ed  based  up o n  t he  r equest   t hat   T aiwan  had  p ut 
befo r e  us  and  o u r   assessment   o f  t heir   d efense  need s. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Ho w  much  o f  it   is  har dwar e  and 
ho w  mu ch  is  su ppo r t ? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     I   can  g et   yo u  t he  exact   br eakdo wn  because  in 
so me  o f  t he  cat ego r ies,   t her e  is  har dwar e  and  su ppo r t   ar e  wr app ed 
t o g et her ,   bu t   cer t ainly  when  it   co mes  t o   t hings  like  t he  Blackhawk 
helico pt er s,   t he  P AC­ 3  fir ing  unit s,   t he  OS P RE Y­ class  mine  hunt er s  and 
t he  Har p o o n  t elemet r y  missiles,   I   mean  t hat 's  har d war e,   but   t her e  is 
su pp o r t   t hat 's  asso ciat ed  wit h­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Who   is  g o ing  t o   pr o vide  t r aining 
and   wher e? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     We  have,   as  yo u  kno w,   a  r at her   r o bu st 
r elat io nship   wit h  T aiwan  t o   pr o vide  t hem  wit h  appr o pr iat e  t r aining  and 
su pp o r t .
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Ar e  t hese  peo ple,   if  t hey'r e 
Amer icans,   ar e  t hey  in  har m's  way? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     We  cer t ainly  do n't   t hink  so .     I   sup po se  t hat   all 
d epend s  o n  ho w  yo u   co nsider   "in  har m's  way, "  but   we  cer t ainly  do n't 
t hink   so . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Ar e  yo u  fr ee  t o   say 
ap pr o ximat ely  ho w  many  unifo r med  o r   o t her   peo ple  t her e  ar e  o n  t he
                                                   ­ 34 ­ 
island   no w  per fo r ming  t r aining  and  o t her   suppo r t   ser vices? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     No t   in  t his  set t ing . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     One  mo r e  quest io n,   sir .  Yo u 
q u o t ed  o r   at   least   r efer r ed  t o   t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act   and  said  t hat 
p ar t   o f  it   is  a  vit al  int er est   t o   t he  U. S .     My  u nder st and ing  is  t hat   "vit al" 
means  t hat   we  may  go   t o   war   if  a  vit al  ar ea  wer e  t hr eat ened. 
           Co u ld  maybe  bo t h  o f  yo u  co mment   o n  which  par t   o f  t he  T aiwan 
Relat io ns  Act   po ses  a  vit al  co nsider at io n  t o   t he  Unit ed  S t at es? 
           MR.   S HE AR:     I f  I   r ecall  co r r ect ly,   t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act 
st at es  t hat   secur it y  and   st abilit y  in  t he  West er n  P acific  is  o f  gr eat 
imp o r t ance  t o   t he  U. S .     I   do n't   r emember   t he  exact  wo r ds,   whet her   it 
says  "vit al"  impo r t ance  o r   no t . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     I   t hink  t his  mo r ning  yo u  used  t he 
wo r d   "vit al. " 
           MR.   S HE AR:     T he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act   r eco g nizes  t he 
imp o r t ance  o f  secu r it y  and  st abilit y  in  t he  West er n  P acific,   and   it   st at es 
t hat   t he  U. S .   go ver nment   wo uld  view  wit h  gr ave  co ncer n  t he  incidence 
o f  vio lence  in  t he  S t r ait . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Under st o o d.     But   as  far   as  t he 
amo u nt s  invo lved,   t he  $6. 4  billio n  and   t he,   t o   me  what   appear s  t o   be 
r at her   few,   t hr ee  missiles  at  almo st   $ 900  millio n  ap iece,   helico pt er s  at 
$ 5 0  millio n  ap iece,   is  t his  an  equ ipment   co st   o r   is  it   a  co mbined   co st   o f 
eq uipment   p lus  supp o r t ?    And  ho w  lo ng  a  per io d  o f  t ime  will  t his 
p ack ag e,   t his  pr o gr am,   sp an,   and  ho w  ar e  t hey  go ing  t o   pay  fo r   it ? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     As  I   said,   I   will  be  able  t o   pr o vide  yo u  t he 
br eak do wns,   if  yo u  wish,   fo r   each  element   o f  t he  har d war e  package  and 
t hen  t he  su ppo r t   element   and  br eak   t hat   d o wn  fo r   yo u. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     We  wo uld  ap pr eciat e  t hat . 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     As  yo u  kno w,   wit h  many  o f  t hese  syst ems  t hat 
we  p r o vide  t o   T aiwan,   t hese  can  be  mult i­ year   packages,   and  we  ar e 
r ig ht   no w  at   t he  ear ly  st ages,   having  no t ified  Co ngr ess  o f  o ur   int ent io ns 
t o   o ffer   t hese  syst ems  t o   T aiwan,   o f  no w  ent er ing  int o   t he  pr o cess  o f 
d iscussing   wit h  T aiwan  t he  co nt r act s  and  t he  pr o cess  by  which  t hey  will 
t hen  be  p ur chasing  t ho se­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     T hank  yo u.     I f  yo u   co u ld  pr o vid e 
t hat   t o   t he  lead er ship,   we'd   app r eciat e  it   ver y  much.     T hank  yo u. 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     Happy  t o   do   so . 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
           Lar r y,   yo u   had  so met hing   yo u   want ed  t o   get   int o   t he  r eco r d. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     I 'm  go ing   t o   help  yo u  o u t , 
Dave.         I 'm  go ing  t o   quo t e  fr o m  t hat   par agr ap h  o f  t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns 
Act ,   and  t hen  I 'll  g et   o u t   o f  t he  way: 
           "I t   is  t he  po licy  o f  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  t o   co nsid er   any  effo r t   t o 
d et er mine  t he  fu t u r e  o f  T aiwan  by  o t her   t han  peaceful  means,   inclu ding 
by  bo yco t t s  o r   embar g o es,   a  t hr eat   t o   t he  peace  and  secur it y  o f  t he 
West er n  P acific  and   o f  gr ave  co ncer n  t o   t he  Unit ed   S t at es. "
                                                        ­ 35 ­ 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank   yo u   fo r   t hat 
clar ificat io n.     T hat 's  in  t he  r eco r d . 
          No w,   Chair man  S lane. 
          CHAI RMAN  S LANE :     T hanks  t o   bo t h  o f  yo u  fo r   t aking  t he  t ime 
t o   ap pear   befo r e  u s  t o d ay. 
          I   have  a  q uest io n  fo r   Mr .   S hear .     Can  yo u  give  u s  an  up dat e  o n 
t he  ext r adit io n  t r eat y? 
          MR.   S HE AR:     We'r e  lo o king  at   t he  po ssibilit y  o f  an  ext r adit io n 
ag r eement   wit h  T aiwan.     We  have  no t   yet   finished   t ho se  deliber at io ns, 
and   when  we  do ,   we  will  get   back  t o   T aiwan  wit h  a  r espo nse. 
          Bu t   cer t ainly  enhanced  legal  co o per at io n  bet ween  T aiwan  and  t he 
Unit ed   S t at es  is  ver y  impo r t ant ,   and   we  believe  t hat   t his  issue  is  a  g o o d 
ind icat io n  o f  t he  impo r t ance  we  place  o n  co o per at io n  as  a  who le  wit h 
T aiwan. 
          CHAI RMAN  S LANE :     One  o f  o ur   r espo nsibilit ies  is  t o   mak e 
r eco mmend at io ns  t o   Co ng r ess.     I s  t her e  anyt hing   t hat   Co ngr ess  can  d o 
t o   help  yo u   mo ve  t his  fo r war d? 
          MR.   S HE AR:     We'll  have  t o   g et   back  t o   t he  Co mmissio n  o n  t hat 
as  o u r   lo o k   at   t his  po ssibilit y  pr o g r esses. 
          CHAI RMAN  S LANE :     T hank   yo u . 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     I s  t hat   it ? 
          CHAI RMAN  S LANE :     Yes. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Co mmissio ner   Wessel. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     T hank  yo u  bo t h  fo r   being  her e.     I 'm 
su r e  yo u  have  many  d emands  o n  yo u r   t ime  so   ap pr eciat e  all  o f  yo ur 
t ime. 
          Let   me  ask  a  quest io n  r elat ed  t o   t he  co mmit ment s  and  t he 
langu age  t hat  Co mmissio ner  Wo r t zel  r ead  just   a  mo ment   ago   r eg ar ding 
t he  act ivit ies  t he  U. S .   might   engage  in. 
          China  has  enhanced  it s  capabilit ies  o f  d enial  and  det er r ence,   and 
clear ly  bo t h  in  a  har dwar e  sense,   as  well  as  we've  seen  wit h  cyber ­ 
incur sio ns  o ver   t he  last   sever al  year s,   pr esumably  t ar get ing  lo gist ical 
su pp o r t   o r   ho w  t hey  mig ht   at t ack  lo gist ical  su ppo r t ,   et   cet er a,   in  t he 
event ualit y  t hat   t her e  mig ht   be  so me  co nflict   o r   desir e  o f  t he  U. S .   t o 
have  fo r ce  pr o ject io n  t o   sho w  it s  int er est   in  t he  ar ea. 
          Can  yo u   co mment   o n  incr easing   Chinese  capabilit ies  in  t er ms  o f 
t ar g et ing,   denial,   d et er r ence,   and  ho w  t he  U. S .   is  r esp o nd ing , 
r eco gnizing  t her e  has  been  so me  minimizat io n  o f  mil­ t o ­ mil  co nt act s, 
but   what   ar e  we  d o ing   abo ut   t heir   enhanced  capabilit ies  and  ho w  d o   we 
r espo nd  t o   t hem?    E it her   wit ness,   but   Mr .   S chiffer ,  t his  is  pr o bably 
mo r e  in  yo ur   bailiwick . 
          MR.   S CHI FFE R:     S ur e,   and  let   me  ju st   pr o vide  yo u  wit h  o ne 
examp le  in  t he  cyber   ar ea  t hat   yo u  had  ment io ned.     Our   20 09  r epo r t   t o 
Co ngr ess,   as  yo u 'r e  awar e,   discussed   China's  use  o f  co mp ut er   net wo r ks 
as  bo t h  a  t o o l  fo r   int elligence  but   also   as  a  po t ent ial  asymmet r ic 
weap o n.
                                                    ­ 36 ­ 
           T he  S ecr et ar y  o f  Defense  has  ap pr o ved   t he  est ablishment   o f  a  su b­ 
u nified   co mmand ,   t he  U. S .   Cyber   Co mmand,   in  June  2009,   t o   bet t er 
fo cu s  milit ar y  cyber space  o per at io ns,   including  t he  defense  o f  o ur   o wn 
d epar t ment 's  info r mat io n  net wo r ks,   and   also   t o   be  able  t o   pr o vid e  us 
wit h  t he  app r o pr iat e  sub­ unified  co mmand  t o   fo cu s  o n  t he  milit ar y 
asp ect s  o f  cyber sp ace,   o f  t he  cyber space  do main. 
           We  view  t ho se  as  abso lut ely  cr it ical  fo r   U. S .   milit ar y  co mmand 
and   co nt r o l  and  t he  co nduct   o f  o p er at io ns  and  o bvio usly  cr it ical  in  any 
p o t ent ial  co nflict   t hat   we  wo u ld  envisage  wit h  an  adver sar y  t hat 
p o ssesses  cyber   abilit y  and   t he  abilit y  t o   use  cyber   as  an  asymmet r ic 
weap o n.
           We  ar e  d o ing   o u r   u t mo st   t o   develo p  t he  capabilit ies  t hat   we  need 
t o   be  able  t o   defend  and  pr o t ect   o ur selves  and   o u r   par t ner s  in  t he  cyber 
d o main. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     I   believe  it   was  last   year   in  o ur 
hear ing  o n  naval  mo der nizat io n  t hat  we  lear ned  o f  incr eased  cap abilit ies 
by  t he  Chinese  t o   det er   U. S .   naval  fo r ces,   lo nger ­ r ange  t ar get ing,   mo r e 
accu r at e  t ar g et ing,   et   cet er a,   t hat   wo uld  pr esumably  seek  t o   have  us, 
o u r   fo r ces,   at   a  g r eat er   d ist ance  and  t her efo r e  less  able  t o   r espo nd. 
           I   have  no t   r ead   t he  mo st ­ r ecent   QDR­ ­ has  Do D  lo o ked  at   t hat 
sp ecifically,   and  have  t her e  been  any  d iscussio ns  wit h  t he  Chinese  abo u t 
co ncer ns  abo ut   specific  t ar get ing   o r   cap abilit ies  o f  U. S .   fo r ces? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:     We  ar e  incr easingly  co ncer ned   abo u t   t he  ar ea 
d enial  and  ant i­ access  capabilit ies  t hat   China  app ear s  t o   be  develo p ing , 
and   we  ar e  p ar t icu lar ly  co ncer ned  abo ut   t he  lack  o f  t r ansp ar ency  t hat 
acco mpanies  t his  ar ea  as  wit h  o t her   ar eas  o f  China's  milit ar y 
mo der nizat io n  effo r t s. 
           We  have  made  a  nu mber   o f  effo r t s  t o   engage  wit h  o ur   Chinese 
fr iend s  t o   d iscu ss  t hese  issues  and  t o  enco ur age  t hem  t o   eng age  wit h  us 
in  o u r   mut ual  int er est s  in  a  gr eat er   deg r ee  o f  t r anspar ency  so   t hat   we 
can  bet t er   u nder st and   what   t hey  ar e  d o ing  and   t her efo r e  avo id  any 
p o ssibilit y  o f  miscalculat io n  o r   misappr ehensio n  do wn  t he  line. 
           I   can  t ell  yo u  t hat   t her e's  been  so me  success,   we've  go t t en  so me 
t r act io n,   bu t   o bvio u sly  no wher e  near   as  mu ch  as  we  ho p e,   and   t his  is  an 
ar ea  wher e  we'r e  g o ing  t o   co nt inue  t o   wo r k  and  co nt inue  t o   pr ess  t he 
Chinese  t o   see  if  we  can  develo p   a  bet t er   set   o f  co mmunicat io ns  and 
exchang es  in  t his  ar ea. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     T hank  yo u. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
           Co mmissio ner   Cleveland. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  CLE VE LAND:     I   have  a  sho r t   quest io n.     T he 
T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act   says  t hat   wit h  r egar d  t o   d efense  ar t icles  and 
ser vices,   any  decisio n  t o   make  t ho se  available  t o   T aiwan  sho uld  be 
based  so lely  up o n  t heir   jud gment   o f  t he  needs  o f  T aiwan. 
           Co u ld  yo u   int er p r et   t hat   clau se  fo r   me? 
           MR.   S HE AR:     I t   means  what   it   says.     I t   means  t hat   o ur   decisio ns
                                                     ­ 37 ­ 
ar e  based   o n  an  assessment   o f  T aiwan  defense  needs  t hat   ar e  made  in 
co nsu lt at io n  wit h  t he  T aiwan  sid e. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
          I   have  a  qu est io n.     T his  g o es  t o   Mr .   S chiffer 's  t est imo ny  o n  pag e 
t wo ­ ­ and   t he  q uest io n  is  fo r   Mr .   S hear   and   t hen  Mr .   S chiffer   t o 
co mment : 
          "I t   ap pear s  Beijing's  lo ng ­ t er m  st r at egy  is  t o   use  po lit ical, 
d ip lo mat ic,   eco no mic  and   cult ur al  lever s  t o   pur sue  u nificat io n  wit h 
T aiwan,   while  build ing  a  cr ed ible  milit ar y  t hr eat   t o   at t ack   t he  island  if 
event s  ar e  mo ving   in  what   Beijing  sees  as  t he  wr o ng   dir ect io n. " 
          T aiwan  alr ead y  a  has  much  mo r e  t r ade  wit h  China  t han  t hey  d o 
wit h  us.     T hey  have  mo r e  invest ment   wit h  China  t han  t hey  do   wit h  us. 
T his  will  pr o bably  fur t her   incr ease  t hat .     Do es  t he  Unit ed   S t at es  favo r 
t his  E co no mic  Co o p er at io n  Fr amewo r k  Agr eement ? 
          MR.   S HE AR:  I n  g ener al  t er ms,   we  haven't   seen  ho w  t he  E CFA  is 
g o ing  t o   lo o k ,   and   we  have  no t   yet   had  t he  chance  t o   det er mine  ho w  it 
may  affect   o u r   eco no mic  r elat io nship   wit h  T aiwan,   so   I 'm  go ing  t o 
wit hho ld   judg ment   o n  t he  E CFA  fo r   t he  mo ment ,   bu t   I   wo uld  like  t o   say 
t hat   in  gener al  t er ms  we  welco me  exp and ed   eco no mic  co o per at io n 
bet ween  T aiwan  and  China. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:  As  a  fo llo w­ up  t o   t hat ,   what 
wo u ld   yo u   t hink  if  T aiwan  and  China  ent er ed   an  agr eement   t hat   T aiwan 
says  we'r e  no t   g o ing   t o   mo ve  t o war ds  u nificat io n?    We'll  do   a  5 0­ year 
ag r eement ;  we  wo n't   mo ve  t o war ds  unificat io n  fo r   50  year s,   and  yo u 
p r o mise  t hat   yo u   wo n't   invad e  u s  fo r   50  year s,   and  we'll  see  wher e 
t hing s  ar e  aft er   5 0  year s.     Do   yo u  t hink  so met hing  like  t hat   wo uld   be 
u seful  t o   ease  t ensio ns  t her e? 
          MR.   S HE AR:     I   t hink   t hat 's  pr et t y  hypo t het ical,   and  I 'm  r eluct ant 
t o   co mment   dir ect ly  o n  it ,   but   I   will  say  t hat   it   is  up  t o   t he  peo ple  o n 
bo t h  sides  o f  t he  S t r ait ,   and  I   expect   t hat   sho u ld  pr o gr ess  be  made  in 
cr o ss­ S t r ait  r elat io ns­ ­ t hat   it  will  be  mad e  o n  t he  basis  o f  st r o ng 
su pp o r t   fr o m  t he  peo ple  o f  T aiwan  as  a  who le. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Mr .   S chiffer ,   do   yo u  have 
anyt hing  yo u   want   t o   add? 
          MR.   S CHI FFE R:     No ,   no t hing   t o   ad d. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Okay.     Alt ho ugh  we'r e  no w  at 
t he  t ime  when  we  sho uld  let   yo u  fello ws  go ,   do   yo u  have  a  few  mo r e 
minu t es?    T her e  ar e  a  co uple  o f  Co mmissio ner s  who   have  fo llo w­ u p 
q u est io ns;  if  we  g ive  t hem  t wo ­ minut e  fo llo w­ up  quest io ns,   t hat   might 
be  u seful. 
          Co mmissio ner   Blument hal. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     S ur e.     T he  st at ement   is  t o 
bo t h  o f  yo u .     Mr .   S hear ,   I   did   no t   mean  t o   put   yo u  o n  t he  spo t .     T his 
inco nsist ency  has  been  pu zzling  me  since  I   ser ved   in  go ver nment ,   and 
we  even  had  peo ple  in  t he  Bush  ad minist r at io n  say  we  wo u ld  g o   ahead 
and   o pp o se  T aiwan  indep endence.
                                                    ­ 38 ­ 
          I   gu ess  my  po int   is,   is  if  we  want   a  peaceful  r eso lu t io n,   we  have 
t o   keep  all  o pt io ns  and  flexibilit y  o n  t he  t able  and  no t   be  inco nsist ent 
abo u t   any  o ne  o f  t ho se  o p t io ns.  T his  has  been  a  lo ng st anding  lo gical 
inco nsist ency  t hat   I   t hink  fo r eclo ses  flexibilit y. 
          Bu t   my  fo llo w­ up   q uest io n  is  o n  t he  quest io n  o f  t he  F­ 16  C/ Ds 
and   so me  o f  t he  t hings  yo u  said,   Mr .   S chiffer ,   r efer r ing  t o   t he 
su r vivabilit y  and   so   fo r t h,   it   seems  lik e  we'r e  ho ld ing  T aiwan  t o   a  higher 
st and ar d  t han  o u r   o wn  Air   Fo r ce.     Kadena  and   Guam  ar e  no t   any  mo r e 
o r   less  har dened,   fr o m  my  und er st anding,   u nless  t hings  have  chang ed , 
t han  T aiwan  is.     Yet   we  co nt inue  t o   have  an  Air   Fo r ce  deplo yed   in  t ho se 
p laces. 
          I   wo nder   why  we  d o n't   have  a  p o licy  t hat   says  because  o f  t he 
clear  r eq uir ement   t hat   says  we'r e  go ing   t o   har d en  t ho se  places,   help 
T aiwan  har d en  t ho se  places  and  sell  t hem  t he  weapo ns  t hey  need,   ju st   as 
we'r e  go ing   t o   har den  o u r   o wn  bases,   which  ar e  no t   any  mo r e  har d ened? 
          MR.   S CHI FFE R:     I   t hink  we'r e  paying  an  awfu l  lo t   o f  at t ent io n  t o 
t hat   exact   set   o f  q uest io ns  r eg ar d ing  o ur   bases  in  t he  r eg io n  as  well,   and 
t hat 's  an  issue  t hat   we'r e  gr app ling  wit h  t her e  also . 
          I   d idn't   want   t o   sugg est   in  my  st at ement ,   and  I   ho pe  no   o ne  t o o k 
it   as  su ch,   a  decisio n  o ne  way  o r   ano t her   o n  t his  issue.     I   was  ju st 
mer ely  t r ying   t o   sket ch  o ut   t hat   it 's  a  mu ch  mo r e,   get t ing  t o   t he  r ight 
answer   o n  t he  qu est io n  o f  ho w  we  assur e  t hat   T aiwan  is  able  t o   maint ain 
su fficient   d o minance  o f  it s  air sp ace  is  a  mu ch  mo r e  co mplicat ed 
q u est io n  t han  just   so r t   o f  a  simp le,   o kay,   her e's  we  have  t his  challeng e 
so  t his  p ar t icu lar   syst em  in  and  o f  it self,   by  it self,   is  t he  answer . 
          And   as  we  g r apple  wit h  t his  quest io n  o f  what   t he  r ight   answer   is 
t o   assur e  t hat   T aiwan  has  sufficient   co nt r o l  o f  it s  air space,   we'r e  cycling 
t hr o u gh  a  who le  r ange  o f  int er co nnect ed   quest io ns.     T hat 's  all  I   was 
su gg est ing . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     T hank  yo u.     T hank  yo u,   bo t h. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
          Co mmissio ner   S hea. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     I   also   want   t o   t hank  yo u  bo t h  fo r   being 
her e. 
          I 've  just   g o t   t hr ee  q uick  quest io ns.     I t 's  my  u nder st and ing  under 
t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act ,   t he  Unit ed   S t at es  is  no t   r equir ed  t o   int er vene 
milit ar ily  in  t he  event   o f  a  co nflict   bet ween  T aiwan  and  t he  P RC.     I s 
t hat   co r r ect ? 
          MR.   S HE AR:     T hat   is  co r r ect . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     Okay.     Do   yo u  t hink  t he  pr o spect   o f 
t he  U. S . ­ ­ I   t hink  t his  is  called  "st r at egic  ambigu it y"­ ­ t he  pr o spect   o r   t he 
p o ssibilit y  o f  U. S .   milit ar y  int er vent io n  in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait s  enhances 
t he  secu r it y  o f  T aiwan? 
          MR.   S HE AR:     I   t hink  it   do es. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     Ok ay.     Mr .   S chiffer ,   do   yo u  agr ee? 
          MR.   S CHI FFE R:     Yes,   I   wo uld  agr ee  wit h  t hat .
                                                  ­ 39 ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:  Go ing  back  t o  t he  issue  Co mmissio ner 
Wessel  r aised ­ ­ I 've  been  hear ing/ r eading  abo ut   t his  ant i­ ship  ballist ic 
missile  t hat 's  go ing  t o   deny  po t ent ially  access  o f  t he  U. S .   milit ar y  int o 
t he  r egio n.     I f  t he  P RC  wer e  t o   t est   and   deplo y  such  a  weapo n,   ho w 
wo u ld   t hat   impact   yo ur   analysis  o f  T aiwan's  defensive  milit ar y  needs? 
           MR.   S CHI FFE R:  We  wo uld  have  t o   t ak e  it   int o   acco unt   if  and 
when  it   happ ened  and ,   yet ,   ag ain,   I   mean  t hese  ar e  pr ecisely  t he  so r t s  o f 
q u est io ns  t hat   we  ar e  co nst ant ly  assessing  as  we  t r y  t o   det er mine  bo t h 
what   o ur   needs  ar e  t o   assur e  t hat   U. S .   fo r ces  have  t he  capabilit ies  t hat 
t hey  need ,   t he  po st u r e  t hat   t hey  need ,   t he  pr esence  t hey  need ,   in  t he 
r eg io n,   t o   be  able  t o   co nt inu e  t o   under wr it e  peace  and  st abilit y  in  t he 
Asia­ P acific  r egio n  as  we  have  successfully  fo r   60   year s  no w,   as  well  as 
what   t he  implicat io ns  o f  any  o f  t hese  develo pment s  ar e  fo r   o ur   allies  and 
fo r   o u r   p ar t ner s  in  t he  r egio n. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     Ok ay.     T hank  yo u. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Co mmissio ner   Fiedler . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Ju st   a  quick  qu est io n  o n  China's 
r eact io n  t o   t his  package  and  t heir   t hr eat s  o f  r et aliat io n  ag ainst   U. S . 
co mp anies. 
           Do   yo u ,   as  t he  go ver nment ,   co nsider   t hat   t o   be  ser io u s  o r   ju st   a 
new  fo r m  o f  whining   abo ut   o u r   po licy? 
           MR.   S HE AR:     I n  gener al  t er ms,   t he  Chinese  r eact io n  t o   t he 
no t ificat io n  did  no t   exceed  o u r   expect at io ns,   no r   did  it   exceed  what   t he 
Chinese  have  d o ne  in  t he  p ast   except   fo r   t he  t hr eat   o f  sanct io ns  o n  U. S . 
fir ms  invo lved   in  t he  ar ms  sale. 
           T he  Chinese  have  no t ­ ­ as  far   as  I   k no w­ ­ t he  Chinese  have  no t 
imp lement ed   t hat   t hr eat .     T hey  have  no t   yet   imp o sed   any  sanct io ns  o n 
U. S .   fir ms. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:  S o ,   t her efo r e,   am  I   r ight   t o   assu me 
t hat   we  t ak e  t his  t hr eat   ser io usly,   ar e  mo nit o r ing  it ,   and   t hat   if  it 
o ccur s,   t hat   it   pr esent s  a  fair ly  sig nificant   p r o blem  in  U. S . ­ China 
r elat io ns?    "I t "  being   a  explicit ,   alt ho ug h  we  saw­ ­ half  o f  u s  believe  t hat 
t hey  have  t he  mo r e  so phist icat ed   use  o f  p o lit ical  t hr eat s  fo r   eco no mic 
g ain,   but ,   in  t his  case,   it   wo uld  be  a  blat ant   differ ence  in  t heir   po licy  o f 
d ealing   wit h  us. 
           MR.   S HE AR:     We'r e  cer t ainly  wat ching  t he  sit u at io n  ver y  clo sely. 
  We  t o o k   st r o ng  no t e  o f  what   t he  Chinese  said,   and  we  wo u ld  view  wit h 
co ncer n  any  implement at io n  o f  t he  t hr eat . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     T hank  yo u. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     I   want   t o   t hank   bo t h  o ur 
wit nesses,   and   we  want   t o   t hank   S t at e  and  Do D  fo r   being  so   helpful  t o 
t his  Co mmissio n  o ver   t he  year s. 
           We'r e  g o ing   t o   t ake  a  seven­ minut e  br eak,   and   t hen  we'll  co me 
back   wit h  o u r   next   p anel. 
           T hank  yo u,   again,   gent lemen. 
           [ Wher eupo n,   a  sho r t   r ecess  was  t aken. ]
                                                  ­ 40 ­ 
                          PANEL  III:     M ILITARY  AS PECTS 

           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     I f  yo u  t ake  yo ur   seat s,  we'll 
g et   st ar t ed.  I n  t his  next  panel  we'll  examine  t he  cr o ss­ S t r ait   milit ar y 
balance  and  what   it   means  fo r   t he  Unit ed  S t at es. 
           We'r e  jo ined   by  t hr ee  exper t   wit nesses  t o   help  us  explo r e  t he 
t o p ic,   and  we'r e  delight ed   t o   have  t hem. 
           Ou r   fir st   speaker   will  be  Mar k   S t o kes.     He's  E xecut ive  Dir ect o r   o f 
t he  P r o ject   204 9   I nst it ut e,   a  no npr o fit   t hink  t ank  t hat   fo cuses  o n  fut ur e 
secu r it y  assessment s  o f  E ast   Asia. 
           He  was  t he  fo und er   and   P r esid ent   o f  Quant um  P acific  E nt er pr ises 
and   Vice  P r esident   and  T aiwan  Co unt r y  Manager   fo r   Rayt heo n 
I nt er nat io nal.   He  is  a  20 ­ year   Air   Fo r ce  vet er an  and  has  ser ved   as  T eam 
Chief  and   S enio r   Co unt r y  Dir ect o r   fo r   China,   T aiwan  and  Mo ngo lia  in 
t he  Office  o f  t he  S ecr et ar y  o f  Defense  fo r   I nt er nat io nal  S ecur it y  Affair s, 
and   as  air  at t aché  in  China. 
           Ou r   next   speak er   will  be  David  S hlapak.     He's  a  S enio r 
I nt er nat io nal  P o licy  Analyst   at   t he  RAND  Co r po r at io n.     Beg inning  in 
t he  lat e  199 0 s,   S hlapak  help ed  wr it e  a  nu mber   o f  st udies  o n  t he 
st r at eg ic  challeng es  pr esent ed   by  China's  r ise. 
           He  has  also   p ublished  o n  t he  milit ar y  and  st r at egic  asp ect s  o f  t he 
China­ T aiwan  co nfr o nt at io n  and   t he  S ino ­ U. S .   secur it y  r elat io nship , 
inclu d ing  co ­ au t ho r ing  last   year 's  st ud y,   "A  Quest io n  o f  Balance: 
P o lit ical  Co nt ext   and   Milit ar y  Aspect s  o f  t he  China­ T aiwan  Disput e. " 
           T he  final  sp eak er   is  Dr .   Alber t   Willner .     Al  is  Dir ect o r   o f  t he 
China  S ecur it y  Affair s  Gr o up   at   t he  no np r o fit   r esear ch  inst it u t e,   CNA. 
P r io r   t o   CNA,   he  was  Asso ciat e  Dean  at   Geo r gia  Gwinnet t   Co llege 
wher e  he  r esear ched  Chinese  defense  p o licy,   China­ T aiwan  secur it y 
issu es,   and  U. S . ­ China  milit ar y  r elat io ns. 
           He's  a  r et ir ed   U. S .   Ar my  Co lo nel,   and  in  200 5,   Dr .   Willner   was 
t he  fir st   act ive­ du t y  U. S .   Defense  At t aché  equivalent   assig ned   t o 
T aiwan  since  1979 .     He  was  in  char ge  o f  r epr esent ing  t he  U. S . 
Dep ar t ment   o f  Defense  int er est s  in  su ppo r t ing  U. S . ­ P acific  Co mmand 
init iat ives.     He  ho lds  a  P h. D.   in  Fo r eig n  Affair s  fr o m  t he  Univer sit y  o f 
Vir g inia. 
           We  t hank  yo u   all  fo r   being  her e  t o get her   t o day.     We'll  st ar t   wit h 
Mr .   S t o k es,   and  it 's  seven  minut es. 


 S TATEM ENT  O F  M R.  M ARK   S TO K ES ,   EXECUTIVE  DIRECTO R 
      PRO JECT  20 49   INS TITUTE,   ARLING TO N,   VIRG INIA 

          MR.   S T OKE S :     T hank  yo u ,   sir . 
          I   app r eciat e  t he  o pp o r t unit y  t o   appear   her e  befo r e  t his  est eemed 
g r o u p  and  aside  co lleag ues  her e.
                                                 ­ 41 ­ 
          T o   be  able  t o   st ick  wit hin  t hat  par t icular   limit at io n,   I 'll  keep   my 
r emar k s  limit ed   t o   fo ur   p o int s,   and  t he  fir st   po int   being  I   kno w  it 's  been 
d iscussed   alr eady,   bu t   it 's  useful,   as  a  r emind er ,   t o   po int   o u t   t he  basis 
o f  U. S .   p o licy  wit h  r eg ar d   t o   T aiwan  and  t he  basis  fo r   U. S .   r elat io ns 
wit h  t he  P eo p le's  Repu blic  o f  China,   and  t hat   basis  lies  wit hin  t he 
T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act . 
          What 's  useful  t o   highlight   is  t he  emp hasis  o n  peaceful  r eso lut io n 
o f  p o lit ical  differ ences  bet ween  t he  t wo   sides  o f  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait . 
What 's  impo r t ant   her e  is  t hat  o ne  o f  t he  fundament al  o bst acles,   o r   at 
least   fr o m  Beijing's  per spect ive,   o bst acles  t o   U. S . ­ P RC  r elat io ns  has  t o 
d o   wit h  t he  d efinit io n  o f  what   peaceful  r eso lut io n  is. 
          Beijing  d o es  a  ver y  g o o d  jo b  at   cast ing  blame  o n  t he  Unit ed   S t at es 
fo r   it s  ar ms  sales,  but   t he  r ealit y  is  t he  U. S .   defines  a  peacefu l 
r eso lu t io n  in  t er ms  o f  t he  nat u r e  o f  t he  milit ar y  challenge,   and  milit ar y 
t hr eat   t hat   t he  P RC  p o ses  t o   T aiwan,   wher eas,   t he  P RC  has  a  d iffer ent 
int er p r et at io n. 
          S o   I   ju st   want   t o   t hr o w  t hat   o ut ,   t hat   t he  U. S .  r equ ir ement   t o 
p r o vide  fo r   T aiwan's  d efense  and  sell  necessar y  defense  ar t icles  and 
ser vices  is  based   u po n  t he  T aiwan  Relat io ns  Act . 
          A  seco nd   po int .   T he  P RC,  despit e  imp r o vement s  in  cr o ss­ S t r ait 
r elat io ns  and  deepening   and   br o adening  eco no mic  int er depend ence,   has 
yet   t o   r eno unce  use  o f  fo r ce  t o   r eso lve  it s  differ ences  wit h  T aiwan,   as 
well  as  effect   a  visible  and  t angible  r edu ct io n  in  it s  milit ar y  po st ur e 
o p p o sit e  T aiwan. 
          T aiwan  faces  a  sig nificant   challenge  t o day,   as  d o es  t he  Unit ed 
S t at es.     Cent r al  t o   t he  challenge,   I   wo uld   ar gue,   ar e  t he  five  br igades  o f 
sho r t ­ r ange  ballist ic  missiles,   missiles  subo r dinat e  t o   t he  S eco nd 
Ar t iller y,  t hat   ar e  deplo yed   in  so ut heast   China  o pp o sit e  T aiwan. 
          I t   canno t   be  o ver st at ed   t hat  t his  is  r eally  t he  pr o blem.     T her e 
wo u ld  be  an  eq uilibr iu m  if  it   wer en't   fo r   t hese  ballist ic  missiles,   bu t   t his 
is  t he  k ey  po int . 
          T he  t hir d   issu e  t o   ad dr ess  ar e  fundament al  differ ences  in 
ap pr o aching  T aiwan's  r eq uir ement s,   and  t hese  depend  upo n  t he  scenar io 
in  which  yo u   lo o k   at   t he  po t ent ial  fo r  P RC  use  o f  fo r ce,   o ne  being 
co er cive  at   t he  lo wer   end  o f  t he  spect r u m,   and  o ne  being,   fo r   lack  o f  a 
bet t er   t er m,  annihilat ive,   usually  in  t he  fo r m  o f  an  amp hibio us  invasio n, 
wit h  t he  differ ences  being  a  who le  r ange  o f  o pt io ns  in  bet ween. 
          Mo st   st ud ies  and  mo st   analyses  ar e  do ne  wit hin  t he  co nt ext   o f  an 
annihilat ive  t ype  scenar io ,   an  amphibio us  invasio n.     S o   I   wo uld  like  t o 
mak e  t hat   po int   and  ad dr ess  quest io ns  lat er . 
          T he  fo ur t h  and   last   po int ,   I   believe  t he  Obama  administ r at io n  and 
Dep ar t ment   o f  Defense  is  do ing  well  and  co nt inuing  a  t r adit io n  o ver 
su ccessive  administ r at io ns  in  pr o vid ing   fo r   T aiwan's  defense. 
          T her e  is  st ill  a  lo t   mo r e  t o   be  do ne.     I n  my  view,   t he  mo st 
imp o r t ant   pr io r it y  fo r   T aiwan  is  in  t he  ar ea  o f  C4I S R,   Co mmand , 
Co nt r o l,   Co mmunicat io ns,  Co mp ut er s,   I nt ellig ence  S ur veillance  and
                                                   ­ 42 ­ 
Reco nnaissance.     T he  r easo n  why  t his  is  so   fundament al,   yet   o ft en 
fo r go t t en,   t o   u se  an  analo g y  like  o xygen,   o xyg en  is  so   fundament al,   but 
it 's  o nly  r ealized   ho w  impo r t ant   it   is  o nce  yo u  lo se  it . 
          T he  C4I S R  is  cr it ical  fo r   T aiwan's  d efense,   all  t he  way  fr o m 
co mmunicat io ns  t hat   ar e  sur vivable,   t o   co mmand   and   co nt r o l  syst ems, 
and   all  t he  way  t o   senso r s,   being   able  t o   see  t hr eat s  ar o u nd  yo u,   and  it 's 
no t   ju st   fo r   milit ar y,   but   it 's  also   fo r   disast er   r espo nse  and   a  who le 
r ang e  o f  o t her   emer g encies. 
          Air   defenses  ar e  cr it ical.     As  an  Air   Fo r ce  o fficer ,   I 'd  be  r emiss  in 
no t   p o int ing  o u t   t hat   when  it   co mes  t o   milit ar y  co nflict ,   co nt r o l  o f  t he 
air   is  key,   and   it   go es  all  t he  way  fr o m  a  limit ed  use  o f  fo r ce  lik e  we 
saw  in  t he  19 96   missile  exer cises,   1 999  flight s  o ver   t he  T aiwan  S t r ait , 
all  t he  way  t o   a  denial  t ype  o f  scenar io .   And  so   t his  is  a  key  pr io r it y. 
          S ea  denial  is  also   k ey.     S ubmar ines  have  a  useful  r o le  and  ar e  a 
leg it imat e  r eq u ir ement .     And  all  t he  way  t o   gr o und  fo r ces. 
          S o   wit h  t hat ,   I   will  wr ap  up  my  r emar ks  and   leave  it   o pen  t o 
q u est io ns.     T hank  yo u,   sir . 
          [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 

Prep ared   S t a t emen t   o f  M r.  M ark  S t okes,   Execu t i ve  Di rect o r,   Proj ect 
                      20 49   In st i t u t e,   Arli n gt on ,   Vi rgi n i a 

Mr. Chairman, thank you for the opportunity to participate in today’s hearing on a topic that is important 
to U.S. interests in peace and stability in the Asia­Pacific region.  It is an honor to testify here today. 
A  proper  starting  point  is  a  brief  review  of  the  Taiwan  Relations  Act  (TRA).    The  TRA  highlights  the 
U.S.  expectation  that  Taiwan’s  future  will  be  determined  by  peaceful  means,  considers  non­peaceful 
solutions  a  challenge  to  regional  peace  and  security,  provides  the  basis  for  U.S.  provision  of  arms  of 
defensive character, and the need to maintain the capacity of the United States to resist any resort to force 
or other forms of coercion that jeopardize the security, or social or economic system of Taiwan. 

At the same time, healthy and constructive relations between the United States and People’s Republic of 
China  (PRC)  are  important  and founded upon understandings outlined in the three Joint Communiqués. 
An  important  yet  often  overlooked  aspect  of  these  understandings  is  an  assumption  of  Beijing’s 
commitment  to  a  peaceful  approach  to  resolving  its  political  differences  with  Taiwan.  However, 
fundamental  differences  exist  over  what  constitutes  a  peaceful  approach.    Beijing  views  its  military 
posture as ensuring a peaceful approach in part by deterring what it perceives as moves on Taiwan toward 
de  jure  independence.    However,  successive  U.S.  administrations  have  defined  a  peaceful  approach  in 
terms of the nature of the PRC military posture arrayed against toward Taiwan. As a result, U.S. sales of 
defense  articles  and  services  in  accordance  with  the  TRA  are  driven  by  the  nature  of  the  military 
challenge that the PRC poses to Taiwan. 
In  addition,  it  is  worth  noting  up  front  that  the  military  dimension  of  cross­Strait  relations  is  only  one 
aspect  of  a  broader  dynamic  that  contains  elements  of  both  cooperation  and  competition.    Subsequent 
panels  today  will  address  growing  economic  interdependencies.  Despite  unfavorable  odds,  Taiwan  has 
not  only  flourished  but  has played a central yet often unacknowledged role in a gradual liberalization of 
the PRC since initiation of its far­reaching economic reforms.  Over the past 25 years, Taiwan has become 
a hidden yet major factor behind China's economic reforms and rapid export­driven growth that has been 
essential  for  domestic  stability,  modernization,  and  potential  gradual  political  liberalization.  These 
reforms,  facilitated  by  a  massive  infusion  of  capital  and  expertise  from  Taiwan,  have  increased  the 
population’s standard of living, literacy, and relative level of personal freedom.
                                                       ­ 43 ­ 
Economic  interdependence  has  the  dual  effect  of  discouraging  moves  that  challenge  fundamental  PRC 
interests with regards to perceived moves toward de jure independence on the one hand, while furthering 
the  peaceful  transformation  of  China  on  the  other.  As economic ties have grown, Beijing appears to be 
softening its approach to dealing with Taiwan while at the same time continuing to advance its ability to 
exercise military force.  Paradoxically, despite the PRC’s ability to impose its will upon Taiwan through 
military  means,  the  costs  of  doing  so  are  rising  at  an  exponential  rate.    Non­military  factors,  such  as 
growing  economic interdependence, may increasingly dampen moves on either side of the Taiwan Strait 
to adopt policies that challenge fundamental interests of the other. 

Perhaps the greatest challenge to cross­Strait relations continues to be the PRC’s refusal to renounce use 
of force to resolve its political differences with Taiwan.  However, renunciation of use of force by itself is 
not  enough.    An  end  to  the  state of hostility between the two sides of the Taiwan Strait would require a 
tangible decrease in the nature of the military threat that Chinese authorities and the military force under 
their control pose to the people on Taiwan and their democratically elected leadership.  Overall trends in 
cross­Strait  relations  makes  continued  reliance  on  implicit  or  explicit  use  of  military  force  increasingly 
outdated and even counterproductive. 
Taiwan’s  influence  in  China  likely  will  continue  well  into  the  future.    Guided  by  the  Taiwan  Relations 
Act, a strong defense has enabled Taiwan to withstand PRC coercion, foster democratic institutions, and 
given  Taiwan  and  its  people  the  confidence  needed  for  the  deepening  and  broadening  of  cross­Strait 
economic  and  cultural  interactions.    In  short,  there  is  no  logical  disconnect  between  efforts  to  improve 
cross­Strait  economic  and  political  relations,  Taiwan’s  desire  for  a  strong  defense,  and  procurement  of 
defense articles from the United States. 
Trends in PRC Military Capabilities 
The PRC is steadily broadening its military options that could be exercised against Taiwan, including the 
ability to use force at reduced cost in terms of lives, equipment, and overall effects on the country’s longer 
term  development  goals.  Investment  priorities  include  increasingly  accurate  and  lethal  theater  ballistic 
and land attack cruise missiles; development and acquisition of multi­role fighters; development of stand­ 
off  and  escort jammers; and ground force assets such as attack helicopters and special operations forces. 
At the same time, Beijing is investing in advanced command, control, communications, and intelligence 
systems and is increasing emphasis on training, including increased use of simulation. 
Beyond  simply  developing  a broader range of military options that could be applied against Taiwan, the 
PRC also is focused on developing the means to deny or complicate the ability or willingness of the United 
States  to  intervene  in  response  to  PRC  use  of  force  around  its  periphery.  Evolving  capabilities  include 
extended  range  conventional  precision  strike  assets  that  could  be  used  to  suppress  U.S.  operations  from 
forward  bases  in  Japan,  from  U.S.  aircraft  battle  groups  operating  in  the  Western  Pacific,  and  perhaps 
over the next five to 10 years from U.S. bases on Guam. 
Aerospace  power  will  become  an  increasingly  powerful  instrument  of  PRC  coercion  as  the  range  and 
number  of  PLA  strike  aviation  assets  increase,  land  attack  cruise  missiles  are  fielded,  their  inventory of 
increasingly  lethal  and  accurate  theater  ballistic  missiles  expands,  and  sophisticated  electronic  attack 
assets  are  deployed.    Aerospace  power  likely  will  dominate  any  conflict  in  the  Taiwan  Strait  and  could 
shape  its  ultimate  outcome.  PLA  planners  may  perceive  that  an  aerospace  campaign,  involving  the 
integrated  application  of  theater  missiles,  electronic  warfare,  and  strike  aviation  assets,  offers  the  PRC 
political  leadership  with  quick,  decisive  political  results,  perhaps  more  so  than  other  options,  such  as 
gradual escalation involving a series of island seizures or slow strangulation through a maritime blockade. 
Balance and Assumptions 

With the foregoing in mind, a relative erosion of Taiwan’s military capabilities could create opportunities 
and  incentives  for  Beijing’s  political  and  military  leadership  to  assume  greater  risk  in  cross­Strait 
relations,  including  resorting  to  force  to  resolve  political  differences.    The  cross­Strait  security  situation 
often  is  viewed  within  the  context  of  a  military  balance.    However,  PLA  capabilities  should  be  judged 
against specific political objectives in a given scenario and assessed in light of Taiwan’s vulnerabilities, as 
well as assumptions upon which U.S. decisions in fulfilling TRA obligations are made.

                                                       ­ 44 ­ 
Evaluating  basic  assumptions  may  serve  as  a  useful  starting  point.    Assumptions  are  an  important 
foundation for the deliberate and force planning process and in assessing Taiwan’s required capabilities. 
At least two assumptions may be most relevant: 1) independent defense vs. external intervention; and 2) 
coercive courses of action vs. annihilative/invasion. 
To  begin  with,  should  Taiwan  assume  U.S.  intervention  as  the  basis  for  strategic  and  operational 
planning?    If  there  is  a  high  degree  of  certainty  of  external  assistance,  such  as  that  found  in  a  formal 
alliance,  then  this  likely  would  lead  to  a  different  set  of  priorities  in  the  force  planning  and  acquisition 
process.    While  there  is  good  reason  to  hope  and  plan  for  potential  ad  hoc  coalition  operations  with 
intervening U.S. forces, the TRA is no substitute for a mutual defense treaty.  In the absence of a formal 
alliance  commitment,  prudence  seems  to  suggest  that  independent  defense  should  serve  as  a  formal 
planning  assumption  and  the  basis  upon  which  U.S.  policy  decisions  with  regard  to  release  of  defense 
articles. 
A  second  fundamental  assumption  relates  to  possible  PRC  courses  of  action.    If  one  judges  Taiwan’s 
requirements on a worst­case, least likely course of action, then the conclusions reached could be different 
from judgments based on more likely coercive courses of action.  Within this context, assessments of the 
capabilities required for sufficient self­defense can be inherently subjective. 
At its most basic level, debates could surround whether most likely courses of action could be coercive in 
nature, or annihilative through a full scale invasion.  An amphibious invasion is the least likely yet most 
dangerous scenario and the basis upon which most assessments of Taiwan’s requirements are made.  It is 
easier to evaluate military balances when political, psychological, economic, and factors are removed. 
However,  annihilation  involving  the  physical  occupation  of  Taiwan  is  the  least  likely  course  of  action. 
PRC  decision  makers  could  resort  to  coercive  uses  of  force,  short  of  a  full  scale  invasion,  in  order  to 
achieve limited political objectives.  Coercive strategies could include a demonstrations of force as seen in 
the  1995/1996  missile  exercises,  1999  flights  in  the  Taiwan,  or  in  the  future  a  blockade  intended  to 
pressure  decision  makers  in  Taiwan  to  assent  to  Chinese  demands,  strategic  paralysis  involving  attacks 
against the islands critical infrastructure, limited missile strikes, flights around the island, just to name a 
few. 
A coercive campaign could be geared toward inflicting sufficient pain or instilling fear in order to coerce 
Taiwan’s  leadership  to  agree  to  negotiations  on  Beijing’s  terms,  a  timetable  for  unification,  immediate 
political  integration,  or  other  political  goals.    Military  coercion  succeeds  when  the  adversary  gives  in 
while it still has the power to resist and is different from brute force, an action that involves annihilation 
and total destruction. 
Prominent  PLA  political  analysts  believe  coercive  approaches  offer  the  optimal  solution  to  minimize 
negative international repercussions in the wake of using force against Taiwan to achieve limited political 
objectives.    According  to  one  PLA  observer,  a  full  scale  military  assault  is  “the  largest  scale  and  most 
violent  military  operation  that  hopes  to  achieve  unification  in  one  stroke  and  will  be  the  most  likely 
operation to cause the most serious U.S. military intervention.” While confident China could prevail in a 
determined attempt to occupy the island, even in the face of limited U.S. military intervention, observers 
believe that the likelihood of a new Cold War in the Asia­Pacific region would be the costly consequence 
of a brute force, annihilative solution.  Such a situation would imperil China’s broader national goals and 
may be unnecessary to achieve more limited political goals. 
PRC  leaders  may  believe  that  Taiwan’s  central  leadership  has  a  low  threshold  for  pain  and  would 
acquiesce shortly after limited strikes.  However, others do seem to believe that coercive measures such as 
a  blockade  or  occupation  of  a  few  off­shore  islands  leaves  too  much  to  “luck”  since  the  Taiwan 
leadership’s threshold is difficult to calculate. 
Regardless, a couple of examples may help in illustrate the differences between coercive and annihilative 
scenarios  in  the  context  of  U.S.  security  assistance.    First,  as  the  PRC  began  its  short  range  ballistic 
missile  (SRBM)  build­up  opposite  Taiwan  well  over  a  decade  ago,  Chinese  interlocutors  vehemently 
protested  the  potential  sale  of  systems,  such  as  PATRIOT  PAC­3,  which  could  undercut  the  coercive 
utility  of  the  SRBMs.    PRC  interlocutors  made  it  clear that the military utility of these systems in a full 
scale  military  confrontation  was  not  a  concern.    Missile  defenses can be saturated or exhausted in fairly 
short  order  through  a  combination  of  multi­axis  strikes,  maneuvering  re­entry  vehicles,  exhaustion  or 
saturation  through  large  scale  salvos,  and  a  range  of  other  missile  defense  countermeasures.    However,
                                                        ­ 45 ­ 
what made these systems egregious is that they weakened the coercive utility of China’s growing arsenal 
and  increasingly  accurate  and  lethal  ballistic  missiles,  limited  the  menu  of  coercive  courses  of  action 
available  to  PRC  political  and  military  leaders,  and  ostensibly  signified  a  deepening  of  the  bilateral 
relationship between Taiwan and the U.S. 
On  the  other  hand,  the  PRC  has  long  viewed  U.S.  support  for  Taiwan’s  acquisition  of  submarines  as 
another  red  line,  yet  for  different  reasons.    Submarines  are  viewed  as  having  significant  military  utility 
due  to  their  inherent  ability  to  survive  a  crippling  first  strike,  potential  ability  to  complicate  surface 
operations  in  an  amphibious  invasion  scenario,  and  possible  challenges  to  PRC  strategic  sea  lines  of 
communication  should  a  conflict  escalate  beyond  the  immediate  vicinity  of  Taiwan.  Yet  they  also  most 
likely could signify a broadening or deepening of operational linkages between the US and Taiwan. 
When viewed within a coercive context, Beijing is at war with Taiwan every day.  Use of force goes along 
a  continuum  from  "deterrence  warfare,"  perhaps  best  demonstrated  by  Beijing's  deployment  opposite 
Taiwan of five Second Artillery SRBM brigades under the People’s Liberation Army Second Artillery, all 
the  way  to  annihilation.    In  between  are  a  range  of  coercive  scenarios  involving  limited  applications  of 
force  to  achieve  limited  political  objectives.  The  1995/1996  missile  tests  and  1999  flight  activity  in  the 
Taiwan  Strait  are  examples  of  use  of  force  at  the  lower  end  of  the  violence  spectrum.    An  amphibious 
invasion  is  the  least  likely  scenario,  but  there  are  a  range  of  more  likely  coercive  courses  of  action  far 
short  of  annihilation.  Despite  Beijing's  arguments  to  the  contrary,  "deterrence  warfare"  is  hardly  a 
peaceful approach to resolving differences with Taiwan. 
Taiwan’s Defense Requirements: How Much is Enough and Toward What End? 
Taiwan faces perhaps the most daunting security challenges in the world.  Under significant pressure, the 
armed forces of the Republic of China (ROC) are transforming into a world­class military and the Obama 
administration, and Department of Defense (DoD) in particular, should be commended for efforts to date. 
 In  order  to  meet  the  evolving  challenges,  a  set  of  fundamental  capabilities  may  be  worth  considering, 
with  a  special  emphasis  on  cost  effective  solutions  that  could  address  a  broad  spectrum  of  coercive  and 
annihilative  challenges.    The  effectiveness  of  one  capability  over  another  depends  upon  the  effects  that 
policymakers are seeking.  If planning for a worst case scenario, then raising the costs to the PRC of using 
military force by denying it success in occupying and pacifying the island becomes critical.  A discussion 
of possible solutions could be broken down into the following capabilities:
      ·  Upgrading the island’s ability to ensure situational awareness and assured ability to communicate 
          in the most stressing of scenarios;

     ·    Denying the PRC command of the skies in the Taiwan area of operations;

     ·    Ensuring sea lines of communication remain open; and

     ·    Denying the PRC the ability to take and hold Taiwan. 

