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                        Welcome to
                           aryville High
School

The decisions and choices you make as a student at Maryville High
School will have a profound and long-lasting effect on your future.
You are encouraged to make your own decisions and to be
responsible for the consequences of them.


All students should develop a four-year plan of courses according
to their individual interests, abilities, and goals. Each spring the
student will study and adjust the four-year plan, using input from
parents, teachers, counselors and other resources. Students should
utilize career information in the Guidance Center, media center and
Missouri Connections to aid in developing the four-year plan.
Information on careers, scholarships, technical schools, college
entrance requirements, and other related data is available from the
counselors, the A+ Coordinator, or in the media center.


Parent involvement is critical to the success of the student’s four-
year plan. It is the responsibility of each student to read carefully all
of the registration materials and requirements for graduation, and
to be willing to live with the choices made for the year. Parents
should be aware of the requirements and recommendations for their
student’s chosen pathway. Also, parents should support the
                                               2



student and school by providing a proper study atmosphere at
home and by maintaining good communications with school
officials and teachers.


We challenge you to set high standards for yourself, select courses
and organizations which will advance you toward those goals,
attend classes daily, and work hard to achieve your goals.




                           Guidance Center Message

To Parents and Students:

The program of studies at the high school level is designed to expand the general educational
experiences of all students and to prepare students for the workplace and/or further education
or training after graduation. Your high school program should be planned with your post-
secondary objectives in mind. It is strongly recommended that specific graduation requirements
be met before your senior year. Requirements for the Coordinating Board of Higher Education’s
Recommended High School Core Curriculum and the admission standards for Missouri and
area colleges are provided.

We encourage parents to check grade cards during the high school years and know your
son/daughter’s progress towards graduation. You may also monitor your student’s progress
through the parent portal. The graduation requirements to receive a diploma from Maryville High
School are currently twenty-four and one-half (24 ½) credits. The total credits must be checked
each time that a class is failed. The credit problem may require a student to take summer
school or make up failures during the regular school year, but the reward of graduation with
peers would be worth it. Please check the grade cards, failures and total accumulated credits.

We want to make the high school experience a positive one for all students and look forward to
working with you.
                            MSHSAA Eligibility
                                                  3


   The Missouri State High School Activities Association (MSHSAA) requires students to pass
   3 credits each semester to be eligible for competitive school activities the following semester.
   Competitive school activities would include all MSHSAA sanctioned activities that the school
   offers. Additionally, students must be currently enrolled in 3.5 credits. Summer school does not
   count. In order to be eligible for academic awards or to receive an Academic Letter, the student
   must be enrolled in seven classes for credit.




        We encourage all parents to sign up for the Parent Portal.
   Using the Parent Portal allows parents to closely monitor their student’s progress as well as
communicate with school personnel. To learn more about Parent Portal contact the guidance office.
                                                         4



                                       Why Go to College?
Whether you are uncertain about going to college or you just need some reassurance you're on the right track, here
                                       are a few reasons to go to college:

      Every bit of education you get after high school increases the chances you'll earn good pay. Most
       college graduates earn more money during their working years than people who stop their education at high
       school earn.

      The more education you get the more likely it is you will always have a job. According to one estimate,
       by the year 2028 there will be 19 million more jobs for educated workers than there are qualified people to fill
       them.

      Continuing education after high school is much more important for your generation than it was for
       your parents' generation. Today most good jobs require more than a high school diploma. Businesses
       want to hire people who know how to think and solve problems.

      Education beyond high school gives you a lot of other benefits, including meeting new people, taking part
       in new opportunities to explore your interests, and experiencing success.




                                 Average yearly income by educational attainment

                                   Professional degree                            $119,009

                                    Doctoral degree                                $92,863

                                    Master's degree                                $67,898

                                    Bachelor's degree                              $54,689

                                   Associate's degree                              $37,990

                                      Some college                                 $31,421

                                  High school graduate                             $29,448

                                   High school dropout                             $19,915

                                       Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 data
                                                               5




                            Table of
                            Contents
A+ Schools Program ................................................................................................. 5

College Prep & Career Prep ....................................................................................... 6
Grading…..…………………………………………………………………………...………………………………………………………………..7

Requirements for Graduation .................................................................................... 8

Policy on Retaking a Class ......................................................................................... 8

Dual
Credit.…………..………….………………………………………………………………………9

Missouri

Connections…………………………………………………………………………………...10

Your Future Plans .................................................................................................... 12

Course Offerings ..................................................................................................... 18

Course Descriptions

     Communication Arts ......................................................................................... 20
     Foreign Language…………………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………..24

     Mathematics ..................................................................................................... 26
     Science………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….….….30

        Social Studies ................................................................................................. 33

        Fine arts ......................................................................................................... 36
     Health/Physical Education…………………………………………………………………………………………….…………..…39
     Practical Arts: Business………………………………………………………………………………………….…………………..…40

     Practical Arts: Consumer Sciences ..................................................................... 43

        Practical Arts: Health Services Technology ...................................................... 46
                                                      6


    Practical Arts: Industrial Technology ................................................................. 47
    Practical Arts: Agriculture……………………………………………………………………………………………………….……49
General Elective Courses…………………………………………………………………………….……………………………………...54
Special Services Courses…………………………………………………………………………………………….…………………….….55




                    A+                   Schools Program

Maryville High School has been selected by the Missouri Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education as an A+ School site. The A+ Schools
grant provides the opportunity and funding for Maryville to make basic changes
designed to guide students in a rigorous program of academic and technical
education that will prepare them for the workplace, post-secondary technical
training, or college.