C4ISR.  One  of  the  most  fundamental  requirements  in  any  emergency situation is a survivable national 
command  and  control  system  that  with  sufficient  warning  of  impeding  dangers  and  a  survivable 
information infrastructure that could function in the most stressing of emergencies.  Taiwan has powerful 
incentives to field one of the most advanced and networked emergency management C4ISR systems in the 
world.  Whether  military  or  civilian,  responses  to  all  hazards  require maximal situational awareness and 
the  means  to  react  efficiently  and  effectively  to  prevent  a  further  deterioration  of  the  situation.  Perhaps 
best exemplifying Taiwan’s position at the cusp of the information revolution is the recent introduction of 
one of the world’s most sophisticated advanced tactical data link networks. The number of participants in 
the  network  today  remains  limited.  However,  assuming  proper  training  and  cultural  adjustments  can  be 
managed, the gradual expansion of the advanced data link network will solidify Taiwan’s position at the 
leading edge of the network­centric information revolution. 
However,  there  is  more  that  could  be  done  to  leverage  C4ISR  for  its  defense.  Enhancements  to  its 
command  and  control  system,  especially  in  the  area  of  anti­submarine  warfare  (ASW)  and  maritime 
domain  awareness,  would  better  prepare  the  island’s  civil  and  military  leadership  for  a  range  of 
emergency  situations.  Other  investments  could  be  worth  considering,  such  as  advanced  voice
                                                       ­ 46 ­ 
communication technologies and dual­use space systems (including electro­optical and synthetic aperture 
radar (SAR) remote sensing and broadband communication satellites), could prove invaluable to PRC use 
of  force,  as  well  as  disaster  warning,  recovery,  and  response.  These  capabilities  also  may  satisfy 
verification requirements in any future cross­Strait arms control regime. 
Air Defenses.  Denying the PRC unimpeded access to skies over the Taiwan Strait and Taiwan proper is a 
fundamental  requirement.    While  it  may  be  difficult  to  sustain  operations  indefinitely in an annihilative 
scenario,  air  and  air/missile  defense  assets  may  be  critical  in  resolving  a  conflict  in  its  early  stages  and 
help  defend  the  sovereignty  of  the  skies  over  Taiwan.    In  a  protracted  resistance,  it  may  be  within 
Taiwan’s ability to hold PLA pilots at risk for an extended period of time.  Among the basic requirements 
include effective early warning and survivable surveillance networks and air battle management systems; 
an integrated approach to defending against medium and short range ballistic missiles, land attack cruise 
missiles, anti­radiation missiles, unmanned aerial vehicles, and other airbreathing threats. 
If  viewed  from  an  annihilative  perspective,  and  the  goal  is  to  deny  the  PRC uncontested air superiority, 
sea  control,  and  ability  to  insert  a  sizable  force  onto  Taiwan  proper,  then  a  multi­role  manned platform 
able to conduct multiple missions is needed: close air support missions in support of the Army, maritime 
interdiction missions in support of the Navy, and extended range air defense against opposing fighters and 
other air assets.  The fourth mission is more sensitive: deep interdiction against critical nodes within the 
theater operational system. 
Maintaining  the  current  size  of  Taiwan’s  fighter  fleet,  consisting  of  roughly  400  fighters,  is  important. 
The fleet of 60 F­5E/F fighters that Taiwan acquired during the Reagan administration is nearing the end 
of its useful service life and sustaining four different airframes is a significant logistical burden. 
When matching these requirements against the need to take off and land using limited amount of runway, 
then an optimal solution could be a very short take off and landing airframe.  However, possible options 
likely  wouldn’t  enter  the  operational  force  for  an  extended  period  of  time.    From  this  perspective, 
Taiwan’s  desire  to  procure  additional  F­16s  is  understandable.    The  airframe  already  exists  in  the 
ROCAF’s  operational  inventory,  and  additional  F­16s  to  replace  other  airframes  could  reduce  the 
logistical  burden.  A  follow­on  procurement  of  F­16s  could  serve  as  a bridge pending the availability of 
very  short  take  off  and  landing  airframes,  or  reduction  of  the  PRC’s  military  posture  arrayed  against 
Taiwan.  While Taiwan’s current ability to rapidly repair runways is substantial and its bunkers housing 
aircraft are significant, more likely could be done to ensure continuity of air base operations. 
Denial of Sea Control. An integrated maritime surveillance network that could detect activity out into the 
open ocean appears to be a valid requirement.  Such a network could not only support military operations, 
but  also  could  be  invaluable  for  a  broad  range  of  other  missions,  including  border  control,  disaster 
warning,  counter­trafficking,  and  scientific  research.    Among the range of options include undersea and 
coastal surveillance, a network of low probability of intercept coastal surveillance radars, and unmanned 
aerial vehicles.  Taiwan’s acquisition within the last few years of fast attack boats also appears to be a step 
in the right direction.  The boats, with a lower radar cross section than larger frigates and destroyers, are 
able to operate with more flexibility in coastal waters.  Taiwan has a valid requirement for diesel electric 
submarines that not only would undercut the coercive value of the PRC’s growing naval capabilities, but 
also contribute toward countering an amphibious invasion. 
Counter  Invasion.  The  goal  in  a  counter­amphibious  landing  campaign  logically  would  be  to  identify 
and  target command and control nodes, negate as many amphibious landing ships as possible, and attrit 
invading  forces  to  the  maximum extent, preferably as far from shore as possible.  In order to reduce the 
size  of  attacking  forces,  joint  maritime  interdiction  is  key.  In theory, assuming sufficient munitions, an 
impenetrable  coastline  could  be  an  ultimate  deterrent.    In  addition  to  new  generation  attack  helicopters 
and anti­ship cruise missiles, also worth examining could be artillery­ or multiple rocket­launched shells 
with dual purpose improved conventional munitions (DPICM) or other submunitions. 

Concluding Remarks 
A  full  scale  military  conflict  between  the  two  sides  of  the  Taiwan  Strait  would  be  disaster,  not  only  for 
Taiwan  and  the  PRC,  but  for  the  United  States  and  the  world as a whole.  As the economies of the two 
sides of the Taiwan Strait become increasingly integrated, the chances for armed conflict, in effect a form 
of mutually assured economic destruction, are likely to diminish.  However, the PRC’s refusal to renounce
                                                        ­ 47 ­ 
use of force against Taiwan to resolve political differences and reduce its military posture arrayed against 
the  island  remains  an  obstacle  to  peace  and  stability  in  the  region.    Given  the  evolving  asymmetries  in 
military capabilities, innovative means must be found to raise the costs for PRC of force, regardless of how 
integrated the two economies become. 
Thank you.

          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u,   Mr .   S t o kes. 
          Mr .   S hlap ak. 

              S TATEM ENT  O F  M R.  DAVID  A.   S H LAPAK 
      S ENIO R  INTERNATIO NAL  PO LICY  ANALYS T,   TH E  RAND 
           CO RPO RATIO N,   PITTS B URG H ,   PENNS YLVANIA 

           MR.   S HLAP AK:     Go o d  mo r ning.     I   wo uld  like  t o   t hank  t he 
Co mmissio n  fo r   t he  o pp o r t u nit y  t o   t est ify.     I t 's  an  ho no r   t o   be  her e. 
           I t   seems  p ar ad o xical  t o   d iscuss  a  po t ent ial  China­ T aiwan  co nflict 
when  r elat io ns  bet ween  t he  t wo   ar e  smo o t her   flo wing  t o d ay  t han  t hey 
have  been  in  year s. 
           We  kno w,   ho wever ,   t hat   p o lit ical  t ides  can  change  almo st 
o ver night ,   while  it   t ak es  year s  t o   r ed r ess  a  milit ar y  balance  go ne  awr y. 
S o   p r udent   d efense  planner s  and  st r at egist s  in  t he  Unit ed   S t at es  and 
T aiwan  mu st   t her efo r e  r emain  at t ent ive  t o   t he  changing  cr o ss­ S t r ait 
balance.
           Fo r   2 0  year s,   China  has  wo r ked   t o   t r ansfo r m  t he  P eo ple's 
Liber at io n  Ar my  int o   a  mo der n  fo r ce  capable  o f  effect ive  o per at io ns  o n 
a  co nt emp o r ar y  bat t lefield .     While  it   is  impo r t ant   no t   t o   o ver st at e  it s 
p r o g r ess,   China's  milit ar y  has  st eadily  impr o ved  mo r e  o r   less  acr o ss  t he 
bo ar d .     T he  r esult   t o day  is  a  cr o ss­ S t r ait   milit ar y  balance  t hat   is  t ilt ed 
incr easingly  in  China's  favo r . 
           T his  mo der nizat io n  effo r t   ap pear s  t o   have  t wo   pr imar y  and 
int er lo ck ing   aims:   enhancing  China's  abilit y  t o   t ake  o ffensive  act io n 
ag ainst   T aiwan  while  pr event ing  effect ive  U. S .   int er vent io n. 
           A  k ey  t o   achieving  bo t h  t hese  go als  is  a  syner gy  bet ween  China's 
g r o wing  ar senal  o f  sur face­ t o ­ sur face  missiles  and  it s  incr easing ly 
mo der n  air   fo r ce. 
           China  has  fielded   o ver   1, 0 00  sho r t ­ r ange  ballist ic  missiles  and 
ad ds  abo u t   10 0   t o   it s  invent o r y  ever y  year .     T he  lat est   ver sio n  o f  t he 
missiles  o ffer   g r eat er   r ang es,   impr o ved  accur acy,   and  a  wider   var iet y  o f 
co nvent io nal  paylo ad s,   and   may  inco r po r at e  feat ur es  such  as  deco ys  and 
maneu ver ing   war head s  t o   help  d efeat   ant i­ missile  defenses. 
           A  pr ime  t ar get   fo r   t hese  missiles  wo uld  lik ely  be  T aiwan's  milit ar y 
air bases.     T he  P LA  co u ld  seek   t o   cr ipp le  T aiwan's  Air   Fo r ce  by 
at t ack ing   t he  r u nways  and  p ar ked   air cr aft   at   t hese  inst allat io ns. 
           T o   at t ack   a  r unway,   China  wo u ld  emplo y  missiles  wit h 
su bmu nit io n  p aylo ads  o p t imized   t o   cr eat e  cr at er s  in  t he  sur face.     I f 
eno u g h  cr at er s  ar e  pr o d uced,   t he  r unway  beco mes  unu sable.     Civil

                                                      ­ 48 ­ 
eng ineer   t eams  wo uld   wo r k  t o   r epair   t he  d amage,   bu t   t he  sheer   number 
o f  po t ho les  t hat   co u ld  be  cr eat ed,   and  China's  abilit y  t o   r eat t ack  bases, 
co u ld   keep   mo st   o r   all  o f  T aiwan's  Air   Fo r ce  o ut   o f  act io n  fo r   ho ur s  t o 
d ays. 
           S ince  no t   all  o f  T aiwan's  co mbat   air cr aft   can  be  acco mmo d at ed  in 
har d ened   shelt er s,   so me  ar e  t ypically  par ked  o u t side.     T hese  wo uld  be 
st r u ck  wit h  a  d iffer ent   kind   o f  submunit io n  war head,   o ne  o pt imized   t o 
d est r o y  any  war planes  t hat   mig ht   be  exp o sed  o n  t he  r amps. 
           Ou r   analysis  co nclud ed  t hat   bet ween  90  and  2 50   missiles  wo uld 
enable  China  t o   cut   ever y  r unway  at   T aiwan's  t en  main  fight er   bases  and 
d amage  o r   d est r o y  vir t u ally  ever y  u nshelt er ed   air cr aft   fo und  t her e. 
           T he  at t ack   wo u ld  decimat e  T aiwan's  abilit y  t o   defend  it self 
ag ainst   fo llo w­ o n  st r ik es  co nduct ed  by  manned  air cr aft   deliver ing 
p r ecisio n­ gu id ed   mu nit io ns  ag ainst   a  wide  var iet y  o f  t ar get s,   including 
har d ened   air cr aft   shelt er s. 
           China's  abilit y  t o   inflict   such  a  k no cko ut   blo w  t o   T aiwan's  Air 
Fo r ce  has  incr eased  in  r ecent   year s  as  t he  P LA  Air   Fo r ce  has  added 
mo der n  air cr aft   and  t he  asso ciat ed   weapo ns  t o   it s  ar senal.   T hese  jet s  ar e 
co mp ar able  t o   fo u r t h  g ener at io n  U. S .   fig ht er s  like  t he  F­ 15,   F­ 16,   and 
F/ A­ 1 8.     Only  t he  F­ 22   and   in  t he  fu t u r e  p er haps  t he  F­ 35  will  r et ain  a 
sig nificant  ed ge  o ver   China's  newer   fig ht er s,   and  even  t hey  co u ld  be 
o ver whelmed  by  t he  nu mber s  o f  air cr aft   t hat   China  co uld   emplo y. 
           Wer e  T aiwan's  Air   Fo r ce  supp r essed,   t he  U. S .   wo u ld  face  a 
d ifficult ,   p er haps  impo ssible,   t ask  t r ying   t o   p r o t ect   T aiwan's  air space  o n 
it s  o wn.     U. S .   Air   Fo r ce  fight er s  lack   well­ sit uat ed  bases  fr o m  which  t o 
o p er at e.     Bases  t hat   ar e  clo se  t o   T aiwan,   like  Kadena  in  Japan,   ar e 
t hr eat ened   by  Chinese  missiles,   while  t ho se  safer   fr o m  at t acks  su ch  as 
And er sen  in  Guam  ar e  a  lo ng  way  fr o m  t he  fight . 
           U. S .   Navy  air cr aft   car r ier s  wo uld  lik ewise  face  limit at io ns. 
Absent   a  lo ng  pr e­ war   war ning  per io d,   o nly  a  few  car r ier s,   p er haps  o nly 
o ne  o r   t wo ,   wo uld   be  o n  scene  at   t he  st ar t   o f  t he  co nflict .     T he 
r elat ively  small  nu mber   o f  U. S .   fig ht er s  t hat   wo uld  be  available  in  t hese 
cir cu mst ances  wo uld   face  an  uphill  st r ug gle  against   t he  mo r e  nu mer o us 
at t ack er s. 
           Ou r   analysis  indicat es  t hat   ad ding   5 0  new  fight er s  t o   T aiwan's  Air 
Fo r ce  mig ht   impr o ve  o ut co mes,   bu t   r esult s  depend  st r o ng ly  o n  t he 
island 's  air   bases  r emaining   o per at io nal. 
           A  new  F­ 16 C  t hat   canno t   fly  becau se  r u nways  ar e  clo sed  o r   o ne 
t hat   has  been  dest r o yed   while  p ar ked   o n  t he  t ar mac  o ffer s  no   advant age 
o ver   o lder   mo del  fig ht er s. 
           T her e  ar e  imp o r t ant   imp r o vement s  t hat   co uld  enhance  T aiwan's 
abilit y  t o  fly  and   fight .     Air   bases  co u ld  be  fur t her   har d ened   o r   T aiwan's 
Air   Fo r ce  co u ld  seek  t o   acqu ir e  sho r t   t ake­ o ff  ver t ical­ land ing  fight er s 
lik e  t he  F­ 35 B  t hat   r equ ir e  a  much  sho r t er   st r et ch  o f  r unway  fr o m  which 
t o   o p er at e.     T aiwan  co u ld   also   p r o cur e  ad dit io nal  mo bile  sur face­ t o ­ air 
missiles  mak ing   it   har der   fo r   China  t o   fully  suppr ess  it s  air   defenses.
                                                  ­ 49 ­ 
           E ach  o f  t hese  so lu t io ns  wo uld   be  expensive  and   o nly  a  par t ial 
so lu t io n  t o   t he  p r o blems  co nfr o nt ing  T aiwan.     I mplement ing  all  t hr ee 
o p t io ns  mig ht   be  mo r e  r o bust ,   bu t   wo uld  likely  be  p r o hibit ively  co st ly 
and   t ake  year s  t o   acco mplish. 
           Over all,   t he  d iffer ence  bet ween  yest er day's  cr o ss­ S t r ait   balance 
and   t o d ay's  is,  aft er   decad es  o f  o ffset t ing  t he  mainland's  quant it at ive 
su per io r it y  by  explo it ing   decisive  qu alit at ive  advant ages,   T aiwan  and 
t he  Unit ed   S t at es  have  seen  it s  qu alit at ive  ed ges  er o de  while  t he 
numer ical  hand icap   per sist s. 
           T his  det er io r at ing  cr o ss­ S t r ait   milit ar y  balance  has  t wo   impo r t ant 
imp licat io ns  fo r   t he  Unit ed  S t at es.     One  is  mo r e  immediat e;  o ne  is 
lo ng er ­ t er m. 
           T he  jo b  o f  d efend ing   T aiwan  is  get t ing  har der .     Fo r   t he  fir st   t ime 
since  t he  Co ld  War ,   t he  Unit ed   S t at es  faces  a  p o t ent ial  challenger   t hat 
can  co mpet e  wit h  it   in  ever y  r elevant   d imensio n  o f  war far e:   in  t he  air , 
o n  and   und er   t he  sea,   in  space,  and  alo ng  t he  info r mat io n  fr o nt ier . 
           P LA  mo d er nizat io n  do es  no t   bo d e  well  fo r   fut ur e  st abilit y  acr o ss 
t he  T aiwan  S t r ait ,   and  t her e  appear   t o   be  no   quick,   easy  o r   inexpensive 
ways  o ut . 
           I n  t he  lo nger   t er m,   t he  Unit ed  S t at es  and   T aiwan  may  co nfr o nt   a 
fu ndament al  st r at egic  d ilemma,   o ne  inher ent   in  t he  geo gr ap hy  o f  t he 
sit u at io n.     T aiwan  lies  o nly  a  few  hundr ed  miles  fr o m  t he  mainland . 
T aip ei  meanwhile  is  near ly  1, 50 0  naut ical  miles  fr o m  t he  near est   U. S . 
t er r it o r y,   Gu am;  near ly  4 , 40 0  naut ical  miles  fr o m  Ho no lulu;  and  abo u t 
5 , 6 0 0   nau t ical  miles  fr o m  t he  west   co ast   o f  t he  Unit ed  S t at es. 
           T his  g eo g r ap hic  asymmet r y  co mbined  wit h  t he  limit ed   ar r ay  o f 
fo r war d  basing  o pt io ns  fo r   U. S .   fo r ces  and  China's  gr o wing  abilit y  t o 
effect ively  at t ack  bo t h  t ho se  fo r ces  and  t heir  bases  call  int o   quest io n 
Washingt o n's  abilit y  t o   cr edibly  ser ve  as  gu ar ant o r   o f  T aiwan  secur it y 
ind efinit ely. 
           A  China  t hat   is  co nvent io nally  pr edo minant   alo ng  t he  E ast   Asian 
lit t o r al  co u ld  p o se  a  d ir ect ,   d ifficult ,   br o ad ,   and  end ur ing  challenge  t o 
t he  U. S .   p o sit io n  in  t he  r eg io n.     As  wit h  almo st   ever y  issue  t o uching   o n 
S ino ­ U. S .   r elat io ns,   t his  is  all  a  q uest io n  o f  balance. 
           T he  U. S .   and  it s  allies  mu st   co nt inue  t o   pu r su e  a  st r at egy  t hat 
simu lt aneo usly  hed g es  ag ainst   China's  g r o wing  milit ar y  po wer   while 
eng ag ing  and   enmeshing  Beijing  in  net wo r ks  o f  po lit ical,   eco no mic  and 
human  t ies  t hat   may  event ually  r ender   milit ar y  p o wer   anachr o nist ic. 
           T o d ay's  T aiwan  dilemma  r aises  an  impo r t ant   geo po lit ical  quest io n: 
what   r o le  sho uld  and   can  t he  U. S .   seek  t o   play  in  t he  E ast   Asian 
landscape  t hat   inclu des  an  eco no mically  vibr ant ,   milit ar ily  po wer ful, 
p o lit ically  u nified   and   self­ co nfident   China? 
           Lo o k  at   T aiwan  and  beyo nd,   what   is  t he  new  eq uilibr ium  in  E ast 
Asia,   and  ho w  can  t he  fo r ces  at   wo r k  t her e  be  managed  so   as  t o  cr eat e 
an  eq uilibr iu m  t o ler able  t o   t he  Unit ed  S t at es?    T hat   is  t he  ult imat e 
q u est io n  o f  balance  po sed   by  t he  gr o wing   imbalance  o f  milit ar y  po wer
                                                     ­ 50 ­ 
acr o ss  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait . 
        I   t hank  yo u  again  fo r   invit ing  me  t o   speak. 
        [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 1 

        HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u. 

             S TATEM ENT  O F  DR.   ALB ERT  S .   WILLNER 
        DIRECTO R,   CH INA  S ECURITY  AFFAIRS   G RO UP,   CNA, 
                       ALEXANDRIA,   VIRG INIA 

           DR.   WI LLNE R:     Mr .   Chair man,   Mr .   Vice  Chair man, 
Co mmissio ner s,   t hank  yo u  fo r   invit ing  me  t o   appear   her e  t o day  t o 
d iscu ss  impo r t ant ,   planned  changes  in  T aiwan's  defense  po st ur e.     I t   is  an 
ho no r   fo r   me  t o   be  her e  t o   t est ify  t o day. 
           Wit h  t he  publicat io n  o f  t wo   key  do cument s  last   year ,   t he 
Qu ad r ennial  Defense  Review  and  t he  Nat io nal  Defense  Repo r t ,   T aiwan 
has  fo r mally  laid  o ut   an  ambit io us  agenda  o f  change  t o   it s  defense 
p o st u r e  dur ing  t he  next   few  year s. 
           Fo r   budget ar y,   po lit ical,   and  bur eaucr at ic  r easo ns,   ho wever ,   many 
o f  t he  pr o po sed  changes  ar e  unlikely  t o   t ake  place  exact ly  as  planned . 
My  t est imo ny  t o day  will  fo cus  o n  majo r  ar eas  o f  change  int r o duced  and 
lay  o u t   so me  o f  t he  key  challenges  and  implicat io ns  fo r   T aiwan. 
           T aiwan's  fir st   ever   QDR,   published  in  Mar ch  2009,   pr o duced  a 
d efense  assessment   and  helps  explain  what   t he  cur r ent   administ r at io n  is 
d o ing .     I t s  key  pr o po sals  ar e  as  fo llo ws: 
           S t r eamline  T aiwan's  defense  o r ganizat io n  by  co nso lidat ing 
Defense  and  Jo int   S t affs  and  milit ar y  ser vices  t o   impr o ve  acco unt abilit y 
and   fo cus  o n  ser vice  specialt ies; 
           Reduce  t he  t o t al  st at ut o r y  ar med  fo r ce  st r uct ur e  fr o m  275, 000  t o 
2 1 5 , 0 00  by  t he  end  o f  2014; 
           Reduce  t he  number   o f  senio r   level  gener al  flag  o fficer s.     T he  go al 
is  t o   make  cut s  o f  t his  number   fr o m  387  t o   so mewher e  slight ly  abo ve 
2 0 0   p lus;  and 
           Reduce  t he  high  r at io   o f  senio r   o fficer s  t o   per so nnel  do wn  fr o m 
almo st   t wo   per cent   t o  . 7  per cent ; 
           I ncr ease  t he  number   o f  civilian  defense  o fficials  in  MND,   in  par t 
t o   g et   o fficer s  assigned  t her e  back  t o   t he  field,   and  t o   build  up  civilian 
d efense  exper t ise; 
           Wo r k  t o war ds  a  vo lunt eer   fo r ce  by  co nt inuing  t o   r educe  t he 
co nscr ipt   per io d,   cur r ent ly  o ne  year ,   and  develo p  means  t o   r ecr uit   and 
r et ain  o fficer s  and  enlist ed  fo r   t he  lo ng  t er m. 
           Addit io nal  t r ansfo r mat io n  o bject ives  fo cus  o n  impr o ving  fo r ce 
p lanning  and  ar mament s  develo pment   mechanisms.     I n  addit io n,   jo int 

1 
  Click here to read the prepared statement of Mr. David 
Shlapak
                           ­ 51 ­ 
o p er at io ns,   human  r eso u r ces,  and  expanding  effo r t s  wit h  civilian 
ind ust r y  and   lo cal  go ver nment s  r eceive  mo r e  at t ent io n  in  t he  do cument . 
          T he  200 9  Nat io nal  Defense  Rep o r t ,   r eleased  in  Oct o ber   o f  last 
year ,   exp ands  o n  t he  QDR's  pr o p o sed   d efense  p o st ur e,   addr esses  cur r ent 
MND  challeng es,  and  it   makes  so me  impo r t ant   r evisio ns. 
          T he  mo st   significant   g o al  is  t o   build  a  fo r ce  built   o n  vo lunt eer s. 
T he  co st   o f  t r ansit io ning   t o   t he  act ive  fo r ce  wit hin  five  year s  will 
r eq uir e  funding  and   r eso u r ces  no t   yet   pr o vided  by  t he  Leg islat ive  Yu an 
in  t he  defense  bu dg et . 
          Disast er   p r event io n  and  r elief  have  also   been  int r o du ced  in  t he 
NDR  as  a  new  co r e  ar med   fo r ces  missio n.     T he  co st s  o f  t aking  o n  t his 
missio n  and   it s  su pp o r t   r eq uir ement s  have  yet   t o   be  adequ at ely 
ad dr essed   as  well. 
          Finally,   t he  NDR  makes  no t es  o f  t he  effo r t s  o f  T aiwan  t o   init iat e 
p eace  and   seek  o ut   co nfidence­ bu ilding  measur es  t o   supp o r t   t he 
g o ver nment 's  cr o ss­ S t r ait   effo r t s  at   seeking  co mp r o mise  and  keep ing   t he 
p eace,   no t ing  t hat   it s  go al  is,   q uo t e,   "lo wer ing  t he  pr o babilit y  o f 
accident al  pr o vo cat io n  o f  war . " 
          Ho w  t his  chang e  will  act ually  affect   T aiwan's  d efense  po st ur e  and 
st r at eg y  st ill  r emains  t o   be  seen. 
          T he  changes  p r o p o sed   ar e  likely  t o   enco unt er   significant 
challenges,   and  it 's  t o   t hat   I   t ur n  no w. 
          Fir st ,   t her e  is  t he  quest io n  o f  whet her   t he  po lit ical  will  and 
fu nding  exist s  t o   see  t hese  changes  t hr o u gh?    P r esident   Ma's  init iat ives 
acr o ss  t he  S t r ait   ar e  chang ing   t he  secur it y  envir o nment ,   which  is  likely 
t o   have  a  co r r espo nding  effect   o n  t he  defense  p o st ur e.     Mult ip le 
d o mest ic  po lit ical  challenges  t o   Ma  wit hin  his  o wn  p ar t y,   wit h  t he  LY, 
and   by  t he  pu blic  co uld  well  weaken  his  co mmit ment   t o   see  t he  changes 
t hr o u gh.
          A  chang e  in  t hr eat   per cep t io ns  co uld  lead   t o   a  co mmensur at e 
chang e  in  t he  willing ness  o f  pu blic  o r   t heir   r epr esent at ives  t o   sup po r t 
need ed   defense  r efo r ms. 
          S eco nd,   co nt inued  r edu ct io ns  in  defense  spending  will  clear ly 
affect   fu ll  implement at io n  o f  t hese  changes.     Debat es  wit hin  t he  LY, 
bet ween  t he  LY  and   t he  execut ive  br anch,   and  p ar t y  p o sit io ning  in  t he 
lead ­ u p  t o   elect io ns  lat er   t his  year ,   and  o n,   ar e  likely  t o   imp act   o n 
sp ending   p lans. 
          T her e  app ear s  t o   have  been  a  significant   do wnt ur n  in  civil­ milit ar y 
r elat io ns  which  co uld  imp act   sig nificant ly  o n  QDR  and  NDR 
imp lement at io n. 
          T her e  ar e  indicat io ns  t hat   MND  is  no t  being  kept   in  t he  lo o p 
abo u t   o ngo ing  cr o ss­ S t r ait   dialo g ue  and  secur it y  impact s,   t hat   Nat io nal 
S ecu r it y  Co u ncil  and   MND  r elat io ns  ar e  st r ained,   and  t hat   Ma  and   his 
ad viso r s  ar e  d ismissive  o f  MND  advice  and  per spect ives. 
          At   issu e  is  no t   o bedience  t o   civilian  co nt r o l,   but   t he  neg at ive 
imp act   t hat   civil­ milit ar y  t ensio ns  ar e  likely  having   in  ad dr essing  cr it ical
                                                  ­ 52 ­ 
and   needed  defense  r efo r ms  and,   even  mo r e  significant ly,   po t ent ially 
cau sing  damage  t o   ensur ing  go o d  and  r eliable  co mmunicat io ns, 
co o r d inat io n  and  co nt r o l  especially  in  t ime  o f  cr isis. 
          Recent   pay­ fo r ­ pr o mo t io n  scandals,   independent   pr o secut o r 
invest igat io ns  o f  T aiwan  defense  co nt r act o r s,   milit ar y  accident s,   and 
o t her   challenges  have  all  fur t her   st r essed  t he  milit ar y's  r elat io nship  wit h 
t he  P r esident   and  o t her s,   affect ing  mo r ale  and  diver t ing  needed 
at t ent io n  o f  senio r   o fficials  t o   t he  day­ t o ­ day  business  o f  r unning  t he 
milit ar y  and  wo r king  o n  t hese  new  defense  init iat ives. 
          As  T aiwan  t r ansit io ns  t o   a  vo lunt eer   milit ar y,   fundament al  cho ices 
will  have  t o  be  made  abo ut   ho w  t o   develo p  a  new  cult ur e  wit h 
incent ives  designed  t o   br ing  o n  bo ar d  t he  r ight   kind  o f  so ldier s  and  keep 
t hem  in  fo r   t he  lo ng  t er m. 
          Recr uit ment   and  r et ent io n  effo r t s  will  have  t o   addr ess  ser vice  t o 
nat io n,   a  challenge,   par t icu lar ly  amo ng  many  o f  t he  yo ung  peo ple  who 
see  lit t le  incent ive  o r   significant   secur it y  t hr eat s  r equir ing  t heir 
co mmit ment . 
          T he  need  t o   develo p  civilian  defense  exper t ise  is  an  impo r t ant 
p r o p o sal  and,   if  implement ed,   wo uld  po t ent ially  cr eat e  a  r eser vo ir   o f 
civilians  who   deeply  under st and  and  wo r k  defense  issues  day­ t o ­ day  and 
ar e  in  go ver nment   fo r   t he  lo ng  t er m. 
          Alt ho ugh  it   will  t ake  year s  t o   fully  implement ,   mo vement s  t o war d s 
est ablishing  a  civilian  defense  bur eaucr acy  is  cr it ical  t o   enhancing 
influ ence  and  br o adening  under st anding  o f  defense  challenges  facing 
T aiwan. 
          Finally,   in  o r der   t o   be  successful,   t he  defense  po st ur e  changes  will 
need   t o   be  augment ed  by  a  vigo r o us  and  per suasive  campaign  t o   fur t her 
ed u cat e  t he  public  abo ut   t he  t hr eat s  t hat   co nt inue  t o   face  T aiwan. 
          E ven  as  cr o ss­ S t r ait   impr o vement s  ar e  t aking  place,   it   is 
imp o r t ant   t hat   t he  T aiwan  go ver nment   cr edibly  co nt inue  t o   ar t iculat e 
why  a  cr edible  defense  po st ur e  r emains  par amo unt .     T aiwan  has  alr ead y 
t ak en  a  significant   st ep  by  o ut lining  in  it s  QDR  and  NDR  what   needs  t o 
be  d o ne  t o   st ay  r elevant ,   successfully  adapt   t o   t he  changing  do mest ic 
sit u at io n,   and  meet   t he  emer ging  r egio nal  envir o nment . 
          I n  do ing  so ,   it   has  o ut lined  impo r t ant   changes  t hat   will  help  t he 
g o ver nment ,   it s  milit ar y,   and  it s  peo ple  t o   t r ansit io n  t o   t he  new 
r ealit ies.     Har d  cho ices  will  have  t o   be  made  and  r eso ur ces  applied.     I f 
t ho se  co mmit ment s  ar e  made  and  seen  t hr o ugh,   T aiwan's  defense  po st ur e 
and   it s  cr it ical  r o le  in  helping  keep  t he  peace  and  st abilit y  will  be  well­ 
ser ved. 
          T hank  yo u  ver y  much,   and  I   lo o k  fo r war d  t o   yo ur   quest io ns. 
          [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 2 

2 
 Click here to read the prep ared  st at emen t   of  Dr.   Alb ert   S . 
W i lln er
                                             ­ 53 ­ 
                PANEL  III:     Di scu ssi o n ,   Q u est i on s  an d   An swers 

           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u.     T he  t hr ee  o f  yo u 
d id   a  su per b  jo b  in  co ver ing   differ ent   aspect s  o f  t he  defense  equ at io n.     I 
d o n't   t hink  we  co uld   have  asked  fo r   a  bet t er   co ver age  o f  t he  wat er fr o nt . 
           We'r e  have  five  minut es  fo r   each  Co mmissio ner ’s  quest io ns,   and 
t he  fir st   Co mmissio ner   is  Co mmissio ner   Blument hal. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     Yes.     T hank  yo u  all  ver y 
mu ch  fo r   excellent   t est imo ny. 
           I 'd   lik e  t o   ask   a  quest io n  r egar d ing  so me  o f  yo ur   t est imo ny,   Mr . 
S hlap ak,   and   t hen  a  br o ad er   qu est io n,   I   t hink,   fo r   ever yo ne. 
           T he  fir st   is  I   u nder st and  well  t he  pr o blems  T aiwan  faces  in  having 
a  su r vivable  Air   Fo r ce,   bu t ,   as  I   asked   in  t he  pr evio us  p anel,   I   t hink  we 
face  t he  same  p r o blems  wit h  o ur   fo r war d  deplo yed  Air   Fo r ce,   and   o ur 
answer   is  no t   let 's  no t   have  an  Air   Fo r ce;  o ur   answer   is  let 's  have  an  Air 
Fo r ce  t hat   can  sur vive. 
           S o   yo u   made  so me  r eco mmendat io ns,   I   t hink,   fo r   T aiwan  t o   have, 
ho w  T aiwan  co uld  have  a  sur vivable  Air   Fo r ce.     I   was  wo nder ing  if  yo u 
co u ld   pr o vid e  an  answer   o n  a  p ackag e  t he  U. S .   can  co me  up  wit h  su ch 
t hat   T aiwan  has­ ­ basically  t he  administ r at io n  has  co me  up  wit h  a  r epo r t 
saying   t hey  cer t ainly  need   t he  new  air cr aft  becau se  t hey  have  an  aging 
fleet ­ ­ ho w  t o   make  t hat   mo r e  su r vivable?    And  wo uld   t hat   mir r o r   so me 
o f  t he  t hings  we  need   t o   d o   at   o ur   o wn  bases? 
           My  mo r e  g ener al  q uest io n  is­ ­ Co mmissio ner   Fiedler   br o u ght   t his 
u p   in  t he  last   p anel­ ­ but   it 's  t his  no t io n,   and  yo u  make  r efer ence  t o   it , 
Mr .   S hlap ak,   t hat   t he  Chinese  say  t hey  need  a  milit ar y  in  o r der   t o   make 
su r e  t hat   if  t he  next   par t y  co mes  int o   po wer  in  T aiwan,   t hey  can  mak e 
su r e  t hat   it   do esn't   declar e  ind ependence. 
           Bu t   so meho w  it   seems  like  fr o m  t he  panel  we  saw  last   t ime,   we'r e 
accep t ing  t hat   as  so meho w  ju st ified,   and  Co mmissio ner   Fiedler   made  t he 
p o int   t hat ,   in  fact ,   t hey'r e  no t   happy  wit h  demo cr at ic  change  in  T aiwan. 
           I s  it   t r u e,   and   t his  is  fo r   all  o f  yo u,   is  it ,   so meho w,   why  wo uldn't 
we  say  t o   t he  Chinese  t his  is  no t   t he  way  we  do   t hings;  we  do   no t 
r eso lve  issues  t hr o u gh  t he  u se  o f  fo r ce;  r eno u nce  t he  use  o f  fo r ce; 
accep t   t hat   ano t her   p ar t y  will  co me  int o   po wer ? 
           T his  is  no t  so meho w  go ing  t o   wo r k   it s  way  int o   t he  Amer ican 
blo o d st r eam  t o   say,   yes,   we  under st and  yo u  need   a  milit ar y  so   t hat   if 
ano t her   p ar t y  co mes  t o   po wer ,   yo u  can  co er ce  t hem  int o   no t   co ming  int o 
p o wer   o r   yo u   can  co er ce  t hem  eit her   way. 
           And   so   t hat 's  a  br o ad er   quest io n  fo r   t he  who le  panel. 
           MR.   S HLAP AK:     Let   me  addr ess  yo u r   fir st   qu est io n.     Mar k  t alked 
abo u t   t he  key  r o le  o f  t he  ballist ic  and  land  at t ack  cr uise  missiles  in 
T aiwan's  defensive  p r o blems,   and   ind eed  we  believe  t hat   t ho se  ar e  r eal 
g ame  changer s. 
           T he  abilit y  t o   use  accur at e  weap o ns  wit h  so phist icat ed  war heads,
                                                         ­ 54 ­ 
inclu d ing  su bmu nit io n  war heads,   cr eat es  a  t hr eat   t hat   yo u  can  har d en 
ag ainst   it   t o   so me  ext ent ,   but   at   so me  level  it   beco mes  a  r ace  bet ween 
ho w  fast   t hey  can  bu ild  missiles  and   ho w  clever   we  can  be  at   pr o t ect ing 
t he  t hings  we  d o n't   want   t hem  t o   dest r o y. 
          Yo u  can  build   har dened  shells  fo r   air cr aft .     I t 's  har d   so met imes  t o 
fu r t her   har den  a  r unway,   it   being  made  o ut   o f  co ncr et e  t o   begin  wit h. 
S o   even  if  t he  air cr aft   su r vive,   t he  r isk   o f  being   t r apped  o n  t he  gr o und 
is  no n­ t r ivial.     S o ,   yes,   t her e  ar e  t hings  t hey  co uld  do . 
          I 'm  co ncer ned,   ho wever ,   t hat   in  t he  lo ng­ r u n,   we'r e  o n  t he  wr o ng 
sid e  o f  t he  exchange  r at e  t her e. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     Ho w  abo ut   Mr .   S t o k es  o r 
so meo ne  else  o n  t he  br o ader   qu est io n  I   just   r aised ? 
          MR.   S T OKE S :     On  t he  br o ader   q uest io n  o f  t he  P RC's  po licy  o f 
no t   r eno u ncing   use  o f  fo r ce  and  maint aining   a  ver y,   fo r   lack  o f  a  bet t er 
t er m,   so mewhat   o f  a  bellico se  milit ar y  p o st ur e  against   T aiwan? 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     And  o ur   accept ance  so meho w 
t hat   t his  is­ ­ we  und er st and  t hat   t hey  need   t o   d o   t his  in  case  ano t her 
d emo cr at ic  par t y  is  elect ed. 
          MR.   S T OKE S :     I   t hink  t he  milit ar y  po st ur e,   in  gener al,   and   t his  is 
t he  way  P RC  t ends  t o   fr ame  it ,  is  a  d et er r ence  fo r ce.  I t 's  a  fo r m  o f 
d et er r ence  war far e  int end ed  t o ,   what   t hey  view,   is  t o   det er ,   sp lit   us,   t o 
d et er   T aiwan  ind ep endence  ad vo cat es. 
          I n  my  per so nal  o pinio n,   t o d ay,   t he  P RC's  milit ar y  po licy  wit h 
r eg ar d s  t o   T aiwan  is  no t   o nly  unnecessar y  but   is  co unt er pr o duct ive. 
          One  quest io n,   do   t hey  even  need   t o   have  t his  milit ar y  po st ur e 
anymo r e?    Wit h  t he  t wo   sides  being   as  int er dependent   as  t hey  ar e 
eco no mically,   bo t h  sid es,   in  my  view,   wo uld  have  a  ver y,   ver y  difficu lt 
t ime  having   a  su dden  shift   in  po licy  eit her   way. 
          No w,   in  20 1 2,   if  t her e's  ano t her   par t y  t hat   co mes  int o   play  in 
T aiwan,   I   t hink   it   wo u ld   st ill  be  ext r emely  limit ed  in  it s  abilit y  t o   be 
able  t o   shift   it s  o wn  p o licies  vis­ à­ vis  China. 
          And   so   I   t hink   what 's  under est imat ed ,   it s  abilit y  t o   be  able  t o ­ ­ in 
o t her   wo r d s,   it   has  o t her   lever ag es  o t her   t han  milit ar y,   and  t o   me,   I   ju st 
d o n't   u nd er st and   why  t hey  wo u ldn't   t ake  act ive  measur es  t o   be  able  t o 
r eno u nce  u se  o f  fo r ce  as  well  as  r ed uce  t heir   milit ar y  po st u r e. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u. 
          I f  we  get   a  seco nd   r o und,   yo u  might   want   t o   r eaddr ess. 
          Co mmissio ner   Wessel. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     T hank  yo u ,   gent lemen,   fo r   being 
her e. 
          I   have  t wo   q u est io ns,   which  if  we  co uld   st ar t   wit h  Mr .   S hlap ak 
and   t hen  have  t he  o t her s  co mment . 
          Fir st ,   I   asked  a  q u est io n  o f  a  pr evio u s  p anelist ,   Mr .   S chiffer , 
abo u t   U. S .   cap abilit ies.  Mo st   o f  t he  discussio n  has  been  abo ut   what   ar e 
T aiwanese  capabilit ies,   bu t   if  wit h  changing  d ynamics  and  capabilit ies  o f 
t he  Chinese,   what   is  yo ur   view  o n  what   t he  U. S .   may  need  t o   do   t o
                                                     ­ 55 ­ 
minimize  t he  d et er r ence  and   cap abilit ies  o f  t he  Chinese  vis­ à­ vis  o ur 
abilit y  t o   co me  t o   t he  aid   o f  T aiwan  if  t hat   sho u ld  beco me  necessar y? 
Fir st   q uest io n. 
          T he  seco nd   is,   is  it   yo ur   assessment   t hat   t he  acquisit io n  o f  F­ 1 6 
C/ D  o r ,   lat er   o n,   po t ent ially  F­ 35s,   wo uld  t hat   make  a  subst ant ial 
d iffer ence  in  t he  air   p o wer   balance  bet ween  T aiwan  and  t he  Chinese,   and 
in  what   ways? 
          MR.   S HLAP AK:     Let   me  t ake  yo ur   seco nd  q uest io n  fir st .     Our 
analysis  su g gest s  t hat   t he  F­ 16  C/ D  wo u ld  su bst ant ially  impr o ve  t he 
sit u at io n  as  lo ng  as  t hey  ar e  based  at   facilit ies  t hat   can  st ay  o pen,   t hat 
d o n't   get   shut   d o wn  fo r   su bst ant ial  p er io ds  o f  t ime.     S o   t hat 's  t he 
d ilemma  t hat   T aiwan  faces  and  t hat   we  face  in  jud ging  t hat . 
          Yo u'r e  abso lut ely  r ig ht ,   t hat   t he  r isk  t o   o ur   o wn  fo r ces  in  t he 
West er n  P acific,   in  t he  event   o f  a  co nflict ,   is  gr o wing.     We've  lo o ked  at 
Kad ena  and  Gu am  and  all  so r t s  o f  o pt io ns.     T her e  ar e  t hings  t hat   can  be 
d o ne,   bu t   as  wit h  t he  case  wit h  T aiwan,   it   co mes  do wn  t o   t hem  building 
missiles  and   us  p o ur ing  co ncr et e,   and  who   can  d o   what   fast er . 
          S o   I   t hink  t hat   t he  challenge  t her e  is  t o   co nt inue  r aising  t he  co st 
o f  ent r y,   if  yo u   will,   fo r   China,   so   t hat   t hey'r e  no t   mak ing   a  cho ice 
bet ween  st ar t ing   a  lit t le  t iny  war   and   no   war .     T hey  face  a  cho ice  o f 
st ar t ing   a  r eally  big  war   and  a  lit t le  war ,   and  t hat ,   I   t hink,   is  ho w  yo u 
can  alt er   t he  det er r ence  dynamic  in  o ur   favo r . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     Okay.     Ot her   wit nesses? 
          MR.   S T OKE S :     I   t end  t o   view  t he  ut ilit y  o f  F­ 16s  in  a  slig ht ly 
d iffer ent   manner .     I   ag r ee  wit h  ever yt hing  t hat   Mr .   S hlapak  ment io ned . 
But   o ne  is  assu ming   a  wo r st ­ case  scenar io   when  yo u  lo o k   at   t he  massive 
salvo s  o f  sho r t ­ r ange  ballist ic  missiles  t hat   fr ankly  anyt hing   o n  T aiwan 
t hat   is  no t   har d ened ­ ­ it   wo uld   r ender   anyt hing  vu lner able  basically  wit h 
so me  except io ns. 
          And ,   t o   me,   a  fu ll­ scale  annihilat ive  scenar io   invo lving   massive 
salvo s  o f  ballist ic  missiles  is  o ne  st ep  do wn  o n  t he  spect r u m  o f  vio lence 
fr o m  a  nuclear   st r ike.     I n  o t her   wo r d s,   yo u  hear   many  peo ple  saying 
what   do   we  d o   t o   maint ain  T aiwan's  d efense  in  t he  face  o f  a  nuclear 
t yp e  o f  scenar io ?    Full­ scale  amphibio us  invasio n,   t o   me,   is  no t  t he  mo st 
lik ely  scenar io   fo r   u se  o f  fo r ce  against   T aiwan. 
          T he  mo st   likely  scenar io   is  o ne  t hat   is  limit ed   use  o f  fo r ce  t o 
achieve  limit ed  p o lit ical  o bject ive.     Wit hin  t his  co nt ext ,   lo o king   at 
cr o ss­ S t r ait   co mpet it io ns  being   inher ent ly  p o lit ical  in  nat ur e  wit h 
milit ar y  being  a  su bset ,   t he  value  o f  F­ 16s  cer t ainly  has  milit ar y  value, 
but   mo r e  t han  t hat ,   it   ser ves  as  a  viable  demo nst r at io n  o f  T aiwan's 
r eso lve  t o   be  able  t o   r esist   P RC  co er cio n. 
          S ame  t hing   wit h  P AC­ 3,   P at r io t   P AC­ 3,   yo u  can  make  t he  same 
ar g ument .     P at r io t   P AC­ 3  wo uld   be  a  speed  bump  in  t er ms  o f  a  massive 
P RC  ballist ic  missile  st r ike.     Bu t   t he  valu e  o f  P AC­ 3  r eally  lies  in  it s 
abilit y  t o   be  able  t o   under cu t   t he  ut ilit y  o f  t ho se  ballist ic  missiles  t hat 
ar e  ar r ayed   against   T aiwan.     I t 's  mo r e  so r t   o f  a  co nfidence,  a
                                                  ­ 56 ­ 
p sycho lo gical  ed g e. 
           S o   I   wo uld  t end   t o   put   F­ 16s  in  t er ms  o f  a  st r o ng  ar g ument   so r t 
o f  in  t hat   so r t   o f  fr ame. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     Dr .   Willner . 
           DR.   WI LLNE R:     No t hing. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     T hank  yo u. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Dr .   Willner ,     Mr .   S t o kes 
d iscussed   C4I S R.     Can  yo u  addr ess  advant ages  t hat   mig ht   accr ue  t o 
T aiwan's  defense  cap acit y  if  C4 I S R  r eceived  a  higher   p r io r it y  fr o m  t he 
Leg islat ive  Yuan  and  t he  Minist r y  o f  Defense?    T he  pr o cur ement   and 
inst allat io n  o f  t hese  by  T aiwan  seems  t o   be  piecemeal,   which  impedes 
co o p er at ive  t ar get ed   engagement ,   and  o bvio usly,   Mr .   S t o kes,   yo u  may 
have  a  co mment   o n  t hat   also . 
           Mr .   S hlap ak,   just   ho w  safe  is  Guam  fr o m  China's  lo nger ­ r ange 
missiles?    And   in  t hat   o r der . 
           DR.   WI LLNE R:     Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel,   t hank   yo u  fo r   yo ur 
q u est io n. 
           Obvio usly,   I   fo cu sed   mo st   o f  my  t est imo ny  her e  t o d ay  o n  QDR 
and   so me  o f  t he  t hings  t hey  wer e  do ing  wit h  t he  Nat io nal  Defense 
Rep o r t ,   but   my  exp er ience  bo t h  o n  island  and  since  o bvio usly  wo uld 
heavily  suppo r t   an  incr eased  pr io r it y  fo r  C4I S R.     I   t hink  it   go es  t o   t he 
co r e  o f  t heir   abilit y  t o   manage  at   a  macr o   and  micr o   level,   and  I   t hink 
t hat   t his  is  wo r r iso me. 
           I   t hink   o ne  o f  t he  issues  t hat   is  o ut   t her e  wit h  t he  Nat io nal 
Defense  Repo r t   and  t he  QDR  is  t hat   t her e  ar e  lo t s  o f  bud get   it ems 
imp lied  in  t ho se  t wo   do cument s  and  it   may  be  at   t he  expense  o f  so me 
o t her   need ed   milit ar y  develo pment s  t hat   ar e  o ng o ing . 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     On  t he  subject   o f  C4I S R,   no   quest io n,   t o   me,   it 's 
similar   t o   an  ind ivid ual's  co gnit ive  syst em.     Yo u  can't   live  wit ho ut   it . 
           And   t o   give  T aiwan  cr edit ,   and  t his  go es  back  all  t he  way  t o   t he 
p r evio us  ad minist r at io n,   Lee  T eng ­ hu i  administ r at io n,   p r evio us 
ad minist r at io n,   and   t hen  t he  Ma  ad minist r at io n,   t hey've  do ne  act ually 
r eally  well. 
           What 's  g o ne  unno t iced  is  o per at io nal  cap abilit y,   what 's  called  P o 
S heng ,   which  is  t heir   advanced  t act ical  dig it al  dat a  links,   t hat   went 
fo r war d  in  December .     T his  is  a  r evo lut io nar y  chang e.     T he  who le  fo r ce 
is  no t   equ ipp ed  wit h  it ,   but   t his  is  a  r evo lut io nar y  change  in  lo o k ing  at 
it   fr o m  a  do ct r inal  p er spect ive  in  t er ms  o f  net wo r k­ cent r ic  war far e 
wher e  yo u  empo wer   war fig ht er s  at   lo wer   levels,   fo r   example,   whet her 
it 's  yo u r   t ank  dr iver s  o r   whet her   it 's  yo ur   air plane  pilo t s,   be  able  t o 
emp o wer   t hem  t o   be  able  t o   synchr o nize  o p er at io ns  wit ho ut   init ially­ ­ 
even  if  yo u 'r e  cut   fr o m  t he  t o p ,   yo u  can  st ill  co ndu ct   au t o no mo us 
o p er at io ns. 
           T her e's  a  lo t   mo r e  t hat   T aiwan  can  do ,   and   T aiwan  has  t he 
p o t ent ial  t o   field  o ne  o f  t he  mo st   advanced  C4I S R  net wo r ks  in  t he  field . 
  I   can  give  d et ails  if  int er est ed,   but   I 'll  ho ld   it   at   t hat .
                                                   ­ 57 ­ 
           MR.   S HLAP AK:     I n  t er ms  o f  Guam's  safet y,   I   t hink   t o day  we 
wo u ld   assess  it   as  being  fair ly  safe.     T he  Chinese  have  no t   develo p ed 
and   deplo yed   t he  so r t s  o f  weapo ns  t hat   wo u ld  be  necessar y  t o   launch 
t he  k ind   o f  at t acks  o n  Guam  t hat   we  see  po ssible  in  T aiwan  o r   o n 
Ok inawa. 
           T her e's  no t hing  pr event ing­ ­ t hat   we  can  see­ ­ t her e's  no t hing 
p r event ing   China  fr o m  d evelo ping  and  d eplo ying  eno u gh  lo nger ­ r ange 
missiles,   whet her   I RBMs  o r   submar ine­ launched  land   at t ack  cr uise 
missiles,   t hat   co u ld  br ing  Guam  und er   su bst ant ial  t hr eat .     T hat 's  in  t he 
fu t u r e.     We  d o n't   see  t hem  do ing  it . 
           T her e  ar e  so me  challenges  t o   t heir   acco mp lishing   it   t hat   t hey 
d id n't   enco unt er   wit h  t he  sho r t ­ r ange  missiles,   but   in  t er ms  o f 
t echno lo g y,   if  t hey'r e  willing  t o   make  t he  invest ment s,   t hey  co uld 
cer t ainly  make  t he  sit u at io n  much  mo r e  wo r r iso me  fo r   Guam. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u. 
           Co mmissio ner   Vid eniek s. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Go o d  mo r ning,   gent lemen. 
           T he  fir st   quest io n  is  kind   o f  a  br ief  o ne.   I t 's  t o   Dr .   Willner .     E ven 
t ho u gh  T aiwan's  d efense  budg et   is  r o u ghly  $9 . 3  billio n,   and  half  o f  it 
g o es  t o   p er so nnel  co st s,   yo u 'r e  saying   at   t his  po int   t hat   t hey  st ill  have 
no t   begu n  t o   fu nd,   have  no t   begu n  t o   fund   t he  vo lunt ar y  aspect   o f  t he 
ar med   fo r ces  even  t ho u gh  half  o f  t heir   milit ar y  budg et   is  d evo t ed  t o 
p er so nnel  co st s? 
           And   a  g ener al  quest io n  is  when  we  lo o k   at   t he  co mp ar at ive 
effect iveness  o f  t he  fo r ces,   ar e  we  lo o k ing  at   t he  t heat er   co ncent r at io n 
o f  fo r ces?    Because­ ­ and  I   do n't   k no w  what   p o r t io n  o f  t heir   milit ar y  t he 
P RC  has  co ncent r at ed  acr o ss  t he  S t r ait ,   but   I   co uld   see  wher e  o t her 
milit ar y  do n't   even  co me  int o   t he  co nsid er at io n. 
           And   t hen,   ho w  wo uld ,   since  t her e  ar e  1, 100  missiles  co ncent r at ed 
acr o ss  t he  S t r ait ,   and   po ssibly  t he  Air   Fo r ce  co uld   be  incap acit at ed  by 
d amaging  t he  air fields,   ho w  wo uld   a  pr eempt ive  st r ike  by  T aiwan  o n 
P RC  t o   t r y  t o   g et   t ho se  missiles  o u t   o f  t he  way  be  viewed  by  t he  U. S . 
and   by  t he  T RA?    T hat 's  t o   all  t hr ee. 
           DR.   WI LLNE R:     Well,   t o   yo ur   fir st   q uest io n,   Co mmissio ner ,   t he 
issu e  o f  d efense  bu dg et ,   t heir   being  eno u gh  mo ney  fo r   p er so nnel,   I   t hink 
p ar t   o f  t he  challenge  is  o ne  o f  t he  same  challeng es  we  enco u nt er ed  in 
t he  '7 0s  go ing  t o   an  all­ vo lunt eer   fo r ce,   is  t hat   t her e  ar e  sp ikes  in  t er ms 
o f  t hat   init ial  t r ansit io n,   and  I   t hink  t hat   was  under est imat ed. 
           I   t hink   t her e's  a  lo t   mo r e  mo ney  t hat   go es  int o   easing  so me  p eo p le 
o u t ,   bo nu ses,   t ho se  kinds  o f  t hing s,   in  t r ansit io ning  t he  fo r ce.     I   t hink 
t hat   also   pr o bably  u nder played  o r   under est imat ed  in  t er ms  o f  budget ing 
fo r   p er so nnel  is  t he  amo unt  o f  mo ney  t hat   it   t akes  t o   r ecr u it   and  r et ain 
fo r   t he  lo ng   t er m  fo lks  t hat   ar e  co ming   in  vo lunt ar ily.     T her e's  issues 
r elat ed   t o   family  sup p o r t . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Ar e  yo u  saying,   sir ,   t hat   is 
so met hing  which  will  be  r eflect ed  in  fu t u r e  bu dget s,   and  t his  o ne  do esn't
                                                     ­ 58 ­ 
even  t o uch  o n  it ? 
           DR.   WI LLNE R:     Well,   t hat 's  what   we  ho pe,   but   I   t hink  t hat   t her e 
is  u nder st and ing   r eally  o n  bo t h  t he  par t   o f  defense  o fficials  and   t he 
civilian  o fficials  t hat   t her e  wer e  co st s  t hat   wer e  no t   fully  t ak en  int o 
acco u nt   as  t hey  planned   t he  bud get s  t o   suppo r t   bo t h  t he  NDR  and  QDR 
p r o p o sals. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     T hank  yo u. 
           On  t he  o t her   qu est io n,   t heat er ,   pr eempt ive  st r ikes,   and  maybe  t he 
ser io u sness  o f  T aiwan’s  t hr ee  p er cent   o f  GDP   milit ar y  bu dg et   as  a 
ser io u s  at t emp t   t o   self­ defense? 
           MR.   S HLAP AK:     On  t he  issue  o f  what   fo r ces  China  will  br ing  t o 
bear ,   in  o u r   wo r k ,   we  assembled   a  co u ple  o f  differ ent   fo r ces 
r ep r esent ing   d iffer ent   assump t io ns  abo ut   who ,   what ,   wher e.     I n  bo t h 
cases,   t hey  wer e  br o adly  co nsist ent   wit h  t hings  yo u  see  in  t he  Do D's 
annual  r epo r t   and  so   fo r t h. 
           Regar d ing   so me  so r t   o f  p r eempt io n  against   China  o n  t he  p ar t   o f 
T aiwan,   I   canno t   speak  at   all  t o   what   t he  at t it ud e  o f  t he  U. S . 
g o ver nment   wo uld   be  t o   t hat .     Oper at io nally,   I   wo uld  have  t o   be 
co nvinced   t hat   it   wo u ldn't   be  a  flea  bit ing   an  elephant . 
           T hese  missile  lau ncher s  ar e  mo bile.     I f  t hey  ar e  disper sed,   t hey'r e 
ver y  har d  t o   get .     I f  yo u   r emember ,   199 1,   in  t he  deser t ­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     All  t ho se  t ho usand   missiles  ar e 
mo bile.     I   und er st and  t heir  nu clear   fo r ces  ar e. 
           MR.   S HLAP AK:     Right ,   r ight .     T he  st r at egic  nuclear   fo r ce  at   t his 
t ime  is  fixed ,   but   t he  sho r t ­ r ange  missiles,   I   believe,   ar e  all  mo bile.     I 'm 
lo o king  ar o u nd  fo r   co nfir mat io n.     Obvio usly,   if  t hey'r e  sit t ing  in  t heir 
st o r ag e  facilit ies,   t hey'd  be  mo r e  vulner able,   bu t   pr esumably  any  st at e  o f 
t ensio n  sufficient ly  hig h  fo r   t he  idea  o f  pr eemp t io n  t o   per co lat e  t o   t he 
t o p   o f  T aiwan's  lead er ship   echelo n  wo uld  be  o ne  in  which  t he  Chinese 
wo u ld   have  been  lik ely  t o   have  flushed   t ho se  lau ncher s  and  made  t hem 
ver y,   ver y,   ver y  sur vivable. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     P lease. 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     S ir ,   o n  t wo   o f  t he  issues,   fir st ,   o n  t he  all­ 
vo lu nt eer   fo r ce,   o ne  wo uld  need  t o   ask   a  fu ndament al  q uest io n  o f  what 
mak es  peo ple  jo in  t he  milit ar y?    Financial  incent ives,   in  my  view,   ar e 
o nly  o ne  asp ect   in  t er ms  o f  r ecr u it ing   and  r et aining   peo ple. 
           One  aspect   t hat 's  fo r g o t t en  ver y  o ft en  is  t he  at t r act iveness  o f 
having  a  milit ar y  t hat 's  r espect ed  and  has  mo der n  equipment .     No w, 
simp ly,   fo r   k ids,   it 's  kind  o f  co o l  t o   go   o ut   and  fly  an  F­ 16.     I t   may  no t 
be  t hat   co o l  t o   be  able  t o   go   and  fly  an  F­ 5.     S o   t her e's  a  co nnect io n 
bet ween  t hat . 
           T he  5 0  per cent   in  t er ms  o f  t he  co st s,   t hat   will  be  wo r ked  d o wn. 
T her e  will  be  so r t   o f  differ ences  in  t he  bucket . 
           Yo u  ment io ned  t he  t en  billio n,  and  if  t hat 's  eno ugh.  My  view,  in 
t er ms  o f  t hr ee  per cent   GDP ,  is  t her e's  an  o pp o r t unit y  co st .     I f  yo u 
incr ease  t he  milit ar y  bu dg et ,   yo u 'r e  go ing  t o   t ake  away  o t her   t hings  t hat
                                                  ­ 59 ­ 
ar e  r eally  impo r t ant   fo r   T aiwan,   whet her   it 's  all  t he  way  fr o m  so cial 
welfar e,  t o  invest ment   int o   science  and  t echno lo gy. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     But   is  it   basically  a  ho pe  fo r   a 
lar g er   war ? 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   Videniek s, 
we've  r un  o u t   o f  t ime  o n  t his  o ne. 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     T he  last   p o int   o n  pr eempt io n,   just   t o   make  t he 
p o int ,   t hat   t he  S eco nd   Ar t iller y  Fo r ces  o pp o sit e  T aiwan,   yes,   o f  co ur se, 
t he  launcher s  ar e  mo bile.     Ho wever ,   in  ever y  syst em,   if  yo u   lo o k  at   t he 
S eco nd   Ar t iller y  as  a  syst em,   it   is  a  syst em,   and  ever y  syst em  has  sing le 
p o int s  o f  vu lner abilit y. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     T hank   yo u. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   Fied ler . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     T wo   set s  o f  quest io ns.     One, 
co ncep t u al,   and  o ne  much  mo r e  specific,   a  har d war e  quest io n. 
           Bu t ,   fir st ,   t he  who le  d iscussio n  we  had  ear lier   abo ut   limit ed  war 
and   t his,   t hat ,   and   we'r e  all  t alking  har d war e,   bu t   let 's  t alk  po lit ics  o f  it 
because  in  t he  end  t he  d ecisio n  t o   go   t o   war   is  always  in  so me  measur e 
p o lit ical. 
           Do es  anybo dy  believe  t hat   it   is  r easo nable  t o   co nsider   t hat 
Chinese  mo t ivat io n  vis­ à­ vis  T aiwan  co nt ains  so me  significant   element 
o f  p lanning,   t hat   if  t her e  is  int er nal  inst abilit y  in  t he  co unt r y,   t hat   it   is  a 
u seful  d iver sio n?    At   t hat   po int ,   t he  po lit ical­ dip lo mat ic  calcu lus 
chang es  dr amat ically,   i. e. ,   if  we  have  a  sur vival  pr o blem  d o mest ically, 
we  d o n't   much  car e  what   anybo dy  t hinks  wo r ldwide.     I s  t hat   a  scenar io 
t hat   p eo p le  game  o ut ?    I s  it   r easo nable?    I s  it   a  co nsider at io n  o r   ar e  we 
d isco unt ing   t hat ? 
           I   kno w  t he  g o ver nment   wo uldn't   answer   t hat   qu est io n  so   I   didn't 
bo t her   t o   ask  t hem. 
           MR.  S T OKE S :     I   can  addr ess  t hat   at   a  p o lit ical  level.     Yes,   sir ,   o f 
co u r se,   it   is  a  po ssible  scenar io . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     I s  it   r easo nable? 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     I f  I   wer e  in  Beijing,   I   wo uld   say  it   is  no t 
r easo nable,   and   t he  r easo n  is  yo u   can  cause  yo ur self  a  lo t   mo r e 
p r o blems  by  cau sing   p r o blems  wit h  T aiwan  t han  yo u   wo u ld  if  yo u  t o o k 
t hat   ap pr o ach. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Yes,   but   yo u  also   said  ear lier ,   yo u 
d id n't   und er st and  why  t hey  didn't ­ ­ 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     Reno unce  use  o f  fo r ce. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:  ­ ­ yes.  S o   I   t ho ug ht   t hat   was  naive. 
  S o ­ ­ 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     Well,  t o   me,   it 's  a  wo r t hwhile  o bject ive.     T her e 
have  been  p o lls  t hat   r eflect   a  significant   par t   o f  China's  po p ulat io n  t hat 
act u ally  wo u ld  lik e  t o   see  t hat   happ en,   but   it   is  a  p o ssible  scenar io .     No 
q u est io n.     T he  u se  o f  an  ext er nal  diver sio n  is  cer t ainly  a  p o ssible 
scenar io .
                                                   ­ 60 ­ 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Anybo dy  else?    Yo u  disag r ee  wit h 
him?    All  t hr ee? 
          Yo u   t hen  mad e  r efer ence  t o   limit ed   war far e  fo r   limit ed   o bject ives. 
  I n  t he  cur r ent   co nt ext ,   can  yo u  co nceive  o f  t hat   being   r ealist ic,   i. e. , 
t hat   t hey  t hink   t hat   t hey  can  dr o p   any  o r dnance  o n  T aiwan  and  no t   have 
a  majo r   int er nat io nal  p r o blem? 
          MR.   S T OKE S :     T he  sho r t   answer   t o   yo ur   qu est io n  is  t her e  wo uld 
be  majo r   int er nat io nal  pr o blems  if  t her e's  a  kinet ic  so lu t io n  invo lved . 
          Ho wever ,   wo uld   t he  int er vent io n  be  as  sever e  as  if  yo u  wo uld 
have  a  majo r   amphibio u s  invasio n?    I n  o t her   wo r ds,   t her e's­ ­ 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     No ,   I   under st and  t he  differ ence. 
Yo u 'r e  t alking   t he  differ ence  bet ween  lo bbing   missiles  and  p u t t ing 
p eo p le  o n  t he  gr o u nd. 
          MR.   S T OKE S :     And   lar ge­ scale  d eat hs  and   blo o d shed.     I n  o t her 
wo r d s,   t he  r eact io n,   I   t hink  t her e  wo u ld  be  a  calculat io n­ ­ 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     I   t ell  yo u  what   I 'm  g et t ing  at .     I 'm 
g et t ing   less  at   t he  Chinese  willingness  t o   do   t hat   as  so r t   o f  wo r ld  and 
t he  Unit ed  S t at es',   o ur   o wn  g o ver nment 's,   r eact io n  t o   such  an  event , 
when  we  ar e  less  t han  ag gr essive,   in  my  view,   abo ut   co nfr o nt ing  t hem 
o n  what   I   p er ceive  t o   be  abso lu t ely  mino r   issues  o f  pr o t o co l,   like 
meet ing   t he  Dalai  Lama  in  t he  Oval  Office  o r   t he  o ffice  next   d o o r ,   o r   let 
him  g o   o u t   t he  fr o nt   d o o r   o r   t he  back   do o r . 
          I f  we'r e  so   co ncer ned   abo ut   t hat   kind  o f  st uff,   I 'm  ver y  fr ight ened 
abo u t   t he  r eact io n  t o   limit ed   incu r sio ns,   if  yo u  will. 
          And   so   t he  quest io n  beco mes  her e,   and  t his  is  all  in  t he  end   a 
p o lit ical,   and  I   u nder st and   it 's  gaming   o ut   what   ar e  p o ssibilit ies,   but 
t hese  ar e  all  t hing s,   I   mean  if  t hey  t ho ught   t hat   t hey  co u ld  get   away 
wit h  so met hing  limit ed ,   I 'd  be  ver y  fr ig ht ened   abo ut   o ur   r espo nse. 
          MR.   S HLAP AK:     Just   a  quick   r espo nse.     I   t hink  t hat   t her e  ar e  t wo 
t hing s  t o   bear   in  mind   her e.     T he  fir st   is  I   do n't   kno w  o f  many  p eo p le 
who   have  st udied  China  who   wo uld  say  t hat   China  is  it ching   t o   g o   t o 
war ,   is  it ching   t o   dr o p  weapo ns  o n  T aiwan.     I   t hink,   cer t ainly  my  belief 
is,   t hat   u se  o f  fo r ce  against   T aiwan  is  abso lu t ely  t he  last   r eso r t   fo r 
t hem,   pr ecisely  fo r   t he  r easo ns  t hat   yo u   expr ess. 
          T he  co nsequences  o ut side  t he  bat t lefield,   t he  co nsequ ences  t o 
t heir   eco no my,   and   so   fo r t h,   wo uld  be  sever e.     As  t o   ho w  likely  we 
wo u ld   be  t o   int er vene,   it   co u ld   d epend  so mewhat   o n  what   pr o vo ked  t he 
Chinese.     I f  it   was  a  clear   and   ver y  dr amat ic  br eaching  o f  o ne  o f  t heir 
d eclar ed  r ed  lines  ver sus  so met hing  abo ut   who 's  using  what   do o r   o n  t he 
p r esid ent ial  p alace,   I   t hink  it 's  p o ssible  t hat  t he  r eact io n  mig ht   be 
d iffer ent . 
          Bu t   I   t hink   absent   a  mo r e  t ho r o ugh  under st anding  o f  t he  exact 
cir cu mst ances,   it 's  har d  t o   mak e  a  pr edict io n  o ne  way  o r   t he  o t her . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     T hank  yo u. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   Mu llo y. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank   yo u ,   Mr .   Chair man.     I
                                                        ­ 61 ­ 
want   t o   t hank  all  o f  yo u  fo r   being  her e. 
           Mr .   S hlap ak,   I   r eally  lik ed  yo ur   t est imo ny  becau se  I   t ho u ght   it 
was  such  a  br o ad  gaug e  lo o k  at   t his  who le  t hing .     I   r emember   t he  Cuban 
missile  cr isis  so   I   app r eciat ed  t he  po int   yo u   made  t her e. 
           On  p ag e  fo ur ,   yo u  t alk  abo ut   t he  differ ence  bet ween  t he  cr o ss­ 
S t r ait   balance  t en  t o   2 0  year s  ago   and   say  it 's  subst ant ial­ ­ t he  differ ence 
is  su bst ant ial.     And  yo u   say  aft er   d ecad es  o f  o ffset t ing  t he  mainland 's 
q u ant it at ive  su p er io r it y  by  explo it ing  d ecisive  qualit at ive  ad vant ag es, 
t hese  qualit at ive  edges  ar e  er o ding  while  t he  numer ical  handicap 
p er sist s.
           S o   I   t hink  t hat   means  t hat  we  had  hig her ­ t ech  weapo n,   and  co uld 
co u nt er   t he  lo wer ­ t ech  weapo ns  o f  China. 
           Have  t he  Unit ed  S t at es'  po licies,   eco no mic  and  t r ad e  po licies  and 
invest ment   po licies  and   t ech  t r ansfer   po licies,   t o war d  China  o ver   t he 
last   t en  year s  co nt r ibu t ed  t o   t his  er o sio n  o f  o ur   abilit y  t o   defend  T aiwan 
if  we  cho se  t o   d o   t hat ? 
           MR.   S HLAP AK:     I 'm  no t   r eally  qualified  t o   t alk  abo ut   t r ade 
p o licy  o r   t echno lo gy  t r ansfer   p o licy  so   I 'd   lik e  t o   t ake  a  pass  o n  t hat . 
           T he  er o sio n  has  had   many  so ur ces.     China  fo r   t he  last   almo st   2 0 
year s  no w  has  been  buying   billio ns  o f  d o llar s  o f  fr o nt ­ line  equipment 
fr o m  Russia,   and   pr o bably  t echno lo g y  t r ansfer   fr o m  t her e  is  far   mo r e 
imp o r t ant   t han  any  impact   it   mig ht   have  had  fr o m  t he  Unit ed  S t at es,   but 
I 'm  no t   r eally  equ ipped  t o   judge  what   t hat   impact   was. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Do   eit her   o f  t he  o t her 
wit nesses  want   t o   co mment   o n  t hat ? 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     I   do n't   have  a  g o o d  handle  o n  U. S .   t ech  t r ansfer 
p o licy.     Ho wever ,   inst inct ively,   I   wo uld  say  t hat   when  t he  P eo p le's 
Rep u blic  o f  China,   when  t heir   defense  ind ust r y,   whet her   it 's  t he  sp ace 
and   missile  indu st r y  o r   aviat io n  ind ust r y  o r   ship building  ind ust r y,   has  a 
t echno lo g ical  pr o blem,   in  o t her   wo r d s,   t her e's  a  bo t t leneck   t hat   exist s, 
my  view  is  t hat   t hey  ar e  ver y  adep t   at   finding  ways  t o   o ver co me  t hat 
p ar t icu lar   t echno lo gical  bo t t leneck ,   whet her   it 's  t echno lo gy  fr o m  t he 
Unit ed   S t at es  o r   fo r mer   S o viet   Unio n,  o r   a  r ange  o f  all  o t her   so u r ces. 
           S o   whet her   o r   no t   t his  is  a  r eflect io n  o f  U. S .   t ech  t r ansfer   p o licy 
o r  if  it 's  t he  Chinese  gr o wing­ ­ basically,   t he  glo bal  nat u r e  o f  t echno lo g y 
d iffu sio n,   whet her   t hat 's  mo r e  o f  a  fact o r   t han  it   is  any  sp ecific  aspect 
o f  U. S .   p o licy  per   se. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     No w,   o n  t he  eco no mic 
ag r eement ,   do   yo u   g uys  fo llo w  t he  eco no mic  agr eement   t hat 's  being 
d iscussed   bet ween  T aiwan  and   China?    Anybo d y  fo llo wing   t hat ?    No . 
Ok ay. 
           Mr .   S t o kes,   yo u'r e  no t ­ ­ 
           MR.   S T OKE S :  No t   in  det ail. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Okay.     I 'll  save  my  quest io n 
t hen  o n  t hat   fo r   t he  next   panel. 
           T hank  yo u  ver y  much.
                                                    ­ 62 ­ 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   S hea. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     I   want   t o   t hank  yo u  all  fo r   yo u r   ver y, 
ver y  int er est ing  t est imo ny. 
           I   guess  t he  fir st   quest io n  I   have  is  fo r   Mr .   S t o k es,   and  t hen  t he 
seco nd  o ne  fo r   Dr .   Willner ,   and ,   Mr .   S hlapak,   just   jump  in  if  yo u  feel 
t he  u r ge. 
           Fo llo wing  u p  o n  Co mmissio ner   Fiedler 's  po int ,   Mr .   S t o kes,   yo u 
said   t hat   it   was  inexplicable  t hat   China  wo uld  be  co nt inuing  t o   have  a 
t ho u sand   plu s  missiles  t ar g et ed  o n  T aiwan.     I   was  wo nder ing  if  yo u 
co u ld   give  us  a  lit t le  bit   o f  insig ht   int o   t he  dynamic  wit hin  China,   wit hin 
t he  Chinese  lead er ship?  I s  t he  milit ar y  calling  t he  sho t s  her e?    I s  it   t he 
civilian  leader ship ? 
           Ar e  t her e  any  t ensio ns  wit h  t he  civilian  leader ship ?    Or   is  t he 
civilian  leader ship  calling   t he  sho t s?    Or   do   yo u  have  any  insight   int o 
t hat ?    T hat 's  t he  fir st   quest io n. 
           And ,   t hen,   Dr .   Willner ,   wit h  r espect   t o   T aiwan,   yo u  hint ed  t hat 
t her e  was  so me  t ensio n  bet ween  t he  Minist r y  o f  Nat io nal  Defense  and 
t he  Nat io nal  S ecur it y  Co u ncil,   t he  civilian  lead er ship,   t he  secur it y 
lead er ship,   in  T aiwan.     I   was  wo nder ing  if  yo u   co u ld  flesh  t hat   o ut ? 
           And   has  t he  exp anded  missio n  o f  d isast er   r elief  fo r   t he  T aiwanese 
milit ar y,   has  t hat   been  well  r eceived?    I f  yo u  co uld  co mment   o n  t hat   as 
well. 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     I   co uld  say  I 'm  no t   in  a  po sit io n  t o   speculat e; 
ho wever ,   I 'm  no t   g o ing  t o   say  t hat . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     S peculat e. 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     I 'm  go ing  t o   sp eculat e.     I   lo ve  sp eculat io n.     I n 
g ener al,   t her e  is  t he  st at ed  r easo n  abo ut   t he  r efusal  t o   r eno unce  use  o f 
fo r ce  o r   wit hd r aw  t he  five  missile  br ig ades  o p po sit e  T aiwan,   but   t her e's 
a  who le  r ange  o f  dynamics  t hat   pr o bably  exist   in  China  t hat   may  no t   be 
d iffer ent   fr o m  o t her   co u nt r ies  ar o und  t he  wo r ld. 
           Yo u  need  a  t hr eat .     S cenar io ­ based  planning.     P eo ple  like  t o   get 
away  fr o m  scenar io ­ based  planning  and  go   t o   cap abilit ies­ based 
p lanning ,   but   yo u   need  a  t hr eat ,   and  T aiwan  is  a  go o d  whip ping   bo y. 
I t 's  a  gr eat   o ne. 
           Yo u  can  bu ild   up  yo ur   milit ar y  in  a  way  t hat   so r t   o f  channels 
at t ent io n  o n  t o   o ne  p ar t icu lar   issue,   and  yo u'r e  no t   go ing  t o   have, 
t heo r et ically,   p eo p le  t hat   alar med ,   fo r   example.     What   bet t er   way  t o   d o 
it ?    Because  fr ankly,  t he  capabilit ies  yo u'r e  br inging  against   T aiwan 
co u ld   be  ar r ayed   against   Japan.     I t   do esn't   t ake  t hat   much  o f  a  leap  t o 
t ak e  t ho se  S RBMs,   ext end  t he  r ange,   and  t hen  use  t ho se  same 
capabilit ies.     But   having   T aiwan  as  so r t   o f  at   t he  fo cus  o f  t hat   t hr eat   is 
nice  and   co nvenient . 
           S eco ndly,   t he  o t her   issue,   and   ag ain  t his  is  keep ing  wit h  t he  same 
t heme,   a  lo t   o f  t he  changes  t hat   o ccu r r ed  in  t er ms  o f  t he  milit ar y 
p o st u r e  o ppo sit e  T aiwan  o ccur r ed  in  199 1  r ight   when  t he  availabilit y­ ­ 
r ig ht   when  t he  S o viet   t hr eat   went   away.
                                                  ­ 63 ­ 
          S o   when  yo u   st ar t ed  having  t hat   bu ild ­ up  t hat   o ccur r ed  in  '91,   and 
so   in  o r der   t o   maint ain  t hat   fo cus,   yo u  had  T aiwan,   yo u  r o ll  o ut   t he 
u sual  su spect ,   and   let 's  co u nt er   T aiwan  independence,   when  act ually  use 
o f  milit ar y  fo r ce  do esn’t   do  anyt hing   t o   d et er .     On  T aiwan,   I  t hink 
t hey'r e  o blivio u s  t o   it ,   but   anyway. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     T hank  yo u. 
          Dr .   Willner . 
          DR.   WI LLNE R:     T o   yo ur   fir st   qu est io n,   Co mmissio ner ,   abo ut 
d iffer ences  bet ween  MND  and  NS C,   I   t hink  t her e  ar e  t hr ee  issues  at 
p lay:   per so nalit y­ based  issues,   cult u r al­ based  issues,   and  p o licy­ based 
d iffer ences. 
          I   t hink  per so nalit y,   I   t hink  t her e  wer e  so me,   cer t ainly  wit h  S u  Chi 
and   t he  MND  lead er ship ,   I   t hink   t her e  was  so me  fr ict io n  t her e  t hat   was 
ver y  p er so nalit y­ based,   and  I   t hink  t her e  was  a  co nso lid at io n  wit hin  t he 
NS C  t o   wo r k  so me  t hings  so met imes  t o   t he  exclusio n  o f  MND  t hat 
caused  so me  per so nalit y  fr ict io ns. 
          I   t hink   t her e  wer e  cult ur al  differ ences,   and  I   t hink   t his  is  an  issu e 
t hat   wo uld   be,   maybe  no t   r eso lved,   bu t   t hat   wo uld  go   a  lo ng  way  in 
d evelo p ing  civilian  defense  exp er t ise  fo r   t he  lo ng  t er m.     Fo lk s  t hat   st ay 
in,   t hat   under st and  t he  issues  t hat   deal  wit h  t he  milit ar y,   t hat   haven't 
necessar ily  been  in  t he  milit ar y,   go   a  lo ng  way  in  advancing  T aiwan's 
int er est s.     S o   I   t hink  t her e  ar e  so me  cult ur al  issues  t her e  in  t er ms  o f 
u nd er st anding  o f  each  o t her ’s  cult ur e. 
          And   I   t hink  p o licy  has  played   a  r o le  in  t his,   and  t hat   is  p o licy 
d iffer ences  o r   at   least   co ncer n  o n  t he  par t   o f  t he  civilian  side  o f  t he 
ho use  and  NS C  t hat   MND  was  less  t han  supp o r t ive  o r   per haps  slo w­ 
r o lling   so me  o f  t he  chang es  expect ed   by  Ma,   and  t hat   was  a  r eflect io n  o f 
so me  o f  t he­ ­ t hat   was  played   o ut   in  so me  o f  t his­ ­ maybe  no t   co nflict   bu t 
cer t ainly  so me  o f  t hese  t ensio ns. 
          I n  t er ms  o f  whet her   t he  expanded  missio n  o n  disast er   r elief  has 
been  well  r eceived,   it   has  been  well  r eceived.     Act ually,   t her e's  been  an 
o ngo ing  mo ve  o ver   t he  past   sever al  year s  t o   mo ve  in  t hat   dir ect io n. 
          I   t hink  t hat   t his  also   plays  t o   t he  co ncer ns  t hat   t he  Legislat ive 
Yu an  and  t he  p eo p le  have  abo ut   whet her   t he  milit ar y  can  no t   o nly 
su pp o r t   d efending  T aiwan  against   ext er nal  t hr eat s,   bu t   is  r eady  t o 
r espo nd  when  t her e  ar e  int er nal  challenges  as  well. 
          I   t hink   T ypho o n  Mo r ako t   last   year   o pened  t he  windo w  o n  so me 
sig nificant   challeng es  t hat   t he  milit ar y  has,   t hat   T aiwan  has  in  dealing 
wit h  t hese,   and  I   t hink   t hat   is  what   gener at ed ,   in  p ar t ,   t his  push  t o   make 
su r e  t hat   d isast er   r elief  was  a  co r e  missio n  o f  t he  milit ar y,   and  I   t hink 
it 's  been  well  r eceived . 
          I   t hink  I   wo u ld  just   add  t hat   o ne  o f  t he  pr o blems  is  t hat   when  an 
ear t hq uak e  o r   t ypho o n  hit s,   t hat   sig nificant   amo u nt s  o f  t he  d efense 
bud g et ,   O&M,   is  r ealigned   t o   supp o r t   t hat .     And   t her e  was  a  lo t   o f 
mo ney  p ulled  o u t   t o   supp o r t   t he  t ypho o n  r espo nse,   and  I   gu ess  t hat 
cr eat es  ad d it io nal  challeng es  in  t er ms  o f  t heir   d ay­ t o ­ day  sup po r t   fo r
                                                  ­ 64 ­ 
o t her   init iat ives. 
            COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     T hank  yo u. 
            HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   Cleveland. 
            COMMI S S I ONE R  CLE VE LAND:     Dr .   Willner ,   I   was  int er est ed  in 
yo u r   t est imo ny.     Yo u  said   t hat   in  a  discussio n  abo ut   t he  t r ansit io n  t o   t he 
vo lu nt ar y  milit ar y  t hat ­ ­ vo lunt eer   milit ar y­ ­ t hat   yo u ng  peo ple  see  lit t le 
incent ive  o r   significant   secur it y  t hr eat s  r eq uir ing  t heir   co mmit ment . 
            I   was  int er est ed  in  yo ur   co mment ,   Mr .   S t o kes,   in  t alking  abo ut 
China,   t hat   t her e  has  t o   be  a  t hr eat . 
            S o   I 'd  like  t o   ask  all  o f  yo u ,   do   yo u   t hink  t hat   t he  T aiwanese 
p eo p le  per ceive  a  clear   and   pr esent   danger   o r   a  t hr eat ?  T he  seco nd  p ar t 
o f  t he  qu est io n­ ­ pr o bably  apo cr yphal  in  t his  co nt ext ­ ­ bu t   do   yo u  t hink­ ­ 
we  co nst ant ly  t alk  abo u t   t he  need  fo r   ad dit io nal  milit ar y  asset s­ ­ do   yo u 
t hink   t hat   t hey  wo uld   act ually  be  used ? 
            MR.   S T OKE S :     I   haven't ,   in  t er ms  o f  T aiwan  t aking  po lls  t her e, 
but   I   t hink  t her e's  a  co nsensu s,   and  it 's  r eflect ed  in  t he  sust enance  o f 
t he  d efense  bu dget ,   a  co nsensus  t hat   a  st r o ng  defense  is  r equir ed  amo ng 
T aiwan's  g ener al  po pu lat io n. 
            Yo u   will  see  so me  co mp laint s  o r   so me  o pinio n  lead er s  co ming  o u t 
st r o ngly  in  favo r   o f  a  r edu ct io n,   fo r   examp le,   o f  t he  milit ar y  budget ,   but 
it 's  no t   t hat   differ ent   fr o m  what   we  have  her e  in  t he  U. S .     I n  o t her 
wo r d s,   so   yo u   do  see  sup po r t   fo r   sust ained  levels  o f  defense  spending. 
            COMMI S S I ONE R  CLE VE LAND:     I   do n't   lik e  t o   eq uat e  defense 
sp ending   wit h  a  p er cep t io n  o f  nat io nal  secur it y  int er est s.     I   do   no t 
believe  t hat   t hey  ar e  syno nymo u s.     S o   if  yo u  co uld  separ at e  defense 
sp ending  and  t alk  mo r e  abo ut   what   yo u  see  as  pu blic  per cep t io n  o f  t he 
t hr eat ,   I   t hink   t hat 's  r eally  what   I 'm  mo r e  fo cu sed   o n. 
            MR.   S T OKE S :     I n  t he  gener al  p o pulace,   a  t hr eat   fr o m  t he  P RC, 
milit ar y  t hr eat ,   t hey  see  t he  ballist ic  missiles  o bvio usly.  E ver y  cit izen 
o n  T aiwan  lives  wit hin  seven  minu t es  o f  dest r uct io n,   and   t hey  k no w 
t hat . 
            DR.   WI LLNE R:     I   wo uld   ad d  t o   t hat   a  co uple  o f  t hing s.     I   t hink  in 
t er ms  o f  yo ung   p eo p le,   my  exper ience  t her e  was  T aiwan  is  at t r act ing 
so me  gr eat   yo ung  peo ple  t o   it s  milit ar y  fo r ce.     I  t hink  t her e  is,   t he 
yo u ng   lieu t enant s  and  t he  capt ains  t hat   I   r an  int o   and  so me  o f  t he  junio r 
ser geant s,   esp ecially,   ver y  impr essive.     T hey've  g o t   t heir   eye  o n  t he  ball, 
and   t hey'r e  do ing  what   it   t ak es  in  an  u nlimit ed  envir o nment   t o   suppo r t 
T aiwan's  defense. 
            I   t hink  t he  pu blic  p er cept io n  o f  t hr eat   is  mixed .     I   t hink  t hat ,   as 
Mr .   S t o kes  po int ed  o ut ,   t hat   t her e  ar e  lo t s  o f  o t her   issu es  co mpet ing  fo r 
d efense  d o llar s.     I   t hink  t her e  ar e  lo t s  o f  t hings  pu lling  yo u ng  peo ple  in 
o t her   dir ect io ns,   o bvio u sly,   lo t s  o f  go o d  business  o p po r t unit ies,   t ho se 
t yp es  o f  t hings,   and  t hat 's  imp act ing   cer t ainly  o n  yo ung  peo ple  want ing 
t o   g o   in. 
            T hat 's  o ne  o f  t he  r easo ns  I   hig hlight ed  in  my  t est imo ny  t hat   I 
t hink   it 's  incumbent   o n  t he  T aiwan  g o ver nment ,   MND,   t o   seek  o ut   ways
                                                    ­ 65 ­ 
t o  make  sur e  t hey'r e  ar t icu lat ing  t hat   t he  d efense  po st u r e  r eflect s  a 
ser io u s  t hr eat   t o   T aiwan  t hat   co nt inu es  t o   be  o ut   t her e,   and   t her e  ar e 
lo t s  o f  t hings  go ing  o n,   such  as  o pening   up  bases,   int r o ducing  yo ung 
p eo p le  t o   what 's  available  t o   t hem  in  t he  milit ar y,   and   I   t hink   t his 
t r ansit io n  t o   t he  vo lunt eer   fo r ce  will  o nly  enhance  t hat . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  CLE VE LAND:     T he  seco nd  par t   o f  t he 
q u est io n,   do   yo u  t hink   t hey'll  use  t he  asset s  t hat   t hey  have  secur ed? 
           MR.   S T OKE S :     T he  T aiwan  defense  est ablishment ?    Yes,   ma'am. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   Fiedler ,   I 'll 
g ive  yo u   t wo   minut es  fo r   a  fo llo w­ up. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     I   just   have  a  quick  har dwar e 
q u est io n.     S o   we  say  t her e's  anywher e  bet ween  1, 1 00  and  1 , 200  missiles 
p o int ed  at   T aiwan.  T hat 's  no t   t heir  ar senal,   so   ho w  many  d o   t hey  have 
available,   t hey  co uld  r u n  in,   near by,   r esupply,   o r   do   t hey  just   t hink  t hat 
t he  1, 100   o r   1, 200  at   t he  mo ment   is  all  t hey  need  t o   acco mplish  t heir 
o bject ives?    What   kind  o f  pr o blem  ar e  we  facing  o ver   if  t hey  do n't 
achieve  t heir   end s  wit h  t he  fir st   bar r age  o r   t he  fir st   t en  bar r ages? 
           MR.   S HLAP AK:     I   t hink  t hat   all  o f  t heir   d ep lo yed  sho r t ­ r ange 
ballist ic  missiles  ar e,   in  fact ,   ar r ayed  in  t he  r egio ns  o ppo sit e  T aiwan. 
I 'm  no t   awar e  o f  t heir   being  act ive  dut y  br igades  elsewher e. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     S o   ho w  many  sit t ing  ar o und  u n­ 
d eplo yed   do   t hey  have  t hat   t hey  co u ld   r esup ply  wit h? 
           MR.   S HLAP AK:     Well,   t hey  have  a  much  smaller   number   o f 
lau ncher s  t han  t hey  have  missiles  so   t hat   1, 1 00,   1, 200  number   includes  a 
su bst ant ial  nu mber   o f  r elo ads  fo r   t heir   launcher s,   maybe  a  t hr ee­ t o ­ o ne 
o r   fo u r ­ t o ­ o ne  r at io   o f  missiles  t o   lau ncher s. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     S o   t he  1 , 100  includ es  t he  r epeat ed 
lau nch­ ­
           MR.   S HLAP AK:     T hat 's  co r r ect ,   yes. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Okay.     T hank  yo u. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Gent lemen,   t hank   yo u  fo r 
helping  us  und er st and  t his.     We  appr eciat e  yo ur   t ime  and  yo ur   t est imo ny 
ver y  mu ch.   I t 's  been  enlight ening . 
           We'r e  go ing  t o   br eak   no w  unt il  12: 4 5. 
           [ Wher eupo n,   at   12: 00   no o n,   t he  hear ing  r ecessed,   t o   r eco nvene  at 
1 2 : 5 0   p. m. ] 

                           A  F  T   E   R  N  O  O  N      S   E   S   S   I   O  N 

                         PANEL  IV:     ECO NO M IC  AS PECTS 

          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Welco me  back.     I n  t his  p anel, 
we'r e  go ing  t o   examine  t he  eco no mic  develo pment s  in  t he  cr o ss­ S t r ait 
r elat io nship   and  t heir   imp licat io ns  fo r   t he  Unit ed  S t at es.     We'r e  ver y 
fo r t u nat e  t o   have  t hr ee  t o p   exper t s  o n  t his  mat t er   befo r e  t he 
Co mmissio n,   and   we'r e  g r at eful  t o   t hem  fo r   accept ing   o ur   invit at io n  t o
                                            ­ 66 ­ 
be  her e. 
          Ou r   fir st   speak er   is  Dr .   Mer r it t   ( T er r y)   Co o k e,   and  he's  t he 
fo u nder   and   CE O  o f  GC3   S t r at egy.     I   fir st   met   T er r y  dur ing   his  15  year 
car eer   wit h  t he  U. S .   Fo r eign  Co mmer cial  S er vice.     Dur ing  t hat   car eer , 
he  wo r k ed   at   U. S .   missio ns  in  Ber lin,   S hanghai,   T aipei,   T o kyo ,   and  as 
t he  U. S .   g o ver nment 's  S enio r   Co mmer cial  Rep r esent at ive  in  T aiwan. 
          Ou r   next   sp eaker ,   Rup er t   Hammo nd ­ Chamber s.   Ruper t ,   we'r e  glad 
t o   have  yo u   back.     He  t est ified   at   t he  Co mmissio n's  ver y  fir st   hear ing  o n 
Ju ne  1 4,   2 0 01.     We  welco me  yo u  back . 
          He's  been  t he  P r esident   o f  t he  U. S . ­ T aiwan  Business  Co uncil  since 
2 0 00 .     Over   t he  year s,   he's  wo r ked   t o   develo p  t he  Co uncil's  r o le  as  a 
st r at eg ic  par t ner   t o   it s  member s  wit h  t he  go al  o f  po sit io ning   t he  Co uncil 
as  lead er   in  empo wer ing  Amer ican  co mp anies  in  Asia. 
          Ou r   final  panelist   is  Dr .   S co t t   Kast ner .     He's  an  Asso ciat e 
P r o fesso r   at   t he  Depar t ment   o f  Go ver nment   and  P o lit ics  at   t he 
Univer sit y  o f  Mar yland. 
          I n  2 00 5­ 20 06 ,   he  was  a  Visit ing   Resear ch  Fello w  in  t he  P r incet o n­ 
Har var d   China  and   t he  Wo r ld  P r o gr am. 
          I n  200 7­ 20 08 ,   he  was  a  China  S ecur it y  Fello w  at   t he  I nst it ut e  fo r 
Nat io nal  and  S t r at eg ic  S t u dies  o f  t he  Nat io nal  Defense  Univer sit y. 
          We  welco me  all  t hr ee  o f  yo u,   and  why  do n't   we  st ar t   wit h  Dr . 
Co o k e,   and   t hen  go   acr o ss. 