The education of all students is important, regardless of their plans following
high school. Some Maryville High School graduates will choose to attend a
technical school, two-year or four-year institution; others may go directly into
the work force or the military. The A+ Schools Program is designed to ensure
that no matter which option is chosen, all high school students will be provided
selections of courses, career counseling, technology and/or workplace skill
development opportunities which are appropriate to their career goals.


The three major goals of the A+ Schools Program are:

       All students will graduate from high school.


       All students complete a selection of high school studies that is
challenging
            and for which there are identified learning expectations.
                                                         7


                 All students proceed from high school graduation to a post-secondary
                     institution or high-wage job with workplace skill development
          opportunities.


          By the year 2010, 75 percent of our jobs will require technical skills, according
          to the U.S. Department of Labor. The A+ Schools Program encourages all
          students to focus on a career early and set a goal that includes training beyond
          high school. The A+ Schools Program asks all students to select a career path,
          plan coursework for all four years of high school, and progress toward a goal of
          additional training at the post-secondary level or a high-wage job.


          Upon achieving A+ Schools status, financial incentives will be offered to
          students who stay in school, maintain at least a 95 percent attendance record
          and a 2.5 grade point average, exhibit good citizenship, and avoid the unlawful
          use of drugs.


          If you or your parents have any questions concerning the A+ Schools Program,
          please feel free to contact Paul Snow, A+ Coordinator, at 562-4164.




                                     aryville High School’s
                            recommended “College Prep sequence” is the following:

English                                                      Social Studies
          1.0 credit English I Honors                               .5 credit American Government (required for
          1.0 credit English II Honors                              graduation)
          1.0 credit English III Honors                             1.0 Credit Honors World History OR
          .5 credit Speech I (required for                                Geography OR         Western
          graduation)                                                     Civilizations
          1.0 credit English IV Honors                               1.0 credit Honors American History
          .5 Credit Speech II                                         .5 credit Personal Finance (required for
          1.0 Credit Honors World Literature                                  graduation)
Math                                                                  .5 Social Studies elective
          1.0 credit Algebra I                               Foreign Language
          1.0 credit Advanced Geometry                              2.0 credits of the same foreign
          1.0 credit Honors Algebra II                                  language = French I & II OR Spanish I
          1.0 credit Pre-Calculus                                       & II
          (for a student needing 4 years instead of 3)
Science
          1.0 credit Biology
          1.0 credit Physical Science
          1.0 credit Chemistry OR Physics
             OR Human Biology OR College Biology


                   The Following Courses are NOT “College Prep” Classes:

                English           Mass Media is an elective credit only it does not meet core English
          requirements.                            Although Speech II is a college prep course, it does not
          count as one of the 3 ½ credits                                  towards the high school English
          graduation requirement.
                Math              Alg 1A + Alg 1B=Alg1
                Science           Biology A + Biology B=Biology
                Social Studies    Most universities do not count Personal Finance as a social studies credit
          . For this                               reason, students are encouraged to take another social
          studies elective in addition to                                  Personal Finance.


                                                  Embedded Credits

          MHS offers embedded credit for students enrolled in certain Northwest Technical School courses.
          Embedded credit is defined as earning graduation credit for a core content class while being enrolled in a
          class typically defined as an elective or career training/exploratory class.

          Science Embedded Credit: Students may earn one unit credit of science by completing three classes of
          qualifying Agricultural Sciences courses. See your school counselor for qualifying course details. This
          embedded credit is noted on the transcript as “Science Credit – Embedded.”

          Science Embedded Credit: Students completing all three Health Service Technology classes will
          receive one embedded science credit. These classes include Body Structure & Function and Medical
          Terminology, Health Careers Exploration, and Health Fundamentals.

          Math Embedded Credit: Students may earn .5 embedded credits annually for completion of three credits
          of a qualifying Career and Technical Education courses. These classes include Welding/Machine Shop I
          & II, Automotive Tech I & II, Building Trades I & II, and Collision Repair I & II. This embedded credit is
          noted on our transcripts as “Technical Math.”




                                                  Grading Scale



                                                   A=4           95-100%                    A- = 3.67        90-
                                            94%
                  B+ = 3.33        87-89%                  B=3           83-86%             B- = 2.67        80-
          82%
                  C+ = 2.33        77-79%                  C=2           73-76%             C- = 1.67        70-
          72%
                                                  7


             D+ = 1.33       67-69%            D=1             63-66%             D- = .67      60-
    62%
             F   = 0 Below 60%           I = Incomplete                 P = Passing




                                       Weighted Grades


                     Maryville High School adds .33 weighting to the following (honors) courses:


Communication            Foreign
                                                Math                    Science         Social Studies
      Arts              Languages

English I Honors
                         French III        Honors Algebra II        Chemistry        Honors American History
English II Honors

English III Honors       French IV           Pre-Calculus               Physics      Western Civilizations
                                                                        Human        Honors World History
English IV Honors       Spanish III            Calculus
                                                                        Biology
                                                                        College
    Speech II                                                           Biology
                        Spanish IV
  Honors World
    Literature




                              Graduation Requirements




             The Maryville R-II Board of Education has adopted the following regulations and
    procedures to implement the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education's
    provisions for high school graduation.
    Any student graduating from Maryville R-II High School must complete a minimum of
    24 ½ units of credit in grades nine through twelve in a program planned cooperatively
    by the student, the student's parents, and the school. The program shall be designed
    to meet the individual needs of the student.
                                                                    8




       NOTE: A credit is the equivalent of a class meeting one 50 minute period daily for 175
       days.

                                              CREDIT REQUIREMENTS

                             MHS Graduation
                          Requirements & Entry                                                MU                   NCAA Eligibility Requirements
                             Requirements for:                   NWMSU                       Entry                       (submit appl.)
   COURSES             Military, Technical Schools,         Entry Requirements            Requirements                       Division
                           Community Colleges                                                                          I                  II



                                     4                                  4                        4                         4                  3
Communication             Including .5 Speech I
     Arts                                                  Core credit not given for Mass Media or Drama.English graduation credit not given for Speech II



 Mathematics                        3                                   3                        4                         2                    2
                                                                                        ◄◄◄Algebra I and higher►►►
    Science                         3                                   3                        3                        3                     2
                                    3
                       Including .5 Government &                      3                         3
Social Studies    1 American History,.5 Personal Finance      +.5 Pers Finance          +.5 Pers Finance
                                                                                                                          2                     2



   Fine Arts                        1                                   1                        1


 Practical Arts                     1

Health/Physical               1.5 Including
  Education                     .5 Health

   Electives                        8                                                                                   1                2
                                                                                                                  (From English, Math or Science)
   Foreign                                                                                      2
                                                                                        credits in same
  Language                                                                             foreign language

    TOTAL
                                   24.5                                 17                      17                         16               14
Requirements

                                                              21 or combined             Combined with
  ACT Score                                                   ACT/class rank             class rank for                        17          17
                                                              Percentile must              percentile
                                                             equal 100 or more
                                                  RETAKING A CLASS




       The only classes a student may repeat for credit are Advanced Fitness, Band, Concert Choir,
       Drama, Forensics, Debate, Mixed Choir, Mass Media.
       A student may retake a class in order to get credit if they failed the first attempt. The class may
       also be retaken in order for the student to gain a better understanding of those concepts that
       are necessary to continue in the curricular area.
                                                9




           The following stipulations will be followed for retaking a class:

    1. Students must have permission from the content area teacher, parent, counselor and an
       administrator.
   2. Only 1 credit can be given for a full year class. Double credit is not given if the
       student passes the class more than once.
   3. If the student earned a failing grade the first time, that grade will not be superseded
       but will continue to be figured into the cumulative GPA.

                                     DUAL CREDIT



A student interested in Dual Enrollment may earn college credit from Northwest Missouri State
University while still in high school. To be eligible for dual credit a student must have an ACT
score of 21 (or a 100 index) and a cumulative GPA of 3.0. Juniors may enroll in dual credit
courses with a composite score of 18 on the PLAN test. Seniors, however, cannot use a PLAN
score to qualify for dual credit. Seniors must have a qualifying ACT score.      Additionally, there
are ACT subscore requirements for specific dual credit courses as listed here:


Honors English IV (Composition I)    ACT English subscore of 19
Calculus                             ACT Math subscore of 27


If minimum subscores are not met, students may qualify using an alternate method. See your
guidance counselor for details.


All course offerings are entry level and taught by high school faculty members with advanced
degrees, who have been approved by the university. Course content is comparable to the on-
campus course and has been developed in cooperation with university professors who are
liaisons for the program.


Students interested in taking any of the dual-credit courses through Northwest Missouri State
University will need to call the university they plan to attend to find out if and how the
Northwest credits would be received. It is important to ask for the transfer specialist and then
report the Northwest Department and Course numbers.
                                                           10




                            NWMSU Course Title and                                          NWMSU Course Title and
     MHS Course Title         Course Number              Credit   MHS Course Title            Course Number              Credit

Honors English IV         Comp I (10-111)                  3      Honors Amer History    Amer. Histor. Survey (33-155)    3

Honors World Literature   Intro to Literature (10-220)     3      Western Civilization   Western Civ (26-103)             3

Pre-Calc                  Pre-Calculus (17-117)            4      Speech II              Fund Oral Comm (29-102)          3