         S TATEM ENT  O F  DR.   M ERRITT  T.   CO O K E,   CEO ,   G C3 
            S TRATEG Y,   INC. ,   B RYN  M AWR,   PENNS YLVANIA 

           DR.   COOKE :     T hank   yo u  ver y  much,   Co mmissio ner   Mu llo y. 
           I t 's  a  gr eat   p leasur e  fo r   me  t o   make  my  fo ur t h  app ear ance  befo r e 
t his  Co mmissio n.     T he  co mmer cial  and   eco no mic  r elat io nship  acr o ss  t he 
S t r ait   o f  T aiwan  has  evo lved  dr amat ically  since  I   fir st   gave  t est imo ny  o n 
t hat   issue  in  August   2 00 1,   and  I   co mmend  t he  Co mmissio n  fo r   it s 
co nt inu ed  fo cu s  o n  t his  co mplex  but   highly  significant   dynamic. 
           As  I 've  co nsist ent ly  t est ified ,   t he  gr o wing  eco no mic  and 
co mmer cial  int er depend ence  bet ween  T aiwan  and  China  has  gr eat 
sig nificance  fo r   t he  p r o sp er it y  and  st abilit y  o f  t he  Asia­ P acific  r eg io n. 
           T he  U. S .   st ake  in  t his  dynamic  is  hug e.     U. S .   pr o sper it y  and  jo bs 
d epend   d ir ect ly  upo n  act ive  engag ement   in  t his  r egio n  o f  t he  wo r ld 
enjo ying   t he  mo st   r o bust   cu r r ent   gr o wt h  and   t he  best   lo ng­ t er m 
p r o spect s  fo r   high  r at es  o f  fut ur e  gr o wt h. 
           U. S .   secur it y  also   d epends  dir ect ly  o n  maint aining   t he  st abilit y  o f 
t he  r egio n  and   fur t her   advancing  t he  pr o sper it y  which  supp o r t s  t hat 
st abilit y.     While  it 's  far   fr o m  Main  S t r eet ,   t he  S t r ait   o f  T aiwan  is  a 
fu lcr u m  fo r   vit al  U. S .   int er est s.     T his  Co mmissio n  plays  a  vit al  r o le  in 
helping  illu minat e  t he  eco no mic  dynamics  behind  t he  head lines  in  t he 
r eg io n. 
           As  we  meet ,   t he  t r iangular   secur it y  r elat io nship  bet ween  t he
                                                   ­ 67 ­ 
Unit ed   S t at es,   China  and  T aiwan  is  again  u nder   so me  st r ain.     I n 
p ar t icu lar ,   t he  st r ain  in  t he  U. S . ­ China  leg   o f  t he  t r iangle  has  been 
mar k ed  o ver t ly,   as  t his  gr o up   was  lo o king  at   ver y  clo sely  t his  mo r ning , 
by  a  ser ies  o f  p o lit ical  event s  o ver   r ecent   mo nt hs:   t he  P r esid ent 's 
meet ing   wit h  t he  Dalai  Lama;  t he  T aiwan  ar ms  sale  pack age;  China's 
p er ceived   int r ansigence­ ­ China's  int r ansig ence­ ­ excuse  me­ ­ as  o t her 
U. N.   S ecur it y  Co uncil  member s  have  mo ved  t o war d   sanct io ning   I r an  fo r 
it s  nu clear   pr o gr am;  and  t he  per ceived   sp o iler   r o le  t hat   China  played  in 
t he  COP 1 5  climat e  change  t alks  in  Co penhagen;  as  well  as,   finally,   t he 
g o ver nment al  par r y­ and ­ t hr ust   o ver   Go o gle's  disclo sur e  o f  o r chest r at ed 
hack ing   int o   it s  ser ver s. 
          T he  U. S .   r elat io nship  wit h  T aiwan  d esp it e  an  o ver all  impr o vement 
u nd er   t he  administ r at io n  o f  P r esident   Ma  has  no t   been  wit ho ut   it s  o wn 
r ecent   difficult ies.     Mo st   significant   has  been  t he  int er r upt io n  in 
mo ment u m  t o war d s  impr o ving  t r ade  and  invest ment   t ies  as  a  r esult   o f 
leg islat io n  ado p t ed  in  T aiwan  in  December . 
          Meanwhile,   t he  imp r o vement   o f  T aiwan­ China  eco no mic  and 
co mmer cial  r elat io ns  has  been  bo t h  st eady  and  st r o ng,   and  pr o spect s  ar e 
g o o d   fo r   co nclu sio n  o f  an  E co no mic  Co o per at io n  Fr amewo r k  Ag r eement 
by  Ju ne  o f  t his  year . 
          T he  o ver t   mar ker s  fo r   t hese  shift ing  t ensio ns  wit hin  t he  st r at egic 
r elat io nship ,   t he  eco no mic  t r iangu lar   r elat io nship,   have  been  po lit ical 
event s,   as  just   ment io ned,   bu t   t he  t ect o nic  fo r ces  det er mining  t hese 
su r face  event s  have  been  lar gely  eco no mic  and ,   in  par t icular ,   t he  glo bal 
eco no mic  r ecessio n  st ar t ing  in  S ept ember   2 008  has  shar p ly  acceler at ed 
p r essu r es  lo ng  at   play  affect ing  each  leg  o f  t he  secur it y  t r iangle. 
          As  I 've  wr it t en  int o   my  st at ement ,   and  I   will  no t   t ak e  t he 
Co mmissio n's  t ime  r ig ht   no w,   I   include  t he  sho r t   analysis  o f  t he 
eco no mic  st at u s  o f  each  leg  o f  t he  t r iang ular   r elat io nship,   and  wit h 
China  and   T aiwan,   it   is  clear ly  t he  st o r y  o f  t he  dr amat ic  pr o g r ess  o f  t he 
E CFA  nego t iat io ns  and  t he  pr eceding  Financial  Ag r eement . 
          Wit h  China  and   t he  U. S . ,   it 's  essent ially  t he  fact   t hat   t he  impact   o f 
t he  glo bal  r ecessio n  seems  t o   have  fallen  mo r e  heavily  o n  E ur o p e,   and 
t he  st r ains  t her e  ar e  ver y  o ver t .     I t   has  cr eat ed  a  gr eat   deal  o f  challenge 
and   d iscu ssio n,   as  far   as  t he  U. S .   and   China  eco no mic  r elat io n,   and  I 'm 
su r e  it   do es  co nt inu e  fo r   t he  year   ahead,   t ho ugh,   o n  balance,   t he 
eco no mic  and   co mmer cial  t ies  do   r emain  no t   t o o   badly  affect ed . 
          And   t hen  wit h  t he  U. S .   and  T aiwan,   it 's  lar gely  a  d iscussio n  o f 
p er haps  a  so mewhat   po lit ical  imp asse  t hat   has  t o   do   wit h  t he  difficult ies 
o ver   t he  beef  leg islat io n,   st ar t ing  in  December ;  t he  fact   t hat   t he  Obama 
ad minist r at io n  and   t he  execut ive  br anch  has  yet   t o   co mp let ely,   clear ly 
and   co nvincing ly  define  it s  int er nat io nal  t r ade  po st ur e;  and   t hen  t he  fact 
t hat   in  t his  br anch  o f  t he  go ver nment ,   t her e  ar e  also   so me  st r o ng  and 
d ivid ed  o pinio ns;  and  t hat   t hat   at   so me  level  ho lds  t he  vit alit y  o f  t he 
U. S .   and   T aiwan  r elat io nship  ho st age. 
          Whet her   it 's  due  t o   t he  t echnical  issu es  o f  beef,   o r   t he  br o ader
                                                   ­ 68 ­ 
issu es  o f  t he  par t y  base  o f  t he  administ r at io n  t hat 's  cur r ent ly  in  po wer , 
o r   t u g s  o f  war   bet ween  t he  co ngr essio nal  and  t he  execut ive  br anch,   t he 
eco no mic  vit alit y  o f  t he  U. S . ­ T aiwan  t r iangle  is  so mewhat   held  up  by 
t ho se  t hings. 
           S o ,   in  co nclusio n,   I   will  simply  per haps  r espo nd  t o   so me  o f  t he 
sp ecific  po int s  t hat   wer e  r aised  in  t he  let t er   o f  invit at io n  t o   me,   and  I 
invit e  Co mmissio ner   Mullo y  o r   Wo r t zel  t o   cut   me  o ff  at   any  po int   when 
my  t ime­ ­ sho uld  I   co nt inue  int o   so me  o f  t his? 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     No ,   keep  go ing.   Yo u've  go t   a 
lit t le  t ime  left . 
           DR.   COOKE :     Okay.     Go o d.     What   is  T aiwan's  po sit io n  in  t he 
Wo r ld   T r ade  Or ganizat io n?    Gener ally,   China  r efuses  t o   deal  dir ect ly 
wit h  T aiwan  wit hin  t he  WT O  fo r mat ,   and  fr o m  a  U. S .   po licy 
p er sp ect ive,   t his  is  r egr et t able  since  all  WT O  member s  have  t he  r ight   t o 
ent er   int o   FT A  discussio ns  under   WT O  auspices,   and  t he  cur r ent   E CFA 
neg o t iat io ns  bet ween  China  and  T aiwan  ar e  t aking  place  o ut side  o f  WT O 
au sp ices  lar gely  due  t o   China's  r efusal  t o   deal  dir ect ly  wit h  T aiwan 
wit hin  t he  exist ing  WT O  st r uct ur e. 
           Ho w  is  t he  r ecent ly  implement ed  China­ AS E AN  FT A  affect ing 
T aiwan?    I t   put s,   acco r ding  t o   my  analysis,   co nsider able  pr essur e  o n 
T aiwan's  t r adit io nal  indust r ies  such  as  pet r o leum,   aut o   par t s,   and 
machiner y,   since  co mpet ing  impo r t s  fr o m  AS E AN  member   co unt r ies  ar e 
able  t o   ent er   t he  mainland  at   a  r educed  t ar iff  r at e,   put t ing  t he  T aiwan 
su p p lier s  at   a  disadvant age. 
           T his  is  no t   so   much  o f  an  issue  wit h  t he  I T   glo bal  supply  chain 
wher e  T aiwan  has  t r adit io nally  had  a  ver y  st r o ng  po sit io n  pr ecisely 
becau se  t hat   supply  chain  is  so   well  int egr at ed  int o   t he  mainland 
eco no my  and  because  t ar iffs  ar e  alr eady  lo w. 
           Ho w  likely  is  clo ser   eco no mic  int egr at io n  bet ween  mainland  China 
and   T aiwan  t o   lead  t o   po lit ical  int egr at io n?    I 'll  leave  t hat   quest io n  t o 
t he  p o lit ical  panelist s  in  t o day's  hear ing  o t her   t han  t o   r emar k  t hat   t he 
q u est io n  o f  t he  r amificat io ns  o f  eco no mic  int egr at io n  has  always  been 
vig o r o usly  co nt est ed  by  T aiwan's  po lit ical  act o r s,   and  t hat   T aiwan's 
p u blic  o pinio n  has  demo nst r at ed  r emar kably  co nsist ent   dispo sit io n  t o 
p u r su e  t he  benefit s  o f  eco no mic  int egr at io n  while  r esist ing  any 
co nco mit ant   pr essur es  t o war ds  po lit ical  int egr at io n. 
           [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 3 

       HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u.     T hank  yo u  ver y 
mu ch  fo r   t hat .     Yo ur   full  st at ement   will  be  in  t he  r eco r d  o f  t he  hear ing 
and   will  be  up  o n  o ur   Web  sit e. 
       Mr .   Hammo nd­ Chamber s. 


3 
   Click here to read the prepared st at emen t   of  Dr.   M erri t t   T. 
Co o ke
                           ­ 69 ­ 
       S TATEM ENT  O F  M R.   RUPERT  H AM M O ND­ CH AM B ERS , 
                                 PRES IDENT 
    U. S . ­ TAIW AN  B US INES S   CO UNCIL,   ARLING TO N,   VIRG INIA 

         MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     T hank  yo u ,   Co mmissio ner 
Wo r t zel  and  Co mmissio ner   Mullo y. 
         I t   is  ind eed  my  ho no r   t o   r et u r n  t o   t he  U. S . ­ China  Co mmissio n  t o 
t est ify  t o day,   and ,   as  yo u  no t ed,   in  t he  fir st   o p po r t unit y  I   had,   we  also 
wer e  in  t he  pr esence  o f  Jim  Lilley,   r ecent ly  d epar t ed  and   gr eat ly  missed , 
so mebo d y  who   p layed   an  impo r t ant   r o le  in  guiding  many  o f  t he  po licies 
t hat   o ur   co u nt r y  has  used  t o   pr o ject   it s  int er est s  int o   t he  r egio n  and 
influ ence  many  o f  us  in  ho w  we  t hink   abo ut   China  and   o ur   co unt r y's 
r elat io nship   wit h  China. 
         I 'm  go ing   t o   keep   it   ver y  br ief,   as  Mar k  S t o kes  did  in  a  pr evio us 
p anel,   and  just   p o int   yo u  t o   t he  answer s,   t he  r espo nses,   I   sho uld  say,   I 
g ave  in  my  fo r mal  submissio n  t o   t he  Co mmissio n. 
         Bu t   ver y  q u ickly,   ju st   t o   t o u ch  o n  t he  cent r al  issu es  r ight   no w  in 
t he  co mmer cial  r elat io nship   bet ween  t he  Unit ed   S t at es  and  T aiwan  and 
China.     T aiwan  and  China,   r ig ht   no w  t he  nar r at ive  is  do minat ed  by  t he 
E co no mic  Co o per at io n  Fr amewo r k   Agr eement ,   o r   E CFA.     E CFA 
d o minat es  t he  r elat io nship   bet ween  T aiwan  and  China  as  a  plat fo r m  fo r 
d eliber at io n  o ver ,   fir st ,   t he  no r malizat io n  o f  t he  eco no mic  r elat io nship 
bet ween  t he  t wo ,   and   t hen  t he  liber alizat io n  o f  t he  r elat io nship   bet ween 
t he  t wo ,   using  t he  fr amewo r k  t hat   China  and  AS E AN  u sed   in  AS E AN 
P lu s  1,   wher e  yo u   have  a  fr amewo r k ,   yo u  have  what   t he  T aiwanese  call 
an  "ear ly  har vest , "  an  init ial  set   o f  liber alizing   ar eas,   and  t hen  a 
calend ar   fo r  t he  fo llo wing  sever al  year s,   let 's  say,   in  which  o t her   ar eas 
ar e  liber alized. 
         E CFA  is  t he  mo st   imp o r t ant   issue  in  T aiwan's  do mest ic  nar r at ive, 
d o mest ic  po lit ical  nar r at ive  at   t his  t ime.     I t   co mplet ely  d o minat es  t he 
d iscussio n  bet ween  t he  g o ver nment   and   t he  o ppo sit io n  par t ies.     T he 
p r incipal  o pp o sit io n  p ar t y,   t he  Demo cr at ic  P r o gr essive  P ar t y,   o pp o ses 
E CFA.     S o me  o f  t he  r easo ns  fo r   it s  o p po sit io n,   in  t he  Co uncil's  view 
anyway,   ar e  no t   clear ly  t hr ashed   o u t ,   and  cer t ainly  wit hin  T aiwan,   it 's 
d ifficult   t o   g r asp  fu lly  t he  differ ences  o f  o pinio n.     I f  no t   E CFA,   t hen 
what ? 
         Bu t   anyway,   no t io nally,   t he  Ma  go ver nment   is  fo cu sed   o n  passag e 
o f  t he  E CFA  at   t he  next   S t r ait s  E xchange  Fo undat io n­ ARAT S   meet ing 
in  t he  May­ Ju ne  t ime  fr ame.     And  t hat   will  be  a  big  mo ment   fo r   t he 
r elat io nship   bet ween  T aiwan  and  China.     I t   will  cer t ainly  r eceive  a  gr eat 
d eal  o f  co ver ag e,   and   I   t hink  it   will  also   be  a  mo ment   in  which 
co mment at o r s  ask  a  legit imat e  q uest io n:   ho w  is  Amer ica  go ing  t o 
r espo nd? 
         What   is  an  appr o p r iat e  Amer ican  r espo nse  t o   t his  r appr o chement , 
t his  eco no mic  r ap pr o chement ,   bet ween  T aiwan  and   China? 
         As  T er r y  t o uched  o n,   t he  T r ade  and   I nvest ment   Fr amewo r k
                                                    ­ 70 ­ 
Ag r eement ,   o r   T I FA,   is  at   t his  t ime  anyway  Amer ica's  p r incipal  plat fo r m 
fo r   engag ing   T aiwan  in  any  discussio ns  o n  t r ad e  issues  o r   t r ad e 
liber alizat io n  mat t er s. 
          T he  T I FA  has  fo r   t he  seco nd   t ime  in  a  decade  been  fr o zen,   t his 
t ime  o ver   t he  issue  o f  beef.     I n  t he  Co uncil's  view,   t he  fr eeze  in  t he  '03­ 
0 4   t ime  fr ame  o ver   I P R  and  t his  mo st   r ecent   fr eeze  o ver   beef  has  been  a 
failu r e,   has  been  co u nt er pr o duct ive  t o   Amer ican  int er est s. 
          Beef  is  a  t iny  co mpo nent   o f  U. S .   co mmer cial  r elat io ns  wit h 
T aiwan,   and  t he  bu lk  o f  t ho se  bu sinesses  t hat   wo uld   benefit   fr o m  fur t her 
liber alizat io n  o f  t he  t r ade  r elat io nship  bet ween  t he  t wo   ar e  at   t his  t ime 
co nt inu ing  t o   be  shu t   o u t   as  a  fu nct io n  o f  t he  T I FA  fr eeze. 
          T hat   said,   t he  manner   in  which  T aiwan  handled  t he  br eak ing   o f  t he 
Oct o ber   20 09  P r o t o co l,   which  is,   in  fact ,   what   t r anspir ed ­ ­ an  agr eement 
was  r eached   bet ween  t he  Obama  administ r at io n  and  t he  Ma 
ad minist r at io n.     T hat   ag r eement   was  anno unced   in  Oct o ber   '09,   but   t he 
r o llo u t   o f  t he  agr eement   was  bung led   in  T aiwan,   and  it   t o o k  a  po lit ical 
life  o f  it s  o wn  r esult ing   in  an  ear ly  Januar y  2010   decisio n  o n  t he  par t   o f 
T aiwan's  par liament   t o   make  changes  t o   t he  P r o t o co l. 
          T hat   if  and  o f  it self  r aises  legit imat e  q uest io ns  abo u t   T aiwan's 
r eliabilit y  as  a  t r ad ing   par t ner .     I f  we  ar e  t o   do   fu t u r e  pr o t o co ls,   will  we 
be  co nfr o nt ed   wit h  similar   challenges  in  dealing  wit h  a  legislat ive 
br anch  t hat   is  no t   in  t une  wit h  t he  execut ive  br anch? 
          And   also   t he  r egio nal  imp licat io ns  o f  t his.     I f  we  d o   no t   r eact   in  a 
ser io u s  manner   t o   T aiwan's  changing  o f  ag r eed   pr o t o co l,   what   message 
d o es  t hat   send  t o   t he  Ko r eans  and   t he  Japanese,   who   ar e  also   lo o king 
clo sely  at   mar ket   access  issues,   so me  o f  which  also   ar e  r elat ed  t o   beef? 
          S o   t hat 's  ver y  mu ch  o n  t he  minds  o f  US T R.   T hat   said,   wit h  t he 
t iming   o f  E CFA  and  t he  fact   t hat   Amer ica  has  equit ies  in  t he 
r elat io nship   wit h  T aiwan,   it   is  beho lden  o n  u s  as  a  co u nt r y  t o   r espo nd. 
          I   d o  believe  t hat   t he  Obama  ad minist r at io n  is  lo o king  fo r   ways  t o 
ad dr ess  t his  issue  wit h  beef,   while  also   at t empt ing  t o   schedule  a  T I FA 
meet ing   at   so me  po int   lat er   t his  year ,   so   t hat   bo t h  o pt ically,   as  well  as 
su bst ant ively,   t her e  is  balance  in  T aiwan's  ext er nal  r elat io ns  wit h  it s  t wo 
p r incipal  st r at eg ic  int er lo cut o r s:   t hat   o f  China  o n  o ne  sid e  wit h  E CFA; 
t hat   o f  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  o n  t he  o t her   sid e  wit h  T I FA. 
          One  final  t ho u g ht   I   wo uld   like  t o   leave  yo u   wit h  is  what   next ? 
Once  E CFA  is  d o ne,   what   challenges  is  t he  U. S .   g o ing  t o   face  in  r espect 
t o   su pp o r t ing  t his  nascent   ear ly  r appr o chement   bet ween  t he  t wo   sides? 
Yes,   we've  made  so me  gains  in  r esp ect   t o   peace  and   secu r it y  in  t he 
T aiwan  S t r ait ,   but   as  t he  Chinese  demands  o n  T aiwan  mo ve  fr o m 
eco no mic  lo w­ hanging  fr uit ,   t r ade  no r malizat io n,   and   liber alizat io n, 
what   d emands  will  be  p laced   o n  T aiwan  in  t he  po lit ical  and  milit ar y 
ar ena? 
          T her e  is,   t her e  r emains  anyway,   a  co nsensu s  in  T aiwan  t hat 
eco no mic  no r malizat io n  wit h  China,   as  lo ng   as  it   co mes  hand­ in­ hand 
wit h  T aiwan's  abilit y  t o   par t icipat e  in  bilat er al  and   mult ilat er al
                                                    ­ 71 ­ 
init iat ives  in  t he  r egio n,   which  at   t his  t ime  China  st ill  o ppo ses,   t hat 
co nsensus  fo r   suppo r t   o f  E CFA  r emains,   but   P r esident   Ma  has  no   such 
co nsensus  fo r   suppo r t   o n  po lit ical  and  milit ar y  mat t er s. 
         S o   ho w  do es  t hat   impact   Ma's  abilit y  t o   engage  t he  Chinese  as  we 
mo ve  t hr o ugh  E CFA?    And  t hen  what   wo uld  be  an  adequat e  U. S . 
r esp o nse  t o   suppo r t   t he  Ma  administ r at io n  as  it   deals  wit h  t ho r nier 
issu es  r elat ed  t o   so ver eignt y? 
         T hank  yo u  ver y  much. 
         [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 4 

          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u  ver y  much. 
          Dr .   Kast ner . 

           S TATEM ENT  O F  DR.   S CO TT  L.   K AS TNER 
 AS S O CIATE  PRO FES S O R,   DEPARTM ENT  O F  G O VERNM ENT 
AND  PO LITICS ,   UNIVERS ITY  O F  M ARYLAND,   CO LLEG E  PARK , 
                           M ARYLAND 

          DR.   KAS T NE R:     I 'd  like  t o   t hank  yo u  ver y  much  fo r   invit ing  me 
her e. 
          I   want ed  t o   co mment   br iefly  o n  so me  o f  t he  po lit ical 
co nsequences  o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait   eco no mic  int egr at io n.     I n  par t icular ,   my 
co mment s  will  t o uch  o n  t wo   issues: 
          Fir st ,   I   co nsider   if  and  ho w  deepening  eco no mic  int egr at io n  might 
affect   t he  likeliho o d  o f  a  fut ur e  milit ar y  co nfr o nt at io n  in  t he  T aiwan 
S t r ait ? 
          S eco nd,   I   ask  whet her   China­ T aiwan  eco no mic  int egr at io n  makes 
p o lit ical  unificat io n  bet ween  China  and  T aiwan  any  mo r e  likely? 
          E co no mic  int egr at io n  is  widely  believed  t o   have  a  st abilizing 
imp act   o n  cr o ss­ S t r ait   secur it y  r elat io ns.     And  my  r eading  o f  U. S .   po licy 
is  t hat   it   has  gener ally  been  suppo r t ive  o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait   eco no mic 
exchange  fo r   t his  r easo n. 
          But   t o   be  co nfident   abo ut   eco no mic  int egr at io n’s  st abilizing 
effect s,   I   t hink  it 's  impo r t ant   t o   examine  whet her   t he  specific  pr o cesses 
t hr o u g h  which  eco no mic  t ies  co uld  affect   co nflict   ar e  act ually  playing 
o u t   in  China­ T aiwan  r elat io ns.   Wit h  t his  in  mind,   I   believe  it 's  po ssible 
t o   id ent ify  at   least   t hr ee  such  pr o cesses  t hr o ugh  which  China­ T aiwan 
eco no mic  int egr at io n  co uld,   indeed,   po t ent ially  lead  t o   a  r educed  danger 
o f  milit ar y  co nflict   in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait . 
          Fir st ,   and  t his  is  t he  mo st   st r aight fo r war d,   eco no mic  int egr at io n 
r aises  t he  co st   o f  milit ar y  co nflict   fo r   bo t h  sides.     As  t he  co st s  o f 
milit ar y  co nflict   incr ease,   it 's  po ssible  t hat   leader s  o n  bo t h  sides  will  be 
mo r e  caut io us  abo ut   using  fo r ce  o r   ado pt ing  po licies  t hat   co uld  r isk 

4 
    Click here to read the prep ared  st at emen t   of  M r.   Ru p ert 
H a mmon d ­ Ch amb ers
                            ­ 72 ­ 
escalat io n. 
          S eco nd,   eco no mic  int egr at io n  can  po t ent ially  fo st er   a 
t r ansfo r mat io n  in  t he  p o licy  pr efer ences  o f  t he  t wo   go ver nment s, 
esp ecially  in  T aiwan,   which  is  mo r e  dep end ent   o n  t he  bilat er al  eco no mic 
r elat io nship . 
          Fo r   inst ance,   a  gr o wing  per cent age  o f  T aiwanese  likely  r eco g nize 
t hat   T aiwan's  gener al  eco no mic  fo r t u nes  have  beco me  d eeply  int er t wined 
wit h  t he  P RC's. 
          I n  t ur n,   a  g r o wing  number   o f  T aiwan  vo t er s  may  be  less  lik ely  t o 
su pp o r t   cand idat es  who   will  emp hasize  so ver eignt y­ r elat ed  issu es, 
fear ing  t hat   such  candidat es  will  pr o vo k e  co nflict   wit h  Beijing. 
          As  such,   it   may  beco me  mo r e  difficult   o ver   t ime  fo r   leader s 
co mmit t ed  t o   T aiwan  independence  t o   be  elect ed  in  T aiwan.     E co no mic 
int eg r at io n,   in  o t her   wo r ds,   may  facilit at e  so me  co nver gence  in  t he 
p r efer ences  t hat  go ver nment s  in  T aipei  and   Beijing  have  o ver 
so ver eignt y  r elat ed   issues. 
          Co nflict ,   in  t u r n,   co uld   beco me  less  likely  as  t he  t wo   sid es  co me 
t o   have  similar   o r   at   least   less  d iver g ent   u nder lying  p r efer ences. 
          T hir d ,   cr o ss­ S t r ait   eco no mic  int egr at io n  p o t ent ially  mak es  it 
easier   fo r   Beijing  t o   co er ce  T aiwan  o r   t o   signal  r eso lve  cr edibly  wit ho u t 
r eso r t ing  t o   milit ar y  measur es,  since  eco no mic  int eg r at io n  means  t hat 
Beijing  can  imp o se  g r eat   co st s  o n  T aiwan  by  enact ing  eco no mic 
sanct io ns. 
          I n  essence,   eco no mic  int egr at io n  may  r educe  t he  likeliho o d  o f  war 
in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait   because  it   pr o vides  Beijing  wit h  ways  t o   p unish 
T aiwan  wit ho ut   needing   t o   r eso r t   t o   milit ar y  vio lence. 
          As  I   no t e  in  my  wr it t en  t est imo ny,   so me  o f  t hese  p r o cesses  may  be 
u nfo ld ing   in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait .     I n  par t icular ,   I   su spect   t hat   cr o ss­ S t r ait 
eco no mic  int egr at io n  lik ely  co nt r ibu t es  t o   a  sense  o f  p r agmat ism  amo ng 
T aiwan  vo t er s  o n  cr o ss­ S t r ait   so ver eig nt y  issues. 
          I n  t ur n,   t his  pr ag mat ism  pr o bably  makes  it   har der   fo r   st r o ngly 
p r o ­ T aiwan  independence  candid at es  t o   be  elect ed   pr esident   in  T aiwan. 
Yet ,   I   also   no t e  t hat   t her e  is  at   least   so me  r easo n  fo r   sk ep t icism 
co ncer ning  ho w  deep ly  ent r enched   o r   r elevant   t hese  pr o cesses  ar e  in  t he 
T aiwan  S t r ait ,   and  I 'd   be  happ y  t o   exp and   o n  t hat   a  lit t le  bit   mo r e  in  t he 
Q&A. 
          Fo r   so me  o f  t he  same  r easo ns,   I   am  so mewhat   sk ep t ical  t hat 
cr o ss­ S t r ait   eco no mic  int egr at io n  is  having  a  majo r   effect   o n  t he 
p r o spect s  fo r   milit ar y  co nflict   in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait ,  I   am  also   sk ept ical 
t hat   cr o ss­ S t r ait   eco no mic  int eg r at io n  mak es  p o lit ical  unificat io n  any 
mo r e  lik ely.     Ag ain,   I   t hink   t hat   t her e  ar e  t wo   plausible  mechanisms 
t hr o u gh  which  gr o wing   cr o ss­ S t r ait   eco no mic  t ies  co uld  influence  t he 
lik eliho o d   o f  China­ T aiwan  po lit ical  u nificat io n. 
          Fir st ,   t o   r et u r n  t o   an  ear lier   po int ,   eco no mic  int eg r at io n  might 
enhance  China's  co er cive  capacit y  o ver   T aiwan.     T hat   is,  by  o pening  t he 
p o ssibilit y  o f  t hr eat ening  o r   impo sing   eco no mic  sanct io ns,   it   may  be
                                                    ­ 73 ­ 
mo r e  feasible  fo r   Beijing   t o   co er ce  T aiwan  int o   a  unificat io n  bar gain. 
           S eco nd,   eco no mic  int egr at io n  co uld  lead  t o   changed  pr efer ences 
amo ng  so ciet al  act o r s  in  T aiwan  so   t hat   t her e  is  mo r e  demand   fo r 
u nificat io n. 
           Ho wever ,   again,   my  sense  is  t hat   eco no mic  int egr at io n  is  unlikely 
t o   lead  t o   unificat io n  t hr o u gh  eit her   o f  t hese  pr o cesses,   at   least   fo r   t he 
fo r eseeable  fu t u r e. 
           Co nsider ,   fir st ,   t he  po ssibilit y  t hat   t he  P RC  might   use  eco no mic 
co er cio n  as  a  means  t o   maneuver   T aiwan  int o   so me  so r t   o f  a  unificat io n 
d eal.     As  T aiwan's  eco no my  has  beco me  mo r e  int egr at ed   wit h  t he  P RC, 
it   is  cer t ainly  t he  case  t hat   China  co uld   cause  a  g r eat   deal  o f  pain  in 
T aiwan  t hr o u gh  t he  use  o f  eco no mic  sanct io ns. 
           Bu t   it   is  impo r t ant   t o   r eco gnize  t hat   t he  P RC  wo uld  also   face 
sig nificant   co nst r aint s  in  any  effo r t   t o   co mpel  unificat io n  t hr o ug h  t he 
u se  o f  eco no mic  sanct io ns.     Obvio usly,   eco no mic  sanct io ns  wo uld  also 
be  co st ly  t o   t he  P RC,   as  well  as  T aiwan,   bu t ,   p er haps  mo r e  impo r t ant ly, 
it   is  by  no   means  clear   t hat   T aiwan  wo u ld  r eact   t o   eco no mic  co er cio n  by 
capit u lat ing  t o   P RC  d emand s. 
           S anct io ns  wo uld   p o t ent ially  alienat e  t he  ver y  act o r s  who m  Beijing 
wo u ld   mo st   need  t o   acquiesce  t o   P RC  co nt r o l,   t ho se  who   alr ead y  have  a 
st r o ng  st ake  in  a  st able  eco no mic  r elat io nship.     And  sanct io ns  wo uld 
co nfir m  t he  wo r st   fear s  o f  T aiwanese  who   suspect   t hat   China  mig ht   no t 
have  T aiwan's  best   int er est s  at   hear t . 
           A  seco nd  po ssibilit y  is  t hat   gr o wing  cr o ss­ S t r ait   eco no mic  t ies 
will  u lt imat ely  lead   t o   incr eased  demands  in  T aiwan  fo r   po lit ical 
u nificat io n.     Fo r   inst ance,   it   is  co nceivable  t hat   deep ening  eco no mic  t ies 
and   t he  asso ciat ed  gr o wt h  in  cr o ss­ S t r ait   co nt act s  and   co mmunicat io ns 
will  lead   a  g r o wing  nu mber   o f  T aiwanese  t o   ident ify  mo r e  wit h  China 
and   t o   see  t hemselves  incr easing ly  as  Chinese. 
           Alt er nat ively,   T aiwan's  vo t er s  and  businesses  might   st ar t   t o   mak e 
a  mo r e  pr agmat ic  calculat io n  t hat   T aiwan's  eco no mic  fut ur e  is 
fu ndament ally  t ied  t o   China  and   unificat io n  ult imat ely  o ffer s  t he  best 
way  t o   guar ant ee  co nt inued   st abilit y  and  pr o sper it y. 
           Yet ,   again,   well­ kno wn  t r ends  in  T aiwan  pu blic  o p inio n  call  int o 
q u est io n  whet her   t hese  so r t s  o f  pr o cesses  ar e  t aking  ho ld  o r   ar e  likely 
t o   t ak e  ho ld   in  t he  fut ur e.     Fo r   examp le,   desp it e  deepening   eco no mic 
t ies,   t he  p er cent ag e  o f  T aiwan  cit izens  who   self­ ident ify  as  T aiwanese 
r at her   t han  as  Chinese  o r   bo t h  Chinese  and  T aiwanese  has  co nt inued  t o 
g r o w. 
           I n  so me  r ecent   su r veys,   t ho se  id ent ifying   so lely  as  T aiwanese 
o u t number   t ho se  placing   t hemselves  in  t he  o t her   t wo   cat eg o r ies 
co mbined. 
           S imilar ly,   var io us  su r veys  sugg est   ext r emely  limit ed   suppo r t   in 
T aiwan  fo r   u nificat io n,   ag ain,   despit e  bu r g eo ning  eco no mic  t ies. 
           Recent   su r veys  suggest   t hat   even  when  pr esent ed  wit h  a 
hypo t het ical  fut u r e  scenar io   wher e  so cial,   po lit ical  and   eco no mic
                                                   ­ 74 ­ 
co nd it io ns  o n  mainland  China  and  T aiwan  ar e  similar ,   mo st   T aiwanese 
vo t er s  st ill  o ppo se  unificat io n. 
          S o ,   in  sho r t ,   eco no mic  int egr at io n  do es  no t   ap pear   t o   be  having  a 
t r ansfo r mat ive  effect   o n  T aiwan  p ublic  o p inio n  r elat ing  t o   T aiwan  st at us 
and   id ent it y.     P er haps  sup po r t   fo r   u nificat io n  wo uld   be  even  lo wer   if  it 
wer en't   fo r   deepening   cr o ss­ S t r ait   eco no mic  t ies,   but   suppo r t   r emains 
q u it e  limit ed  as  it   is. 
          T hank  yo u. 
          [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 

                 Prep a red   S t at emen t   of  Dr.   S cot t   L.   K ast n er 
      Associ a t e  Pro fesso r,   Dep art men t   of  G overn men t   an d   Poli t i cs, 
            Un i v ersi t y   O f  M ary la n d ,   Colleg e  Pa rk,   M ary lan d 

Prior  to  the  election  of  Ma  Ying­jeou  as  Taiwan’s  president  in  2008,  the  phrase  “hot  economics,  cold 
politics”  succinctly  summarized  the  nature  of  the  China­Taiwan  relationship.    Despite  hostile  political 
relations and occasional crises, economic ties grew rapidly beginning in the late 1980s; by the early 2000s 
China  had  become  Taiwan’s  largest  trading  partner.  Since  Ma’s  election,  however,  the  political 
relationship has improved dramatically.  The two sides are engaged in regular dialogue, and have reached 
numerous  agreements  on  such  issues  as  direct  flights  across  the  Taiwan  Strait  and  allowing  Chinese 
tourists to visit Taiwan; both sides have even indicated some interest in trying to reach a peace accord. 

Whether  the  détente  in  cross­Strait  relations  is  a  permanent  thaw,  or  merely  a  temporary  warming, 
remains unclear.  The People’s Republic of China (PRC) continues to modernize its military capabilities, 
and it has not reduced the large number of missiles deployed in range of Taiwan.  Taiwan president Ma 
Ying­jeou’s approval ratings have been weak, meaning the island’s future political direction is uncertain. 
Given this uncertainty, the impact of deepening cross­Strait economic integration on cross­Strait security 
relations remains an important topic.  My comments briefly address two issues.  First, I consider whether 
deepening  economic  integration  helps  to  reduce  the  likelihood  of  a  future  military  confrontation  in  the 
Taiwan  Strait.    Second,  I  ask  whether  China­Taiwan  economic  integration  makes  it  more  likely  that 
Taiwan will eventually choose political unification with the PRC. 



DOES  CHINA­TAIWAN  ECONOMIC  INTEGRATION  MAKE  A  CROSS­STRAIT  MILITARY 
CONFLICT LESS LIKELY? 

Economic integration is widely believed to have a stabilizing impact on cross­Strait security relations, and 
my reading of US policy is that it has generally been supportive of cross­Strait economic exchange for this 
reason.    This  idea—that  economic  integration  across  the  Taiwan  Strait  would  help  stabilize  the 
relationship—is  grounded  in  a  large  body  of  literature  that  examines  the  relationship  between 
international  trade  and  military  conflict  in  a  broadly  international  context.    While  this  topic  remains 
controversial, it is my judgment that the preponderance of the evidence in this literature is on the side of 
those who argue that trade does indeed tend, all else equal, to reduce conflict between countries. 

Applying  these  findings  to  a  specific  case  like  China­Taiwan  relations,  however,  is  problematic.    For 
instance,  it  is  possible  that  the  Taiwan  Strait  is  simply  an  exception  to  a  broader  pattern.    There  have 
certainly been other cases where military conflict emerged despite considerable economic ties: the case of 
World War I in Europe is an example in this regard.  To assess whether economic integration affects the 
likelihood of military conflict in a specific case like the Taiwan Strait, it is important to examine whether 
the  specific  processes  through  which  economic  ties  could  affect  conflict  are  actually  playing  out  in  that
                                                      ­ 75 ­ 
case. 

With  this  in  mind,  it  is  possible  to  identify  at  least  three  such  processes  through  which  China­Taiwan 
economic integration could indeed lead to a reduced danger of military conflict in the Taiwan Strait. 

First,  economic  integration  raises  the  costs  of  military  conflict  for  both  sides;  at  a  minimum,  serious 
military conflict would most likely lead to a prolonged interruption in cross­Strait trade, and it is easy to 
imagine more dire, and long­term, consequences.  As the costs of military conflict increase, it is possible 
that  leaders  on  both  sides  will  be  more  cautious  about  using  force  or  adopting  policies  that  could  risk 
escalation. 

Second, economic integration can potentially foster a transformation in the policy preferences of the two 
governments—especially in Taiwan, which is much more dependent on the relationship.  In particular, a 
growing  number  of  Taiwanese  have  a  clear  economic  stake  in  a  stable  cross­Strait  relationship.    This 
point  does  not  apply only to those businesses with investments in China and their employees.  Rather, a 
growing percentage of Taiwanese likely recognize that Taiwan’s general economic fortunes have become 
deeply  intertwined  with  the  PRC’s.    In  turn,  actors  in  Taiwan  who  benefit  from  cross­Strait  economic 
exchange may be less likely to support candidates who will emphasize sovereignty­related issues, fearing 
that  such  candidates  will  provoke  conflict  with  Beijing.    Economic  integration,  in  other  words,  may 
facilitate some convergence in the preferences governments in Taipei and Beijing have over sovereignty­ 
related issues; conflict, in turn, could become less likely as the two sides come to share similar—or at least 
less divergent—underlying preferences. 

Third, cross­Strait economic integration makes it easier for Beijing to coerce Taiwan or to signal resolve 
credibly  without  resorting  to  military  measures.    Leaders  in  Taiwan  may  have  some  uncertainty 
concerning PRC resolve to use military force should Taiwan take concrete steps to formalize its sovereign 
status; PRC threats in this regard are inherently suspect since talk is relatively cheap.  War could result if 
Taiwan  concludes  a  truly  resolved  PRC  is  bluffing.    But  economic  integration  gives  Beijing  a  way  to 
communicate  its  resolve  more  credibly  if  Taipei  tests  that  resolve:  in  particular,  China  can  impose 
economic sanctions, which demonstrate a willingness to pay high costs to block Taiwan independence.  In 
essence, economic integration may reduce the likelihood of war because it provides Beijing with ways to 
punish Taiwan without needing to resort to military violence. 

Some of these processes may be unfolding in the Taiwan Strait.  For instance, the average Taiwan voter is 
quite pragmatic on sovereignty related issues.  This pragmatism is revealed in surveys which show that a 
substantial  majority  of  Taiwan  voters  support  maintaining  the  status  quo  in  cross­strait  relations. 
Likewise,  while  a  substantial  majority  of  voters  would  support  an  independent Taiwan if peace with the 
PRC  could  be  maintained,  an  equally  large  majority  would  oppose  independence  if  it  were to provoke a 
PRC  attack.    I  suspect  that  this  pragmatism  in  part  arises  because  voters  believe  that  war  would  be 
incredibly costly for Taiwan, and I also suspect that deepening cross­Strait economic ties help to reinforce 
this belief.  So, the perceived increasing costs of war may help to induce a cautious attitude at the level of 
individual  Taiwan  voters,  and  this,  in  turn,  probably  makes  it  harder  than  it  otherwise  might  be  for 
politicians  strongly  committed  to  independence  to  be  elected  to  Taiwan’s  presidency.    In  other  words, 
economic  integration  may  reduce—at  least  marginally—the  extent  to  which  the  PRC  and  Taiwan  are 
pursuing divergent foreign policy objectives. 

Yet  there  is  also  reason  to  be  at  least  somewhat  skeptical  about  how  deeply  entrenched  the  causal 
processes  linking  increased economic integration to a reduced likelihood of military conflict actually are 
in  the  Taiwan  Strait.    For  example, though economic ties may be contributing to a sense of pragmatism 
among  Taiwan’s  voters,  there  is  little  evidence  to  suggest  a  deeper  transformation  in  the  fundamental 
preferences  held  by  most  Taiwanese  on  cross­Strait  sovereignty  issues.    I  will  return  to  this  point 
momentarily when discussing whether cross­Strait economic integration affects the prospects for political 
integration.
                                                      ­ 76 ­ 
Likewise,  it  is  quite  possible  that  economic  integration  can  actually  be  destabilizing  in  certain  contexts. 
For  instance,  if  economic  integration  does  indeed  raise  the  costs  of  war  for  Beijing,  then  a  Taiwan 
president  may  be  tempted  to  “push the envelope” on sovereignty issues farther than he otherwise might. 
At a minimum, economic integration may be less stabilizing when Taiwan is led by a president unhappy 
with  the  status  quo  in  cross­Strait  relations  than  is  the  case  if  Taiwan  is  led  by  a  president  generally 
content with the status quo. 

Finally,  while  the  possibility  of  economic  coercion  does  give  Beijing  a  way  to  punish  Taiwan  without 
firing  a  shot,  economic  sanctions  could  also  backfire.    For  instance,  economic  sanctions  would  most 
seriously  hurt  actors  in  Taiwan  that  already  have  a  direct  stake  in  the  cross­Strait  relationship  (such  as 
businesses with mainland investments) and as such tend to be more skeptical of Taiwan policies that could 
be  destabilizing.    Punishing  these  sorts  of  actors  could  be  especially  damaging  to  Beijing’s  long­term 
goals  in  Taiwan,  as  it  would  in  essence  alienate  a  constituency  that  tends  to  support  stable  cross­Strait 
relations to begin with.  If Beijing calculates that economic sanctions might backfire by further alienating 
Taiwan’s  population  without  leading  to  changed  Taiwan  behavior,  then  it  is  unlikely  the  PRC  would 
utilize economic sanctions as a way to signal resolve prior to initiating military conflict. 

DOES ECONOMIC INTEGRATION MAKE POLITICAL UNIFICATION MORE LIKELY? 

For some of the same reasons I am somewhat skeptical that cross­Strait economic integration is having a 
major effect on the prospects for military conflict in the Taiwan Strait, I am also skeptical that cross­Strait 
economic integration makes political unification any more likely. 

I  think  there  are  two  plausible  mechanisms  through  which  growing  cross­Strait  economic  ties  could 
influence  the  likelihood  of  China­Taiwan  political  unification.    First,  to  return  to  an  earlier  point, 
economic  integration  might  enhance  China’s  coercive  capacity  over  Taiwan.    That  is,  by  opening  the 
possibility  of  threatening  or  imposing  economic  sanctions,  it  may  be  more  feasible  for  Beijing  to coerce 
Taiwan  into  a  unification  bargain.    Second,  economic  integration  could  lead  to  changed  preferences 
among societal actors in Taiwan, so that there is more demand for unification.  Economic integration, for 
instance,  could  conceivably  lead  individuals  in  Taiwan  to  identify  more  with  China.    Or,  alternatively, 
individuals  and  businesses  could  come  to  view  unification  as  essential  to  a  stable  cross­Strait  economic 
relationship.    However,  my  sense  is  that  economic  integration  is  unlikely  to  lead  to  unification  through 
either of these processes, at least in the foreseeable future. 

Consider first the possibility that the PRC might use economic coercion as a means to maneuver Taiwan 
into some sort of unification deal.  As Taiwan’s economy has become more integrated with the PRC, it is 
certainly  the  case  that  China  could  cause  a  great  deal  of  pain  in  Taiwan  through  the  use  of  economic 
sanctions.    Taiwan’s  Mainland  Affairs  Council  estimates,  for  instance,  that  trade  with  mainland  China 
accounts for over 22 percent of Taiwan’s total trade, and exports to China account for over 30 percent of 
Taiwan’s total exports.  Furthermore, roughly two­thirds of Taiwan’s approved outward direct investment 
flows to mainland China. 

But  it  is  important  to  recognize  that  the  PRC  would  also  face  significant  constraints  in  any  effort  to 
compel  unification  through  the  use  of  economic  sanctions.    Obviously,  extensive  economic  sanctions 
would impose costs on the PRC as well as Taiwan. Some of these costs would be direct, such as lost trade 
and investment linkages vis­à­vis Taiwan.  Others would be indirect, such as harm done to China’s other 
bilateral  relations.   I doubt, for instance, that the US would simply stand by if Taiwan were subjected to 
broad­scale  economic  sanctions  or  an  economic  blockade.    Perhaps  more  importantly,  and  as  I  noted 
before,  it  is  by  no  means  clear  that  Taiwan  would  react  to  economic  sanctions  by  capitulating  to  PRC 
demands.    Sanctions  would  potentially  alienate  the  very  actors  whom  Beijing  would  most  need  to 
acquiesce to PRC control: those who already have a stake in stable cross­Strait relations.  And sanctions 
would confirm the worst fears of Taiwanese who suspect that China does not have Taiwan’s best interests
                                                       ­ 77 ­ 
at heart.  Finally, while Beijing has shown some willingness to politicize cross­Strait economic ties—such 
as harassment of pro­Democratic Progressive Party businesses in China after the 2000 and 2004 Taiwan 
elections—these  efforts  seem  to  me  to  be  quite  limited  and  of  questionable  success.    In  sum,  I  don’t 
believe deepening cross­Strait economic ties make it much more likely that the PRC will be able to coerce 
Taiwan into some sort of unification bargain. 

A second possibility is that growing cross­Strait economic ties will ultimately lead to increased demands 
in Taiwan for political unification.  For instance, it is conceivable that deepening economic ties—and the 
ancillary growth in cross­Strait contacts and communications—will lead a growing number of Taiwanese 
to identify more with China and to see themselves increasingly as Chinese.  Alternatively, Taiwan’s voters 
and  businesses  might  start  to  make  a  more  pragmatic  calculation  that  Taiwan’s  economic  future  is 
fundamentally tied to China, and unification ultimately offers the best way to guarantee continued stability 
and  prosperity.    Yet  well­known  trends  in  Taiwan public opinion again call into question whether these 
sorts of processes are taking—or are likely in the future to take—hold. 

For  example,  despite  deepening economic ties, the percentage of Taiwanese citizens who self­identify as 
Taiwanese  rather  than  as  Chinese  or  both  Chinese  and  Taiwanese  has  continued  to  grow;  in  recent 
surveys,  those  identifying  solely  as  Taiwanese  outnumber  those  placing  themselves  in  the  other  two 
categories  combined.    Similarly,  various  surveys  suggest  extremely  limited  support  in  Taiwan  for 
unification,  again  despite  burgeoning  economic  ties.    Support  for  China’s  proposed  one  country,  two 
systems framework has been consistently minimal.  Recent surveys suggest that even when presented with 
a  hypothetical  future  scenario  where  social,  political  and  economic  conditions  on  the  Mainland  and  in 
Taiwan  are  similar,  most  Taiwanese  voters  still  oppose unification.  In short, economic integration does 
not  appear  to  be  having  a  transformative  effect  on  Taiwanese  public opinion relating to Taiwan’s status 
and identity.  Perhaps support for unification would be even lower if it weren’t for deepening cross­Strait 
economic ties, but support is quite limited as it is. 


CONCLUSION 

In  summary,  the  United  States  should  not  be  too  complacent  about  the  implications  of  cross­Strait 
economic integration for the prospects for military conflict in the Taiwan Strait.  While it is possible that 
economic  ties  could  reduce  the  danger  of  conflict—and  there  are  several  plausible  ways  this  could 
happen—there  is  at  least  some  reason  to  be  skeptical  that  the  specific  causal  processes  that  could  link 
trade to a reduced danger of conflict are actually playing out in this case.  With that said, I do not believe 
that economic integration across the Taiwan Strait is on balance a bad thing (at least from the standpoint 
of  its  security­related  implications).    I  certainly  don’t  think  it  makes  military  conflict  any  more  likely. 
Moreover,  I  don’t  believe  that  economic integration has clear implications for the likelihood of eventual 
political unification between China and Taiwan.  As such, I do not believe that China­Taiwan economic 
integration is inconsistent with current US policy toward Taiwan. 