Calculus                  Calculus I (17-120)              4      French III             French I (14-131)                3
                          Gen Physics I/Lab (25-
Physics                   110/111)                         4      French IV              French II (14-132)               3

Chemistry                 Gen Chem I/Lab (24-114/115)      4      Spanish III            Spanish I (14-141)               3

College Biology           Gen Biology/Lab (04-102/103)     4      Spanish IV             Spanish II (14-142)              3

Animal Science            Missouri State AGS101            4      Business Technology    Comp. and Info Tech (44-130)     3

                           (2010-11 tuition costs were $97.00 per credit)


ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CALCULUS– Students enrolled in the AP Calculus course have the
option at the end of the year to take the AP exam that is administered worldwide in May. The
students are not required to take the exam to enroll in the course. The test is graded on a
scale of 1-5 with 5 being the highest score. Based on this score, students can receive advanced
standing and/or college credit for most Calculus I courses offered at universities worldwide.
The required score varies from school to school and can be found by contacting individual
universities. The cost of the exam has been $86 for the past few years. The curriculum taught
is developed using the collaborative efforts of university and secondary –school faculty to align
with college-level curriculum and expectations. The Advanced Placement program is run by
The College Board, the same company that administers the SAT, so it’s a nationally recognized
college prep course.




                                            Missouri Connections
                                                    Career Pathways
                                        11




Missouri Connections helps students open the door to career exploration and
educational planning. Sponsored by the Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education, Missouri students in public and private schools (grades 7
through college), their parents, guidance counselors, and educators can use the
online system at no charge.


MHS and the Guidance Counselors strongly recommend the use of these
Individual Login Instructions. Students will create a personal account at school
if they haven’t already done so, following these instructions. Counselors and
other qualified staff will have administrative access to help students manage
their accounts and monitor completion of specific assignments.


      1. Go to www.missouriconnections.org
      2. Returning users may enter their login information.
      3. New users must contact the guidance office in order to register and be
         linked to the MHS system.
      4. Username: first name plus four-digit month/day of birthday
               Example: Michelle0206
      5. Password: hounds1
      6. Explore the home page or click on ―Go to My Portfolio‖ to view your
         account records.


Parents: You will not need to log in. Take a virtual tour of the system, learn
how careers are presented to students, see a career planning timeline, and get
suggestions on how to help your child with career planning. You can also view
your child’s portfolio, if they have provided you with their username and
password.


The Maryville R-II School District is developing programs to assist all students
in choosing and preparing for rewarding careers. A general high school
program of studies is simply not enough preparation for today’s colleges or for
employment in today’s complex workplace. Rather, the program of studies
must be carefully planned and selected to help ensure that students may attain
their goals.
                                        12




The A+ Schools program has initiated a program of Career Paths, coinciding
with Missouri Connections Career Paths and Career Clusters, to give FOCUS and
DIRECTION to the selection of a high school course of study and to best assist
the student in achieving whatever goal has been chosen. All high school
students will be asked to select a career path, which include:
                  Industrial & Engineering Technology: Building & Fixing Path
                  Human Services: Helping Path
                  Natural Resources & Agriculture: Nature Path
                  Business, Management & Technology: Business Path
                  Arts & Communication: Creative Path
                  Health Services: Health Path


As a part of the A+ Schools program, each student, working with parents and
the high school counselor, will develop a course of study centered on one of the
six broad career pathways. The course of study may reflect a general area of
interest such as health services, or it may concentrate on a specific
occupational goal such as becoming a respiratory therapist or a registered
nurse. The following activities enable students to achieve a designated career
path:
                                        13




                  Maryville students have been involved in activities designed
                   to expand awareness of a variety of careers, including local
                   and regional career fairs and college fairs, in addition to in
                   class career exploration.
                  By the ninth grade, a student will be able to choose a career
                   path by considering personal interests, personalities and
                   strengths. Then the student can develop a four-year plan by
                   selecting courses which are relevant to the variety of
                   occupations in the chosen career path.


If students change their minds…
A career path choice is not a permanent commitment. As students mature and
have new experiences, they will learn new things about themselves and may
want to change career paths. If a student decides on a new career path, it
should be discussed with the counselor, so the student’s four-year plan may be
adjusted according to the new career direction.
                                                 14




                               Your Future Plans
In the high school years – especially in your freshman and sophomore years – you
should be closing in on a decision about the cluster of occupations you are likely to
enter, which high school courses would be most beneficial for you, and what kind of
education or training you will pursue after high school. In order to accomplish these
tasks, we suggest that you do the following:
       Take the interest assessments on Missouri Connections, such as the Career
        Cluster Inventory and Interest Profiler and print out the Composite Report from
        these two. You might want to discuss this report with your parents and your
        counselor.
       Explore careers to find a list of occupations in the clusters of your highest
        interest and/or skill and to get detailed information about them.
       Take Connections assessments to help you identify your personal values and
        career interests.
       Develop a four-year high school plan that will prepare you for work in your
        selected cluster(s).
       Based on your favorite occupations, develop a plan for education or training
        after high school. If appropriate, select from among the available career-
        technology schools or colleges. Determine what your major should be in order
        to be best prepared for your future occupation.




                            Freshman/ Sophomore
                                           Year


       In the high school years—especially in your 9th and 10th grade years—you should
                                                  15




    be closing in on a decision about the cluster of occupations you are likely to enter,
    which high school courses would be most beneficial for you, and what kind of
    education or training you will pursue after high school. In order to accomplish
    these tasks, we suggest that you do the following:

    Talk to your guidance counselor and/or teachers about your future plans. Choose a
     course of study and focus your electives in particular areas that support your interests
     and build your skills in those areas of interest.
    Take part in extracurricular activities to learn about what you like to do and to gain
     experiences that will benefit you in your future academic and career paths.
    Talk to your parents, friends, and family members about their occupations.
    Take advantage of additional opportunities to learn about other occupations through
     activities such as guest speakers, field trips, part-time jobs, and volunteer activities.
    Document your career exploration activities by keeping appropriate notes and
     document.
    Begin setting up a basic resumé on Missouri Connections. Add work experiences to
     your resume. Continue to add accomplishments and awards. .
    Manage your list of favorites in the Missouri Connections by removing items in which
     you are no longer interested and adding new items of interest.
    Take (or re-take) the interest assessment skills inventory and print out the Composite
     Report from these two. You might want to discuss this report with your parents and
     your counselor.
    Explore careers to find a list of occupations in the clusters of your highest interest
     and/or skill and to get detailed information about them. Plan for your future by
     developing or refineing a four-year high school plan that will prepare you for work in
     your selected cluster(s).
    Based on your favorite occupations, begin to develop a plan for education or training
     after high school. Begin exploring appropriate technical, two-year, and four-year
     postsecondary education options using Missouri Connections.
                                                   16




                                         Junior Year


      The junior year of high school is a crucial year in career and academic planning. If you
      have not already done so, you should decide which occupation or occupation cluster you
      intend to pursue. Based on that decision, you will need to make preparations for entering
      the job market or further education. During your junior year, we suggest you do the
      following:

       Continue to learn more about occupations and education options using the
        exploratory activities listed in the previous years.
       Attend career fairs and visit with school representatives who come to your campus.
       Continue to record accomplishments, extracurricular activities, and work experiences
        in your
        Missouri Connections Portfolio.

August/September

       Review your education plan to ensure you will meet graduation requirements and will
        be prepared to pursue the job, training, or education plans that best suit you.
       If you are considering attending college after you graduate from high school, obtain
        schedules, forms, and other information about standardized exams such as the ACT,
        SAT I, SAT II, and AP exams. Find out which of these is preferred by the schools you
        have selected.
       If you plan to pursue a four-year degree, register for the PSAT exam offered in
        October.

October/November

       Take the PSAT at a local high school on one of two dates it is offered in October if you
        want to use it as a practice exam for the SAT or if you plan to apply for scholarships
        for which it is a screening exam.
       In November, review your PSAT results with your counselor and parents/guardians.

       Consider a part-time job with a company that hires people in the occupation that
        interests you

December/January
                                                 17




     If you have not taken the career inventories on Missouri Connections within the past
      year, re-take them now so your results will be up-to-date as you continue to make
      occupation and postsecondary education plans.
     Review the results of the assessments and research occupations in your top two
      career clusters.
     Based on the occupations that interest you, learn about the kind of education you
      need to pursue those occupations: technical school, two-year college, or four-year
      college/university and what major(s) would be most appropriate. Using Missouri
      Connections, you can search for and compare post secondary institutions to
      determine if they meet your personal requirements and preferences.
     Search Colleges to review and compare over 7,400 postsecondary institutions. Save
      the schools that interest you in your ―My Favorites‖ list.
     If you plan to take the ACT or SAT test, you may wish to sign up for preparatory
      course.




February/March

     In February, register for the March SAT or the April ACT exams.
     Start planning visits to the schools and colleges that interest you. Take guided tours,
      meet with admissions counselors, and attend a class or two as a guest. If looking at
      schools with on-campus housing, stay overnight in a residence hall and eat at the
      dining hall, if possible. The more time you spend on campus and talking with faculty
      and students, the easier it will be for you to determine if this is the right
      postsecondary option for you.
     If you would like to join the military through the Reserve Officer Training Corps
      (ROTC) while attending college, be sure to speak with a ROTC representative as part of
      your campus visits.
     After any campus visit or talk with a school representative, write down your thoughts
      about the school and its programs. What, specifically, did you like? What did you not
      like? If you are considering a major that requires a portfolio for admission into the
      program, begin creating and compiling items to include in your portfolio. Examples of
      majors that might require a portfolio include art, media studies, fashion design, or
      music.
                                                            18




 April/May

           Start researching financial aid and scholarship information using Missouri
            Connections. Check with your guidance counselor to learn about local scholarships.
           Take the ACT test or SAT test, as appropriate. Almost without exception, colleges will
            accept scores from either the ACT or the SAT exams, though they may prefer one over
            the other. Some colleges require neither, so be aware of the entrance requirements for
            the schools that interest you most. Many people try to improve their score by taking
            these standardized tests more than once, so allow for that possibility in your personal
            timeline.
           Before school is over for the academic year, talk with teachers and counselors about
            writing letters of recommendations for you.