                  PANEL  IV:     Di scu ssi on ,   Q u est i o n s  an d   An swers 

        HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u ,   Dr .   Kast ner . 
        We'r e  g o ing   t o   have  a  five­ minut e  q uest io n  per io d  fo r   each 
Co mmissio ner ,   and  we'r e  g o ing  t o   st ar t   wit h  Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel. 
        HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank   yo u,   all,   fo r   yo u r 
t est imo ny. 
        Mr .   Hammo nd­ Chamber s,   can  yo u   g ener ally  char act er ize  t he 
ind ust r ial  sect o r s  fo r   t he  2 , 244   p r o du ct   cat eg o r ies  t hat   T aiwan  r est r ict s
                                                  ­ 78 ­ 
and   t he  r at io nale  fo r   t ho se  r est r ict io ns?    And   t hen  I 'll  co me  up   wit h  a 
seco nd  q u est io n,   and  t hen  let   yo u   gu ys  g o . 
           Fo r   Dr .   Kast ner ,   can  yo u  char act er ize  t he  po lit ical  p o licy  views  o f 
t he  bu siness  act o r s  in  T aiwan  wit h  mainland   invest ment s?    Ho w  do   t heir 
p o lit ical  views  impact   o n  any  do mest ic  po lit ical  act ivit ies  t hey  may  have 
in  T aiwan  and   ho w  do   t hese  business  act o r s  int er act   wit h  mainland 
lead er s?
           And   Dr .   Co o k e,   if  yo u  have  any  views  yo u  want   t o   ad d  o n  eit her 
o f  t hese,   please  do . 
           MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     T hank  yo u,   sir . 
           Abo ut   80 0  o f  t hem  ar e  ag r icult u r al  pr o duct s.     P r esident   Ma  as  a 
cand id at e  in  t he  r u n­ up   t o   t he  Mar ch  20 08   pr esident ial  elect io n 
co nsist ent ly  mad e  t he  po int   t hat   in  any  r app r o chement ,   eco no mic 
r ap pr o chement ,   wit h  t he  Chinese,   t ho se  agr icult u r al  pr o d uct s  wo u ld  no t 
be  p ar t   o f  any  E CFA  ag r eement . 
           I t   is  wo r t h  no t ing  t hat   t he  o ppo sit io n  par t ies  q uest io n  t hat   t he 
far mer s'  int er est s  will,   in  fact ,   no t   be  jeo p ar dized.     Ot her wise,   yo u'r e 
t alk ing   abo u t   an  ar bit r ar y  g r o up   o f  p r o du ct s  t hat   o st ensibly  have 
nat io nal­ ­ t he  T aiwanese  do   use  t he  t er m  "nat io nal  secu r it y"  r elat ed 
p r o d uct s,   bu t   t hey  fall  in  ar eas  such  as  fast ener s,   indust r ial  fast ener s,   o r 
heat   p anels.     I   mean  it   r eally  is  an  ar bit r ar y  list   o f  pr o duct   ar eas  wher e 
bar r ier s  wer e  put   in  place  t o   ensur e  t hat   T aiwan's  nascent   ind ust r ies  in 
t ho se  ar eas  wer e  p r o t ect ed  against   Chinese  impo r t s. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u. 
           Yes. 
           DR.   KAS T NE R:     I n  r esp o nse  t o   yo u r   qu est io n,   I   haven't   do ne  a 
g r eat   deal  o f  r esear ch  o n  t his  specific  issue,   but   my  sense  is  t hat   when  it 
co mes  t o   eco no mic  mat t er s,   t her e  is  cer t ainly  a  view  t hat   eco no mic 
liber alizat io n  is  a  go o d   t hing .     I   t hink  t hat   t her e's  a  t endency  t o   t ake  a 
lo wer   p r o file  o n  po lit ical  issu es  becau se  it 's  a  lo se­ lo se  sit uat io n  t o   be 
t o o   o ut sp o k en  o n  p o lit ical  issues. 
           I 'm  no t   r eally  sur e  abo ut   yo ur   last   po int ,   abo ut   t he  int er act io ns 
wit h  t he  P RC  go ver nment . 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Ok ay.     Dr .   Co o k e,   anyt hing 
t o   ad d? 
           DR.   COOKE :     I   wo uld  ju st   mak e  t hr ee  simple  po int s.     Fir st   o f  all, 
in  t er ms  o f  t he  int er act io n  o f  T aiwan  CE Os  wit h  mainland  co unt er par t s, 
it   dep ends  r eally  t he  ind ust r y  sect o r   we'r e  t alking  abo ut .     I n  t he 
info r mat io n  t echno lo g y  sect o r ,   t he  fo und ing  CE Os  o f  t he  lar gest   T aiwan 
fir ms  ar e  viewed  wit h  co nsider able  r esp ect   as  ment o r s  fo r   China’s 
ind ust r y,  but   in  mo r e  fut ur e­ o r ient ed   indust r ies  lik e  bio t echno lo gy  o r 
clean  ener gy,   t he  Chinese  business  leader ship  appear s  t o   feel  t hat   t hey 
have  a  clear   pat h  t o   t hat   fu t u r e  wit ho ut   t he  assist ance  o f  CE Os  fr o m  t he 
T aiwan  ar ea,   and  t he  r elat io nship  is  st r uct ur ed  acco r dingly. 
           Just   an  ad dit io nal  co mment   t hat   t ies  t o   Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel's 
q u est io n  and  t o   Dr .   Kast ner 's  t est imo ny,   in  t er ms  o f  t he  suscept ibilit y  t o
                                                    ­ 79 ­ 
co er cio n  in  t he  mainland   o n  t he  par t   o f  T aiwan  businesses  who   ar e 
act ive  t her e,   my  o wn  exper ience  is  t hat   it   is  r elat ively  less  t han  o ne 
wo u ld   expect . 
          I n  t he  year   2 000 ,   t her e  wer e  so me  fair ly  cr ude  at t emp t s  made  in 
t he  mainland  t o   har ass  T aiwan  co mpanies  t hr o ugh  aggr essive  aud it ing 
and   o t her   disr upt ive  p r act ices,   and  it   was  r eco gnized  by  t he  T aiwan 
business  lead er ship   as  a  co st   o f  do ing  business  t her e,   but   it   did  no t ,   it 
d id   no t   seem  t o   t r anslat e  in  any  way  t hat   was  par t icular ly  helpful  t o   t he 
mainland  o bject ives. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u   ver y  much. 
          Co mmissio ner   Wessel. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     T hank   yo u,   Mr .   Chair man.     T hank 
yo u   fo r   yo ur   r et ur n  p r esence,   and  fo r   o u r   new  wit ness.     T er r y,   I   t hink 
t hat   yo u   wer e  a  co nt r o l  o fficer   fo r   o ne  o f  my  CODE Ls  pr o bably  20 
year s  ag o   o r  mo r e  so .     I t 's  always  g o o d  t o   see  yo u.   We've  p r o bably 
chang ed  a  bit   in  t he  pr o cess. 
          I 'd   like  t o   ask  a  slight ly  differ ent ly  fr amed  quest io n  because  t her e 
ar e  a  nu mber   o f  issues  o n  t he  U. S .   po licy  agenda  r ig ht   no w,   and  I   want 
t o   have  so me  u nder st anding   fr o m  t he  panelist s  abo u t   ho w  yo u  view 
t ho se  as  affect ing   T aiwan's  int er est s  sp ecifically  and  also  vis­ à­ vis  China 
and   t he  U. S . 
          T he  t wo   po licy  ar eas  ar e  t he  T r ans­ P acific  P ar t ner ship,   and  t he 
o t her   is  t he  q u est io n  o f  China's  cu r r ency  manip ulat io n  and  t he  up co ming 
p o t ent ial  fo r   t he  ad minist r at io n  t o   name  China  as  a  cur r ency 
manip ulat o r . 
          Mr .   Hammo nd­ Chamber s,   if  yo u  co uld   begin  wit h  t he  qu est io n  o n 
t he  T r ans­ P acific  P ar t ner ship,   which  I   assume  yo u  have  fo llo wed   a  bit , 
which  becau se  o f  so me  per cept io ns  t hat   it   is  meant   as  an  eco no mic 
r espo nse  t o   China's  gr o wing  influ ence  in  t he  r eg io n,   so me  view  it   as  an 
eco no mic  co nt ainment   po licy,   ho w  sho uld   we  be  viewing   it ? 
          Ho w  vis­ à­ vis  bo t h  U. S . ­ T aiwan  r elat io ns  and  T aiwan's  int er est s 
it self  in  t he  r egio n  sho u ld   it   be  viewed? 
          And ,   again,   t hen,   also   o n  t he  cur r ency  issue,   wit h  t he  fair ly 
massive  invest ment s  by  T aiwan  business  int er est s  in  t he  mainland ,   what 
ar e  t he  implicat io ns  o f  China  being   named  a  cur r ency  manipulat o r , 
ho pefu lly  leading,   o f  co ur se,   t o   a  mo r e  mar k et ­ based  cur r ency,   but   sho r t 
o f  t hat ,   what   d o   yo u   t hink  happ ens  in  t he  int er im? 
          T his  is  fo r   t he  o t her   wit nesses  as  well. 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     T hank  yo u  fo r   yo u r   qu est io n,   sir . 
          On  t he  T P P ,   in  my  view,   sho uld   t he  U. S .   cho o se  t o   lead  o n  t he 
T P P ,   it   wo u ld  be  bo t h  impo r t ant   fo r   us  as  a  co u nt r y,   as  well  as  fo r 
T aiwan. 
          I 'll  make  a  st at ement   in  my  o wn  view  abo ut   wher e  we  ar e  r ight 
no w.     I n  t he  absence  o f  a  t r ade  liber alizat io n  po licy  her e  in  t he  Unit ed 
S t at es,   we  can't   have  a  co mplet e  Asia  po licy.     T he  Chinese  ar e  dr iving
                                                  ­ 80 ­ 
t hat   p r o cess,   and  we  have  a  self­ inflict ed,   o r   a  cho ice,   if  yo u  will,   t o   be 
o n  t he  o u t side  o f  t hat   pr o cess.     I t 's  d amaging  o ur   int er est s 
eco no mically,   and   it 's  damaging  o ur   int er est s  st r at egically. 
          I f  t he  T P P   r epr esent s  an  o ppo r t unit y  fo r   P r esident   Obama  t o   lead­ 
­ as  P r esident   o f  o u r   co unt r y­ ­ t o   lead  in  Asia  o n  t r ad e,   t hat 's  a  win  fo r 
t he  Unit ed   S t at es,   and  far   fr o m  co nfr o nt ing   China  o r   sur r o unding  China, 
it   is  simp ly  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  p ur suing  it s  o wn  co mmer cial  int er est s  and 
eq uit ies  in  t he  r eg io n. 
          T aiwan  wins  because  it   is  an  o pp o r t unit y  t o   fo ld   T aiwan  int o   a 
p r o cess  r ight   no w  t hat   it   is  shut   o ut   o f.     I t   wo uld   lo ve  t o   be  par t   o f  t he 
bilat er al  and  mult ilat er al  ar r angement s  being  st r u ck   in  T aiwan,   but   as  a 
fu nct io n  o f  Chinese  o pp o sit io n,   it   is  shu t  o ut . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     Do   yo u  t hink  t hat   T aiwan  co uld   be  a 
p ar t icipant   in  T P P   wit h  China's  acquiescence? 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     Acq uiescence.     Ag ain,   I   t hink   it 's 
ver y  imp o r t ant   fo r   t he  Unit ed  S t at es  t o   sho w  lead er ship  o n  t hat .     I f  we 
cho o se  t o   st ep  fo r war d  wit h  t he  T P P ,   t hat   we  cho o se  t o   includ e  T aiwan 
fr o m  t he  get ­ go   in  t hat   co nver sat io n,   making  it   clear   t o   ever ybo d y  t hat 
g iven  t hat   T aiwan  is  par t   o f  t he  ADB,   t he  WT O,   t her e's  abso lu t ely  no 
r easo n  why  it   sho uld n't   be  par t   o f  t he  T P P ,   as  well,   and  AP E C. 
          S o   t her e's  ever y  r easo n  t o   believe  t hat   if  t he  Obama  ad minist r at io n 
cho se  t o   t ake  t his  st ep  and  lead  fo r cefu lly,   t hat   t hey  co uld  inclu de 
T aiwan  in  t hat   wit ho ut   any  co nfr o nt at io n  o f  o ur   so ver eignt y  po sit io n  o n 
T aiwan  st at u s. 
          As  fo r   cur r ency  manipu lat io n,   T aiwan,   t he  int egr at ed  r elat io nship 
bet ween  t he  U. S . ,   T aiwan  and  China  is  such  t hat   T aiwan's  bu sinesses  in 
t he  mainland  t hat   pr o du ce  p r o du ct s  fo r   u s  wo uld  be  equ ally  impact ed,   as 
wit h  o u r   o wn  business  invest ment s  in  t he  mainland,   as  well  as  Chinese 
co mp anies,   bu t   t hese  businesses  ar e  all  exceedingly  co mpet it ive. 
          I   believe  t he  issue  wo uld  be  mo r e  what   so r t   o f  st abilit y  o r 
inst abilit y  wo uld  a  r apid  r evaluat io n  in  t he  Yu an  cr eat e  in  t he  Chinese 
eco no my,   and   as  a  co nseq uence,   what   wo uld  t hat   mean  fo r   businesses 
t hat   have  sp ecific  expo sur e  t o   expo r t s  and  a  r apid  appr eciat io n  o r 
p o ssibly  d epr eciat io n,   but   hig hly  u nlikely. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     Under st and .     Ot her   wit nesses? 
          DR.   COOKE :     No ,   I   t hink  Ru per t   has  capt ur ed   what   I   wo uld   say 
ver y  well.     No t hing  par t icular   t o   add,   t ho ugh  I   r emember   fo ndly  t he  t ime 
we  had. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     As  do   I .     Dr .   Kast ner . 
          DR.   KAS T NE R:     Yes.     I   do n't   r eally  have  anyt hing   t o   add   t o   t hat . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     Okay.     T hank  yo u. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
          Co mmissio ner   Fiedler . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Dr .   Kast ner ,   yo u  wer e  t alk ing 
essent ially  abo ut   t he  po lit ical  and   mo r e  macr o   level  secur it y  co ncer ns 
abo u t   eco no mic  int egr at io n.     I   want   t o   g et   do wn  a  lit t le  far t her ,   and  it 's
                                                   ­ 81 ­ 
a  t wo   p ar t   qu est io n.     T he  fir st   par t   is  what   do es  t his  eco no mic 
int eg r at io n­ ­ by  exp o sing  o u r   t echno lo gy  t hat   is  p r esent   in  T aiwan,   what 
ar e  t he  imp licat io ns  fo r   o u r   o wn  nat io nal  secu r it y  and  t he  t heft   o f  t hat ? 
           T his  inclu d es  defense  info r mat io n.     Given  t he  fact   t hat   t he 
int eg r at io n  po ses  secu r it y,   per so nal  espio nage  secu r it y  p r o blems  fo r   t he 
Unit ed   S t at es.     I   ju st   want   t o   kno w  ho w  d eep  do   yo u  t hink  t hat   might 
be,   nu mber   o ne? 
           Nu mber   t wo ,   what   is  T aiwan's  int er nal  secur it y  pr o blem  po sed  by 
t his  int eg r at io n?    I n  o t her   wo r ds,   can  yo u   t r ust   even  less  t he  allegiances 
o f  a  T aiwan  bu sinessman  because  t hey  ar e  mo r e  o p en  t o   co er cive 
o p p o r t unit ies  fo r   t he  Chinese  go ver nment ? 
           DR.   KAS T NE R:     I n  r esp o nse  t o   t he  fir st   quest io n,   I   gu ess  I   do n't , 
I   d o n't   r eally  have  eno u gh  exper t ise  t o   g ive  yo u  a  go o d  answer   o n  t hat 
in  t er ms  o f  t he  ext ent   t o   which  U. S .   t echno lo gy  o r   U. S .   secr et s  might   be 
co mp r o mised . 
           I n  r eg ar ds  t o   t he  seco nd  o ne,  t her e  ar e  a  number   o f  ways  t hat 
p eo p le  in  T aiwan  t hink  abo ut   so me  o f  t he  secur it y  implicat io ns  o f  cr o ss­ 
S t r ait   exchange,  and  peo p le  po int   t o   a  number   o f  po t ent ial  neg at ive 
co nsequ ences  fr o m  a  secur it y  st andpo int . 
           S o met imes  peo ple  br ing   u p  t hings  lik e  t echno lo gy  t r ansfer . 
T her e's  also  co ncer n  abo u t   beco ming  mo r e  dep endent   o n  t he  P RC,   and 
t her e  is  co ncer n  abo u t   t he  implicat io ns  o f  having  T aiwan  businesses 
int er act ing   in  t he  P RC,  and  t hat  t his  might ,   as  yo u  put   it ,   lead   t o 
chang ed  po lit ical  lo yalt ies. 
           I   t hink   t hat   so me  o f  t hese  co ncer ns  ar e  leg it imat e  o nes.  But   t her e 
ar e  co u nt er  ar g ument s  as  well.     Fo r   inst ance,   t he  lo ss  in  t er ms  o f 
eco no mic  gr o wt h  by  no t   int er act ing  wo uld   be  mo r e  co nsequ ent ial­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     T hat 's  just   a  gener al  expo r t ­ ­ 
           DR.   KAS T NE R:     Yes. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     T hat 's  what   t ea  wo uld   make,   yes. 
           DR.   KAS T NE R:     Bu t   again,   I 'm  kind  o f  skept ical  as  t o   kind  o f 
ho w  much­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Okay.     Let   me  ask  t he  o t her 
wit nesses  a  quest io n.     Let 's  ju st   t ak e  semico nd uct o r s.     T aiwan  is  a 
wo r ld ­ class  semico nd uct o r   pr o ducer .     We  have  r est r ict io ns  o n  t he  lat est 
semico nd uct o r   t echno lo gy  being  so ld  t o   China.     S o   what ?  Do es  it 
mat t er   t hat   we  have  r est r ict io ns  if  it 's  well  expo sed  t o   t heft   and 
co o p er at ive  ag r eement s  t hat   ar e  co unt er   t o   o ur   int er est s  co ming  fr o m 
T aiwan?
           MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     T er r y  is  ver y,   ver y  go o d  o n  t his 
st u ff,   but   I 'll  just   jump  in  befo r e  he  get s  it   all  r ight .     T he  U. S . 
g o ver nment   allo wed  I nt el  t o   invest   in  Dalian  at   300  millimet er   level.     At 
p r esent ,   T aiwan  d o es  no t   allo w  t hat   level. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     E xcuse  me? 
           MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     At   30 0  millimet er ,   t he  t echno lo g y 
level  fo r   t he­ ­
                                                    ­ 82 ­ 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Yes,   I   kno w. 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     Yes,   o k ay.     S o   we've  alr eady 
g o ne  ahead  and   r eleased  t hat   t echno lo gy  level  fo r   invest ment   in  China. 
T aiwan  has  no t .     T her e's  an  und er lying  p r esump t io n  her e  abo ut   t he 
nat ur e  o f  T aiwan  bu sinesses  t hat   I 'd  like  t o   per haps  addr ess. 
          Co mp anies  like  T aiwan  S emico nduct o r   ar e  glo bal  co mpanies  wit h 
I P   t hat   is  as  go o d ,   if  no t   bet t er ,   t han  t heir   glo bal  co mp et it o r s.     And  t he 
no t io n  t hat   t hey  d o n't   nu r t ur e  t hat   I P   and  pr o t ect   it   as  vo r acio usly  as 
any  U. S .   co mp any  is  no t   co r r ect .     I n  fact ,   wit h  T S MC,   t her e's  just   been 
a  r ecent   case  wit h  a  Chinese  co mpany  called  S MI C  in  which  T S MC  wo n 
a  case  in  a  Califo r nia  co u r t   o ver   I P   vio lat io ns.     T hey  wo n  o ver   a  billio n 
d o llar s  in  co mpensat io n,   which  includ ed  t en  p er cent   o f  S MI C. 
          T hese  ar e  so p hist icat ed  co mpanies  wit h  an  acut e  sense  t hat   t heir 
fu t u r e  is  inexo r ably  int er t wined  wit h  t heir   abilit y  t o   p r o t ect   t heir 
int ellect ual  p r o p er t y  as  well  as  r esear ch  and  d evelo p  new  int ellect u al 
p r o p er t y. 
          I 'll  pass  it   o ver . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Can  I   just   r esp o nd  t o   so met hing?    I 
d o n't   want   t he  p r esump t io n  being  her e  t hat   because  t hey'r e  so meho w 
Chinese,   t hat   t her e's  a  g r eat er   r isk .     I t 's  t he  int eg r at io n  quest io n  t hat 's 
t he  r isk .     We  have  plent y  o f  pr o blems  pr o t ect ing   o ur   o wn  st uff,   and 
we'r e  pr et t y  far   away. 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     Yes. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     I 'm  just   get t ing  t o   a  pr o ximit y 
q u est io n  and  an  int er co ur se  q uest io n  in  t er ms  o f  r isk. 
          DR.   COOKE :     T hat 's  a  ver y  useful  clar ificat io n,   Co mmissio ner 
Fiedler ,   and  I   t hink   when  t he  p o sit io n  o f  T aiwan  co mpanies  in  a  g lo bal 
value  chain  is  p r o p er ly  under st o o d,   t heir   vit alit y  depends  p r ecisely  o n 
p r o t ect ing  t he  int ellect ual  pr o per t y  and  br and  eq uit ies  o f  t he  br and 
p ar t ner s  at   t he  hig h  end   o f  t he  value  chain. 
          S o   it   wo r k s  in  exact ly  t he  same  way.     E ven  when  o ne  get s  away 
fr o m  ext r emely  sensit ive  secur it y  t echno lo gy,   such  as  int eg r at ed   chips, 
and   yo u  lo o k   at   a  mo r e  co nsu mer ­ based  pr o duct   like  an  iP ho ne,   t he 
eq uit y  t her e  has  t o   do   mo r e  wit h  co nsumer   dynamics  r at her   t han  milit ar y 
safet y,   bu t   t he  co mpanies  t hat   ar e  in  t he  midd le  o f  t hat   value  chain,   su ch 
as  Ho n  Hai  Fo xco nn  o r   HT C,   r ealize  t hat   t hey  ar e  ju st   go r ing   t heir   o wn 
o x  if  t hey  allo w  t he  sensit ive  p r o pr iet ar ial  t echno lo gies  t o   bleed  do wn 
lo wer   int o   t he  value  chain  o f  co o per at ive  r elat io nships. 
          T hing s  do   hap pen,   but   t he  co mpanies  have  ver y  imp r essive 
syst ems  in  p lace  pr ecisely  t o   pr event   it  fr o m  happening  becau se  it 's  in 
t heir   int er est s  t o   d o   so . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Okay.     T hank  yo u. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
          Co mmissio ner   Blument hal. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     Yes.     T hank  yo u  all  ver y 
mu ch.
                                                       ­ 83 ­ 
           I   have  a  qu est io n  r elat ing  t o   U. S .   po sit io ning  vis­ à­ vis  what   seems 
lik e  t he  inevit able  p assag e  o f  t he  E CFA,   and  what   co uld  t he  Unit ed 
S t at es  do   t o   t ak e  advant age  and  g r o w  it s  o wn  eco no my,   gr o w  it s  o wn 
t r ad e  and  invest ment   capabilit y,   t ake  advant ag e  o f  an  o pening   by  T aiwan 
t o   China  o r   an  o pening  gener ally  o f  T aiwan  sect o r s  t o   t he  wo r ld 
eco no my? 
           I t   seems  as  if  we'r e  so r t   o f  enco ur aging  t hem  t o   go   ahead,   but 
we'r e  no t   t ak ing   advant age.  T hese  ar e  T aiwan  co mpanies  o r   so me  o t her 
co mp anies  t hat   d o   t he  best   in  China  by  far .     T hey  kno w  ho w  t o   d o 
business  t her e.     Cer t ainly,   it   seems  like  t her e  ar e  o ppo r t unit ies  fo r   jo int 
vent u r es,   fo r   all  kinds  o f  t hings  t hat   wo u ld  benefit   o ur   o wn  co mpanies 
and   o ur   o wn  eco no my,   and  what   kinds  o f  r eco mmendat io ns  wo uld  yo u 
mak e  su ch  t hat   we  co uld  bet t er   p o sit io n  o ur selves  t o   t ake  advant age  o f 
t hat ? 
           DR.   COOKE :     My  r eco mmendat io n  is  per haps  less  co ncr et e  t han 
yo u 'r e  lo o king  fo r ,   Co mmissio ner   Blu ment hal,   but   I   wo uld  say  t her e's  a 
wo nder ful  o ppo r t u nit y  fo r   t he  Unit ed   S t at es  t o   seize  a  st o r y  line  her e, 
which  is  simply  t hat   eco no mic  liber alizat io n  is  a  win­ win  sit u at io n  fo r 
t he  p ar t icipant s  o f  eco no mic  liber alizat io n,   and   t hat   t he  T aiwan­ China 
E CFA  Ag r eement   co u ld  be  held   up  in  t and em  wit h  an  aggr essive  t r ad e 
liber alizat io n  po licy  t hat   we  ar e  o ur selves  ar e  br inging  t o   t he  Asia­ 
P acific  r eg io n. 
           I t   co u ld  be  held   up  as  a  po sit ive  examp le  o f  eco no mic 
liber alizat io n  o ver co ming   po lit ical  r igidit ies  t hat   wer e  deep ly  built   int o 
a  hist o r ical  p ast   but   t hat   ho ld  benefit s  fo r   t he  var io u s  par t icipant s. 
And ,   t hen,   in  su ppo r t   o f  t hat ,   we  co u ld  be  engaging  in  o ur   o wn  r o bu st 
eco no mic  liber alizat io n  wit h  t he  r egio n. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     I   was  lo o king  fo r   so met hing 
mo r e  co ncr et e. 
           DR.   COOKE :     I   kno w. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     I t   seems  lik e  we  have  a 
p r efer ent ial  po sit io n  wit h  T aiwan  becau se  o f  o u r   u niq ue  r elat io nship . 
T hey'r e  abo ut   t o   go   ahead   and  neg o t iat e  a  set   o f  t ar iff  r ed uct io ns  and 
o t her   t ypes  o f  r educt io ns,   and  we'r e  o n  t he  o ut side  lo o k ing   in,   wher e  we 
have­ ­ I 'm  no t   an  exper t   o n  t his­ ­ bu t   so me  r eal  co ncr et e  po ssibilit ies  t o 
imp r o ve  o u r   o wn  eco no mic  st and ing . 
           DR.   COOKE :     Well,   I   will  cede  t o   t he  o t her   t wo   panelist s,   but 
ju st   t o   t r y  t o   r esp o nd   a  lit t le  bit   mo r e  co ncr et ely.  I   did  wr it e  in  200 6 
t hat   I   view  a  fr ee  t r ad e  agr eement   bet ween  t he  U. S .   and   T aiwan  as 
d esider at u m,   and  I   t hink  t hat   t he  t iming   o f,   assuming  t hat   o ne  is  able  t o 
o ver co me  T I FA  d ifficult ies,   t hat   wo uld  be  a  ver y  st r o ng  element   t o 
br ing   t o   bear ,   alo ng  wit h  a  co nclusio n  bet ween  China  and  T aiwan  o f  an 
E CFA  in  supp o r t   o f  T aiwan. 
           MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     I   wo uld  st ar t   wher e 
Co mmissio ner   Blu ment hal  left   o ff,   t hat   t he  o pt imu m  so lut io n  is  a  U. S . ­ 
T aiwan  Fr ee  T r ad e  Agr eement ,   all  enco mpassing ,   pr o viding  U. S .   t r ade
                                                       ­ 84 ­ 
neg o t iat o r s  an  o pp o r t unit y  t o   mat ch  t he  p r efer ent ial  mar ket   access  and 
even  go   beyo nd   it   in  ar eas  wher e  we  felt   t hat   we  had  a  cr it ical 
ad vant age. 
          I n  r espect   t o   t he  meant ime,   I   believe  an  ar ea  wher e  I   wo uld   ho p e 
t hat   t he  Obama  administ r at io n­ ­ it 's  cer t ainly  been  wr est ling  wit h  t his 
issu e  fo r   so me  t ime­ ­ but   t he  no t io n  o f  a  bilat er al  invest ment   agr eement . 
  We  d o n't   seem  t o   yet   have  t hat   issue  r eso lved  wit hin  t he  ad minist r at io n 
t o   t he  ext ent   t hat   o u r   t r ad e  nego t iat o r s  can  t hen  t ak e  it   o ut   int o   t he 
wo r ld . 
          Bu t   t hat 's  cer t ainly  an  ar ea  wher e  o ur   Co u ncil  member s  ar e 
lo o king  t o   g ain  bet t er   access  and  unifo r mit y  and   wo uld   be  an  impo r t ant 
win­ win  fo r   bo t h  sides,   t ax,   as  well. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     Am  I   o ut   o f  t ime? 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     No ,   yo u 've  go t   30  seco nd s. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     Which,   if  yo u  all  t hink 
cr eat ively,   which  sect o r s  o f  t he  U. S .   ind ust r y  and  eco no my  co uld  mo st 
benefit   fr o m  T aiwan's  liber alizat io n  t o   China  and   U. S .   liber alizat io n  vis­ 
à­ vis  T aiwan? 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     T en  seco nds.     Right   no w  we  have 
wo r ld ­ class  engineer ing   businesses.     T her e  is  a  hug e  r eq uir ement   r ight 
no w  in  T aiwan  fo r   infr ast r uct u r e  imp r o vement .     T her e  is  abso lu t ely  no 
r easo n  t hat   o ur   businesses  sho uldn't   be  all  o ver   t hat   winning,   I   wo uld 
say,   all  o f  t he  bu siness,   but   at   least ,   at   t he  ver y  least ,   co mp et ing  wit h 
T aiwan  and  Chinese  businesses  fo r   infr ast r uct ur e  and  business. 
          S er vices  co mpanies.     I   t hink  ano t her ,   lo gist ics  and  t r anspo r t at io n, 
I   t hink,   ar e  o t her   ar eas.  Why  is  it   t hat   o nly  T aiwan  and  China 
co mp anies  can  ply  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait ?    S hip  and  air .     We  have 
o u t st anding  air lines.     We  have  o ut st anding  ship ping   co mpanies.     T hey 
sho u ld  be  allo wed  t o   par t icipat e  in  t his  o ppo r t unit y,   t o o . 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     I   sho uld  t ell  t he  wit nesses,   if 
yo u   g et   int er r upt ed   and  yo u   want   t o   submit   so met hing   t o   sup plement 
yo u r   answer   fo r   t he  r eco r d ,   we'r e  hap py  t o   have  t hat . 
          Co mmissio ner   S hea. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     I   want   t o   t hank  t he  wit nesses  fo r   being 
her e  t o d ay.     I 've  enjo yed   yo u r   t est imo ny. 
          I 'd   lik e  yo u   t o   help   me  o ut   her e.     As  I   und er st and  E CFA,   t he 
mo t ivat io ns  o f  t he  Chinese  and   t he  mo t ivat io ns  o f  t he  T aiwanese  and   t he 
end   games  fo r   bo t h  ar e  co mplet ely  differ ent .     Fo r   T aiwan,   t he  end  game 
is  eco no mic.     I t 's  expanding   t heir   eco no my,   using  t he  E CFA  as  a  pr elu de 
t o   get   o t her   fr ee  t r ad e,   t o  have  gr eat er   eco no mic  int egr at io n  int o   Asia. 
T hat 's  ho w  I   und er st and  it . 
          Fo r   China,   t he  eco no mic  benefit s  o f  E CFA  ar e  mu ch  less 
sig nificant ,   and   t hey  basically  view  E CFA  as  a  st ep  o n  a  po lit ical  r o ad 
t o   u nificat io n. 
          I s  t hat   fair   t o   say,   t hat   t hey  bo t h  have  d iffer ent   mo t ivat io ns  and 
end   games;  is  t hat   co r r ect ?    Do   yo u   ag r ee?
                                                      ­ 85 ­ 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     I   abso lut ely  do . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     Ok ay. 
          DR.   KAS T NE R:     I   wo uld  agr ee  as  well. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     S o   t hese  end   games  ar e  ver y  differ ent ; 
r ig ht ?    A  st r o nger   eco no my,   o n  t he  o ne  hand ;  po lit ical  u nificat io n  o n  t he 
o t her . 
          I s  t he  end  g ame,   o ne  po ssible  end  game,   what   so me  have 
su gg est ed ,   a  Finlandizat io n  o f  T aiwan,   wher e  wit h  gr eat er   eco no mic 
int eg r at io n,   T aiwan  essent ially  accep t s  t he  r o le  o f  China  in  t he  r egio n? 
China  g ives  so me  benefit s  back  t o   T aiwan;  T aiwan  beco mes  mo r e  o f  a 
neu t r al  po wer   as  o p po sed  t o   an  info r mal  st r at egic  ally  o f  t he  Unit ed 
S t at es.   Do   yo u   see  t hat   as  a  po ssible  end  game  her e? 
          DR.   COOKE :     I   wo u ld  just   make  t hr ee  co mment s.     I   t hink  t hat   is  a 
t heo r et ical  o ut co me.     I   do n't   t hink   it 's  by  any  means  a  fo r eo r dained 
o u t co me,   t he  Finlandizat io n  scenar io . 
          And   I   wo uld  say  t hat ,   alt ho ugh  t he  mainland's  mo t ivat io ns  ar e 
o ver whelming ly  po lit ical  and   T aiwan's  mo t ivat io ns  ar e  o ver whelmingly 
eco no mic,  t her e  is  o ne  small  beachhead  o f  co mmo n  gr o u nd ,   which  has  t o 
d o   wit h  t he  st at ed  belief,   exp licit ly  ar t iculat ed  by  bo t h  sides,   and  shar ed 
by  t he  U. S .   go ver nment ,   as  well,   t hat   t o u r ism  r elat io ns,   t r ade  r elat io ns, 
and   per so n­ t o ­ per so n  co nt act s  have  a  beneficial  effect . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     Co mment ? 
          DR.   KAS T NE R:     I 'm  also   kind  o f  sk ep t ical  o f  t he  Finlandizat io n 
co ncep t  as  I   do n't   t hink   t hat   a  neu t r al  T aiwan  is  so met hing  t hat   China  is 
g o ing  t o   be  willing  t o   accept   as  lo ng ­ t er m  o u t co me  in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait . 
          S o   I  do n't   t hink  t hat  Finland izat io n  is  a  likely  lo ng­ t er m  o ut co me, 
t ho u gh  it   might  r ep r esent   a  po ssibilit y  in  t he  sho r t   t er m.  I n  t er ms  o f 
mo t ivat io ns,   cer t ainly  t her e  ar e  differ ent   mo t ivat io ns,   including  po lit ical 
mo t ivat io ns,  fo r   pu r suing  an  E CFA,   and  as  T er r y  po int ed  o u t  in  his 
t est imo ny,   t her e  is  a  lo t   o f  co nt r o ver sy  in  T aiwan  abo u t   t he  po lit ical 
imp licat io ns  o f  an  E CFA. 
          Bu t  I  am  sk ept ical  o f  t his  id ea  t hat   E CFA  is  so met hing   t hat 
act u ally  d o es  signify  a  sig nificant   st ep  t o war d  unificat io n. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     Mr .   Chamber s? 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     I   wo uld   just ,   just   g o ing  back  t o 
t he  o p po r t unit y  I   had  t o   g ive  so me  r emar ks  befo r e  t he  st ar t ,   fo r   me,   it 
ap pear s  t hat   bo t h  sides  ar e  vest ed  in  signing  so me  so r t   o f  ag r eement 
t hat   t hey'r e  g o ing  t o   call  E CFA  in  t he  May­ June  t ime  fr ame,   what ever 
t hat   might   end  u p   being.     P o lit ically,   t hey've  bo t h  decid ed   t hat   t hat 's  in 
t he  best   int er est s  o f  t he  d ir ect io n  t his  is  go ing. 
          T he  pr incipal  challenge  in  my  view  is  what   next ?    Becau se  t hat 's 
wher e  t his  who le  t hing  falls  o ff  a  cliff. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     E xact ly.  I f  yo ur   lo ng ­ t er m  go al  is 
p o lit ical  unificat io n,   t hen  yo u  p ass  t he  E CFA,   get   t hat   in  place,   yo u 
mig ht   beco me  a  lit t le  bit   impat ient ;  what 's  next ?    Ho w  do   I   achieve  my 
g o al?
                                                   ­ 86 ­ 
          Ok ay.     T hank   yo u. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Co mmissio ner   Videnieks. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Go o d  aft er no o n,   gent lemen. 
          We've  been  t alk ing   a  lo t   abo u t   eco no mic  int egr at io n,   cr o ss­ S t r ait 
eco no mic  int egr at io n.     I n  what   fo r m  will  it   t ak e  place?    Do   t hey  st ill 
char g e  cu st o ms  d ut ies  t o   each  o t her ?  I 've  no t   been  t her e  so   I 'm  asking 
t hese  quest io ns,   which  may  be  o bvio us.     Okay.     Do   t hey  char ge  d ut ies? 
Will  t hey  eliminat e  cu st o ms  inco me  fiscally?    And   ho pefu lly  t hen 
co r p o r at e  inco me  t axes  will  go   u p.     What   will  be  t he  net   effect   fiscally 
o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait   eco no mic  int egr at io n?    Over   what   p er io d   o f  t ime  will  o ne 
see  any  kind   o f  a  r esult ?    T hat 's  t he  q uest io n  t o   ever ybo dy. 
          DR.   COOKE :     I   will  lead  o ff  wit h  per haps  just   a  st at ement   o f  t he 
o bvio u s,   but   t he  t wo   eco no mies  ar e  ext r emely  co mplement ar y,   and  t he 
p r imar y  benefit   o f  an  E CFA  is  t o   r educe  bar r ier s  o f  t ar iffs  and 
insp ect io n  and  t he  lik e  t hat   cu r r ent ly  imp ede  t he  fr ee  mo vement   o f  t he 
g o o d s  and  capit al  t o   sup po r t   what   is  o t her wise  a  ver y  co mplement ar y 
ar r ang ement . 
          T he  Chinese  mainland  has  vast   ad vant ages  t hat   T aiwan  do es  no t 
enjo y  in  t er ms  o f  access  t o   labo r ,   lo w­ co st   facilit ies,   land  availabilit y, 
and   a  lar g e  do mest ic  co nsumer   mar ket . 
          T aiwan  has  ver y  advanced  manu fact ur ing  p r o cesses,   pr o p r iet ar ial 
k no w­ ho w  and  management   exper t ise,   and  t he  id ea  is  t o   br ing  t he  t wo 
t o g et her   t o   benefit   bo t h  wit h  a  minimu m  number   o f  r igidit ies  get t ing  in 
t he  way.
          COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     As  in  o ne  co mpany?    I n  sever al 
co mp anies?    I nt egr at ed   co mpanies?    I n  o t her   wo r ds,   a  co r po r at io n 
wo u ld   be  lo cat ed   bo t h  in  T aiwan  do ing  high­ end  st uff  and  maybe 
manufact u r ing  in  China?    T he  same­ ­ 
          DR.   COOKE :     T hat   fr equent ly  hap pens,   yes. 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     T er r y  has  r eally  co ver ed  it ,   so   I 
wo u ld   ju st   no t e  t hat   T aiwanese  t hink   t ank s  d o ing  st ud ies  o n  E CFA,   and 
t her e's  act ually  a  st u dy  co ming   o u t   fr o m  o ur   o wn  P et er so n  I nst it ut e  fo r 
I nt er nat io nal  E co no mics  her e  in  D. C. ,   and  acr o ss  t he  bo ar d ,   I 've  yet   t o 
r ead  a  r epu t able  st u dy  d o ne  t hat   do esn't   sho w  significant   year ­ o n­ year 
g r o wt h  as  a  funct io n  o f  E CFA. 
          No t io nally,   yo u'r e  r ight ,   t hat   any  dut y  and  t ar iff  r ed uct io n,   sir , 
wo u ld   co me  wit h  a  mar g inal  r educt io n  in  inco me  fo r   t he  go ver nment . 
T aiwan  fo r t u nat ely  t ak es  a  po licy  o f  having  a  lo w  co r po r at e  t ax  r at e 
which  assist s  it s  co mp anies  in  t heir   co mp et it iveness. 
          Bu t   mo st ly  t he  imp act   o f  E CFA  in  mo r e  gener al  t er ms  imp act s  t he 
r at io nalizat io n  o f  t he  r elat io nship   bet ween  t he  t wo   t hat 's  wher e  we 
alr ead y  ar e  t o day  and   imp r o ves  invest ment   flo ws.     S o   it   dir ect s  mo ney 
mo r e  t o war ds  t he  cr it ical  ad vant ages  t hat   bo t h  sides  have. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :  My  quest io n  basically  is  wo uld 
t her e  be  a  net   gain  o r   lo ss  immediat ely  if  t ar iff  inco me  wer e  eliminat ed? 
  Ho w  lo ng   wo u ld  it   t ak e  fo r  addit io nal  co r po r at e  inco me  t o   mat er ialize
                                                 ­ 87 ­ 
and   wher e  do   t hey  pay  t heir   t axes?    Wher e  t he  headquar t er s  ar e? 
T aiwan,   P RC?    What  pr o p o r t io n  o f  fiscal  inco me  o f  each  co unt r y,   each 
ent it y,   is  fr o m  t r ade  as  o p po sed  t o   inco me  t ax,   budg et ar y  inco me? 
           DR.   KAS T NE R:     I  su spect   it   is  a  pr et t y  t r ivial  per cent ag e.  I   do n't 
k no w  t he  exact   p er cent ag e  r at e.     I   t hink   t hat   cust o ms­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     I s  it   sig nificant   o r   no t ? 
           DR.   KAS T NE R:     I   t hink   it   wo u ld  be  p r et t y  insignificant . 
           DR.   COOKE :     T he  o nly  t hing  t hat   I   wo uld  ad d  is  in  so me  o f  t he 
t r ad it io nal  sect o r s  o f  T aiwan's  eco no my,   I   t hink  t he  analysis  is  less  in 
t er ms  o f  p r o ject ed   inco me.     I 'm  su r e  t her e  ar e  acco u nt ant s  at   t he 
co mp anies  t hat   ar e  do ing  t hat ,   but   it   r eally  has  t o   do   wit h  t he  viabilit ies 
o f  t he  co mp anies  t hemselves  and  t he  ind ust r ial  sect o r s  o n  a  lo ng­ t er m 
basis,   if  t hey  ar e  g et t ing  eco no mically  mar g inalized  in  t he  Asia­ P acific 
r eg io n.     S o   it   has  t o   d o   wit h  t he  o ver all  vit alit y  and  lo ng­ t er m  gr o wt h 
p r o spect s.     T hat 's  t he  analysis  I 've  seen  mo r e  t han  specific  inco me, 
co r p o r at e  ear ning s  impact s. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     T hank  yo u. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
           Co mmissio ner   Cleveland. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  CLE VE LAND:     T hank  yo u . 
           Mr .   Hammo nd­ Chamber s,   yo u  said  t hat   in  200 9,   t he  br each  in  t he 
p r o t o co l  o ver   beef  cr eat ed  q uest io ns  abo ut   T aiwan's  r eliabilit y.     I   t hink 
t hat   was  t he  wo r d   yo u   used. 
           I 'm  int er est ed  in  what   yo u   t hink  co nt r ibut ed  t o   t hat   br eakd o wn, 
and   what   mig ht   have  been  do ne  t hat   co u ld   have  p r event ed  it ?    And  g o ing 
fo r war d,   ho w,   ho w  we  pat ch  u p  t he  differ ences? 
           MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     T hank  yo u,   ma'am. 
           T his  is  a  co mment ar y  o n  T aiwan  do mest ic  po lit ics.     I   t hink 
init ially  what   we  have  seen  as  keen  o bser ver s  o f  t he  Ma  administ r at io n 
and   T aiwan  gener ally  is  t hat   when  P r esid ent   Ma  came  in,   he  cent r alized 
a  g r eat   deal  o f  go ver nment   co nt r o l  in  his  Nat io nal  S ecur it y  Co u ncil,   and 
t o   lo o k  at   t his  issue  t hr o ug h  t hat   pr ism  is  inst r uct ive. 
           T he  NS C  was  t he  p r incipal  o r ganizat io n  addr essing   t he  P r o t o co l 
and   it s  r o llo ut ,   and   as  a  co nsequence  t hey  had  a  br eak do wn  in 
co mmunicat ing  t he  P r o t o co l  t o   t he  Legislat ive  Yuan  and  t o   t he  p eo p le 
mo r e  g ener ally. 
           Becau se  T aiwan's  p ar t isan  at mo spher e  is  as  act ive  as  o ur   o wn,   if 
yo u 'll  excuse  t he  t er m,   all  hell  br o ke  lo o se,   and   t he  o ppo sit io n  p ar t y  saw 
an  o p po r t u nit y  t o   und er mine  t he  cr edibilit y  o f  t he  pr esident   and  t o 
q u est io n  t he  pr esid ent 's  willing ness  t o   pu t   at   t he  fo r efr o nt   t he  int er est s 
o f  t he  T aiwan  peo p le.     T heir   suggest io n  was  at   t he  expense  o f­ ­ put t ing 
t he  int er est s  o f  T aiwan's  r elat io nship  wit h  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  ahead  o f 
t he  int er est s  o f  t he  T aiwan  peo ple. 
           And   t he  Ma  ad minist r at io n  lo st   co nt r o l  o f  t he  issu e,   and   it 
r esult ed  in  t he  Legislat ive  Yuan's  KMT   Caucu s­ ­ t he  KMT ,   t he  r u ling 
p ar t y,   do minat es  t he  p ar liament   as  well,   but   also   as  a  r eflect io n  o f  ho w
                                                     ­ 88 ­ 
lit t le  co nt r o l  t he  p r esid ent   has  o ver   his  o wn  par liament ­ ­ t hat   might 
r eso nat e­ ­ t hat   t hey  went   ahead   and  d id   so met hing  t hat   t he  pr esident 
clear ly  did   no t   want   t hem  t o   do . 
           What   do es  it   leave  wit h  u s? 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  CLE VE LAND:     Co uld  I   st o p   yo u? 
           MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     Yes,   ma'am. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  CLE VE LAND:     When  yo u  say  t hat   he  lo st 
co nt r o l  and   t hey  went   ahead  and  did   so met hing,   wit ho ut   calculat ing  t he 
imp act   o n  t he  r elat io nship  wit h  t he  Unit ed  S t at es?    I   mean  I   t hink  we 
wer e  all  so r t   o f  su r pr ised  when  we  wer e  t her e  at   t he  vo cifer o us  debat e 
t hat   was  go ing   o n,   which  did  no t   seem  t o   t ake  int o   co nsid er at io n  t he 
p o t ent ial  damag e  t o   t he  r elat io nship . 
           MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     I   t hink  t hat 's  fair .     I   mean  I   d o n't 
t hink   it 's  unfair   t o   say  wit hin  T aiwan's  legislat ur e,   t her e  ar e  sever al  ver y 
r espo nsible  g o o d  par liament ar ians  who   u nder st and  t he  impo r t ance  o f 
p ar liament ar y  r espo nsibilit y  fo r   t he  co unt r y's  ext er nal  r elat io ns,   bu t 
t hey'r e  a  mino r it y.     And   all  p o lit ics  is  lo cal,   and  t hat 's  t r u e  fo r   ho w  t his 
sit u at io n  played   o u t . 
           Fo r   o ur   co unt r y  mo ving  fo r war d,   as  I   ment io ned,   we  have  a 
challenge.     We  have  a  challenge  in  t hat   t his  has  r egio nal  implicat io ns. 
We  can't   allo w  T aiwan,   fo r   t his  t o   sit   o ut   t her e  when  we  have  significant 
t r ad e  eq uit ies  and   int er est s  wit h  o t her   majo r   t r ading  par t ner s. 
Ot her wise,   it   might   o ffer   a  blu epr int   fo r   t hem  t o   change  pr o t o co ls  t hat 
o u r   nego t iat o r s  sign. 
           Bu t   t hat   said,   we  have  equit ies  o n  T aiwan  t hat   need  t o   be  d ealt 
wit h  in  t he  face  o f  E CFA,   and  mo r e  br o adly  speak ing,   because  o ur   t r ade 
neg o t iat o r s  ar e  so   limit ed  in  ho w  t o   r esp o nd  t o   China  and  Chinese 
effo r t s  t o   dr ive  t he  pr o cess  o f  r egio nal  liber alizat io n,   we've  go t   t his 
T I FA  p r o cess,   and  it 's  pr et t y  much  all  we've  go t   r ight   no w,   and   we  need 
t o   g et   it   back  up   and  r u nning . 
           S o   pr o bably  so me  so r t   o f  penalizat io n  o f  T aiwan,   what ever   t hat 
mig ht   be,   bu t   also   separ at ing   beef  o ut   and  r elaunching  T I FA  as  so o n  as 
p o ssible. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
           I   have  a  qu est io n.     I n  t his  E CFA,   essent ially,   t hat 's  a  fr ee  t r ad e 
ag r eement ,   and   Ar t icle  24  o f  t he  WT O  GAT T   means  it   has  t o   co ver 
su bst ant ially  all  t r ad e  t o   get   t hat   k ind   o f  except io n  fr o m  t he  MFN 
t r eat ment .     Do   yo u   g uys  expect   t his  E CFA  t o   co ver   subst ant ially  all 
t r ad e  bet ween  China  and  T aiwan? 
           DR.   COOKE :     I   t hink  pr ecisely  because  it   t akes  place  o ut sid e  o f 
WT O  auspices,   China  and   T aiwan  ar e  essent ially  agr eeing   t o   handle  it   in 
a  so mewhat   differ ent   way.     I n  p r inciple,   o ver   t ime,  t he  idea  is  t hat   it 
wo u ld   enco mpass  all  t r ade,   bu t   t o   mak e  it   mo r e  feasible  t o   co nclu de 
q u ickly,   t hey've  r est r ict ed  t he  sco p e  in  t he  init ial  st ages  q uit e  clear ly. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Do   yo u  agr ee  wit h  t hat ,   Mr . 
Chamber s?
                                                  ­ 89 ­ 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     I   d o ,   Co mmissio ner   Mullo y.     I 
hap p en  t o   believe  in  t he  end,   t his  ag r eement   will  be  a  fr ee  t r ade 
ag r eement ,   as  yo u've  descr ibed,   but   t o   T er r y's  po int ,   I   believe  t hat 
init ially  t hey'r e  wo r king  o n  a  p o lit ical  t ime  t able,   and  t hey  do n't   want 
issu es  t hat   may  co me  up  in  a  no r mal  t r ade  nego t iat io n  t o   int er r up t   t he 
sig ning  o f  t his  agr eement   in  t he  sp r ing t ime,   so   so me  o f  t hat   st uff  may 
p o ssibly  fall  o ff. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Okay.  When  we  wer e  in 
T aiwan  in  December ,   senio r   o fficials  in  T aiwan  wer e  saying  t hat   t hey 
want ed  t he  E CFA  becau se  o f  t he  AS E AN­ China  FT A,   and  t hey  po sit ed 
t hat   if  t hey  wer e  ever   t o   g et   t he  E CFA  wit h  China,   t hat   China  might   be 
less  r eluct ant   t o   see  t hem  do   FT As  wit h  o t her ,   wit h  t heir   o t her   t r ading 
p ar t ner s. 
          Mr .   Co o ke,   yo u   say  o n  page  seven  o f  yo ur   t est imo ny  t hat   may  no t 
be  t he  r ig ht   assump t io n.     Yo u'r e  saying   t hat   t hese  FT As  ar en't   what 
China  has  in  mind,   mak ing  t he  po ssibilit y  o f  FT As  wit h  lar ger   eco no mies 
o u t sid e  o f  t he  r egio n  mo r e  r emo t e.     T hat   China  is  no t   g o ing   t o   be 
p laying  t hat   g ame. 
          S o   I   ju st   wo nder   is  so mebo dy  o per at ing  o n  assumpt io ns  t hat   may 
no t   be  r eal?    I 'd   be  int er est ed   in  kno wing  yo ur   views. 
          DR.   COOKE :     One  o f  t he  benefit s  o f  no   lo ng er   being   a  U. S . 
g o ver nment   o fficial  is  t hat   I   am  able  t o   speak   ver y  fr eely.  And  it 's 
no t hing  bu t   a  per so nal  int er pr et at io n,   bu t   my  per so nal  int er p r et at io n  is 
t hat   China's  t act ical  p lan  wit h  an  E CFA  is  t hat   it   can  invo lve  T aiwan  t o 
mu t u al  eco no mic  benefit   in  a  r o bu st   net wo r k  o f  r eg io nal  t r ade 
r elat io nship s  wher e  China  has  a  ver y  cent r al  po sit io n,   but  in  Beijing's 
calculat io n,   t hat   may  so meho w  give  Beijing   a  lit t le  bit   mo r e  abilit y  t o 
int er fer e  wit h  a  po ssible  fr ee  t r ade  agr eement   o ut side  t he  r egio n  wit h 
ver y  lar g e  par t ner s  such  as  t he  E U  o r   t he  Unit ed   S t at es. 
          Bu t   I   t hink   it   wo uld   incumbent   upo n  t he  E U  and   t he  U. S .   t o   be 
fo r cefu l  in  t heir   glo bal  co mmit ment   t o   eco no mic  liber alizat io n 
ever ywher e. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Mr .   Co o ke.     Mr .   Chamber s, 
have  any  view  o n  t hat ? 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     Co mmissio ner   Mullo y,   sir ,   I 
hap p en  t o   t hink   t hat   in  t he  absence  o f  ano t her   p lan  t hat   what   P r esid ent 
Ma  is  pr o p o sing  makes  sense,   but   wher e  t he  r ubber   meet s  t he  r o ad  is 
Chinese  willing ness  t o   change  t heir   p o sit io n  o n  o bject io ns  t o   T aiwan's 
p ar t icipat ing  in  bilat er al  and  mu lt ilat er al  ag r eement s. 
          T hat   said ,   t her e  is  a  st r o ng  case  t o   be  made.     I f  yo u  lo o k   at   t he 
chang e  t hat   China  made  in  it s  po sit io n  o ver   WHA  o bser ver   st at us  last 
year   and   t he  no t io n  t hat   t he  Chinese  want ed   t o   demo nst r at e  so me 
mag nanimit y  o n  int er nat io nal  space  fo r   T aiwan,   it   is  po ssible,   it   is 
co nceivable  t hat   t he  Ma  g o ver nment   can  quiet ly  make  t he  case  t o   t he 
Chinese  t hat   t his  co uld  fit   in  t he  r ealm  o f  flexibilit y  in  t he  no n­ 
so ver eignt y  r elat ed  ar ea,   t o   affo r d   T aiwan  mo r e  int er nat io nal  sp ace
                                                    ­ 90 ­ 
wher e  it   r aises  t he  eco no mic  equ it ies  o f  t he  T aiwan  p eo p le,   but   do esn't 
affr o nt   China's  int er pr et at io n  o f  T aiwan  so ver eignt y. 
          And   t hat   wo uld   be  t o   allo w  T aiwan,   under   what ever   t hey  might 
ag r ee  t o   call  it ,   whet her   it 's  an  E CFA  fo r   ever ybo dy  else,   as  well,   but   t o 
allo w  T aiwan  t o   st ar t   eng aging  in  r egio nal,   bilat er al  and  mult ilat er al 
init iat ives. 
          Bu t   as  it   st and s  r ight   no w,   t he  Chinese  ar e  saying  no . 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Do   yo u  have  anyt hing   t o   ad d? 
          DR.   KAS T NE R:     I   wo u ld  agr ee  wit h  t hat .     I   wo u ld  t hink   t hat 
t her e  wo uld  be  so me  co mpr o mise  aft er   E CFA  is  r eached,  especially  wit h 
t he  Ma  administ r at io n,   t ho ug h  I ’m  no t   sur e  ho w  br o ad  su ch  a 
co mp r o mise  wo u ld  be  o r  whet her   China  wo uld  dr o p  o bject io ns  t o 
T aiwan  nego t iat ing   FT A’s  wit h  majo r   eco no mies. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
          Fello w  Co mmissio ner s,   t hr ee  o f  yo u  have  asked   fo r   an  addit io nal 
r o u nd .     I f  we  co uld  limit   it   t o   t wo   minu t es,  we  can  do   it .  T 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     I   have  just   a  fact ual  quest io n. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Go   ahead. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Five  seco nd s.     Do es  T aiwan  have  a 
meaningful  eq uivalent   t o   o u r   Fo r eign  Co r r up t   P r act ices  Act ? 
          DR.   COOKE :     No t   t o   a  U. S .   st andar d,   no . 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     I   agr ee  wit h  T er r y. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Ano t her   yes/ no .   I f  t he 
Leg islat ive  Yuan  r ever sed   so me  o f  Ma  Ying ­ jeo u's  po sit io n  o n  t he  U. S . 
Beef  Agr eement ,   co u ld  t he  LY  do   t he  same  kind  o f  t hing  and  d er ail  an 
E CFA  aft er   it   is  agr eed? 
          MR.   HAMMOND­ CHAMBE RS :     Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel,   I 'll  t ak e  a 
st ab. 
          S ir ,   co ncep t u ally,   in  my  exper ience  wit h  t he  LY,   t hey  can  d o   a  lo t 
o f  t hings.     But   t hey,   it 's  int er est ing  t he  way  it   t r ack s  wit h  what   we'r e 
seeing   g o ing  o n  r ight   no w  her e  in  t he  Unit ed  S t at es.     T hey'r e  lo o king  at 
a  nu mber   o f  d iffer ent   p r o cedur al  met ho ds  fo r   hand ling  E CFA  t o 
minimize  t he  po ssibilit y  o f  co llat er al  damage  and  t he  o pp o r t unit ies  t hat 
t ho se  who   o p p o se  E CFA  may  feel  t hey  have  in  t r ying  t o   kill  it . 
          Bu t ,   as  yet ,   as  I   und er st and  it ,   and   please,   please  d isagr ee,   t hey 
haven't   yet   d ecided   exact ly  ho w  E CFA  will  pass  t hr o u gh  t he  Legislat ive 
Yu an,   bu t  t he  LY  will  g et   so me  o pp o r t u nit y  t o   r eview  it ,   bu t   ho w,   t hat 's 
st ill  ap par ent ly  t o   be  d et er mined . 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     I   want   t o   t hank  t his  panel 
ag ain  fo r   yo u r   ver y  helpful  o r al  t est imo ny.     Yo ur   wr it t en  t est imo ny, 
which  was  ver y  t ho u ght fu l,  will  be  in  o ur   r eco r d,   and  we  can  t hen  use 
t hat  t o   help  wr it e  o ur   r ep o r t   lat er .     S o   we  t hank  yo u  ver y  much,   all 
t hr ee  o f  yo u. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T en  minut es.     We'll  be  back   at
                                                      ­ 91 ­ 
2 : 1 0.     T hank  yo u . 
           [ Wher eupo n,   a  sho r t   r ecess  was  t ak en. ] 

                          PANEL  V:     PO LITICAL  AS PECTS 

         HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T he  final  p anel  t o d ay  will 
exp lo r e  t he  po lit ical  dynamics  o f  t he  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io nship  and   it s 
imp licat io ns  fo r   t he  Unit ed  S t at es.     We  have  t hr ee  ver y  d ist ing uished 
p anelist s. 
         T he  fir st   panelist   is  Rand all  S chr iver ,   P r esident   and  CE O  o f  t he 
P r o ject   2 049   I nst it u t e.     He's  also   a  fo unding   par t ner   o f  Ar mit age 
I nt er nat io nal  LLC,   and   a  S enio r   Asso ciat e  at   t he  Cent er   fo r   S t r at eg ic 
and   I nt er nat io nal  S t u dies. 
         He  ser ved  as  Depu t y  Assist ant   S ecr et ar y  o f  S t at e  fo r   E ast   Asian 
and   P acific  Affair s  fr o m  20 03   t o   2 005 ,   and  as  Chief  o f  S t aff  and  S enio r 
P o licy  Ad viso r   t o   t hen  Deput y  S ecr et ar y  o f  S t at e  Richar d   Ar mit age  fr o m 
2 0 01   t o   20 0 3.     He's  also   ser ved   as  an  int elligence  o fficer   in  t he  U. S . 
Navy. 
         Dr .   S helley  Rig ger   is  t he  Br o wn  P r o fesso r   o f  E ast   Asian  P o lit ics 
at   Davidso n  Co llege  in  No r t h  Car o lina.     S he  has  a  P h. D.   in  Go ver nment 
fr o m  Har var d   Univer sit y  and   B. A.   in  P ublic  and   I nt er nat io nal  Affair s 
fr o m  P r incet o n  Univer sit y. 
         S he's  been  a  Visit ing  Resear cher   at   Nat io nal  Chengchi  Univer sit y 
in  T aiwan  and  a  Visit ing  P r o fesso r   at   Fud an  Univer sit y  in  S hanghai. 
         S he's  a  p r o lific  wr it er   and  has  published  t wo   bo o ks  and  nu mer o us 
ar t icles  o n  T aiwan's  do mest ic  po lit ics  and  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns. 
         T he  final  panelist   is  Dr .   Richar d  Bush,   I I I ,   a  S enio r   Fello w  at   t he 
Br o o k ings  I nst it ut io n  and  Dir ect o r   o f  it s  Cent er   fo r   No r t heast   Asian 
P o licy  S t u d ies. 
         Dr .   Bu sh  has  lo ng ­ t ime  exp er ience  in  dealing  wit h  China  and 
T aiwan  beginning  in  1 977   wit h  t he  China  Co uncil  o f  T he  Asia  S o ciet y. 
He  has  wo r ked  in  t he  Ho use  Fo r eig n  Affair s  Co mmit t ee  S u bco mmit t ee 
o n  Asia­ P acific  Affair s,   t he  Ho use  Fo r eign  Affair s  Co mmit t ee,   and  t he 
Nat io nal  I nt ellig ence  Co uncil  as  Nat io nal  I nt elligence  Officer   fo r   E ast 
Asia. 
         His  final  p o sit io n  pr io r   t o   Br o o kings  was  as  Chair man  and 
Managing  Dir ect o r   o f  t he  Amer ican  I nst it ut e  in  T aiwan.     He's  also   t he 
au t ho r   o f  nu mer o u s  ar t icles  and   sever al  bo o ks  o n  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns 
and   U. S .   r elat io ns  wit h  China  and  T aiwan. 
         We  lo o k   fo r war d   t o   yo ur   t est imo ny.  I t   will  be  seven  minu t es 
each.     P lease,   Rand y. 

              S TATEM ENT  O F  M R.   RANDALL  G .   S CH RIVER 
             PRES IDENT  AND  CEO ,   PRO JECT  249   INS TITUTE 
                        ARLING TO N,   VIRG INIA

                                               ­ 92 ­ 
           MR.   S CHRI VE R:     T hank  yo u,   Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel,   and  t hank 
yo u   t o   all  t he  Co mmissio ner s.     I   app r eciat e  t he  o ppo r t unit y  t o   be  her e, 
and   I   p ar t icular ly  appr eciat ed  being  seat ed  wit h  peo ple  I   r espect   so 
mu ch,   Dr .   Rig g er   and  Dr .   Bush. 
           T his  has  been,   I   t hink,   a  lo ng  day  fo r   t he  Co mmissio ner s,   and  I 
k no w  mu ch  g r o und  has  been  co ver ed,   but   I   do   t hink  t hat   t he  po lit ical 
element s  o f  t his  cr o ss­ S t r ait   envir o nment   ar e,   in  fact ,   t he  mo st 
imp o r t ant   and  t he  co r e  element s.     At   t he  hear t   o f  it ,   t he  disput e  is  a 
p o lit ical  dispu t e. 
           Bu t   I   will  be  ver y  br ief  and  want   t o   fo cu s  ver y  int ensely  o n  what   I 
t hink   ar e  t he  co r e  challenges  t o  an  end ur ing  st abilit y  and  a  st abilit y 
which  wo uld  ensur e  pr o sper it y  and  peace  go ing  fo r war d  becau se  I   t hink 
t her e  is  a  nar r at ive  o ut   t her e  t hat   is  beco ming   clo se  t o   co nsensus  and 
co nvent io nal  wisd o m,   even,   which  I   t hink   may  no t ,   in  fact ,   be  t he 
co r r ect   nar r at ive. 
           what   I   mean  by  t hat   is  I   t hink   mo st   wo uld   ag r ee,   per hap s  all 
wo u ld   ag r ee,   t hat   t her e  is  a  gr eat   d eal  o f  po sit ive  mo ment um  in  t he 
cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io nship ,   and  t hat   t he  envir o nment   is  mu ch  impr o ved 
o ver   t he  last   co u p le  o f  year s,   but   I   t hink  when  yo u  pull  t he  t hr ead 
fu r t her   and  give  co nsid er at io n  t o   t he  fut ur e  t r aject o r y,   I   cer t ainly  t hink 
t hat   t r aject o r y  is  far   fr o m  cer t ain,   and   when  peo ple  st ar t   t o   t alk  abo ut 
challenges  and  o bst acles,   I   t hink   t hey'r e  o ft en  go ing  t o   t he  wr o ng  place 
and   lo o king   at  t he  wr o ng  issues. 
           I   t hink  o ne  o f  t he  co mmo n  nar r at ives  is  t hat   t he  p o t ent ial 
challenge  o r   o bst acle  fo r   an  endur ing  peace  and  st abilit y  is  so r t   o f  t he 
vo lat ilit y  o f  T aiwan's  d emo cr acy  and  p er haps  t he  unpr edict abilit y  o f  an 
act ivist   Legislat ive  Yuan  o r   pr esid ent   o r   fut ur e  p r esident ,   bu t   I   d o n't 
t hink   t hat   t he  r o bust   and  ver y  r epr esent at ive  nat ur e  o f  T aiwan's 
d emo cr acy  is  t he  co r e  p r o blem. 
           I   t hink  t he  co r e  p r o blem  is  Beijing's  int r ansig ence,   t heir   st r at egy, 
which  is  fund ament ally  flawed  in  t hat   it   o ver ly  r elies  o n  co er cio n  as  o ne 
o f  t he  key  element s  and  t heir   neur algia  r eally  r elat ed  t o   t he  demo cr acy 
o n  T aiwan. 
           S o   let   me  be  a  lit t le  bit   mo r e  specific  abo ut   t his.     I   do   t hink 
Beijing  in  a  sense  has  so mewhat   o f  an  u pper   hand.     T hey  act ually  have  a 
visio n,   and   t hey  have  a  st r at egy  t o   get   t her e.     T heir   visio n  is  quit e  clear . 
  T hey  want   so me  r eco nciliat io n,   and   what   t hey  wo u ld  say  r eunificat io n­ ­ 
what   o t her s  wo u ld  say  unificat io n­ ­ ar o und  t he  co r e  pr incip le  o f  "One 
China. " 
           T heir   st r at eg y,   alt ho ug h  it   has  many  mo ving  par t s  t o   it ,   is 
essent ially  a  st r at egy  o f  car r o t s  and   st icks,   and  t hen  a  few  year s  ago   it 
was  no t ed  sweet er   car r o t s  and  har der   st icks.     S weet er   car r o t s  being  t he 
eco no mic  ind u cement s;  t he  har der   st icks  being   t hings  like  t he  Ant i­ 
S ecessio n  Law  and  t he  milit ar y  bu ild­ up  o ppo sit e  T aiwan. 
           T his  is  all  under sco r ed  by  a  ver y  aggr essive  per cept io ns 
manag ement   camp aig n  which  is  desig ned   t o   d r ive  a  wedge  bet ween
                                                  ­ 93 ­ 
T aiwan  and  it s  k ey  sup po r t er s,   mo st   pr incipally  t he  Unit ed  S t at es,   but 
also   t o   iso lat e  T aiwan  int er nat io nally  and  vilify  t ho se  t hat   might   seek  a 
d iffer ent   fut ur e  fo r   T aiwan. 
            S o   t his  is  t he  fu ndament al  st r at egy  t hat   has  been  in  place  fo r   I 
t hink   so me  p er io d   o f  t ime.   E ven  t ho u gh  t he  level  o f  so phist icat io n  and 
t he  imp lement at io n  o f  t his  st r at egy  and  so me  o f  t he  element s  o n  t he 
mar g ins  changed,   t his  is  essent ially  it ,   a  car r o t s  and  st ick   st r at egy 
su pp o r t ed  by  an  agg r essive  per cept io ns  management   campaig n. 
            T he  p r o blem  wit h  t his  is  t hat   t he  sweet er   car r o t s  have  been 
p o wer ful  eno ugh  t o   cr eat e  t hese  eco no mic  linkages,   have  been  po wer fu l 
eno u g h  t o   chang e  so me  o pinio ns  abo ut   mainland  China  wit hin  T aiwan, 
but   t he  st icks  p ar t ,   t he  co er cive  element s  have  had   t he  o ppo sit e  effect   in 
t er ms  o f  eng ender ing  po sit ive  feeling s  t o war d   China  in  T aiwan. 
            S o   t he  o ut co me  has  been  an  int er est   in  gr eat er   eco no mic  t ies  and 
g r eat er   int er act io n,   but   t he  p o lit ical  go al  which  Beijing   ho ld s  may 
act u ally  be  g et t ing  fur t her   away  o r   mo r e  difficult   t o   o bt ain  d ue  t o   t his 
co er cive  element   o f  t heir   po licy. 
            S o   what   do es  t he  net   effect   t hen  beco me  o ver   t ime?    Over   t ime, 
yo u   have  a  sit uat io n  wher e  Beijing   eit her   changes  a  po lit ical  o bject ive, 
which  I   t hink  is  hig hly  unlikely,   o r   yo u  ask  fo r   unlimit ed   pat ience,   which 
is  I   t hink   is  also   p r et t y  unlikely,   o r   t he  co er cive  t o o ls  beco me  mo r e 
at t r act ive  t o   t hem,   which  I   t hink  is  a  caut io nar y  no t e  and   so met hing   t hat 
we  d o   need  t o   be  wat chfu l  abo ut . 
            I   t hink   t he  po lling  in  T aiwan,   t ho ug h  fickle  and  no t   100  per cent 
r eliable,   und er sco r es  t his  view.     I f  yo u  ask  peo ple  t heir   o pinio n  abo ut 
t he  p o lit ical  st at u s  bet ween  t he  t wo   sides,   yes,   o ver whelmingly,   p eo p le 
say  st at us  q u o ,   t he  so ­ called  "st at u s  qu o . "    But   if  yo u  ask  fo llo w­ o n 
q u est io ns  su ch  as  st at us  quo ,   t hen  what ,   o r   t he  t heo r et ical,   in  t he 
absence  o f  milit ar y  t hr eat   o pp o sit e  T aiwan,   what   wo u ld  yo ur   o pinio n  be, 
in  bo t h  cases,   t ho se  su ppo r t ing   ind ependence  is  act ually  incr easing 
acco r d ing  t o   t he  Mainland   Affair s  Co uncil  in  t heir   p o lling. 
            S o   st at u s  q uo   no w,   indep endence  lat er   is  incr easing.     What   wo uld 
yo u   sup po r t   in  t he  absence  o f  a  milit ar y  t hr eat ?    I ndependence  is 
incr easing.   And   so ,   ag ain,   I   t hink  t he  dynamic  t hat   is  unfo lding  is  a 
sit u at io n  which  co uld   be  mo r e  and  mo r e  difficult   fo r   Beijing   t o   t o ler at e. 
            Many  have  co mment ed  o n  t hese  po lls  and   said,   well,   t he  o ut co me 
her e  t hen  sho uld   act ually  g ive  u s  so me  r eassu r ance  T aiwan  is  no t   go ing 
t o   r u sh  int o   a  deal  t hat 's  bad  fo r   t heir   int er est s.     T hey  wo uld n't   sacr ifice 
t heir   so ver eig nt y  and   t he  har d  fo ught ­ fo r   d emo cr acy  t hat   t hey  have,   but , 
in  fact ,   no t   as  mu ch  at t ent io n  is  being  paid  o n  t he  effect s  t hat   t his 
d ynamic  co uld  have  o n  Beijing . 
            Again,   do   t hey  have  u nlimit ed  p at ience?    I   hear d  Co mmissio ner 
S hea's  q uest io n  t o   t he  pr evio us  panel.     Do   t hey  have  a  fundament ally 
d iffer ent   p o lit ical  go al?    Do   we  exp ect   t hem  t o   have  unlimit ed   pat ience 
o r   d o   we  t hink  t he  co er cio n  t o o l  co uld  beco me  mo r e  at t r act ive  t o   t hem? 
            T o   co nclu de,  I   do   want   t o   t ake  t he  o p po r t unit y  o f  t his  hear ing   and
                                                    ­ 94 ­ 
t his  p anel  t o   mak e  so me  r eco mmendat io ns  because,   I   t hink,   ag ain,   if 
yo u r   analysis  is  flawed  and  yo u'r e  lo o king  at   t he  wr o ng  o bst acles  and 
challenges  t o   an  endu r ing  st abilit y,   t hen  yo ur   p o licy  r eco mmendat io ns 
t hat   fo llo w  fr o m  t he  analysis  co u ld  also   be  flawed. 
           I   t hink  t her e  ar e  a  number   o f  r eco mmendat io ns  t hat   have  been  p ut 
fo r war d  by  scho lar s  and   academics  and   fo r mer   o fficials  t hat   su ggest 
so meho w  t his  sho uld   be  o n  aut o p ilo t ,   ever yt hing  is  g o ing   g r eat ,   and 
t her efo r e  we  sho u ld  no t   met t le  o r   vio lat e  t he  Hippo cr at ic  Oat h  o f 
invo lving  o ur selves  in  act ually  do ing  har m,   o r   t hat   t hese  o ut co mes  ju st 
ar en't   co nseq uent ial  o r   imp o r t ant   eno u gh  fo r   t he  Unit ed  S t at es  t o   upset 
t he  t r end  line. 
           I   kno w  my  t ime  is  sho r t .     Just   ver y  quickly,   I   do   t hink  t he  Unit ed 
S t at es  sho u ld  r eint r o du ce  and   st r o ng ly  ur ge  t he  Chinese  t o   r eno unce  t he 
u se  o f  fo r ce.     I   t hink  t hat 's  fallen  o ut   o f  o ur   mant r a.     And  sho uld  put   a 
g r eat   deal  mo r e  pr essur e  o n  China  t o   r edu ce  t he  milit ar y  aggr essive 
p o st u r e  o ppo sit e  T aiwan. 
           Failing  t hat ,   I   t hink  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  sho u ld  co nsider   scaling 
back   so mewhat   t he  milit ar y­ t o ­ milit ar y  r elat io nship  wit h  China.     I   t hink 
it   is  o f  so mewhat   qu est io nable  valu e  t o  begin  wit h,   but   as  lo ng  as  t he 
p o st u r e  is  as  we  kno w  it   t o   be  o pp o sit e  T aiwan,   I   t hink   having  a  mo r e 
r o bust   milit ar y  int er change  wit h  China  is  no t   well  advised. 
           I   t hink  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  sho uld   do   a  ser ies  o f  t hings,   ho p efully, 
in  2 010 ,   t o   enhance  t he  U. S . ­ T aiwan  r elat io nship,   and  I   wo uld  includ e 
t hing s  t hat   have  alr eady  been  put   o n  t he  ag enda,   like  a  visa  waiver 
p r o g r am,   an  ext r adit io n  t r eat y.   I   wo uld  also   like  t o   see  a  Cabinet 
S ecr et ar y  visit   T aiwan  in  2 010 .     Of  co ur se,   we  kno w  t he  Clint o n 
ad minist r at io n  sent   t hr ee.     T he  Bush  administ r at io n  in  eight   year s  sent 
zer o .     S o   it 's  been  o ver   a  decad e  since  a  Cabinet   S ecr et ar y  has  visit ed. 
           I   do   su pp o r t   a  Fr ee  T r ade  Agr eement   bet ween  t he  Unit ed  S t at es 
and   T aiwan.     I   t hink   in  t he  cu r r ent   envir o nment ,   par t icular ly  o n  o ur 
sid e,   t hat 's  no t   likely,   bu t   a  mo r e  r o bu st   T I FA  pr o cess,   which  wo uld,   I 
t hink ,   no t   o nly  sup p o r t   o ur   eco no mic  int er est s,   but   I   t hink  wo uld  give 
T aiwan  t he  valu able  hed ge  ag ainst   E CFA,   against   fu r t her   iso lat io n. 
           I   do   su ppo r t   mo r e  enhanced   secur it y  assist ance  t o   T aiwan.     I 
k no w  t he  issue  o f  F­ 16   has  been  o n  t he  t able.     I   do   su ppo r t   t hat   pr o g r am 
ver y  mu ch.     I   t hink   it   wo u ld   be  t he  r ig ht   message  t o   send  t o   China  r ight 
no w,   and  I   do   t hink  t he  Unit ed   S t at es  sho uld  co nt inue  effo r t s  t o   suppo r t 
T aiwan's  p ar t icip at io n  in  int er nat io nal  o r ganizat io ns,   and  par t icu lar ly 
mak e  t his  a  mo r e  pr o minent   feat u r e  in  o ur   discussio n  wit h  Asian  allies 
lik e  Japan  and  Aust r alia. 
           T hank  yo u. 
           [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 

                Prep a red   S t at emen t   o f  M r.   Ra n d all  G .   S ch ri v er 
                   Presi d en t   an d  CEO ,   Proj ect   249  In st i t u t e 
                                    Arli n gt on ,   Vi rgi n i a
                                            ­ 95 ­ 
Good afternoon Commissioners.  Thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to convey my 
views on the current state of the cross­Strait relationship and the direction of important trend lines.  And 
thank you as well for making me look good by association – I’m honored to sit on the same witness panel 
with both Dr. Rigger and Dr. Bush. 

           As this is the last panel of the day, and many issues associated with the cross­Strait economic and 
security environment have already been ably addressed, I’d like to keep my statement very brief.  In that 
spirit, I’ll forgo extensive discussion of where I see things stand today, and instead focus more on what I 
believe  to be the major challenges to stability and progress in the Taiwan Strait going forward.  I’d also 
like to take this opportunity to address the interests of the United States that are at stake and some specific 
policy recommendations. 

Background: 

         Since  the  election  and  inauguration  of  Ma  Ying­Jeou  as  President  of  Taiwan  in  Spring  2008, 
Asia­watchers  have  observed  a  remarkable  rapprochement  between  the  People’s  Republic  of  China  and 
Taiwan.    Significant  progress  has  been  made  between  the  two  sides  in  areas  such  as  cross­Strait 
commercial  air  travel,  tourism  in  both  directions,  an  easing  of  investment  restrictions,  and  even 
international  space  for  Taiwan.    Arguably,  cross­Strait  relations  have  never  seen  so  much  positive 
momentum, over such a short period of time in the modern area. 

          The  future  trajectory  of  cross­Strait  relations,  however,  remains  far  from  certain.    A number of 
essential  questions  about  China  and  Taiwan’s  collective  future  remain  extremely  difficult  to  answer. 
There  are  a  large  number  of  variables,  each  complex  and  fluid,  that  factor  into  the  equation  that  will 
ultimately determine the health of China­Taiwan ties.   While current trend lines remain mostly positive, 
there are increasing signs that the direction of cross­Strait relations could still change dramatically.  The 
environment  remains  fragile  and  vulnerable  to  disruption  from  a  variety  of  sources.    As  a  result,  the 
interests of the United States could be adversely impacted. 

Potential Challenges: 

           There  seems  to  be  an  emerging  conventional  wisdom  that  progress  and/or  minimal  stability 
hinges  upon  effective  leadership  and  governance  by  the  current  Kuomintang  (KMT)  government  in 
Taiwan.  This is largely informed by Chinese government officials and academics who vociferously warn 
us  of  the  dire  consequences  for  cross­Strait  relations  should  the  Democratic  Progressive  Party  return  to 
power in Taipei.  Yet the sources of potential challenge to stability in the Strait are far more complex, and 
have  much  more  to  do  with  the  continuing  insecurities  of  the  Chinese  leadership,  Beijing’s  neuralgia 
associated with democracy on Taiwan, and a strategy that is fundamentally flawed by an over­reliance on 
coercion.  While it’s true there are two primary parties to the dispute and thus both sides contribute to the 
political environment, the threats to peace and progress emanate most acutely from the PRC side. 

          Let me try to be more specific. I believe leaders in Beijing have a grand vision for Taiwan and a 
strategy  to  get  there.    By  some  measure,  this  greatly  advantages  Beijing  by  virtue  of  the  clarity  of  their 
view and their ability to sustain a disciplined approach to Taiwan and the outside world.  While China has 
a  strategy,  Taiwan  continues  to  lack  consensus  on  even  the  most  fundamental  aspects  related  to  the 
desired end state of relations between the two sides of the Strait.  Thus Taiwan, and to a large extent the 
United States, are in a responsive posture, and are constrained to tactical maneuvering. 

         On the other hand, Beijing’s strategy – which appears effective in the short term – may very well 
contain critical flaws that will ultimately inhibit China from achieving the political outcomes they desire. 
The  dynamic  we  are  witnessing,  therefore,  may  actually  be  deceiving.    We  see  rapid  progress  at  the 
present, particularly in the economic sphere, but the political objectives could be subtly diverging.  This,
                                                       ­ 96 ­ 
in turn, may test Beijing’s patience, and may make coercive tools even more tempting to China’s insecure 
leaders. 

          Beijing’s vision is quite clear  – they seek unification (which they refer to as “re­unification”) in 
political  form  under  the  rubric  of  “One  China.”    Their  strategy  is  also  clear,  though  rarely  explicitly 
stated.  Fundamentally, China adopts a version of the classic carrots and sticks approach to Taiwan.  This 
was  enhanced  after  President  Hu  Jintao  came  to  power  and was described by analysts as sweeter carrots 
(more economic inducements) and harder sticks (the Anti­secession Law and the military build­up).  And 
despite  their  rhetoric,  Chinese  leaders  also  recognize  the  Taiwan  issue  has  been  “internationalized.” 
Therefore, they incorporate an international carrots and sticks approach to major outside players, as well 
as  an  aggressive  perception  management  campaign  designed  for  the  consumption  of  the  international 
community. 

          Beijing’s strategy can thus be said to have seven core elements: (1) complete intransigence on the 
issue  of  “One  China;”  (2)  economic  and  other  inducements  to  attract  the  government  and  people  of 
Taiwan;  (3)  military  build­up  as  a  tool  of  intimidation  and  coercion;  (4)  pursue  overwhelming  military 
advantage  to  make  a  variety  of  contingent  scenarios  credible;  (5)  isolate  Taiwan  from  the  international 
community; (6) a steady stream of positive and negative inducements for the United States in an effort to 
weaken  U.S.  resolve  to  support  Taiwan;  and    (7)  an  aggressive  perception  management  campaign  that 
supports all of the aforementioned elements of their strategy. 

          The PRC’s efforts in the area of perception management have grown increasingly sophisticated, 
but the core objectives have been remarkably consistent over time.  PRC leaders seek to paint China as the 
responsible party, offering a reasonable political solution (Beijing assures that Taiwan need only to agree 
to “One­China” for all other things to be possible), seek to de­legitimize and vilify Taiwan independence 
seekers (Chen Shui­bian was always described by the Chinese as a “trouble­maker” who could bring about 
war),  seek to place blame on outside parties who show any level of support for Taiwan (China describes 
U.S.  arms  sales  to  Taiwan  as  an  obstacle  to  cross­Strait  relations,  while  never  making  mention  of  their 
own  aggressive  build­up),  seek  to  dangle  the  promise  of  better  cooperation  with  other  parties  if  core 
interests are respected (e.g. North Korea and Iran cooperation), and seek to ensure China’s threat of war is 
credible (China refuses to renounce the use of force against Taiwan and has repeated the mantra “Taiwan 
Independence  means  war”  so  many  times,  that  even  former  Deputy  Secretary  of  State  Zoellick  urged 
members of Congress to understand during a hearing that “Taiwan Independence means war”). 

          This  overall  approach  from  Beijing’s  perspective  enables  an  ability  to  sustain  a  clear  and 
consistent  pursuit  of  their  vision.    Within  their  strategy,  Chinese  leaders  have  the  latitude  to  make 
pragmatic  decisions  on  economic  and  other  types  of  activities  with Taiwan, and can realize incremental 
progress in the overall relationship with Taipei.  However, since the democratization of Taiwan, China’s 
political  goals  may  actually  be  more  difficult  to  realize  in  the  absence  of  outright  coercion.    Sweeter 
carrots  and  harder  sticks  may  very  well  bring  closer  economic  ties  and  greater  people­to­people 
interaction, but support inside Taiwan for eventual unification continues to drop.  This phenomena is not 
simply  a  result  of  generational  change  on  Taiwan, it is a direct outcome of China’s policy choices.  But 
rather than re­cast her policy, at every juncture China seems to drive deeper into the cul­de­sac. 

          This  is  Beijing’s  conundrum.    With  Taiwan’s  robust  democracy,  the  possibility  of  Taiwanese 
independence  must  be  taken  seriously.    However,  that  which  is  necessary  on  China’s  part  to  prevent 
Taiwanese  independence  in  actuality  makes  political  reconciliation  and  unification  much  more  difficult. 
Unless China is willing to change its political objective (highly doubtful), Beijing’s options dwindle to a 
choice  between  having  unlimited  patience,  or  more  aggressive  isolation  and  coercion  of  Taiwan.    Since 
unlimited  patience  carries  some  risk  (Taiwan  could  slide  further  away  and  abandon  the  so­called  status 
quo),  the  isolation  and  coercion  tools  become  more  understandable.    This  starts  to  explain  why  Beijing 
reacted  so  negatively  to  new  U.S.  arms  sales  to  Taiwan  even  at  a  juncture  when  the  cross­Strait 
relationship  is  so  positive  –  they  understand  their  ultimate  political  objective  may  remain  out  of  reach
                                                     ­ 97 ­ 
unless they can effectively coerce Taiwan. 

          Current polling in Taiwan underscores China’s dilemma.  While it is true that a vast majority of 
people in Taiwan support the so­called status quo, this statistic belies other important trends.  When asked 
what  arrangement  people  would  support  for  Taiwan  in  the  absence  of  a  military  threat  from  China,  the 
numbers supporting independence have been steadily growing, and those supporting eventual unification 
have  been  dropping.    When  people  are  allowed  to  answer  “status  quo  now”  but  something  else  later, 
according  to  the  Mainland  Affairs  Council  in  Taiwan,  those  believing  that  independence  should  come 
after  the status quo in Taiwan is on the rise while those supporting unification after the status quo is on 
the  decline.   This particular trend has developed even during the Ma Administration, and even after the 
economic outreach from Beijing. 

          Some may take away a degree of confidence that these trends prove Taiwan will not rush into an 
ill­advised  political  reconciliation  with  China.    In  my  view,  however,  not  enough  analysts  are  paying 
attention to how these same trends may impact Beijing.  It is truly a dangerous mix when Beijing refuses 
to renounce the use of force, continues to gain military advantage in the Strait, and over time sees the true 
fiction  of  the  highly  questionable  narrative  they  had  once  embraced  –  that  supporters  of  Taiwanese 
independence were the simple by­product a few troublemakers in Taiwan – it may see no alternative but to 
seek a coerced outcome. 

          I do not mean this to sound alarmist or to suggest that conflict in the Taiwan Strait is inevitable. 
We  have  policy  choices  going  forward  that  can  promote  a more durable environment of peace, stability, 
security  and  prosperity.    And  while  I  recognize  that  mine  may  be  a  bit of a contrarian view, I do worry 
that  acceptance  of  faulty  analysis  regarding  the  real  challenges  in  the  cross­Strait  political  relationship 
going forward will lead the Administration to poor policy decisions.  Increasingly, respected people with 
significant  professional  stature  suggest  in  public  forums  that  our  approach  to  the  Strait  should be either 
laissez­faire given how well the two sides are progressing, or that we should actually pull back our level of 
support  for  Taiwan.  Many  advocates  of  the  latter  approach  hope  to  either  gain  Beijing’s  cooperation  in 
other  areas,  or  speed  along  the  inevitable  political  unification  process.    I  strongly  believe  that  a  general 
trend of weakening U.S. support for Taiwan will make a coerced outcome – to possibly include the use of 
violent force – more likely, not less likely. 

What is at Stake for the United States? 

          There  are  some  who  may  disagree  with  my  analysis  above,  and  I  welcome  debate  with  anyone 
who can disagree without being disagreeable.  But what I find quite troubling is that some U.S. Asianists 
may actually agree with my analysis, but might also be quite comfortable with the trajectory I’ve described 
above.    There  are  those  who  are  willing  to  see  Taiwan  sacrificed  in  the  hopes  that  greater  strategic 
cooperation can be forged with China.  I believe this latter camp undervalues Taiwan and the U.S.­Taiwan 
relationship.  I also believe they risk endorsing a false trade­off, and the promise of Chinese reciprocation 
for the U.S. abandonment of Taiwan would never materialize.  Ironically, such a course would equate to 
both bad Taiwan policy and bad China policy. 

           As Commissioner Blumenthal and I wrote in our co­authored report “Strengthening Freedom in 
Asia” in 2008, “the United States has an interest in a free, democratic, prosperous, and strong Taiwan.”  It 
is  a  large  trading  partner  of  the  United  States, and has proven to be a responsible stakeholder on global 
issues of concern such as climate change, counter­proliferation, humanitarian relief, and the promotion of 
democracy  and  human  rights.    Again  to  cite  our  2008  report,  “if  Taiwan  is  successfully  coerced  by  the 
PRC into a settlement against the wishes of the 23 million people of Taiwan, Washington would not only 
lose  a  valuable  international  partner,  but  its  interests  and  regional  position  would  also  suffer  a  severe 
blow…    A  coerced  settlement  against  the  wishes  of  the  Taiwanese  may  carry  even  greater  strategic 
significance  over  the  long  term.    Chinese  control  of  Taiwan  (and  presumably,  the  Taiwan  Strait)  could 
effectively  deny  the  United  States  and  its  allies  access  to  critical  sea  lanes  during  conflict.    Mainland
                                                       ­ 98 ­ 
control of Taiwan would also significantly extend the reach of the People’s Liberation Army in the Asia­ 
Pacific region.” 

           Naturally, the United States also has a strong interest in  a constructive relationship with China. 
Instability in the Taiwan Strait, and the resulting tension with China could adversely impact our interests. 
 But too often in the past when trouble arose, the United States chose to treat the symptom rather than the 
disease.  Perhaps there is a practical logic at play.  When facing tension in the Taiwan Strait, U.S. policy 
makers  often  chose  to  impress  upon  the  party  where  presumably  we  had  the  most  influence  –  in  other 
words, we pressured Taiwan to change their behavior or actions because we had greater chance of success 
than had we tried to alter China’s behavior.  But this type of action­reaction cycle only serves to obscure 
the  real  challenges  to  enduring  peace,  namely  China’s  profound  discomfort  with  democracy in  Taiwan, 
and her unwillingness to abandon a policy rooted in military coercion.   And laterally speaking, analysts 
would  be  hard  pressed  to  demonstrate  where  our  pressure on Taiwan ever resulted in enhanced Chinese 
cooperation in other areas (quite to the contrary – historically speaking, there is absolutely no correlation 
between U.S. policy toward Taiwan and Chinese decision making on Iran, North Korea, etc.) 

Policy Recommendations: 

          U.S.  interests  at  first  blush  may  appear  complex  due  to  the  perception  that  we  are  faced  with 
competing  interests  and  policy  trade­offs.    I  would  submit,  however,  those  are  perceptions  largely 
manufactured by Beijing who want us to believe such trade­offs are real.  The reality may actually be the 
counter­intuitive.  Given  the  fundamental  flaws  in  China’s  strategy  toward  Taiwan,  and  given  our 
interests in both avoiding conflict in the Strait, as well avoiding a potential coerced settlement, we are not 
on the optimal trajectory as popular opinion might have us believe.  I would advocate that we reorient our 
own policy objectives to more accurately address the long term challenges to peace, stability, security and 
prosperity in the Taiwan Strait. 

         As  an  overarching goal, the United States should be seeking to mitigate and/or remove the true 
obstacles  to  an  enduring  peace  in  the  Taiwan  Strait.    And  the  true  obstacle  to  peace  is  not  a  vibrant, 
flourishing  democracy  in  Taiwan  –  it is the Chinese refusal to renounce the use of force, and an overall 
Chinese approach that is leading all parties in the direction of a coerced settlement.  Specifically, I have 
six policy recommendations for the Obama Administration and the Congress: 

­­  The  United  States  should  resume  strong  calls  for  China  to  renounce  the  use  of  force  against  Taiwan, 
and  should  resume  strong  calls  for  China  to  pull  back  from  its  threatening  posture  opposite  Taiwan  in 
consequential ways.  Doing so would be an appropriate counter to growing Chinese assertiveness. 

­­  The  United  States’  military­to­military  relationship  with  China  should  be  scaled  back  until  China  is 
more  responsive  to  our  calls  for  constructive  steps  related  to  the  security  environment  in  the  Taiwan 
Strait.  After nearly 30 years of interaction, the U.S.­China military­to­military relationship has proven to 
be of very limited value to the United States.  Ironically, when Beijing’s leaders want to demonstrate pique 
over U.S. support for Taiwan, China pulls back from military to military exchanges.  In such cases in the 
future,  the  United  States  should  welcome  China’s  decision.    As  China  aggressively  pursues  military 
modernization and seeks a more professional force, choosing to limit interaction with the world’s greatest 
military will actually hurt China more than the United States. 

­­ The United States should take a series of steps to enhance the U.S.­Taiwan relationship.  Before the end 
of  2010,  the  United  States  should  send  a  U.S.  cabinet  secretary  to  Taiwan,  should  reach  agreement  on 
extending  Visa  Waiver  to  Taiwan,  and  should  conclude  an  extradition  agreement.    These  steps  would 
demonstrate  that  we  see  merit  in  a  U.S.­Taiwan  relationship  in  its  own  right,  breaking  free  from  the 
mindset that Taiwan is only important as a subset to broader U.S.­China relations. 

­­ The United States should pursue a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with Taiwan.  As the current political
                                                      ­ 99 ­ 
environment  in  Washington  may  not  be  favorable  to  any  new  FTA efforts, we should at a minimum re­ 
start a robust TIFA process to promote bilateral trade.  Such a step would not only support U.S. economic 
interests  and  strengthen  U.S.­Taiwan  ties,  it  would  also  help  Taiwan  to  have  a  valuable  hedge  against 
PRC economic influence in Taiwan. 

­­ The United States should support a robust security assistance program for Taiwan.  As a first step, the 
United  States  should  accept  a  “Letter  of  Request”  from  Taiwan  related  to  the  follow­on  F­16  purchase, 
and should ultimately approve the request for additional F­16s.  If Taiwan has greater defense capabilities, 
it will have greater confidence to proceed with constructive dialogue with Beijing. 

­­ The United States should promote Taiwan in international organizations and should to promote Taiwan 
as an important issue with our key Asian allies such as Japan and Australia.  Taking such measures may 
help counter China’s attempts to isolate Taiwan. 

              S TATEM ENT  O F  DR.   S H ELLEY  RIG G ER 
    B RO WN  PRO FES S O R  O F  PO LITICAL  S CIENCES ,   DAVIDS O N 
             CO LLEG E,   DAVIDS O N,   NO RTH   CARO LINA 

          DR.   RI GGE R:     I 'd   like  t o   echo   Mr .   S chr iver 's  t hanks  t o   t he  p anel 
fo r   including  us  and  fo r   co nvening  t his  meet ing   and ,   in  par t icu lar ,   fo r 
inclu d ing  me  o n  yo u r   d o ck et .     I 'm  ver y  happ y  t o   be  her e. 
          I   t hink  t hat   it 's  a  pr et t y  well­ est ablished  o bser vat io n  t hat   d o esn't 
r eally  bear   r epeat ing,   but   I 'll  r epeat   it   anyway,   t hat   t he  r elat io ns 
bet ween  T aiwan  and   mainland   China  ar e  mu ch  bet t er   t o d ay  t han  t hey 
have  been  o ver   t he  past   decad e  o r   so ,   and  in  so me  ways  o ne  might 
ar g ue,   ar e  bet t er   t han  t hey  have  ever   been  because  even  in  t he  er a  when 
u nificat io n,   speak ing   o f  mant r as,   was  t he  mant r a  o f  bo t h  sid es,   act ual 
act io n  t o war d   unificat io n,   act ually  co mmu nicat io n  bet ween  t he  t wo   sides 
and   r eal  meaning ful  co nt act s  wer e  co mplet ely  absent . 
          T o d ay  r eally  is  t he  fir st   t ime  t hat   we  have  seen  d eep  pr o g r ess  and 
o p p o r t unit ies  fo r   co llabo r at io n  and   co o per at io n  bet ween  t he  t wo   sides 
o n  bo t h  t he  eco no mic  fr o nt   and  t he  po lit ical  fr o nt .     T his  is  r eally  an 
u np r ecedent ed  mo ment ,   and  I   t hink   becau se  it   is  an  unpr ecedent ed 
mo ment ,   it   has  pr o vo k ed  a  lo t   o f  debat e  and  a  fair   amo unt   o f  r esist ance 
amo ng  t he  T aiwanese  p ublic. 
          Fo r  eight   year s,   du r ing  t he  Chen  S hui­ bian  ad minist r at io n,   t he 
p r imar y  dr iver   o f  T aiwanese  po lit ical  debat e  was  a  co nver sat io n  abo ut 
ho w  wise  o r   unwise  P r esident   Chen's  cr o ss­ S t r ait   po licies  wer e,   and  was 
he  t o o   pr o vo cat ive?    Was  he  t aking   T aiwan  in  a  r isk y  dir ect io n?    And 
t hat   debat e  r eally  escalat ed  in  P r esid ent   Chen's  seco nd   t er m  bet ween 
2 0 04   and  20 08. 
          Given  t he  amo unt   o f  at t ent io n  and   scr ut iny  t hat   T aiwanese  vo t er s 
and   T aiwanese  p ublics  had  g iven  t o   P r esident   Chen's  po licy,   t her e  was 
an  expect at io n,   and  no t   su r pr isingly  so ,   t hat   when  a  new  pr esid ent   came 
in  wit h  a  ver y  d iffer ent   ap pr o ach  t o   cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns,   t he  p ublic 
wo u ld   embr ace  t hat   new  appr o ach,   having  been  cr it ical  o f  t he  pr evio us 
o ne. 
          Bu t   what   we  fo und   is  t hat   t he  T aiwanese  pu blic  is  no t   par t icular ly
                                                   ­ 100 ­ 
ent hu siast ic  ­ ­  o r   cer t ainly  no t   sanguine  ­ ­  abo ut   t he  po ssibilit ies  fo r 
mischief  o r   t r o u ble  asso ciat ed  wit h  t he  Ma  Ying­ jeo u  administ r at io n's 
ap pr o ach.     T his  is  no t   t o   say  t hat   anybo dy  wo u ld  be  eag er   t o   go   back  t o 
t he  Chen  ad minist r at io n,   but  simply  t o   say  t hat   t her e  is  a  g r eat   d eal  o f 
anxiet y  amo ng  T aiwanese  abo u t   t he  fut ur e  dir ect io n  o f  t heir   r elat io nship 
wit h  mainland  China,   and  t her e  is  a  ver y  widespr ead  sense  t hat   t he  r ange 
o f  o p t io ns  fo r   T aiwan  ar e  ver y  nar r o w  so   t he  mo st   impo r t ant 
char act er ist ic  t hat   nat io nal  lead er ship   can  br ing  t o   T aiwan  is  t he  abilit y 
t o   navig at e  t hr o ug h  t his  ver y  nar r o w  channel  wit ho ut   d r ift ing  t o o   far   in 
eit her   dir ect io n  because,   at   bo t h  sid es,   t her e  ar e  ser io u s  p er ils  and 
d ang er s.
           Dur ing  t he  Chen  administ r at io n,   we  saw  a  lo t   o f  public  o pinio n 
p o lling ,   k ind  o f  nu d ging  t he  p r esident   back   t o war d   t he  cent er   o f  t he 
channel,   and  no w  we  see  public  o p inio n  po lling  lo o king   ver y  d iffer ent , 
which  I   t hink  is  r eally  t he  T aiwanese  po pulace  nudging  P r esident   Ma 
back   t o war d   t he  cent er   o f  t he  channel. 
           S o   I   t hink  t he  mo st   impo r t ant   message  we  can  d er ive  fr o m  t he 
p o lit ical  fer ment   wit hin  T aiwan  is  t hat   t her e  is  no   mandat e  fo r   r apid  o r 
r ad ical  act io n  fo r   T aiwan's  leader ship   in  t he  T aiwanese  public  o r  in  t he 
T aiwanese  elect o r at e. 
           Bu t  t her e  also   was  no   mand at e  fo r   r ad ical  o r   ext r eme  act io n  fo r 
t he  p r evio us  administ r at io n,  eit her .     S o   it   seems  t o   me  t hat   t he  effect   o f 
p u blic  o p inio n  in  d o mest ic  po lit ics,   t he  p r imar y  effect   o f  d o mest ic 
p o lit ics  o n  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns,   is  r eally  t o   r est r ain  all  T aiwan 
g o ver nment s  and  t o   slo w  t he  p ace  o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait   develo pment s  so   t hat 
t o d ay  we  find ,   even  o n  t he  eco no mic  fr o nt   wher e,   dur ing   t he  Chen 
ad minist r at io n,   t her e  was  t he  g r eat est   ent husiasm  fo r   r amping  u p  cr o ss­ 
S t r ait   co o per at io n  and   int egr at io n,   even  o n  t he  eco no mic  fr o nt ,   t her e's 
r ising   skep t icism  abo u t   whet her   o r   no t   T aiwan  sho uld  co nt inue  t he 
cu r r ent   t r aject o r y  o f  eco no mic  int egr at io n. 
           I   t hink  u lt imat ely,   t his  is  act ually  ver y  beneficial  t o   T aiwan.   I t 
ser ves  T aiwan's  int er est s  well  t o   have  t his  level  o f  skep t icism  and 
p o p u lar   r eluct ance  t o   embr ace  t he  p r esident 's  appr o ach  becau se  it   gives 
P r esident   Ma  a  ver y  cr edible  fo und at io n  o n  which  t o   ar gue  t o   his 
Chinese  co unt er p ar t s  t he  limit at io ns  o f  what   he  can  deliver   and   what   he 
can  yield . 
           T o   t he  ext ent   t o   which  p eo p le  in  mainland  China  may  have  go ne 
int o   t he  Ma  ad minist r at io n  wit h  t he  expect at io n  t hat   t hey  wo uld  ver y 
q u ickly  gain  t heir   hear t 's  d esir e,   t hat   expect at io n  has  been  subst ant ially 
r evised  wit h  so me  d isapp o int ment   but   also   a  co nsider able  amo unt   o f 
r ealism  o n  t he  p ar t   o f  P RC  lead er s  and  peo ple  in  China  who   ar e 
k no wledg eable  abo ut   t he  T aiwan  issue,   many  o f  who m  knew  t his  wo uld 
hap p en  befo r e  Ma  Ying ­ jeo u  was  ever   elect ed. 
           Bu t   t he  co nsequence  is  t hat   Ma  has  a  ver y  cr ed ible  case  t o   mak e 
in  d ealing  wit h  t he  mainland,   t hat   he  has  t o   t ake  it   slo w,   t hat   he  canno t 
d eliver   ver y  qu ickly,  especially  o n  t he  mo st   co nt r o ver sial  it em,   which  is
                                                 ­ 101 ­ 
t o   say  t he  po lit ical  element s  o f  what   Beijing   mig ht   ho p e  o r   expect   t he 
t wo   sides  co uld   engag e  o n. 
         Wit h  t hat ,   I 'll  yield   t he  r est   o f  my  t ime  t o  Dr .  Bush. 
         [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 

                Prep a red   S t at emen t   of  Dr.   S h elley  Ri gger 
 B rown   Pro fesso r  of  Poli t i cal  S ci en ces,   Davi d son   College,   Da vi d son , 
                                     No rt h   Ca roli n a 

Describe the current status of, and recent trends in, the Cross­Strait Relationship 

Relations between Taiwan and mainland China have warmed substantially since President Ma Ying­jeou 
assumed  office  in  May  2008.  The  tension  that  gripped  Taiwan  and  China  during  the  Chen  Shui­bian 
presidency  (2000­2008)  has  abated.  High­level  visits  have  become  routine,  with  the  heads  of  the  two 
sides’  quasi­official  negotiating  bodies,  (Chiang Pin­kung of Taiwan’s Straits Exchange Foundation and 
Chen  Yunlin  of  China’s  Association  for  Relations  Across  the  Taiwan  Straits)  exchanging  regular  visits 
and  engaging  in  substantive  negotiations  during  those  visits.  The  agreements  already  negotiated  and 
currently  under  negotiation  focus  on  economic  issues,  but  they  also  include  technical  matters  related  to 
cross­Strait  travel,  trade  and  investment.  A  comprehensive  trade  agreement,  which  Taipei  is  calling  an 
Economic  Cooperation  Framework  Agreement (ECFA) is under negotiation. Officials in Taipei say they 
expect it to be finalized this spring. 

What is your assessment of China’s recent diplomatic and economic initiatives toward Taiwan? Why has 
there been no parallel movement on the military front by Beijing? 

It appears the PRC government has determined President Ma is the most favorable interlocutor they can 
realistically  expect  to  find  in  Taiwan.  Although  resistance  within  Taiwan  has  made  for  a  slower­paced 
cross­Strait  rapprochement  than  many  observers  expected, Chinese leaders have tolerated the slow pace. 
For  example,  they fulminated against the U.S. for selling arms to Taiwan, but spared Taipei from direct 
criticism. Beijing has not allowed setbacks in the relationship, such as protests and failed agreements, to 
scuttle  the  talks.  The  PRC  even  has  made  limited  concessions  on  Taiwan’s  demand  for  international 
space.  It  has  joined  Taipei  in  the  tacit  “diplomatic  truce”  Ma  proposed  after  his  inauguration  (neither 
sides  has  established  diplomatic  ties  with  the  other’s  existing  diplomatic  partners)  and  in  2009,  Beijing 
withdrew its opposition to Taiwan’s efforts to secure observer status at the UN World Health Assembly. 

The  most  persuasive  interpretation  of  Beijing’s  actions,  in  my  view,  is  that  they  reflect  a  “hope  for  the 
best,  prepare  for  the  worst”  strategy.  That  is,  China  is  pursuing  better  relations  with  Taipei  on  the 
economic and diplomatic front, but it will not relax its military posture. Chinese leaders believe long­term 
trends are in their favor. They expect that increased economic integration and people­to­people contacts – 
when combined with the steady increase in mainland China’s global weight – will pull Taiwan toward the 
mainland.  However,  they  also  believe  there  is  a  small,  but  real,  chance  Taiwan  might  make  a  sharp 
gesture  toward  formal  independence.  China’s  military  posture  is  designed  to  deter  that  gesture.  If 
deterrence fails, it is designed to respond forcefully to Taiwan’s move. 
Other  interpretations  for  the  gap  between  China’s  economic/diplomatic  conduct  and  its  military  posture 
are less persuasive. The idea that the military posture is dictated by the People’s Liberation Army, and is 
in tension with the civilian leadership’s preference for carrots as opposed to sticks, overstates the degree 
of autonomy the PLA enjoys. Taiwan policy is one of the PRC’s very highest priorities; it is unlikely top 
leaders  would  permit  the  PLA  to  deviate  from  their  preferred  line.  For  that  reason  it is more likely that 
China’s threatening military posture is intended and approved at the very top. The argument that Beijing 
is using carrots to stall for time while it prepares for military action also is unpersuasive, because enticing 
Taiwan  to  move  closer  to  the  mainland  is  far  less  costly  than  unleashing  military  force.  The  military 
option is real, but it remains a last resort.
                                                     ­ 102 ­ 
What is your assessment of future trends in the cross­Strait relationship? Will it continue to improve, or 
has it reached a plateau? What unforeseen events could provide a setback to cross­Strait relations? 