 June/July/August

           Add academic accomplishments, test scores, and other relevant information from the
            previous academic year to your MO Connections Portfolio.
           Continue to visit postsecondary schools to learn more and answer questions that may
            have come up since earlier visits.
           Begin thinking about application requirements for schools and financial aid. Gather
            information you will need to complete those applications and practice writing
            application essays.
           Consider whether you might want to apply to a college that has an early decision
            option.




                                         SENIOR YEAR

The senior year of high school is an exciting time as you make final decisions about your postsecondary plans.
As you leave the familiar company and surroundings of your high school, you will be looking forward to
meeting new people and experiencing new opportunities in the workplace or in a new education environment.
During your senior year, we suggest you do the following:

          Attend career fairs and visit with school representatives who come to your campus.
                                                          19



      Continue to record accomplishments, extracurricular activities, and work experiences in your MO
       Connections Portfolio .

September/October
      Meet with your guidance counselor and review your education plan one more time to ensure you will
       meet graduation requirements and entrance requirements for the postsecondary schools or training
       programs that interest you. While meeting with your counselor, confirm that your transcripts are
       accurate and up-to-date.
      Use MO Connections to narrow your list of potential postsecondary schools or programs to your top
       three or four.
      Consider a part-time job with a company that hires people in the occupation that interests you.
      If you are interested in military service, there are many ways to join. Speak with recruitment
       representatives about the options. You may enlist after completion of high school or its equivalency,
       and you would have opportunity for job training and future education.
      If you plan to retake one or more of the standardized national exams, register in September for the
       October and November SAT I, SAT II, or ACT tests.
      Apply to the colleges, schools, or training programs that interest you. Apply to more than one school
       with different levels of admission requirements to give yourself options.
      Continue searching for scholarships using MO Connections and by asking your guidance counselor
       about local scholarships.
      Ask teachers and counselors to write letters of recommendation to support your college and
       scholarship applications.
      Begin writing essays for college and scholarship applications. Discuss your essays with teachers,
       counselors, parents, and other trusted advisors.
      If you plan to play any Division 1 or Division 2 college sports, register with the NCAA Clearinghouse to
       ensure your eligibility.
      Continue to revise and update your resumé on MO Connections by adding activities in which you have
       participated, jobs which you have held, and places or programs where you have volunteered.

November/December
      Check application deadlines for postsecondary institutions, scholarships, and financial aid. Complete
       the necessary applications. Make photocopies of all application materials before sending them.
      If you are interested in an early decision option with one of your potential colleges, check the
       guidelines for that program.

January/February
      If you plan to attend a postsecondary institution with a specific application deadline, prepare to submit
       those applications now. The application deadlines for many schools is between January 15 and March
       1; however, you should check with the specific schools to which you are applying. Some open
       admissions colleges only require that you register by the time classes start.
      If you plan to enter the workforce after high school, begin looking for job openings. One of the best
       ways to find out about job openings is through networking—telling friends and acquaintances that you
       are looking for a position. You can also search the help wanted ads in newspapers, use job search web
       sites, and contact companies directly about possible openings.


      Whether you are seeking a full-time job or a part-time job to help pay for your education, it is
       important to work on your job-seeking tools and skills. Make sure your resumé is up-to-date,
       accurate, and as attractive as possible. Try the various options for styles and formatting available to
       you through Missouri Connections. Have someone with good proofreading skills look over your resumé
       to make sure it is letter perfect.
                                                           20



      Talk to your counselor about job-seeking aids such as resumé and cover letter assistance and mock
       interviews.
      If you are applying for scholarships through a college or postsecondary program, apply as soon as
       possible. The earlier you apply, the more scholarship funds that will be available.

      Fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form to apply for free financial aid.

March/April
      If you applied to schools in January and February, begin looking for admissions decisions in the mail in
       March and April.
      Make a final decision about which school you plan to attend. Contact all schools to which you were
       accepted and inform the admissions office of your final decisions.
      If you plan to enter an apprenticeship or the military following graduation, contact the admission or
       enlistment personnel to finalize your plans.
      If you plan to enter the workforce following graduation, submit applications and/or resumés for
       positions that seem best suited to your interests and abilities.