At present there is very little overlap in the two sides’ long­term visions. Beijing is committed to a form of 
unification  in  which  Taiwan  is  absorbed  into  the  People’s  Republic  of  China  –  albeit  with  a  very  high 
degree of local autonomy. The democratically­elected government in Taipei is accountable to a public that 
is united in its determination to remain politically independent of the PRC. Taiwan’s public is willing to 
accept  compromises  on  symbolic  issues,  such  as  the  island’s  nomenclature,  but  there  is  no  support  for 
folding Taiwan (or the Republic of China) into the PRC. 

Given these visions’ irreconcilability, the key to successfully managing cross­Strait relations is to draw out 
the process long enough that those visions can be reconciled. Prolonging the process will require the two 
sides  to  find  issues  that  can  be  negotiated;  some  observers  have  begun  to  wonder  whether  the  supply  of 
such issues might be dwindling. I would argue that it is not. Even after all the outstanding economic and 
technical issues are resolved (and there are many), there will be opportunities to negotiate and implement 
military  confidence  building  mechanisms.  Beyond  confidence  building  lies  a  peace  accord  (something 
both sides agreed was desirable back in 2005). Each of these steps can take a very long time. So long as 
both  sides  are  content  to  let  the  process  take  its  course,  they  will  provide  ample  fodder  for  protracted 
negotiations. 

The  quality  of  relations  may  be  at  something  of  a  plateau,  but  I  would  argue  that  reflects  more  the  big 
improvement  over  the  Chen  era  than  a  slowing  of  the  warming  trend  under  President  Ma.  Moreover, 
Taiwan  leaders’  confidence  that  they  will  sign  an  ECFA  in  the  next  few  months  suggests  that  on 
substantive issues, if not in the atmospherics, progress continues. 

Unforeseen  events  that  could  provide  a  setback  would  include  a  military  or  serious  civilian  accident 
involving  actors  from  the  two  sides.  A  sudden  increase  in  the  hostility  directed  at  Taiwan  from  Beijing 
would  provoke  a  retrenchment  in  Taiwan’s  position.  (It  also  would  hurt  President  Ma  and  his  party 
politically, raising the likelihood that the DPP would win the 2012 presidential election. That would put 
the  Sino­skeptical  DPP  back  in  charge  of  mainland  policy –  something  Beijing  would  prefer  to  avoid.) 
Such  an  event  could  be  caused  by  a  surge  in  nationalist  activism  in  the  mainland,  either  domestically­ 
generated  or  in  response  to  actions  in  Taiwan  or  the  U.S.  Because  it  prefers  to  avoid  this  outcome,  the 
PRC government has been at pains to “accentuate the positive” in interpreting cross­Strait developments 
for its citizens. 

Do you feel that greater cross­Strait economic integration will led to increased political integration? 

There is no necessary relationship between economic and political integration; if there were, Ottawa and 
Washington  would  have  set  aside  their  differences  and  reunified  British  North  America  long  ago.  Of 
course, Taiwan and mainland China shared a vision of unification more recently, so the analogy may be 
faulty, but Taiwanese support for unification is negligible today. Economic interactions have reduced the 
level of tension, in part by creating large constituencies on both sides that derive direct benefits from good 
relations. That is especially important in Taiwan, which at one time looked like it might be an obstacle to 
peaceful relations. However, reducing tension is not the same thing as increasing political integration. A 
shift  toward  political  integration  is  not  inconceivable  in  the  long  run,  but  it  is  hard  to  map  a  route  to 
political integration that reaches that destination in the next decade. 

Can  the  Chinese  Communist  Party  continue  to  live  with  de  facto  independence  for  Taiwan  as  long  as 
economic integration progresses? 

On the Taiwanese side, if Taipei were to make a strong gesture toward de jure independence, its de facto 
independence  might  become  intolerable  to  Beijing.  On  the  PRC  side,  domestic  politics  in  the  mainland
                                                      ­ 103 ­ 
could develop in such a way that the CCP would be forced to sacrifice Taiwan to preserve its own power. 
The  most  likely  scenario  of  that  kind  would  be  a  strong  surge  in  nationalistic  sentiment  sparked  by 
setbacks  in  other  areas,  such  as  a  loss  of  international  prestige  or  a  major  economic  failure.  Neither  of 
these  are  necessary  developments,  which  suggests  the  CCP  can  continue  to  live  with  Taiwan’s  de  facto 
independence. 

Another relevant factor here is China’s increasing comprehensive national power. The PRC’s economic, 
political and military power is growing rapidly, and other nations are recognizing its rise. The sense that 
China has “come into its own” could prompt a debate in the PRC over whether it is necessary to continue 
tolerating Taiwan’s de facto independence. The outcome of such a debate is hard to predict, as there are 
strong  voices  that  would  argue precipitous action would be unnecessary and costly – and might even set 
back  China’s  rise.  Chinese  leaders’  statements  to  this  week’s  National  People’s  Congress  meetings 
stressed  China’s  domestic  challenges  –  including  corruption,  inequality  and  economic  instability.  I  see 
little evidence that the Chinese leadership is prepared today to risk its domestic stability and international 
stature in order to force a change in the Taiwan Strait status quo. 

In  your  opinion,  how  willing  is  Taiwan’s  domestic  audience  to  accept  greater  political  and  economic 
integration with China? 

Taiwanese are eager to reap the benefits of economic integration, but they are deeply skeptical of political 
integration.  Even  the  level  of  political  rapprochement  already  achieved  makes  many  Taiwanese 
uncomfortable.  Their  anxiety  is  evident  in  their  receptivity  to  criticism  of  President  Ma  and  his  cross­ 
Strait  policy.  It  is  easy  for  Ma’s  political  opponents  to  activate  citizens’  distrust  of  Ma  and  his party by 
claiming they are insufficiently alert against PRC threats. 

Most  importantly,  Taiwanese  do  not  currently  perceive  a  need  to  sacrifice  their  preference  for  political 
separation  to  achieve  economic  benefits.  Since  1987,  Taiwanese  have  enjoyed  ever­growing  economic 
cooperation  and  engagement  with  the  mainland,  while  surrendering  little  of  their  political  autonomy. 
They have made sacrifices, to be sure. In the early 1990s, there was serious talk about how Taiwan might 
win  formal  independence.  Today,  Taiwanese  rarely  talk  of  de  jure  independence;  when  they  do,  the 
possibility  is  often set in the context of a hypothetical statement like, “if the CCP loses power” or “were 
China  to  implode...”  But  changing  the  name  of  the  country  (one  of  the  few  events  Taiwanese  would 
recognize  as  “changing  the  status  quo”)  has  never  been  a  high  priority  for  a  majority  of  Taiwanese. 
Preserving  Taiwan’s  de  facto  political  independence  is  the  most  important  goal,  and  I  do  not  perceive 
much change on that dimension. 

Many Taiwanese found President Chen Shui­bian’s policies unnecessarily provocative, but they have not 
thrown  their  unconditional  support  to  President  Ma.  Over  the  course  of  his  two  years  in  office,  citizen 
confidence,  as  measured  in  polls,  has  been  consistently  low  for  a  number  of  reasons.  The  lack  of 
transparency  in  decision­making has been a particular concern. Politicians in the main opposition party, 
the  Democratic  Progressive  Party  (DPP)  argue  that  the  government’s  cross­Strait  decision­making  – 
including  on  the  proposed  Economic  Cooperation  Framework  Agreement  (ECFA)  –  is  dangerously 
opaque. They charge that the negotiators may fail to secure Taiwan’s interests. To protect Taiwan, Ma’s 
critics  are  demanding  ECFA  be  subjected  to  formal  ratification,  either  by  popular  referendum  or  in  the 
legislature.  Legislative  speaker  Wang  Jin­pyng,  a  KMT  member, has said the legislature might overrule 
the  ECFA  deal  if  it  does  not  meet  lawmakers’  standards.  As  President  Ma  chairs  the  KMT,  the  weak 
support for his policies in the KMT reinforces the sense that he lacks a firm hand – exactly what he needs 
to  deal  effectively  with  the  ever­tough  negotiators  from  Beijing.  Declining  confidence  in  the  Ma 
government  also  reflects  the  public’s  sense  that  his  administration  has  not  responded  well  to  domestic 
concerns, including typhoon Morakot, H1N1 vaccine and U.S. beef imports. 

In  short,  Taiwan’s  domestic  political  environment  would  not  welcome  a  shift  toward  “political 
integration.”
                                                      ­ 104 ­ 
How do recent cross­Strait political developments impact U.S.­Taiwan relations? 

The  warming  trend  in  cross­Strait  relations  reduces  the  threat  of  a  sudden,  violent  rupture  that  would 
require U.S. action. This is a highly positive development for the U.S. 

How  might  greater  cross­Strait  political  and  economic  integration  affect  U.S.  national  interests  in  the 
region? 

Improving  relations  between Taiwan and the mainland benefit both economies. To the extent that stable 
economic  growth serves U.S. interests, cross­Strait economic ties serve U.S. interests. Because economic 
integration  is  not  likely  to  produce  political  integration  – much less unification  – in the near future, the 
U.S. is unlikely to find itself facing a radical shift in its relationships in the region. In other words, U.S. 
interests still are threatened far more by the absence of good cross­Strait economic and political ties than 
by their presence. 

What  role  should  the  United  States  play  in  the  U.S.­Taiwan­China  triangular  relationship  in  light  of 
recent developments between Taiwan and the Mainland? 

The U.S. should continue to reassure Taiwan that it will help Taipei resist Beijing’s pressure to accept a 
political  deal  with  that  would  erase  Taiwan’s  democracy.  Pressing  for  a  particular  outcome  is  likely  to 
backfire,  not  only  in  the  mainland,  but  on  Taiwan  as  well.  It  is  not the U.S.’s job to push the two sides 
together or to drive a wedge between them. The most useful course of action for the U.S. is to help Taiwan 
remain  strong  and  confident  to  resist  Beijing’s  pressure  without  appearing  to  be  pulling  Taiwan  away 
from  the  mainland.  That  is  a  tricky  balance,  but  acting  consistently,  in  line  with  decades­old  practices, 
minimizes the room for misunderstanding in Beijing and Taipei. 

Altering U.S. policy would be risky. In Beijing, some policy changes could be viewed as an opportunity to 
exploit  U.S.  weakness  or  lack  of  resolve,  while  others  could be seen as attacks on China’s core national 
interests. In Taipei, even small adjustments in how U.S. policy is communicated provoke storms of debate; 
an actual policy shift would be profoundly destabilizing and confusing; a retreat from the traditional levels 
and types of support the U.S. has provided would be dangerously demoralizing. 

Is  there  a  logical  disconnect  between  Taipei  moving  to  improve  economic  and  political  relations  with 
Beijing while continuing to press for arms purchases from the United States? 

The United States and Taiwan have long shared the position that without robust military defenses, Taipei 
will  lack  the  confidence  to  negotiate  with  Beijing.  For  that  reason,  improving  economic  and  political 
relations across the Strait not only is consistent with continued arms sales, but depends on continued arms 
sales.  In  addition,  a  sharp  change  in  the  military  balance  in  the  Strait  would  destabilize  the  region. 
Instability is not conducive to better relations; on the contrary, it is likely to prompt Taiwan to recoil from 
interactions with the mainland. 

All sides need to bear in mind the dangers posed by a sudden deterioration in Taiwan’s political position. 
There is a broad consensus among Taiwanese that the status quo is acceptable, but there is no consensus 
about what else would be acceptable. If the PRC (or the U.S.) were to demand or impose a change in the 
status quo, Taiwan’s domestic situation would become chaotic, with heavy economic losses. The economic 
troubles  would  spill  over  into  the  PRC,  especially  its  high  tech  sector.  Taiwanese  are  not only the main 
foreign  investors  in  that  sector;  they  also  divide  their  production  between  the  PRC  and  Taiwan.  A 
disruption  in  the  Taiwanese  supply  of  high  tech  components  to  assembly  plants  in  the  mainland  would 
have  a  large  impact  on  PRC  exports  –  and  on  the  global  supply  and  price  of  high tech goods. This is a 
concrete example of how excessive pressure from Beijing – even short of military force – could backfire, 
with global consequences.
                                                     ­ 105 ­ 
Concluding Thoughts 

When President Ma Ying­jeou took office, a grand experiment began. His cross­Strait policy differs from 
any  previous  policy  –  it  is  not  Chen  Shui­bian’s  policy  of  minimizing  compromise  while  fortifying 
Taiwanese for resistance, nor is it the policy followed by Chen’s predecessor, President Lee Teng­hui. 
The  stakes  for  this  experiment  are  high.  President  Chen’s  policy  did  not  strike  a  sustainable  balance 
between enhancing economic interactions and avoiding political interactions. Instead, economic ties raced 
ahead  of  technical  agreements,  leaving  Taiwanese  over­exposed  in  the  mainland  and  exacerbating  the 
asymmetry  between  the  two  sides.  Overall,  Taiwan’s  options  were  narrower  at  the  end  of  the  Chen 
administration  than  at  the  beginning.  Chen’s  approach  also  undermined  Taiwan’s  relations  with  the 
United  States.  The  lesson  of  the  Chen  years  was  that  Taiwan  needed  a  different  policy  direction.  Ma’s 
approach  represents  that  new  direction.  The risk is that if Ma’s approach does not succeed, it is unclear 
what  new  policy  Taiwan  might  adopt.  Although  the  DPP  opposes  Ma’s  policy,  it  has  not  articulated  a 
concrete alternative for the future. 
The  popular  reaction  to  the  “grand  experiment”  has  been  skeptical,  which  has  slowed  the  pace  of 
implementation.  Overall,  the  experiment  seems  to  be  having  modest  success.  Economic  ties  are  bearing 
fruit  (Taiwan’s  economy  is  recovering  relatively  quickly  from  the  global  recession),  and  China  is  not 
pressing Taiwan very hard politically. Still, Beijing shows no sign of giving in on its core demands, it has 
not reduced its military threat, and it has made aspects of the Taiwan issue (especially arms sales) a focus 
of  nationalist  discourse  aimed  at  domestic  audiences.  In  sum,  the  atmosphere  in  the  Strait  is  far  better 
than it was three years ago, but the fundamental source of conflict – the two sides’ contradictory goals – 
remains unresolved. 

            S TATEM ENT  O F  DR.   RICH ARD  C.   B US H ,   III 
      DIRECTO R,   CENTER  FO R  NO RTH EAS T  AS IAN  PO LICY 
  S TUDIES ,   TH E  B RO O K ING S   INS TITUTIO N,   WAS H ING TO N,   DC 

          DR.   BUS H:     Chair man  Mullo y,   Co mmissio ner s,   t hank  yo u  ver y 
mu ch  fo r   having  me  t o d ay.     T hank  yo u  fo r   d o ing  t his  hear ing . 
Clar ifying   t he  t r aject o r y  o f  China­ T aiwan  r elat io ns  is  o ne  o f  t he  mo st 
p r essing  analyt ical  challenges  facing   t he  t wo   co unt r ies  co ncer ned  and 
t he  Unit ed   S t at es. 
          Let   me  sp eak  t o   t he  t o pics  t hat   t he  st aff  p r o po sed.     Fir st   o f  all,   o n 
t he  back gr o und  o f  r ecent   event s,   fr o m  t he  ear ly  199 0s  t ill  20 08,   a 
co r r o sive  po lit ical  dynamic  came  t o   do minat e  po lit ical  r elat io ns  bet ween 
T aiwan  and  China  in  sp it e  o f  co mplement ar y  eco no mic  r elat io ns.     E ach 
sid e  fear ed  t hat   t he  o t her   was  pr epar ing  t o   challenge  it s  fundament al 
int er est s.     E ach  side  t o o k   st ep s,   milit ar y  o r   p o lit ical,   t o   defend   t ho se 
int er est s  which  o nly  int ensified  t he  spir al  o f  mut ual  fear . 
          T he  cr o ss­ S t r ait   sit uat io n  impr o ved  mar k edly  aft er   t he  elect io n  o f 
P r esident   Ma  Ying ­ jeo u.     Ma's  belief  t hat   T aiwan  co uld   bet t er   assur e  it s 
p r o sper it y,   dig nit y  and  secur it y  by  engaging  and  r eassur ing  China  r at her 
t han  pr o vo k ing   it   beg an  t he  pr o cess  o f  r ever sing  t he  pr evio us  negat ive 
sp ir al. 
          No w  o n  t he  nat ur e  o f  t he  cur r ent   p r o cess,   analyt ically,   I   t hink 
what   we'r e  seeing   can  yield  t wo   pr incipal  o ut co mes.     One  is  t he 
st abilizat io n  o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns,   mo ving   fr o m  t he  co nflict ed 
co exist ence  t hat   we  saw  pr io r   t o   20 08   t o   a  mo r e  r elaxed  co exist ence.
                                                  ­ 106 ­ 
T he  o t her   is  r eso lut io n  o f  t he  fundament al  d isput e  bet ween  t he  t wo 
sid es,   what   we  call  u nificat io n. 
          I n  and   o f  it self,   st abilizat io n  d o es  no t   lead  t o   r eso lu t io n.     P o lit ical 
int eg r at io n  is  no t   t he  inevit able  r esult   o f  eco no mic  int egr at io n. 
P r esident   Ma  has  been  explicit   t hat   unificat io n  will  no t   be  discu ssed 
d u r ing   his  t er m  o f  o ffice.     T he  Chinese  lead er ship  act ually  ap pear s  t o 
u nd er st and,   co r r ect ly,   t hat   r eso lut io n  is  a  lo ng­ t er m  p r o po sit io n. 
          Cer t ainly  st abilizat io n  can  cr eat e  a  bet t er   climat e  fo r   r eso lut io n. 
I t   can  also   evo lve  incr ement ally  in  t hat   dir ect io n,   eit her   t hr o u gh  bet t er 
mu t u al  u nder st and ing  o r   because  o ne  sid e  kno wingly  o r   unkno wingly 
mak es  co ncessio ns  t o   t he  o t her . 
          No w,   o n  China's  init iat ives.     S ince  2005  and  in  co nt r ast   t o   past 
p er io d s,   China's  ap pr o ach  t o   T aiwan  has  been  so mewhat   mo r e  sk illful. 
P r esident   Hu  Jint ao   shift ed   t he  near ­ t er m  pr io r it y  fr o m  achieving 
u nificat io n  t o   o pp o sing  T aiwan  indep end ence. 
          T he  Beijing  leader ship  r eco gnizes  t he  impo r t ance  o f  build ing 
mu t u al  t r u st   t hr o ug h  d ialo gue  and  exchanges.     I t   is  emphasizing  what 
t he  t wo   sides  have  in  co mmo n  r at her   t han  what   d ivides  t hem. 
          I t   is  t r ying   t o   bu ild  up  supp o r t   fo r   a  P RC­ fr iendly  p ublic  o n 
T aiwan.     I t   sees  t he  value  o f  inst it ut io nalizing  a  mo r e  st able  cr o ss­ S t r ait 
r elat io nship . 
          T he  main  and   wo r r iso me  except io n  t o   t his  t r end  is  t he  P eo ple's 
Liber at io n  Ar my's  co nt inuing  acq uisit io n  o f  capabilit ies  t hat   d eg r ade 
T aiwan's  secu r it y.     Why  t his  bu ild ­ up  co nt inues  in  spit e  o f  t he  d ecline  in 
t ensio ns  is  pu zzling.     I 'm  inclined  t o   believe  t hat   it   r eflect s  bo t h  issues 
in  civil­ milit ar y  r elat io ns  and  t he  P RC's  d esir e  fo r   a  su fficient   co er cive 
capabilit y  t o   bo t h  det er   T aiwan  ind ependence  and  per haps  t o   co mp el 
T aiwan  t o   nego t iat e  o n  it s  t er ms,   and  we  sho uld  r ecall  Beijing   has 
miscalculat ed  befo r e.     I t   can  miscalculat e  again. 
          Wher e  d o   cur r ent   t r ends  lead?    I   can't   r ule  o ut   t he  p o ssibilit y  t hat 
g r adu ally  and  o ver   t ime  t he  T aiwan  p ublic  and   lead er s  will  decide  t hat 
T aiwan  sho uld   beco me  a  S pecial  Administ r at ive  Regio n  o f  t he  P RC,   but 
I   d o u bt   it .  T her e  is  st ill  a  br o ad   co nsensus  t hat   t he  Rep ublic  o f  China 
o n  T aiwan  is  a  so ver eign  st at e,   a  p o sit io n  t hat   is  inco nsist ent   wit h 
China's  unificat io n  fo r mula. 
          T he  mo r e  likely  fut ur e,   I   t hink,   is  a  cr eat io n  and  co nso lidat io n  o f 
a  st abilized   o r der ,   o ne  in  which  eco no mic  int er dep end ence  deepens, 
so cial  and  cu lt u r al  int er act io n  g r o ws,   co mpet it io n  in  t he  int er nat io nal 
co mmunit y  is  mut ed ,   and   all  t hese  ar r angement s  will  be 
inst it u t io nalized,   but   no ne  o f  t his  is  aut o mat ic. 
          T he  so ver eignt y  issu e  and  China's  gr o wing  milit ar y  p o wer   co uld 
co mp licat e  st abilizat io n.     Dr .   Rig ger   has  emp hasized  t he  anxiet ies  o f  t he 
T aiwan  public,   and  if  t he  DP P   wer e  t o   co me  back   t o   po wer ,   China  might 
misr ead   it s  int ent io ns  and  abo r t   st abilizat io n.     Ho w  will  t he  T aiwan 
p u blic  r esp o nd  t o   all  o f  t his? 
          S o   far   po lls  sug gest   t hat   t he  T aiwan  public  su ppo r t s  co nt inu ed
                                                  ­ 107 ­ 
eco no mic  int eg r at io n  but   no t   po lit ical  int egr at io n.     A  subst ant ial 
majo r it y  favo r s  keeping  t he  st at u s  qu o   fo r   t he  fo r eseeable  fu t u r e.     I f 
Beijing  wer e  t o   p u sh  p o lit ical  t alk s  befo r e  t he  public  was  r ead y,   t her e 
wo u ld   likely  be  a  backlash. 
           No w,   I   believe  t hat   T aiwan  will  be  mo r e  likely  t o   suppo r t 
eco no mic  int egr at io n  and  per haps  mo dest   p o lit ical  int egr at io n  if  it   has  a 
sense  o f  self­ co nfid ence.     Cr eat ing  t hat   self­ co nfidence  will  r equir e  self­ 
st r eng t hening   in  t he  eco no mic,   milit ar y  and  po lit ical  ar eas.     Do ing   so 
will  also   det er   P RC  mischief. 
           Can  Beijing   live  wit h  t he  st at us  quo ?    I n  Chinese  pr ess 
co mment ar y,   we  so met imes  see  o pinio ns  t hat   eco no mic  int egr at io n  will 
lead   t o   a  fair ly  quick   p o lit ical  r eco nciliat io n  and  o n  Beijing's  t er ms. 
China's  leader s,   I   t hink,   ar e  mo r e  r ealist ic  and  mo r e  pat ient .     Alt ho ugh 
u nificat io n  do es  r emain  t heir   g o al,   t hey  k no w  t his  will  o ccur   aft er   a 
p r o t r act ed  and  co mp lex  pr o cess.     What   is  impo r t ant   fo r   Beijing  in  t he 
sho r t   and   mediu m­ t er m  is  t hat   no t hing   happ ens  t o   put   t heir   go al  o u t   o f 
r each. 
           What   abo u t   t he  U. S .   view?    Befo r e  2008,   t he  Unit ed  S t at es 
wo r r ied  t hat   t he  t wo   sides  might   inadver t ent ly  slip   int o   a  co nflict 
t hr o u gh  accident   o r   miscalcu lat io n,   and  so   enco ur ag ed  bo t h  sid es  t o 
sho w  r est r aint .     S ince  Ma's  elect io n,   Washingt o n  has  welco med  his 
ap pr o ach  t o   cr o ss­ S t r ait   r elat io ns. 
           Clear ly,   if  t her e  wer e  a  mo vement   fr o m  eco no mic  int egr at io n  t o 
p o lit ical  int egr at io n,   t her e  wo uld  be  implicat io ns  fo r   t he  Unit ed  S t at es. 
One  co ncer ns  t he  U. S .   geo po lit ical  p o sit io n  in  E ast   Asia.     T hat ,   o f 
co u r se,   d epend s  o n  t he  t er ms  o f  u nificat io n  and,   sp ecifically,   whet her 
t he  P LA  Navy  and  Air   Fo r ce  co uld   o per at e  fr o m  T aiwan. 
           Bu t   I   believe  t hat   po lit ical  int egr at io n  wit h  all  it s  at t endant   issues 
is  no t   even  o n  t he  ho r izo n.     U. S .   int er est s  might   also   be  affect ed  by  t he 
p r o cess  o f  st abilizat io n.     T her e's  been  init ial  t alk  abo u t   t he  t wo   sides 
co nclud ing  a  peace  acco r d.   I f  t hey  t r y,   I   exp ect   Beijing  is  likely  t o   place 
U. S .   ar ms  sales  o n  t he  ag enda.     Bu t   I   d o n't   believe  t hat   a  peace  acco r d 
is  lik ely  in  t he  near   t er m. 
           Right   no w  t he  main  secur it y  issue  is  t he  P LA's  co nt inu ed  build ­ u p 
o f  cap abilit ies  r elevant   t o   T aiwan  and  t he  pr o per   U. S .   r espo nse  is 
co nt inu ed  ar m  sales. 
           Ano t her   ar ea  in  which  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  can  co mplement   what 
T aiwan  is  do ing  vis­ à­ vis  t he  P RC  is  in  t he  ar ea  o f  eco no mics  and  t r ad e, 
and   I   agr ee  wit h  Randy  S chr iver 's  r eco mmendat io ns  her e. 
           I n  co nclusio n,   T aiwan's  impr o ving  r elat io ns  wit h  China  sho uld  no t 
be  r egar d ed   as  an  inexo r able  and  ir r ever sible  mo vement   t hr o u g h 
eco no mic  int egr at io n,   po lit ical  r eco nciliat io n  and  u nificat io n.     Neit her 
Beijing  no r   T aipei  sees  it   t hat   way,   and   t her e  ar e  r eal  br akes  o n  t he 
p r o cess­ ­ t he  inher ent   d ifficu lt y  o f  so me  o f  t he  issu es  at   play,   t he 
caut io n  o f  T aiwan's  leader s,   and  T aiwan's  demo cr at ic  syst em. 
           T hank  yo u  ver y  much.
                                                   ­ 108 ­ 
       [ T he  st at ement   fo llo ws: ] 

              Prep a red   S t a t emen t   o f  Dr.   Ri ch ard   C.   B u sh ,   III 
Di rect or,   Cen t er  fo r  Nort h east   Asi an   Poli cy  S t u d i es,   Th e  B rooki n gs 
                           In st i t u t i on ,   Wa sh i n g t o n ,   DC 

Clarifying the trajectory of China­Taiwan relations is one of the more pressing analytical 
challenges facing the two parties concerned and the United States. The hope is that the 
outcome can be beneficial for all parties concerned, and certainly for the people of 
Taiwan. The worry is that trends will work against one or more of the parties and create a 
suboptimal situation. 

The Recent Past 

To clarify the present and the future, it is important to understand the trajectory of cross­ 
Strait relations in the recent past. From the early 1990s until 2008, a corrosive political 
dynamic came to dominate political relations between Taiwan and China, dashing the faint 
hopes in the early 1990s of a political reconciliation after decades of hostility. All this 
happened in spite of their complementary economic relations. 

This process was complex, but the result was obvious: deepening mutual suspicion 
between Taiwan and China. Each feared that the other was preparing to challenge its 
fundamental interests. China, whose goal is to convince Taiwan to unify on the same terms 
as Hong Kong, feared that Taiwan’s leaders were going to take some action that would 
have the effect of frustrating that goal and permanently separate Taiwan from China – the 
functional equivalent of a declaration of independence. Beijing increased its military power 
to deter such an eventuality. Taiwan feared that China wished to use its military power 
and other means to intimidate it into submission to the point that it would give up what it 
claims as its sovereign character. Taiwan’s deepening fears led it to strengthen and assert 
its sense of sovereignty. 

Certainly, there was misunderstanding at work here. I have long believed, for example, 
that Beijing incorrectly read former Taiwan President Lee Teng­hui’s opposition to its 
one­county, two­systems formula as a rejection of unification all together. Certainly, 
domestic politics was at play, particularly in Taiwan’s lively democratic system. The 2008 
Taiwan election was a case in point. But politics is a force in China as well. 
Misperceptions and politics thus aggravated the vicious circle of mutual fear and mutual 
defense mechanisms – military on the Chinese side and political on the Taiwan side. 

The United States came to play a special role in this deteriorating situation. It did not take 
sides, as each side preferred. Rather, Washington’s main goal has always been the 
preservation of peace and security in the Taiwan Strait. First the Clinton Administration 
and then the George W. Bush Administration worried that the two sides might 
inadvertently slip into a conflict through accident or miscalculation (in which case, 
Washington would, unhappily, have to choose sides). So each administration employed the 
approach of “dual deterrence.” Each warned Beijing not to use force against Taiwan, even
                                          ­ 109 ­ 
as it offered reassurance that it did not support Taiwan independence. Each warned Taipei 
not to take political actions that might provoke China to use force, even as it conveyed 
reassurance that they would not sell out Taiwan’s interests for the sake of the China 
relationship. In this way, Washington sought to lower the probability of any conflict. 

The 2008 Transition 

The situation improved markedly after the election of Ma Ying­jeou, the leader of the more conservative 
Nationalist party, or Kuomintang (KMT). This created the possibility of reversing the previous negative 
spiral. Ma campaigned on the idea that Taiwan could better assure its prosperity, dignity, and security by 
engaging and reassuring China rather than provoking it. Since Ma took office in May 2008, the two sides 
have undertaken a systematic effort to stabilize their relations and reduce the level of mutual fear. They 
have made significant progress on the economic side, removing obstacles and facilitating broader 
cooperation. There has been less progress on the political and security side, but this is partly by design. 
Beijing and Taipei understand that the necessary mutual trust and consensus on key conceptual issues is 
lacking, so the two sides have chosen to work from easy issues to hard ones and defer discussion of 
sensitive issues. 

The Nature of the Current Process 

What is the trajectory of the current process? Conceptually, there are at least two possibilities. On the one 
hand, and more consequential, what we are watching might reflect movement toward the resolution of the 
fundamental dispute between the two sides. One type of resolution would be unification according to the 
PRC’s one­county, two­systems formula, but there are others. On the other hand, what we are seeing could 
be the stabilization of cross­Strait relations. That term implies several things: increasing two­way contact, 
reducing mutual fear, increasing mutual trust and predictability, expanding areas of cooperation, 
institutionalizing interaction, and so on. It constitutes a shift from the conflicted coexistence of the 1995­ 
2008 period to a more relaxed coexistence. Examples of this process at work are the array of economic 
agreements that the two sides have concluded, removing obstacles to closer interchange; China’s approval 
for Taiwan to attend the 2009 meeting of the World Health Assembly; and the two sides’ tacit agreement 
that neither will steal the other’s diplomatic partners. 

In and of itself, stabilization does not lead ineluctably to a resolution of the China­Taiwan dispute— 
however much Beijing prefers inevitability and however much some in Taiwan fear it. President Ma has 
been quite explicit that unification will not be discussed during his term of office, whether that is four or 
eight years. The Chinese leadership at least realizes that the current situation is better than the previous 
one and understands that resolution will be a long­term process. 

Certainly, however, stabilization can create a better climate for resolution. It’s easier to address the tough 
conceptual issues that are at the heart of this dispute in an environment of greater mutual trust. But I don’t 
see that happening anytime soon. Stabilization can also evolve very incrementally toward resolution, 
either through better mutual understanding or because one side, knowingly or unknowingly, makes 
concessions to the other. How stabilization might migrate to resolution brings me to the Commission’s 
questions. 

China’s Initiatives 

Since 2005, and in contrast to past periods, China’s approach to Taiwan has been rather skillful. President 
Hu Jintao shifted the priority from achieving unification in the near or medium term to opposing Taiwan 
independence (unification remains the long­term goal). Although he speaks about the need for the two 
sides to “scrupulously abide by the one­China principle,” he has been prepared, for the sake of achieving 
substantive progress, to tolerate so far the Ma administration’s quite ambiguous approach to that issue.

                                                 ­ 110 ­ 
The Beijing leadership recognizes the importance of building mutual trust through dialogue and 
exchanges after a decade­plus of mutual fear. It is emphasizing what the two sides have in common— 
economic cooperation and Chinese culture—and agreed to reduce somewhat the zero­sum competition in 
the international arena. Through its policies and interactions, it is trying to build up support for a PRC­ 
friendly public on Taiwan. It sees the value of institutionalizing a more stable cross­Strait relationship. 

The exception to this trend is the continuation of the People’s Liberation Army’s acquisition of 
capabilities that are relevant to a Taiwan contingency. Why this build­up continues, in spite of the decline 
in tensions since President Ma took office, is puzzling. After all, Ma’s policies reduce significantly what 
Beijing regarded as a serious national security problem. China is more secure today than two years ago, 
yet it continues to make Taiwan more vulnerable. Possible explanations are rigid procurement schedules; 
the inability of civilian leaders to impose a change even when it makes policy sense; and a decision to fill 
out its capacity to coerce and intimidate Taiwan, in case a future Taiwan government challenges China’s 
fundamental interests. The answer is not clear. I am inclined to believe that it is a combination of the 
second and third reasons. 

What is clear is that this trend is in no one's interests – Taiwan's, China's or the United States'. Taiwan's 
leaders are unlikely to negotiate seriously on the issues on Beijing's agenda under a darkening cloud of 
possible coercion and intimidation. The Taiwanese people will not continue to support pro­engagement 
leaders if they conclude that this policy has made Taiwan less secure. The U.S. will not benefit if mutual 
fear again pervades the Taiwan Strait. 

Where do Current Trends Lead? 

To be honest, I do not know. I cannot rule out the possibility that gradually and over time the Taiwan 
public and political leaders will abandon decades of opposition to one­country, two systems and choose to 
let Taiwan become a special administrative region of the PRC. But I doubt it. Despite the consciousness 
on the island of China’s growing power and leverage, there is still a broad consensus that the Republic of 
China (or Taiwan) is a sovereign state, a position that is inconsistent with China’s formula. Moreover, 
because of the provisions of the ROC constitution, fundamental change of the sort that Beijing wants 
would require constitutional amendments and therefore a broad and strong political consensus, which 
does not exist at this time. 

So if political integration is to occur in the next couple of decades, it will occur not because of the 
cumulative impact of economic integration but because Beijing has decided to make Taiwan an offer that 
is better than one­country, two systems. So far, I see no sign it will do so. 

The more likely future is the continued creation and consolidation of a stabilized order, one in which 
economic interdependence deepens, social and cultural interaction grows, competition in the international 
community is muted, and all these arrangements will be institutionalized to one degree or another. But 
none of this will be automatic. Issues relevant to the resolution of the dispute (e.g. whether Taiwan is a 
sovereign entity) may come up in the process of stabilization and dealt with in ways that do not hurt either 
side’s interests And the issue of China’s growing military power—and what it reflects about PLA 
intentions—remains. 

How Will the Taiwan Public Respond? 

Clearly, as long as the Taiwan government wishes to pursue something like the current policies, it will 
have to maintain political support for its continuation in power. How the public views its cross­Strait 
policies are one key factor. So far, polls suggest that the public supports continued economic integration 
but not political integration. A substantial majority favors keeping the status quo for the foreseeable 
future. Because swing voters are a substantial block of public opinion, views of the government’s 
performance can be fairly volatile.
                                                 ­ 111 ­ 
If Beijing were to push for advances in political relations and the Taiwan government chose to go along 
before the public was prepared, there would likely be a backlash. Beijing appears to understand that 
(Taipei certainly does), and I hope that China will see the value of improving its image on Taiwan by 
initiatives that increase Taiwan’s sense of security and its international dignity. These should not be 
regarded as favors but as steps to maintain the current momentum, which is in Beijing’s interest. If China 
is, for example, too grudging in the run­up to the 2012 elections, there is the chance that Taiwan voters 
will punish Ma and his party because their promise of benefits from engagement would not be realized. 

The Taiwan public will be more likely to support economic, and possibly modest political integration, if it 
has a sense of self­confidence. Creating that will require self­strengthening in a few key areas.

    ·    It must continue to enhance its economic competitiveness. Interdependence with the Mainland is 
         one way. The Economic Cooperation Framework Agreement (ECFA) on which the two sides are 
         working is another way because it will enhance interdependence. But economic liberalization 
         with others is also necessary, including the United States. And Taiwan should undertake 
         domestic economic reforms to facilitate the transition to a knowledge­based and service­based 
         economy.
    ·    Taiwan also needs to strengthen itself militarily. If, as is possible, China intends to complete the 
         creation of a robust capability to coerce Taiwan, then the island’s armed forces need the ability to 
         raise the costs of coercion and so ensure some degree of deterrence. The United States certainly 
         has a role to play in improving Taiwan’s deterrent.
    ·    Finally, Taiwan needs to strengthen its democratic system. Some key institutions, such as the 
         legislature and the mass media, could serve the public better. Unfortunately, they reinforce a 
         regrettable polarization that began ten years ago. A centrist foundation to politics, in which the 
         two major parties cooperate on pressing tasks, is what the Taiwan people deserve. The growing 
         pragmatism in public opinion, which Dr. Rigger has so ably documented, suggests that the public 
         would welcome more constructive politics. 

Can Beijing Live with the Status­Quo? 

There is no question that China has different expectations for cross­Strait relations than does Taiwan. In 
Chinese press commentary, writers regularly express the belief that economic integration will lead to a 
fairly quick political reconciliation. Last summer, there was a very interesting poll in which people on 
each side were asked what was likely to happen over the long term. Sixty percent of Taiwan respondents 
believed that the status quo would persist. Sixty­four percent of PRC respondents said that the two sides 
would become one nation. So, Taiwan people prefer stabilization, while Mainland people expect to see 
resolution on Beijing’s terms. 

When it comes to the Chinese leadership, however, I detect a different calculus. They certainly seek 
unification as the ultimate outcome, and they give no hint of any deviation from one­country, two­systems. 
On the other hand, there is an appreciation that this is a protracted and complex process. What is 
important in the short and medium term is that nothing happens to negate the possibility that the PRC 
goal will be achieved. As long as the door to unification remains open, patience is possible. It is when 
Beijing sees that door closing that it becomes anxious and a bit reckless. Thus, the growing emphasis 
before 2008 on preventing Taiwan independence. If the danger of Taiwan independence is low, the 
leadership can wait for political integration. 

What Is the United States View of Recent Developments? 

First the Bush Administration and now the Obama Administration have welcomed the change that 
President Ma’s approach has brought to cross­Strait relations. Recall that in the late 1990s and early 
2000s, Washington was worried that the situation of mutual fear might lead either or both sides to
                                                ­ 112 ­ 
miscalculate, leading to a conflict that would likely involve the United States. As the chances of such a 
scenario decline and Beijing and Taipei take more responsibility for the peace and stability of their 
neighborhood, the United States has one less problem to worry about. It does not need to engage in dual 
deterrence. For similar reasons, the stabilization of cross­Strait relations, if it occurs, would also benefit 
the United States. 

Clearly, if the situation evolved from stabilization to an attempt to resolve the fundamental Taiwan­China 
dispute, and if there was movement from economic integration to political integration, there would be 
implications for the United States. 

Some of these potential consequences are strategic in nature. Would unification, on whatever terms, 
undercut the U.S. geopolitical position in East Asia by facilitating PLA Navy operations in the Western 
Pacific and limiting freedom of navigation for the U.S. and Japanese navies? It is impossible to tell, 
because we cannot know what the terms of that unification might be. If the PLA were to have no presence 
on Taiwan, as is sometimes suggested, the consequences for the United States might be limited. But I 
believe that political integration, with all its attendant issues, is not even on the horizon. The two 
governments are not yet ready, conceptually, to address the key issues (Taiwan’s sovereignty, for 
example), and Taiwan’s public is not ready. 

Even in the task of stabilizing the cross­Strait order, U.S. interests might be affected. There has been 
initial talk about the two sides’ concluding a peace accord. President Ma has long since signaled that such 
an effort would have to be accompanied by changes in PLA capabilities and/or deployments, particularly 
of ballistic missiles. If Beijing agreed, then it would likely try to place on the agenda the advanced systems 
that the island acquires from the United States and the American security commitment. 

Again, I don’t believe that negotiations on a peace accord are likely in the near term. The two sides will 
have enough problems negotiating an economic accord, much less a peace accord. And right now, the 
main security issue is the PLA’s continued build­up of capabilities relevant to Taiwan. The proper U.S. 
response to China’s continued build­up is to increase Taiwan’s capabilities. We should, of course, be 
guided by how the island's civilian and military leaders assess their security needs. But if China increases 
the island's vulnerability even when President Ma’s policies have removed its need to do so, then the 
United States, at the request of Taiwan, should seek to reduce the island's insecurity. It is China’s actions, 
therefore, that create the disconnect between economic and security relations. 

Another area in which the United States can complement what Taiwan is doing vis­à­vis the PRC is in the 
area of economics and trade. As Taiwan liberalizes its economic relations with China, it has an interest in 
pursuing liberalization with other trading partners. Hopefully, the conclusion of ECFA will open the door 
to liberalization with the countries of ASEAN. But the United States should be involved as well. The 
Administration should resume our economic talks with Taiwan under the Trade and Investment 
Framework Agreement. It should not hold those talks hostage to single issues like market access for small 
amounts of American beef. 


Taiwan’s improving relations with China should not be regarded as an inexorable and irreversible 
movement through economic integration, political reconciliation, and unification. Neither Beijing nor 
Taipei sees it that way. And there are real brakes on the process. One is the inherent difficulty of some of 
the issues at play, particularly in the security area. Another is the caution of Taiwan’s leaders when it 
comes to those sensitive issues. And finally, there is Taiwan’s democratic system, despite its problems. 
Taiwan’s legislature will have some say on ECFA, and the island’s voters will have the opportunity to 
judge the performance of President Ma and his party in municipal elections this December, and in the 
legislative and presidential elections of early 2012. Any fundamental change in Taiwan’s relationship 
with the PRC will require a broad political consensus.


                                                  ­ 113 ­ 
                 PANEL  V:     Di scu ssi on ,   Q u est i o n s  an d   An swers 