May through August
      If you took any Advanced Placement courses, consider taking the AP tests in May in order to quality
       for college credit.
      After the end of the school term, send your final high school transcript to the school you plan to
       attend.
      Update your resumé to include your graduation information and any recent additions.
      If entering the workforce, continue to apply for jobs and pursue interviews.
If you are attending a two-year or four-year college, ask about placement tests. Some colleges allow you to test out
          of a subject area rather than take that general coursework which can save you time and money.
                                                                      21



                                                    COURSE OFFERINGS

                                                                    Mathematics                      Credit       Grade Level
Communication Arts              Credit               Grade Level    Algebra 1A                           1                   9-11
English I                         1                            9    Algebra 1B                           1                   9-11
Honors English I (W)              1                            9    Algebra I                            1                   9-12
English II                        1                           10    Algebra II                           1                   9-12
Honors English II (W)             1                           10    Honors Algebra II (W)                1                  10-12
English III                       1                           11    Pre-Calculus(D)(W)                   1                  11-12
Honors English III (W)            1                           11    AP Calculus (D)(W)                   1                     12
English IV                        1                           12    Geometry                             1                  10-12
Honors English IV (W)(D)          1                           12    Advanced Geometry                    1                  10-12
Honors World Lit. (W)(D)          1                           12    Finite Mathematics                   ½                  11-12
Speech I                          ½                        11-12    Statistics                           ½                  10-12
Speech II (W)(D)                  ½                        11-12    Mathematics Credits:                 10
Forensics & Debate                1                         9-12
Mass Media                        1                        10-12    Science                       Credit         Grade Level
Communication Arts                                                  Biology A                       1                   9-10
Credits:                            12.0                            Biology B                       1                  10-11
                                                                    Biology                         1                      9
Foreign Language            Credit                  Grade Level     Physical Science                1                     10
French I                        1                           9-12    Micro-biology                   ½                  10-12
French II                       1                          10-12    Genetics                        ½                  10-12
French III (D)(W)               1                          11-12    Human Biology (W)               1                  11-12
French IV (D)(W)                1                             12    Material Science                1                  11-12
Spanish I                       1                           9-12    Chemistry (D)(W)                1                  11-12
Spanish II                      1                          10-12    Physics (D)(W)                  1                  11-12
Spanish III (D)(W)              1                          11-12    Principles of Technology        1                  11-12
Spanish IV (D)(W)               1                             12    College Biology(D)(W)           1                  11-12
Foreign Language
Credits:                        8                                   Science Credits:                11

 Social Studies                            Credit    Grade Level    Fine Arts                      Credit     Grade Level
 American Government                         ½                 9    Art I                            1               9-12
 Geography                                   1              9-12    Drawing I                        ½              10-12
 World History                               1             10-12    Drawing II                       ½              10-12
 Honors World History                        1             10-12    Painting I                       ½              10-12
 Psychology                                  ½             10-12    Painting II                      ½              10-12
 American History                            1                11    Ceramics I                       ½              10-12
 Honors American Hist. (D)(W)                1                11    Ceramics II                      ½              10-12
 Civil War                                   ½             11-12    Fiber Art                        ½              10-12
 Current World                               ½             11-12    Advanced Music Studies           1              11-12
 Western Civilizations (D)(W)                1             11-12    Concert Choir                    1              10-12
 Personal Finance                            ½             11-12    Mixed Choir                      1               9-12
                                                                    Spectrum                         1               9-12
 Social Studies Credits:                    8.5                     Guitar                           1              11-12
                                                                    Drama                            1               9-12
                                                                    Band                             1               9-12
                                                                         *Music Appreciation         1              11-12
                                                                        *Foundations of Music        1             11-12
                                                                    Fine Arts Credts:               13.5

                                                                   *See Mr. Shouse for more information on theses classes




                                                                                                    Credit        Grade Level
                                                                       22




 Physical Education
 Health                              ½                          9    Practical Arts: Industrial Tech.        Credit        Grade Level
 Introduction to Lifetime            1                          9    Collision Repair                          3                  11-12
 Activities                                                          Automotive Technology                     3                  11-12
 Lifetime Activities I               ½                      10-12    Building Trades                           3                  11-12
 Lifetime Activities II              ½                      10-12    Welding and Machine Shop Tech             3                  11-12
 Advanced Fitness                    1                      10-12    Practical Arts, Industrial Tech.
 Adapted Physical Education          1                       9-12    Credits:                                     12
 Health/PE Credits:                  4.5                             Practical Arts: Agriculture             Credit        Grade Level
                                                                     Agricultural Science I                    1                  9-10
 Practical Arts: Consumer                                            Agricultural Science II                   1                 10-12
 Science                                 Credit     Grade Level      Agricultural Science I-Structures         1                   9-12
 Child Development                         ½                9-12     (Building Maintenance I)
 Family Living                             ½                9-12     Agricultural Science II-Structures            1              10-12
 Fashion for 21st Century                  ½                9-12     (Building Maintenance II)
 Housing & Human Environments              ½                9-12     Agricultural Structures                       1              11-12
 Nutrition and Wellness                    ½               10-12     Agricultural Construction                     1              11-12
 Singles Living/Consumer Education         ½               11-12     Animal Science (D)                             1             10-11
 Culinary Arts                             2               11-12     Agricultural Power                             ½             11-12
 Food Management                           1               11-12     Greenhouse Operation & Management              1             11-12
 Foods Coop                                2                  12     Landscape & Turf Management                    1             11-12
 Child Care                                3               11-12     Agricultural Communications                    ½             11-12
 Practical Arts, Consumer Science                                    Ag Sales & Marketing                           ½             11-12
                                                                     Conservation                                   ½             11-12
 Credits:                                  11                        Ag Coop                                      1 or 2             12
                                                                     Practical Arts, Agriculture Credits:           13
Practical Arts: Health Services
Technology                                Credit      Grade Level
Body Structure &Function/Medical                                     General Elective Courses            Credit            Grade Level
Terminology                                     1               12   A Plus Mentor                        1/2                      12
Health Careers Exploration                      1               12   Cadet Teaching                        1                        12
Health Fundamentals                             1               12   College Release                       0                        12
Practical Arts, Health Services                                      Driver Education (Summer)             ¼                      9-12
Credits:                                        3                    Library Practicum                   ½ or 1                     12
                                                                     Office Assistant                    ½ or 1                     12
                                                    Grade            General Elective Courses
 Practical Arts: Business            Credit         Level            Credits:                            3.75
 Computer Applications                     1             9-12
 Digital Publishing                        ½            10-12        Special Services Courses           Credit             Grade level
 Multi Media                               ½            10-12        Academic Support                     1                       9-12
 Web Design                                ½            10-12        Basic Skills (EMH, LD, BD)           1                       9-12
 Business Technology (D)                   1            11-12        Special Services Credits:            2
 International Business                    1            11-12
 Advanced Web Design                       ½            10-12
 Business law                              1            11-12
 Accounting                                1            10-12        Total Credits Offered:             122.25
 Business Management                       1            11-12
 Network Administration                    1            11-12
 Cooperative Education                   1 or 2            12