           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:                             T hank   yo u   all  fo r   yo ur 
t ho u ght fu l  t est imo ny. 
           Co mmissio ner   Blu ment hal  will  st ar t ,   and  it 's  go ing  t o   be  five­ 
minu t e  r o unds  o f  qu est io ning  by  t he  Co mmissio ner s. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     T hank  yo u  ver y  much  fo r 
yo u r   t est imo ny.     I t   was  all  ver y  go o d   and  ver y  insight ful. 
           I   ask ed  a  q u est io n  o f  t he  ad minist r at io n  ear lier   t o day,   which  I   was 
t r ying   t o   lo o k  fo r   t he  r ight   analo gy,   and  I   asked  my  Cat ho lic  fr iend  her e 
if  t his  is  t he  r ight   analo g y.     I t   was  like  int r o du cing  so met hing  new  int o 
t he  encyclical  o r   so met hing   like  t hat ,   but   t he  r eact io n  cer t ainly  felt   like 
I   was  int r o d ucing   so me  k ind  o f  majo r   t heo lo gical  change  o r   so met hing , 
but   t he  basic  quest io n  was  t his: 
           T he  t est imo ny  was­ ­ which  is  sensible  and  t her e's  an  always  if  t hat 
was  t he  case­ ­ is  t hat   o ur   basic  po licy  is  o ne  o f  peaceful  r eso lut io n  o f 
t he  co nflict   bet ween  T aiwan  and   China;  we'r e  agno st ic  abo ut   t he 
o u t co me  as  lo ng  as  it 's  peaceful.     But   t hen  he  added  bu t   we  do n't 
su pp o r t   ind ep end ence,   and   I   can  und er st and   why  we  wo uld  say  we  do n't 
su pp o r t   independence,   we  d o n't   want   war   and  so   fo r t h,   and   t hat 's 
sensible. 
           Bu t   ho w  can  yo u   be  bo t h  agno st ic  o n  peaceful  r eso lu t io n  and  have 
a  st at ed  po licy  o f  no t   supp o r t ing  indep end ence?    What   if  t he  t wo   sid es, 
lik e  so   many  o t her   co u nt r ies  have  do ne  in  t he  wo r ld ,   ar e  a 
co mmo nwealt h  o f  Anglo   st at es  and  so   fo r t h?    What   if  t he  t wo   sides 
neg o t iat ed   a  peaceful  ind ep endence,   wo uld   we  t hen  no t   supp o r t   a 
p eaceful  ind ep endence?    I   mean  d o esn't   saying  t hat   befo r ehand  pr eclu de 
o p t io ns  and  give  u s  less  d iplo mat ic  flexibilit y  in  t he  fut ur e? 
           I   give  t hat   t o   ever ybo dy. 
           DR.   BUS H:     I   t hink  t hat   if  t he  t wo   sides  nego t iat ed   an 
ind ep endence  deal  fo r   T aiwan,   o f  co ur se,   we  wo u ld  accept   it   and 
su pp o r t   it .     I   t hink   we  ju st   have  a  ver y  r ealist ic  assessment   o f  what   t his 
P RC  g o ver nment   is  pr ep ar ed   t o   t o ler at e. 
           I   t hink  when  we  say  we  d o n't   suppo r t   indep endence,   it 's  a 
p ar t icu lar   k ind   o f  independence  t hat   we  ar e  no t   sup po r t ing,   but   it 's 
r eally  a  neut r al  p o sit io n.     I   t hink  t he  mo r e  pr ecise  way  o f  saying  it   is 
what   Rand y  S chr iver   pr o bably  sugg est ed  P r esident   Bush  say,   t hat   we 
o p p o se  any  u nilat er al  change  in  t he  st at us  quo . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     Okay.     T hey  wer e  q uit e 
ad amant   abo ut   saying   we  do   no t   sup po r t   ind ependence,   and  t his  was 
also ­ ­ it 's  been  puzzling   me  since  I   ser ved   in  go ver nment   because  we 
u sed   t o   have  peo ple  who   almo st   say  t hey  o p po se  ind ep endence,   which 
t hen  we'r e  in  a  p o sit io n  o f,   well,   what   if  t hey  bo t h  agr ee  t o   it ,   ar e  we 
o p p o sed? 
           MR.   S CHRI VE R:     My  po licy  p r efer ence  wo uld  be  t hat   we  suppo r t 
p eaceful  r eso lut io n,   fu ll  st o p .     I f  yo u   t alk  abo ut   o pp o sing   unilat er al
                                                    ­ 114 ­ 
chang es  t o   t he  st at u s  qu o ,   t hen  yo u  co uldn't   o ppo se  a  nego t iat ed 
ind ep endence.     I   appr eciat e  t he  co mment   t hat   we'r e  being  r ealist ic  abo ut 
what   Beijing   can  t o ler at e,   but   we'r e  being  assur ed  t hat   unificat io n  isn't 
o n  t he  t able  eit her ,   yet ,   we'r e  no t   g o ing  o u t   o f  o ur   way  t o   say  we  do   no t 
su pp o r t   u nificat io n. 
          S o   I   t hink  if  yo u'r e  go ing  t o   have  a  po licy  t hat   is  essent ially 
ag no st ic  o n  t he  o ut co me,   and   is  mo st ly  abo ut   pr o cess,   t hat   it   be 
p eaceful,   independence  sho u ldn't   necessar ily  be  t aken  o ff  t he  t able 
because  alt ho u gh  it   may  be  in  t he  cat ego r y  "ver y  unlikely, "  it 's  no t 
imp o ssible.     As  yo u  say,   t her e  ar e  hist o r ic  examples  o f  sides  nego t iat ing 
ver y  d ifficu lt   t hing s. 
          S o   I   guess  my  o t her  co ncer n,   no t   t o   go   o n  t o o   lo ng,   but   I   t hink 
t her e  is  a  sense  t hat   Beijing   t hr o ugh  pr essu r e  and  t heir   o wn  r het o r ic  has 
t he  abilit y  t o   maneu ver   peo ple  even  fur t her   alo ng  t he  line  t hat   t hey 
p r efer . 
          I   t hink  in  t he  Bush  administ r at io n,   we  saw  a  mo vement   fr o m  d o 
no t   su pp o r t   t o   o ppo se  ind ep endence,   and   maybe  t hat   was  t he  po lit ical 
co nd it io ns  at   t he  t ime,   but   again  I   t hink  st ick ing  t o   t he  essent ial 
p eaceful  r eso lut io n,   which  in  my  mind   d o es  keep  a  fo r m  o f  independence 
o n  t he  t able,   wo uld  be  my  p o licy  p r efer ence. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  BLUME NT HAL:     Anyt hing   t o   ad d  t o   t hat ? 
          DR.   RI GGE R:     No t   t o   add. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u. 
          Mr .   S chr iver ,   in  yo ur   wr it t en  submissio n,   yo u  r eco mmend  t hat   t he 
Unit ed   S t at es  milit ar y­ t o ­ milit ar y  r elat io nship  wit h  China  sho uld   be 
scaled   back   unt il  China  is  mo r e  r espo nsive  t o   o u r   calls  fo r   co nst r uct ive 
st ep s  in  t he  secu r it y  r elat io nship   in  t he  T aiwan  S t r ait s. 
          Given  t he  r est r ict io ns  in  milit ar y­ t o ­ milit ar y  co nt act s  in  t he  200 0 
Defense  Aut ho r izat io n  Act ,   and  fu r t her   limit at io ns  in  t he  2 010   Defense 
Au t ho r izat io n  Act ,   what   wo u ld   yo u  fu r t her   scale  back? 
          MR.   S CHRI VE R:     Well,   I 'll  answer   t hat   quest io n,   but   let   me  also 
ad d  co nt ext .     I   t hink   t her e's  a  playbo o k   t hat   we'r e  all  familiar   wit h, 
when  t he  Chinese  want   t o   sho w  t heir   piqu e  o ver   T aiwan  ar ms  sales,   t hey 
immed iat ely  r each  fo r   t he  mil­ t o ­ mil  and  cur b  t hat . 
          I   t hink   r at her   t han  wr ing  o ur   hand s  and   beco me  t he  ar dent   suit o r , 
we  sho uld   say  o kay,   t her e's  a  lo t   o f  t hings  t hat   t he  Unit ed  S t at es  d o esn't 
d o   well,   we  have  o u r   flaws,   we  have  o ur   deficiencies,   but   we  st ill  have 
t he  g r eat est   milit ar y  in  t he  wo r ld.     I f  yo u  have  asp ir at io ns  t o   be  a 
mo der n  g r eat   milit ar y,   and  yo u 'r e  cho o sing   no t   t o   int er act   wit h  us,   t hat 
is  at   yo ur   p er il  and  is  co unt er pr o duct ive  t o   yo ur   u lt imat e  go als. 
          Co mmissio ner   Wo r t zel  and  I   bo t h  have  had  invo lvement   wit h  t he 
mil­ t o ­ mil  r elat io nship .     I   t hink   t her e  ar e  aspect s  t hat   ar e  valuable.     I 
wo u ld   p o int   mo st ly  t o   senio r   level  d ialo gue  because  I   t hink   t her e  is 
wher e  yo u  get   at   p er cept io ns  and  wher e  yo u  get   at   int ent io ns. 
          I   t hink  t he  int er act io ns  bet ween  milit ar y  fo r ces  ar e  o ft en  o ne­ 
sid ed,   and  t hat   can  be  chipped   away  at   and  wo r ked   o ut   o ver   t ime,   but
                                                 ­ 115 ­ 
linking  t hat   back  t o   t he  t o pic  o f  t o day,   t he  P RC  po st u r e  o pp o sit e 
T aiwan,   I   t hink   it 's  so mewhat   inap pr o pr iat e,   given  t his  po lit ical 
envir o nment   bet ween  t he  t wo   sides  o f  t he  S t r ait ,   t hat   t he  buildup 
co nt inu es,   t he  p o st ur e  is  as  aggr essive  as  ever ,   and  we've  do ne  no t hing 
o u r selves  t o   sho w  disp leasu r e  o ver   t hat . 
           DR.   BUS H:     I   t hink  t he  o t her   piece  o f  t his  is  t hat   what   t he 
sit u at io n  r eally  r eq uir es  is  t he  P RC  sid e  be  willing  o f  eng age  in  ser io us 
d ialo g ue  abo ut   t hese  issu es  wit h  T aiwan  and  find  ways  t hr o ugh  t hat 
p r o cess  t o   mak e  T aiwan  feel  mo r e  secu r e. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Let   me  get   r eally  specific,   if  I 
co u ld ,   because  yo u've  been  invo lved  in  t hese  t hings  as  I   have. 
           Wo u ld   yo u   t ell  t he  P acific  Co mmand  and  t he  milit ar y  ser vices  t o 
st o p   engagement ?  T hey  d o ,   ever y  year   t hey  sit   do wn  and   figur e  o ut 
t heir   engagement   p lans  and  ho w  many  ser geant s  t hey'r e  go ing  t o   t r y  t o 
g et   t o   China,   and  ho w  many  majo r s.     Wo u ld   yo u  cu t   t hat   back   and  ju st 
st o p   act ing   as  t ho ugh  we  t hr ive  o n  t hese  co nt act s? 
           MR.   S CHRI VE R:     Yes.     I   t hink  t hat   wo uld  be  t he  app r o pr iat e 
t hing   t o   do .  Again,   my  analyt ical  fr amewo r k  her e  is  what   is  t he 
p r o blem,   t he  o bst acle,   t he  challenge,   and   I   t hink   it 's  t he  P RC  r efusal  t o 
r eno u nce  t he  use  o f  fo r ce  and  t he  aggr essive  build ­ up. 
           S o   I   t hink   t her e's  a  var iet y  o f  ways  we  can  addr ess  t hat ,   and  o ne 
o f  t hem  sho uld   be  t hr o u g h  t he  mo dalit ies  o f  ho w  we  engage  t heir 
milit ar y.
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     T hank  yo u  ver y  much. 
           Co mmissio ner   Wessel. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     T hank   yo u,   gent lemen,   ma'am,   and 
Dr .   Bu sh,   go o d  t o   see  yo u  again.     We  had  many  int er act io ns,   I   guess  is 
p r o bably  t he  best   way  t o   pu t   it ,   o ver   many  year s  o n  issues  r elat ed  t o 
Asia  p o licy. 
           I   ask ed  a  qu est io n  o f  t he  p r evio us  panel  o n  eco no mics  r elat ing  t o 
so me  p o licy  challeng es  t hat   ar e  go ing  t o   co me  up,   pr imar ily  bet ween  t he 
U. S .   and   China,   but   fr o m  a  p o lit ical  p er spect ive,   I   was  ho ping  t o   get 
so me  gu idance  and  insight s. 
           We  have  a  number   o f  eco no mic  p o licies  t hat   ar e  co ming  t o   a  head 
o r   mo ving  fo r war d.     One  is  t he  T r ans­ P acific  P ar t ner ship,   T P P .     T he 
o t her   is  t he  upco ming   po t ent ial  fo r   t he  U. S .   t o   name  China  as  a  cur r ency 
manip ulat o r . 
           Vis­ à­ vis  T aiwan,   and  t he  imp act   o f  t ho se  po licies,   can  yo u  give 
me  what   yo u   t hink   t he  p o lit ical  impact   wo u ld  be?    Fo r   examp le,   T P P , 
so me  believe  is  an  effo r t   t o   eco no mically  iso lat e  China  o r   t o   enhance 
U. S .   p r esence  in  t he  r egio n.  Vis­ à­ vis  T aiwan,   ho w  might   t hat   affect 
t hem  since  t hey  wo n't   be  in  t he  T P P   at   t he  beginning? 
           And   fr o m  t he  cu r r ency  issue,   if  we  have  a  blo wup   o ver   cur r ency, 
ho w  d o   T aiwan's  int er est s  g et   affect ed  po sit ively  o r   negat ively?    P lease, 
all  t he  panelist s,   and   Dr .   Bush  fir st . 
           DR.   BUS H:     S ince  yo u'r e  lo o k ing   at   me,   I 'll  g ive  it   a  sho t .     I   t hink
                                                   ­ 116 ­ 
bo t h  o f  t hese  issu es  sho uld  be  lo o k ed  at   in  t he  co nt ext   o f  t he  nat ur e  o f 
t he  eco no mic  act ivit y  t hat   g o es  o n,   and  t hat   is  t hat   T aiwan  is  in  t he 
mid d le.     I t 's  t he  mid dle  link  in  a  glo bal  su pply  chain,   and  so   anyt hing 
t hat   r at t les  t hat   chain  may  well  have  a  p o lit ical  o r   eco no mic  imp act   o n 
t hem.     T hat ,  I   t hink,  wo uld   be  t he  main  co ncer n,   t hat   T P P   might   diver t 
t r ad e  away  fr o m  t hem,   and   t hat   a  big   fight   bet ween  t he  Unit ed   S t at es 
and   China,   if  t hat   is  what   wo uld  happen  fr o m  o ur   naming  t hem,   might 
co mp licat e  t heir   eco no mic  r elat io ns  wit h  bo t h  o f  u s.     But  t hat   is  pur e 
sp ecu lat io n  o n  my  par t . 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     As  far   as  yo u  o r   any  o f  t he  o t her 
p anelist s  kno w,   in  t he  T P P ,   has  T aiwan  st at ed  any  int er est ,   po sit ive  o r 
neg at ive,   so   far ? 
          DR.   BUS H:  Gener ally  t hey  wo uld  lik e  t o   do   fr ee  t r ade  ar ea  lik e­ ­ 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:  I   und er st and,   yes. 
          DR.   BUS H:  ­ ­ ar r angement s  wit h  u s.   I   t hink  t hat   t he  g o ver nment 
has  made  t he  judg ment   t hat   do ing   E CFA  fir st   may  o pen  t he  do o r s  t o 
d o ing  similar   ar r angement s  wit h  S o ut heast   Asia  and  o t her   par t ner s.     I 
ho pe  t hat   wo r k s.     I t   r emains  t o   be  seen. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     Dr .   Rigger . 
          DR.   RI GGE R:     I t 's  a  t r uism  in  T aiwan,   and  I   t hink  ver y  widely 
accep t ed,   t hat   when  r elat io ns  bet ween  t he  U. S .   and  China  ar e  bad , 
T aiwan  suffer s,   and  I   had   a  co nver sat io n  last   mo nt h  act u ally  wit h  an 
emp lo yee  o f  t he  DP P   Headqu ar t er s,   and  I   r aised   t hat   issue.     I  asked,  d o 
yo u   st ill  feel  t hat   way?    And   she  said   o h,   yes,   definit ely.  When  t hings 
heat   u p  in  t he  Beijing ­ Washingt o n  r elat io nship,   t hings  heat   up  fo r 
T aiwan  as  well. 
          S o   fr o m  a  po lit ical  st andpo int ,   I   t hink  t hat   when  t he  U. S .   and 
China  ar e  t o o   clo se  o r   seem  t o   be  appr o aching   a  mo ment   wher e  t hey 
mig ht   be  t alking  abo u t   T aiwan  in  a  pr ivat e  co nver sat io n  in  which  T aiwan 
is  no t   a  par t icip ant ,  t hat 's  no t   co mfo r t able  eit her . 
          Bu t ,   China  and   t he  U. S .   ar guing  in  t he  hallway  d o esn't   make  t he 
T aiwanese  hu ddling  in  t heir   bed r o o m  feel  any  bet t er   eit her .     S o   t hat 's 
o ne  p iece. 
          T he  o t her   p iece  is  t he  eco no mic  element ,   and   her e  I   wo u ld   ver y 
mu ch  ag r ee  wit h  Richar d ,   t hat   T aiwan's  eco no mic  int er est s  ar e  so 
ent wined   at   t his  po int ,   no t   o nly  in  China's  eco no mic  int er est s  bu t   also   in 
t he  eco no mic  r elat io nship   bet ween  China  and  it s  p r imar y  expo r t 
mar k et s,   t hat   an  int er r u pt io n  in  U. S . ­ China  eco no mic  co o per at io n  is  also 
d amaging  t o   T aiwan. 
          T her e  ar e  many  ways  in  which  T aiwan's  eco no mic  int er est s  in 
China  ar e  fung ible  and  flexible,   and   t he  r elat io nship   is  cer t ainly  no t   a 
o ne­ way  r elat io nship  in  which  China  g ains  all  t he  advant ag e  o r   all  t he 
lever age.     I   t hink   it 's  ver y  much  a  t wo ­ way  r elat io nship   o f  gr eat   value  t o 
t he  P RC  as  well  as  t o   T aiwan. 
          Bu t   it 's  no t   easy  fo r   T aiwanese  businesses  t o   pick  up  and   mo ve  o r 
t o   change  t he  mix  in  t heir   o wn  business  p r o cess  r ap idly.     S o   I   t hink  bo t h
                                                   ­ 117 ­ 
as  a  p o lit ical  mat t er   and  as  an  eco no mic  mat t er ,   det er io r at ing  r elat io ns 
bet ween  t he  U. S .   and   China  wo uld  no t   be  welco me  in  T aiwan  and 
wo u ld n't   ser ve  T aiwan's  int er est s. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     Mr .   S chr iver . 
           MR.   S CHRI VE R:     I 've  always  kind   o f  t ho ught   t he  Go ldilo cks 
p r inciple  app lies:   t hey  do n't   want   r elat io ns  t o o   bad  o r   r elat io ns  t o o 
g o o d   bet ween  t he  Unit ed   S t at es  and   China;  t hey  want   it   so r t   o f  ju st 
r ig ht .     And  I   t hink   t hat ,   even  wit h  t he  chang e  o f  go ver nment ,   I   t hink 
t hat 's  st ill  so r t   o f  a  fu nd ament al  po int   o f  view. 
           On  T P P ,   just   t o   add   t o   what   I   t hink  wer e  ver y  g o o d  co mment s,   I 
t hink   t her e's  a  br o ad er   p o lit ical  issue  at   st ake  her e.     T her e's  a  lo t   o f  t alk 
abo u t   t he  Unit ed  S t at es  being  back  in  Asia  and   being  invo lved   again, 
and   I   t hink  t his  ad minist r at io n  deser ves  cr edit   fo r   sho wing  u p  t o 
meet ings  again  and  being  a  par t icip ant   in  a  lo t   o f  t he  r eg io nal  affair s, 
but   I   d o n't   t hink   yo u 'r e  t r u ly  back  in  Asia  wit ho ut   a  t r ade  po licy. 
           And   t r ade  p o licy/ co mmer ce,   t hat 's  t he  life  blo o d   o f  Asia  so   I   t hink 
t his  is  t he  g ame  in  t o wn.   T his  is  what   t he  ad minist r at io n  finds 
accep t able,   I   gu ess,   given  t he  po lit ical  envir o nment ,   as  t hey  r ead  it   her e 
in  Washingt o n,   and  so   t his  is  what   is  d r awing  us  int o   what   is  a  ver y 
d ynamic  g ame  in  Asia. 
           We  may  no t   be  int er est ed  in  fr ee  t r ad e,   but   ever ybo dy  else  in  Asia 
is,   and   we'r e  no t   in  t he  game  wit ho ut   t his,   wit ho ut   t his  play.     S o   I   t hink 
fr o m  T aiwan's  p er spect ive,   pu t   t he  eco no mic  issues  aside,   t hey  see 
t ensio n  in  t he  U. S . ­ Japan  alliance,   t hey  see  a  favo r able  go ver nment   in 
S eo u l,   bu t   o ne  t hat   we'r e  no t   being  as  r esp o nsive  t o   as  t hey  wo uld  lik e. 
  T his  is  po t ent ially  o ne  o f  t he  key  p illar s  t o   br ing  us  back   int o   t he 
r eg io n  in  a  co nsequent ial  way. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  WE S S E L:     T hank  yo u. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   Fied ler . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     A  co uple  o f  quest io ns.  Chinese 
lead er ship  chang e  is  u pco ming.   Any  ant icipat ed   effect   o r   ar e  we  g o ing 
t o   have  a  seamless  t r ansit io n  in  T aiwan  p o licy  fr o m  t he  next   cr o wd ? 
           DR.   BUS H:     I 've  spent   my  who le  car eer   ho ping  fo r   a  bet t er  next 
g ener at io n  o f  lead er s. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Yes,   and  we'r e  bo t h  g et t ing  a  lit t le 
g r ay. 
           DR.   BUS H:     And  I   t hink  it 's  impr o ving   so mewhat .     T her e  is  no 
way  t o   k no w  what   t he  next   gr o u p  will  do   wit h  r esp ect   t o   T aiwan.     My 
bet   wo uld   be  o n  co nt inu it y  as  lo ng  as  t hey  feel  t hat   t he  do o r   is  no t 
shu t t ing  o n  t heir   go als  and   t hat   t hey'r e  making  pr o gr ess. 
           One  t hing  t hat   co ncer ns  me  is  civil­ milit ar y  r elat io ns  because  t his 
next   leader ship  will  be  t he  t hir d  o ne  t hat   do esn't   have  milit ar y 
exp er ience,   and  so   I   t hink   t hat   cr eat es  gr eat er   aut o no my  fo r   t he  P LA  t o 
so r t   o f  shape  t he  co ur se  o f  nat io nal  secur it y  po licy,   and  t hat   is­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Bo t her so me. 
           DR.   BUS H:  ­ ­ no t   necessar ily  go o d  fo r   T aiwan,   no t   go o d  fo r   u s.
                                                     ­ 118 ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Anybo d y? 
           DR.   RI GGE R:     Just   a  small  po int .     One  t hing  t hat   has  cer t ainly 
chang ed  o ver   t he  last   15   year s  o r   so   is  t he  q ualit y  o f  t he  info r mat io n 
abo u t   T aiwan  t hat 's  available  t o   Chinese  leader s.     We  used  t o   say  t hat 
t hey  r eally  d idn't   under st and  T aiwan,   t hat   so meo ne  was  giving  t hem  t he 
p o lls  fr o m  t he  GI O  Web  sit e,   but   ho w  co uld  t hey  int er pr et   t hem? 
           Bu t   we  k no w  no w  t hr o ugh  co nver sat io ns  wit h  P RC  scho lar s  and  at 
P RC  t hink   t anks  devo t ed   t o   und er st anding  T aiwan  t hat ,   in  fact ,   t her e's 
r eally  g o o d   info r mat io n  available  t o   Chinese  lead er s,   ver y  nuanced  and 
ho nest   assessment s  o f  t he  d o mest ic  p o lit ical  sit uat io n  in  T aiwan. 
           T hese  do cu ment s  and  br iefings  ar e  available  t o   P RC  leader s. 
Unfo r t unat ely,   I   can't   t ell  yo u   what   t hey  do   wit h  t hem,   but   t hat   is  a 
su bst ant ial  imp r o vement . 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Well,   t hey  go t   a  lo t   o f  info r mat io n 
o n  u s,   t o o ,   and  it   seems  t o   be  a  mild  disco nnect . 
           DR.   RI GGE R:     But   I   t hink  in  t er ms  o f  miscalcu lat io n,   in  t er ms  o f 
act u ally  d o ing  so met hing  co unt er pr o du ct ive  because  t hey  ho nest ly  didn't 
u nd er st and  t he  sit u at io n  in  T aiwan,   t hat   seems  less  likely. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Ok ay.     Yes,   Randy. 
           MR.   S CHRI VE R:     I   just   want ed ,   I   d efinit ely  want ed  t o   u nder sco r e 
t he  p o int   Richar d   mad e  abo ut   civil­ milit ar y  r elat io ns.     T hat 's  a  co ncer n. 
  Bu t   t o   add  t o   t hat ,   ir r espect ive  o f  t heir   view  o nce  t hey  t ak e  o ffice,   I 
wo u ld  lik e  t o   po int   o u t   t hat   I   t hink   t his  per io d  up   u nt il  t hat   po int   is  a 
t r ick y  per io d   because  I 've  yet   t o   meet   t he  po lit ical  lead er   in  China  o r 
t he  Minist r y  o f  Fo r eig n  Affair s  p er so n  o r   t he  P LA  o fficer   who   has  fo und 
it   car eer   enhancing  t o   be  mo der at e  o n  T aiwan. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Right . 
           MR.   S CHRI VE R:     And  I   t hink  as  t hey'r e  maneu ver ing  and 
p o sit io ning  and   t r ying  t o   secur e  t heir   po sit io n,   we  co u ld  act ually  get   a 
bit   o f  a  har d er   line  u p   unt il  t he  po int   o f  t hat   t r ansit io n,   and  r emember , 
o f  co u r se,   20 1 2  is  also   an  elect io n  year   in  T aiwan.     S o   t hat 's  a 
d ang er o us­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     T hat 's  what   I   want ed  t o   co mbine 
int o   t he  p ict ur e  next ,   which  is  t he  DP P   co uld  win.  S o   t he  quest io n 
beco mes  has  t he  DP P   leader ship,   new  lead er ship,   mat ur ed  at   all  in  it s 
willing ness  o r   u nwillingness  t o   play  chicken?    S o   do es  it   u nder st and   it 
has  a  differ ent   d ynamic  at   p lay?    And  we'r e  co mbining  t wo   changes  o f 
lead er ship,   t wo   p o t ent ial  changes  o f  leader ship ,   which  seems  t o   me  t o 
be  a  vo lat ile  sit uat io n. 
           DR.   RI GGE R:     I   t hink  fr o m  t he  st andpo int   o f  T aiwan's  next 
p r esid ent ial  elect io n,   t he  po ssibilit y  o f  a  r eplay  o f  20 00  is  r eal,   t hat   t he 
P RC  may  no t   have  co me  t o   t er ms  wit h  t he  necessit y  o f  t aking  ser io u sly 
and   having   a  r elat io nship   wit h  a  DP P   pr esident . 
           S o   if  o ne  wer e  elect ed  in  201 2,   which  is  no t   inco nceivable  g iven 
t he  cu r r ent   p o lit ical  sit uat io n  o n  T aiwan,   alt ho ug h  I   st ill  t hink  it 's  kind 
o f  a  lo ng  sho t ,   but   if  t he  DP P   wer e  t o   win  t hat   elect io n,   t he  P RC
                                                    ­ 119 ­ 
lead er ship  might ,   if  yo u   d o n't   mind  me­ ­ I 'm  no t   a  diplo mat   o r   a  per so n­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Ho pefully. 
           DR.   RI GGE R:  ­ ­ paid­ ­ I 'm  no t   paid  t o   say  t hing s  car efu lly.     I 'm 
p aid   t o   k eep  p eo ple  awake­ ­ 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Go o d.     Go o d. 
           DR.   RI GGE R:  ­ ­ in  classes. 
           I   t hink  t hey  co u ld  p anic  and  assume  t hat   o nce  again,   as  t hey  did 
wit h  Chen  S hui­ bian,   we  d o n't   kno w  ho w  t o   deal  wit h  t his  per so n.     T his 
is  g o ing   t o   be  so meo ne  we  can't   wo r k   wit h. 
           I   t hink  t he  DP P   leader ship  is  much  mo r e  r espo nsible,   mu ch  mo r e 
car eful  and  ser io us  t han  t hey  ar e  po r t r ayed  ver y  o ft en  in  o ur   med ia  and 
cer t ainly  in  t he  P RC  med ia.     I   t hink   t hat   was  also   t r ue,   t ho u gh,   in  200 0. 
  I   do n't   t hink   Chen  S hui­ bian  when  he  t o o k  o ffice  was  t he  o gr e  t hat   t he 
Chinese  lead er ship   decid ed   he  mu st   be. 
           S o   o ne  p o ssibilit y  is  a  r epeat   o f  2000,   but   t hat 's  cer t ainly  no t   t he 
o nly  o ne. 
           COMMI S S I ONE R  FI E DLE R:     Richar d. 
           DR.   BUS H:     I   agr ee  wit h  t hat .     T he  DP P   is  o nly  no w  t r ying   t o 
fig u r e  o u t   what   it s  app r o ach  t o   China  will  be,   and  t her e  ar e  ideo lo g ical 
and   g ener at io nal  disag r eement s  o n  t hat   sco r e,   and  ho w  t hey  co me  o ut   o n 
t hat   I   t hink  will  shap e  what   t he  P RC  wo uld   d o . 
           I 'd   o nly  no t e  t hat   we'r e  go ing  t o   have  a  t r ansit io n  her e,   t o o .     T his 
is  t he  fir st   t ime  t her e  will  be  so r t   o f  po lit ical  t ur no ver   in  all  t hr ee 
co u nt r ies  in  t he  same  year . 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   Mu llo y. 
           HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank   yo u ,   Mr .   Chair man.     I 
want   t o   t hank  each  o f  yo u  fo r   being   her e  and  yo u r   ver y  help fu l  pr ep ar ed 
t est imo ny. 
           Fir st ,   I 'll  just   make  a  co mment .     Just   fo r   t he  r eco r d ,   if  yo u'r e 
int er est ed  in  fr ee  t r ad e  wit h  Asia,   t hat   may  be  o ne  mat t er .     I f  yo u'r e 
int er est ed  in  co nt inuing  a  t r ading  r elat io nship   like  we've  had   wit h  Asia, 
t hat 's  ano t her   mat t er .     S o   I   t hink  t hat 's  par t   o f  t he  p r o blem. 
           Co ming  t o   t he  E CFA,  Dr .   Bu sh,  yo u  said  t hat   it   co u ld  lead   t o 
FT As  wit h  maybe  so me  o f  t he  o t her   Asian  co unt r ies.     I   do n't   kno w 
whet her   yo u  wer e  her e  when  Dr .   Co o k e  was  her e  befo r e;  he  t ho ug ht   t hat 
may  be  t r ue  wit h  so me  o f  t he  o t her   Asian  co u nt r ies,   but   t hat   it   wo uld 
no t   lead  t o   FT As  beyo nd  t he  r egio n. 
           S o   he  t ho ug ht   China  was  r eally  go ing  t o   t r y  and  enmesh  T aiwan 
int o   a  gr eat er   Chinese  co ­ pr o sp er it y  spher e  o r   so met hing  like  t hat .     He 
d id n't  use  t ho se  exact   wo r d s.     T hat 's  my  capt ur ing  o f  it .     Do   yo u   agr ee 
wit h  t hat ?    I s  t hat   what   yo u  see  g o ing  o n? 
           DR.   BUS H:     I   fr ank ly  d o n't   kno w  what   t heir   st r at egy  is  her e.     I 
t hink   what   Dr .   Co o ke  sugg est ed   is  cer t ainly  plau sible.     I   t hink  t hat   even 
t he  q uest io n  o f  T aiwan  do ing   FT A­ like  ar r angement s  wit h  S o ut heast 
Asian  co unt r ies  is  no t   a  slam  dunk  eit her . 
           I   t hink  t hat ,   t ho u g h,   t his  is  a  place  wher e  at   t he  appr o pr iat e  t ime
                                                      ­ 120 ­ 
we  co uld   st ep  up   and   say  t hat   we  have  ever y  r ight   t o   do   an  FT A­ like 
ar r ang ement   wit h  T aiwan  and  t hey  have  a  r ig ht   t o   do   it   wit h  u s,  t hat   we 
sho u ld  go   fo r war d  o n  t hat   basis. 
            HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     Do   any  o f  yo u  have  a  co mment 
o n  t hat   issue? 
            T he  seco nd  qu est io n,   I   r emember   t alking  wit h  a  senio r   o fficial  o f 
T aiwan,   and  he  said   maybe  t he  best   deal  T aiwan  co uld   get  wo uld  be  a 
5 0 ­ year   st at u s  qu o   agr eement .     No   invasio n.     No   ind ependence.     S t at us 
q u o .     Let 's  see  wher e  we  ar e  aft er   5 0  year s.     What   do   yo u  t hink?    I s  t hat 
a  g o o d   idea?    I s  t hat   wher e  we  sho u ld  be  head ing ? 
            Dr .   Rig ger ,   yo u  mig ht   co mment .     I   r emember ,   yo u   wer e  ver y 
helpful  in  2 004   when  we  wer e  in  T aiwan,   and  I   went   t o   o ne  o f  yo ur 
lect u r es,   and   I   lear ned  a  lo t .     S o   I   wo uld   maybe  ask  yo u  t o   t ake  t he  lead 
o n  t hat   o ne. 
            DR.   RI GGE R:     Well,   t hank  yo u. 
            I   can't   r emember   wher e  I   was  in  2 004  so   I 'm  g lad  yo u   can.     I   t hink 
o ne,   maybe  t his  is  a  slig ht ly  mischievo us  way  t o   lo o k  at   it ,   but   it   seems 
t o   me  t hat   if  we  dat e  1 98 7  as  t he  beginning  o f  cr o ss­ S t r ait s 
r ap pr o chement ,   t hat 's  when  t he  T aiwan  side  allo wed  peo ple  t o   begin 
t r aveling  back  and  fo r t h,   and  t hings  ver y  qu ickly  acceler at ed   fr o m  t her e, 
bo t h  o n  t he  bu siness  sid e  in  a  kind  o f  chao t ic  and  unmanag ed  way,   but 
also   o n  t he  po lit ical  side  in  a  ver y  up   and  do wn  kind  o f  way. 
            S o   if  19 87  is  t he  beginning,   t hen  we'r e  p ast   1 997  and  we'r e  past 
2 0 07 ,   so   we've  po st p o ned  t he  beginning  o f  t hat   50­ year   per io d   no w  by 
clo se  t o   half  it s  o wn  lengt h. 
            S o   what   I   t hink   a  lo t   o f  peo p le  in  T aiwan  wo u ld  like  t o   d o   is  t o 
t alk   abo u t   a  50 ­ year   per io d  fo r   ano t her   50   year s  and  t hen  imp lement 
o ne.     T he  indefinit e  p o st po nement   o f  a  final  r eso lu t io n  is,   I   t hink , 
p er ceived   as  t he  mo st   d esir able  o ut co me  by  a  kind  o f  mainst r eam 
co nsensu s  o f  T aiwanese  cit izens. 
            HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     P o st po ne  t he  ult imat e 
o u t co me. 
            DR.   RI GGE R:     Ju st   t o   p o st po ne.     S o   t her e  was  a  t ime  ar o und 
1 9 87   t o   abo ut   1 9 95  when  it   was  easy  t o   find  p eo p le,   ver y  easy  t o   find 
p eo p le  in  T aiwan  who   wo uld  say  t hings  like  I   just   need  t o   have  t his 
set t led;  I   can't   st and  t he  uncer t aint y.     I   t hink  p eo p le  have  go t t en  ver y 
g o o d   at   living   wit h  uncer t aint y  and  ver y  g o o d  at   living  wit h  t his  kind  o f 
liminal  st at us  t hat   t hey  have  as  neit her   fish  no r   fo wl,   but   so met hing  t hat 
bo t h  swims  and   flies  pr et t y  successfu lly. 
            S o   t hat   I   t hink  t he  pr o po sal  fo r   a  50­ year ,   it   was  a  peace  acco r d . 
I t 's  been  phr ased  in  var io u s  ways,   bu t   t he  idea  o f  a  50­ year   fr eeze  o n 
chang e  was  a  way  o f  put t ing  int o   a  mo r e  leg alist ic  o r   fo r mal  fr amewo r k 
what   is  r eally  ju st   a  felt   pr efer ence  fo r   let 's  just   keep  t his  go ing   as  lo ng 
as  we  can.  I   ent ir ely  ag r ee  wit h  Randy,   t hat   t he  fact o r   t hat   allo ws  o r 
d isallo ws  t hat   o ut co me  ­ ­  o r   it 's  r eally  no t   an  o ut co me  ­ ­ ,   t hat   no n­ 
o u t co me,   is  Beijing's  d et er minat io n  t o   have  it s  way  o r   Beijing 's
                                                     ­ 121 ­ 
d et er minat io n  t hat   having   it s  way  is  t o o  co st ly,   and  t hat   t her efo r e  it   will 
allo w  t his  p r o cess  t o   u nwind  fo r   so me  indefinit e  per io d. 
          MR.   S CHRI VE R:     I 'll  just   quickly  jump  in  o n  t his  o ne  as  well.     I 
t hink   if  t he  t wo   sides  decided   t hat   it 's  no t   fo r   an  o ut side  p ar t y  t o   say 
t hat 's  t he  wr o ng  decisio n,   bu t   I   wo uld  be  p r et t y  skep t ical  t hat   t hey 
co u ld   g et   t her e,   number   o ne,   but   also   t hat   it   wo uld   ho ld . 
          Nu mber   o ne,   I 've  never   par t icular ly  liked  t he  t er m  "st at us  quo . "    I 
fo u nd  it   r emar kable  t hat   my  o wn  administ r at io n,   which  I   ser ved  in,   said 
we  d emand  t hat   t her e  be  no   chang es  t o   t he  st at us  quo ,   as  we  d efine  it , 
but   we  wo u ldn't   d efine  it . 
          I f  t her e  is  a  st at us  quo ,   it 's  har dly  st at ic.     S o   t hen  yo u  get   int o   a 
g ame  o f  what 's  a  vio lat io n  o f  t he  st at us  q uo ?    I   am  pr et t y  co nfident 
China  wo u ld   feel  fur t her   U. S .  ar ms  sales  t o   T aiwan  wo u ld  be  a  vio lat io n 
o f  st at us  qu o .     I   wo uld  say  t he  milit ar y  bu ild ­ up  is  a  change. 
          S o   I 've  never   been  a  huge  fan  o f  t hat   because  it 's  har d   t o   d efine, 
and   it 's  no t   r eally  st at ic.     I   mean  a  new  g ener at io n  o f  new  T aiwanese  is 
a  change  o f  t he  st at u s  q uo   in  a  way  if  t hey  have  a  d iffer ent   wo r ld  view; 
r ig ht ? 
          I   also   t hink   t her e's  a  qualit at ive  differ ence.     Yo u  g et   int o   so r t   o f 
d ang er o us  p o sit io n  o f  eq uat ing  a  P RC  milit ar y  p o st ur e  and   t heir 
ag gr essio n  t o   demo cr at ic  decisio n­ making  o n  T aiwan,  and  I   t hink   t hat 's 
q u alit at ively  d iffer ent . 
          I f  peo ple  in  T aiwan  want   t o   have  a  say  in  t heir   fut ur e,   and  we'r e 
saying ,   no ,   yo u   must   ag r ee  t o   no t   d o   t hat ,   and   in  exchange  Beijing  wo n't 
at t ack   yo u ,   I   t hink  yo u'r e  eq uat ing  agg r essio n  and  milit ar y  po st u r e  wit h 
what   I   t hink  sho uld   be  t he  p ur view  o f  t he  peo ple  o n  T aiwan  t o   have  a 
g r eat   say  if  no t   ult imat e  say  in  t heir   fu t u r e. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u . 
          DR.   BUS H:     I   agr ee  wit h  all  o f  t hat .     I   wo uld   o nly  ad d  t hat   t her e 
is  a  d anger   o f  t r ying   t o   neg o t iat e  su ch  an  agr eement   and  failing ,   which 
is  no t   o ut   o f  t he  qu est io n,   because  each  sid e  wo uld  figu r e  o ut   t hat  t he 
o t her   side  was  no t   as  war m  and  fuzzy  as  t hey  t ho ught . 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  MULLOY:     T hank  yo u   all. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   S hea. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     T hank s  fo r   t he  t est imo ny.     I t 's  been 
ver y  int er est ing. 
          Dr .   Rig ger ,   I   just   want   yo u   t o   kno w  t hat   I   r ead  a  po r t io n  o f  yo ur 
t est imo ny  t o   t he  administ r at io n  wit nesses  t his  mo r ning,   and  t hat   was 
yo u r   st at ement   t hat   impr o ving  eco no mic  and  po lit ical  r elat io ns  acr o ss 
t he  S t r ait   no t   o nly  is  co nsist ent   wit h  co nt inued  ar ms  sales,   bu t   depends 
o n  co nt inu ed   ar ms  sales,   and  t hey  bo t h  said  t hey  agr eed  wit h  yo ur 
p o sit io n.     S o   I   just   want   t o   let   yo u  kno w  t hat . 
          And ,   Mr .   S chr iver ,   I   appr eciat e  t he  po int s  yo u  pu t   in  yo ur 
st at ement .     I   was  ho pefu l  t hat   yo u  co u ld  flesh  o ut   t he  last   po int   t hat   yo u 
mak e,   t he  last   r eco mmendat io n,   which  is  yo u  say  U. S .   sho uld  pr o mo t e 
T aiwan  as  an  imp o r t ant   issue  wit h  o ur   key  Asian  allies  such  as  Jap an
                                                       ­ 122 ­ 
and   Aust r alia. 
          Co u ld  yo u  p u t  mo r e  det ail  int o   t hat ,   and  co u ld  yo u  also   info r m  us 
a  lit t le  bit ,   and  maybe  t he  r est   o f  t he  p anel  as  well,   o n  Japan­ T aiwan 
r elat io ns  and   what 's  g o ing   o n  t her e  wit h  t he  new  administ r at io n  in 
Jap an? 
          MR.   S CHRI VE R:     S ur e.     T hank  yo u.     I   was  t r ying   t o   mak e 
r eco mmend at io ns  t hat   wer e  ap pr o pr iat e  fo r   what   I   descr ibed  as  t he  P RC 
st r at eg y,   and  I   t hink   o ne  o f  t he  main  p ar t s  o f  t heir   st r at egy  is  t o   iso lat e 
T aiwan  and  d e­ legit imize  a  lo t   o f  T aiwan's  asp ir at io ns,   and   I   t hink   t he 
Unit ed   S t at es  is  in  a  po sit io n,   as  g iven  t he  p o wer ar chy  o f  wher e  we 
st and   in  t he  wo r ld,   t o   r esist   a  lo t   o f  t hat ,   and   o t her   co unt r ies  ar e  no t 
q u it e  as  able  t o ,   and   so   t hey  r eally  need  a  U. S .   bilat er al  effo r t   t o 
p r o vide  t he  kind  o f  su pp o r t   I   t hink  t hey  sho uld  be  p r o viding  t o   T aiwan 
because  d o ing   so   o n  t heir   o wn  is  o ft ent imes  much  mo r e  d ifficult . 
          What   I   have  in  mind  is  t his  is  a  po t ent ial  flashpo int   and  p r o blem 
ar ea  fo r   Asia.     I t   sho u ld   ver y  much  be  subject   t o   discussio n  and  a 
milit ar y  alliance  and  no t   ju st   t he  milit ar y  issues  asso ciat ed  wit h  it ,  bu t 
br o ad er .
          S o   I   t hink  no t   o nly  sho uld  t he  Unit ed  S t at es  be  invo lved  in  T I FA 
t alk s,   bu t   we  sho uld   be  enco ur ag ing   o t her s,   Japan,   Aust r alia.     T her e's 
alleg edly  t his  gr o u nd  bar gain  o n  t he  t able,   T aiwan  g et s  E CFA,   and   t hen 
t hey  have  t he  abilit y  t o   g o   t alk  t o   o t her s.     We  sho uld   be  enco u r aging 
"t he  o t her s"  par t   o f  t hat   equ at io n  t o   st ar t   t hat   dialo gu e  so o ner   r at her 
t han  lat er ,   r at her   t han  hanging  back  and   wait ing  t o   see  wher e  E CFA 
g o es. 
          Just   ver y  br iefly,   my  o wn  sense  o f  Japan­ T aiwan  r elat io ns  is 
t hey've  so mewhat   so u r ed .     P ar t   o f  t hat   is  based  o n  per cept io ns  t hat 
mig ht   be  fair   o r   u nfair ,   but   when  Ma  Ying­ jeo u  t o o k  o ffice,   t her e  wer e 
co ncer ns  in  Japan  abo ut   his  views  t o war d  Japan,   and  he  said,   well,   I 
t hink   t hat 's  becau se  I   wr o t e  my  disser t at io n  o n  disp ut ed   t er r it o r ies,   and 
so   he  had   an  exp lanat io n  fo r   t hat . 
          Bu t   t her e  was  a  per cep t io n  co ming  in  t hat   he  might   no t   lo o k  at 
favo r ably,   bu t   t hen  yo u  also   had   a  t r ansit io n  in  T o k yo   wher e  I   t hink  t he 
Hat o yama  g o ver nment ,   amo ng  o t her   t hings,   I   t hink  is  ver y  int er est ed 
wit h  r app r o chement   wit h  China. 
          And   so   I   t hink   t hing s  have  so ur ed  a  bit .     T her e  ar e  a  few 
init iat ives.     T aiwan  just   o p ened   up   a  new  r epr esent at ive  o ffice  in 
S app o r o   so   t her e's  t hing s  go ing  o n,   bu t   I   t hink   o ver all  it 's  a  bit   do wn 
fr o m  wher e  it   has  been  in  t he  r ecent   past . 
          DR.   BUS H:     T o   so me  ext ent ,   Japan­ T aiwan  r elat io ns  ar e  a 
fu nct io n  o f  t he  r elat io ns  o f  each  wit h  China.  Japan­ T aiwan  r elat io ns 
wer e  pr o bably  best   while  Chen  S hui­ bian  was  P r esident   o f  T aiwan  and 
Ko izu mi  Junichir o   was  P r ime  Minist er   o f  Jap an  becau se  bo t h  o f  t hem 
saw  China  as  a  pr o blem  o r   act ed  in  ways  t hat   o ffended  China. 
          T hen  Japan  st ar t ed  mo der at ing   it s  po licy  t o war ds  China,   and  at 
least   so me  p eo p le  in  T aiwan  go t   co ncer ned ,   and   co nser vat ives  in  Jap an
                                                  ­ 123 ­ 
g o t   co ncer ned  wit h  Ma  Ying ­ jeo u's  mo r e  favo r able  app r o ach  t o   China. 
Wher e  t he  Hat o yama  ad minist r at io n  is  go ing  wit h  it s  China  po licy 
r emains  t o   be  seen. 
          DR.   RI GGE R:     I f  I   can  just   t ake  t his  issue  in  a  slight ly  d iffer ent 
d ir ect io n.     I   t hink  so met hing  ver y  impo r t ant   fo r   peo ple  in  T aiwan  and 
also   fo r   peo ple  who   car e  abo ut   T aiwan  in  t he  U. S .   t o   bear   in  mind  is 
t hat   t he  g ener at io nal  change  in  T aiwan  bu t   also   in  neighbo r ing  co unt r ies 
has  r equ ir ed   a  new  g ener at io n  o f  cit izens  and  also   po lit icians  t o   pr o duce 
t heir   o wn  und er st anding   o f  why  T aiwan  is  impo r t ant   t o   t hem  o r   t o   t he 
lar g er   wo r ld   o r   t o   t heir   r eg io nal  co mmunit y,   what ever   it   may  be. 
          I   t hink  develo p ing  t hat   under st anding  is  no t   always  easy  fo r 
cit izens  who   have  been  r aised   wit h  t he  id ea  o f  China  as  a  member   o f  t he 
co mmunit y  o f  nat io ns,  ( which  is  no t   r eally  what   p eo p le  o ver   50   in  any  o f 
t hese  co unt r ies  wer e  r aised   t o   und er st and  China  t o   be,   since  China  was 
a  p ar iah  st at e  unt il  t he  1 98 0s,   and   t hen  so r t   o f  became  a  par iah  st at e 
ag ain  in  t he  ear ly  199 0 s. ) 
          Bu t   yo ung  p eo p le  do n't   see  it   t hat   way.     And  so  t he  quest io n  o f 
why  sho uld   we  car e  abo ut   T aiwan  I   t hink  is  act ually  ver y  p r essing  fo r 
p eo p le  in  t he  yo u nger   gener at io ns  o f  cit izens  and   leader s  in  places  like 
Jap an,   and   I   t hink  it   is  impo r t ant   t hat   T aiwan  make  t he  case  fo r   it self  o n 
t he  g r o und s  o f  so met hing   o t her   t han,   well,   we  ar e  so meho w  st anding 
bet ween  yo u   and   China  because  t hat   p ut s  T aiwan’s  st at us  in  t he  co nt ext 
o f  o t her   nat io ns'  r elat io ns  wit h  China,   which  is  no t   an  ind ependent 
p o sit io n  t o   st and   o n. 
          S o   I   t hink   it 's  a  change  t hat   we  need  t o   pay  at t ent io n  t o ,   whet her 
o r   no t   new  lead er s  have  t he  u nder st and ing   o f  t he  r o le  t hat   T aiwan  has 
p layed  hist o r ically  and  t he  values  t hat   T aiwan  br ings  t o   t he  r egio n  and 
t o   t he  wo r ld .     I t   may  no t   be  so   o bvio us  t o   t hem. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  S HE A:     T hank  yo u. 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     Co mmissio ner   Videniek s. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Go o d  aft er no o n,   ever ybo d y. 
          T his  is  kind   o f  a  br o ad  quest io n  fo r   ever ybo dy  and  maybe  it 's  been 
answer ed .     I s  t her e  p r eced ent   anywher e  g lo bally  fo r   a  bilat er al  eco no mic 
int eg r at io n  wit ho ut   so me  po lit ical  int egr at io n  befo r ehand?    I s  o ne  a 
co nd it io n  o f  t he  o t her ?    Or  sho uld  t he  o r d er   be  r ever sed? 
          T o   me,   t he  last   panel  discussed  t he  eco no mic  int egr at io n  and  t he 
mo ves  maybe  fo r   co mmo n  fir ms  t o   o p er at e  in  bo t h  sides  o f  t he  S t r ait  in 
T aiwan  and   mainland.     My  quest io n  is  can  it   be  do ne?    Can  eco no mic 
int eg r at io n,   what ever   fo r m,   eit her   nat io nal  o r   by  fir m  o r   by  indust r y, 
can  it   be  d o ne  wit ho ut   pr io r   p o lit ical  int eg r at io n? 
          DR.   BUS H:     I   t hink  t he  E ur o p ean  Unio n  is  a  case. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     T hat 's  mult ilat er al  t ho ugh,   and 
t her e  is  so me  quest io n  as  t o   t he  degr ee.     Besides  t hat ?    I n  Lat in 
Amer ica,   Asia,   Afr ica,   wher ever ? 
          MR.   S CHRI VE R:     No t   being  an  eco no mist ,   I 'll  pr o bably  say 
so met hing  ver y  st u pid   her e,   but   I   t hink   it   dep ends  o n  what   yo u  mean  by
                                                      ­ 124 ­ 
eco no mic  int egr at io n.     I   wo u ld   p o int   t o   t he  Unit ed   S t at es  and  China  as 
being   t wo   eco no mies  t hat   ar e  incr ed ibly  int egr at ed. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Go o d  po int . 
          MR.   S CHRI VE R:     And,   we'r e  no t hing   even  clo se  t o   po lit ical 
int eg r at io n.  Bar r ing  having   a  co mmo n  cur r ency,   majo r   t r ading  par t ner s, 
majo r   ho ld er   o f  o u r   debt s,   I   t hink  a  lo t   is  po ssible  in  t er ms  o f­ ­ 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Having  a  t r ad e  par t ner   is 
p o lit ical  int egr at io n? 
          DR.   RI GGE R:     I   wo uld  ar gue  t hat   fo r   T aiwan,   t he  bigg est   mist ak e 
was  act u ally  no t   addr essing  t he  po lit ical  side  ear lier ,   no t   in  t he  sense  o f 
p o lit ical  int egr at io n  but   in  t he  sense  o f  r ealist ic  management   o f  t he 
eco no mic  r elat io nship. 
          S o   I   t hink   wher e  T aiwan's  vulner abilit y  came  fr o m  was  in  a 
sit u at io n,   whet her   it   was  so met hing  t hat   t he  T aiwanese  leader ship  co u ld 
have  co nt r o lled  o r   no t ,   what   hap pened  was  T aiwanese  fir ms  went   t o 
China  whet her   o r   no t   t hey  had  t he  blessing  o f  t heir   o wn  go ver nment . 
And   t heir   go ver nment   t hen  belat edly  played  cat ch­ up  and  is  st ill  playing 
cat ch­ up  wit h  t hese  T aiwanese  fir ms. 
          Bu t   t ho se  fir ms  incur r ed  a  lo t   o f  vulner abilit y  as  fir ms.     T aiwanese 
p eo p le  incur r ed   a  lo t   o f  vulner abilit y  as  ind ividuals  in  mainland  China 
because  t heir   go ver nment   had  no t   made  ar r angement s  fo r   t he  secu r it y  o f 
t heir   invest ment s  and   t heir   per so ns  while  t hey  wer e  do ing   bu siness  in 
China. 
          S o   I   t hink  t he  p r o blem  wit h  t r ying  t o   decide  which  is  t he  car t   and 
which  is  t he  ho r se  is  t hat   unr est r ained   eco no mic  act ivit y  pr o duces  ju st 
as  many  pr o blems  as  under t ak ing   t he  pr o cess  o f  po lit ical  nego t iat io n, 
ho wever   awkwar d   and   difficult   t hat   might   be,   int r o duces. 
          COMMI S S I ONE R  VI DE NI E KS :     Any  o t her   co mment s?    T hank 
yo u . 
          HE ARI NG  CO­ CHAI R  WORT ZE L:     No .     Ok ay.     Well,   t hank  yo u 
ver y  much  fo r   help ing   us  t hink   o ur   way  t hr o ugh  it   and  fo r   so me  ver y, 
ver y  t ho u ght fu l  wr it t en  su bmissio ns  and  g r eat   o r al  t est imo ny  and 
answer s  t o   qu est io ns.     T hank s.     We'll  call  it   a  day  t hen. 
          DR.   BUS H:     T hank   yo u. 
          MR.   S CHRI VE R:     P leasur e  t o   be  her e. 
          [ Wher eupo n,   at   3: 15  p. m. ,   T hu r sd ay,   Mar ch  18,   201 0,   t he  hear ing 
was  ad jo u r ned . ]




                                              ­ 125 ­ 
ADDITIO NAL  M ATERIAL  S UPPLIED  FO R  TH E  RECO RD 

     Statement of  Phil Gingrey, a U.S. Congressman from the State of  Georgia 

Chairman Mulloy, Chairman Wortzel, Chairman Slane, Vice Chairman Bartholomew, and 
Commissioners—I appreciate this opportunity to testify before you today and would like 
to thank each of you for your important work on the U.S.­China Economic and Security 
Review  Commission.  Geo­politics  is  far  from  static,  and  we  have  an  obligation  to 
thoroughly evaluate the changing state of international relations and the shifting balance of 
international power and influence—particularly as we see the rapid economic and military 
growth  of  the  People’s  Republic  of  China.  The  implications  of  this  growth  only help to 
underscore  the  importance  of  preserving  and  strengthening  our  relationship  with  the 
Republic of China on Taiwan. 

Accordingly,  I  am  pleased  to be able to share my thoughts with you and to also express 
the general sentiments of the House of Representatives Taiwan Caucus. 

I  am  also  pleased  and  honored  to  be  able  to  join  today  with  my  friend,  colleague,  and 
fellow  Co­Chairman  of  the  Taiwan  Caucus—Lincoln  Diaz­Balart.  The  House  Taiwan 
Caucus has four co­chairs—2 Republicans and 2 Democrats—and maintains a strong, bi­ 
partisan  membership  of  almost  140  members.  The  strength  of  this Caucus demonstrates 
this Congress’s continued commitment to support Taiwan in accordance with the Taiwan 
Relations Act which requires Congress and the Administration to “preserve and promote 
extensive, close, and friendly commercial, cultural, and other relations between the people 
of the United States and the people on Taiwan.” 

In  fact  just  last  year,  Congress  unanimously  passed  House  Concurrent  Resolution  55 
                       th 
recognizing the 30  Anniversary of the Taiwan Relations Act and reaffirmed the House’s 
“unwavering  commitment  to  the  Taiwan  Relations  Act  as  the  cornerstone  of  relations 
between the United States and Taiwan.” 

Peace  is  not  only  sustained  through  diplomacy,  but  also  through  the  maintenance  of 
vigorous  self­defense.  The  preservation  of  peace  in  the  Strait  of  Taiwan  requires  the 
strengthening of Taiwan’s defenses to ensure that PRC military aggression against Taiwan 
is never, never a viable option either from an international perspective or from a practical 
standpoint. 

Under the Taiwan Relations Act, our policy is that that “United States will make available 
to Taiwan such defense articles and defense services in such quantity as may be necessary
                                       ­ 126 ­ 
to enable Taiwan to maintain a sufficient self­defense capability.” 

Further, after intense study and thorough examination, it has become abundantly clear that 
the  United  States  must  move  forward  with  pending  announced  arm  sales  as  well  as 
agreeing to sell F­16 Fighters to Taiwan. 

These  sales  are  critically  important  for  several  reasons.    Outside  of  the  F­16,  Taiwan’s 
current  fleet  consists  of  F­5s,  Indigenous  Defense  Fighters,  and  Mirage  2000  Fighters. 
The F­5s are aging rapidly, while the Mirage 2000 fleet will have to be retired in 2010 due 
to  the  lack  of  affordable  spare  parts.    The  Indigenous  Defense  Fighters  are  expected  to 
reach  the  end  of  their  service  life  by  2020.    Without  new  F­16s,  in  the  next  5  years  the 
Taiwanese fleet will be reduced by 120 aircraft.  It is clear that new F­16s would enable 
Taiwan  to  maintain  a  sufficient  self­defense  and  ensure  cross­strait  stability  through  air 
parity. 

With  respect  to  Taiwan’s  participation  in  the  global  community, we must also recognize 
that  it  is  imperative  that  the  United  States  encourage,  and  the  international  community 
recognize, the practical contributions of the people of Taiwan. As clearly demonstrated by 
its  participation  with  the  World  Health  Organization,  Taiwan  stands  ready,  willing,  and 
able  to  make  meaningful  contributions  to  the  international  community  through 
involvement  in  United  Nations  specialized  agencies,  programs,  and  conventions. 
Accordingly,  I  think  the  U.S.  should  encourage  the  meaningful  participation  of  Taiwan 
International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). 

We all recognize there remains to be unresolved questions for which there are currently no 
definitive answers regarding Taiwan and China.  However, as we continue to analyze and 
deepen our comprehensive of the changing nature of the relationship between the United 
States  and  the  People’s  Republic  of  China,  U.S.  policy  must  continue  to  reflect  the 
important role of Taiwan and preserve the special relationship between the people of the 
U.S. and the people of Taiwan.




                                              ­ 127 ­ 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:43
posted:10/21/2011
language:English
pages:133