 Practical Arts, Business Credits:          11
                                                           23



                   COMMUNICATION ARTS


                                    COMMUNICATION               ARTS
            2011 - 2012 Communication Arts SEQUENCE RECOMMENDATIONS:
                  The MHS English department strongly recommends that students complete
                                one of the following sequences of courses.


                Non-College Bound             College Bound                Honors College Bound
                      Prep                         Prep                            Prep


 Freshman              English I                                *Honors English I




Sophomore             English II                                *Honors English II




                      English III                               *Honors English III
   Junior                and                                           and
                       Speech I                                     Speech I


   Senior             English IV            *Honors English IV         *Honors English IV/Dual Credit
                                          *Speech II/Dual Credit          *Speech II/Dual Credit
                                                                        *World Literature/ Dual Credit



  Credits                4½                           5                               6

                                                                                      * weighted courses


  English                                                                              English Credit/
Department       Forensics & Debate            Grades 9 – 12                 Writing Credit for College
  Elective                                                                                 Admissions


  English                                                                              English Credit/
Department           Mass Media               Grades 10 – 12             Non-writing Credit for College
  Elective                                                                                 Admissions


 Fine Arts
Department              Drama                  Grades 9 – 12                           Fine Arts Credit
  Elective



                                                       To take World Literature, students must be
                                                     simultaneously enrolled in Honors English IV

A summer English Recovery course (1/2 credit) is offered for those students who fail first
                                                                 24


       semester of English I, II, or III.
ENGLISH I: (1 credit, Gr. 9) - This course is designed to re-introduce students to the fundamentals of writing
and reading. This yearlong course (two semesters) prepares the student to apply good writing processes
through various activities. Students will read novels, short stories, nonfiction literature, poetry, a
Shakespearean play, and view films that correlate to works read as part of the class curriculum. Students can
expect a wide variety of classroom activities including workshop sessions, lectures, readings, class
discussions, small group discussions, library research, and basic grammar activities. Homework:
Approximately 1 - 2 weekly.
Pre-requisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 The writing process.                              -005 Critical thinking within a team for collaborative
       -002 Grammar and usage skills.                                 problem solving.
       -003 Understanding and apply literary                  -006 Summarization for information and note taking.
            terminology.                                      -007 Expand vocabulary through context while
       -004 Use of all media center resources.                    improving oral language skills.


HONORS ENGLISH I: (1 credit, Gr. 9) - This course provides accelerated and/or enriched coursework for
those students already familiar with the fundamentals of writing and reading.
Students will intereact with and respond to the literature through a variety of writing assignments
and research-based projects. Analytical readings of novels, short stories, nonfiction literature, poetry, and a
Shakespearean play will be expected. Students will also research topics, compose essays, and document
sources using MLA (Modern Language Association) style. This is a weighted course. Homework:
Approximately 2 - 3 hours weekly. Pre-requisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 The writing process.                              -006 Summarization for information and note taking.
       -002 Grammar and usage skills.                         -007 Expand vocabulary through context while
       -003 Understanding and apply literary                       improving oral language skills.
            terminology.
       -004 Use of all media center resources.
        -005 Critical thinking within a team for
            collaborative problem solving.


ENGLISH II: (1 credit, Gr. 10) - English II provides the opportunity for the continued study of language and
literature. Students should learn to detect the structure of a short story, novel, and drama; to organize a
composition; to be aware of the mechanics and elements of grammar; to apply reading, writing, listening,
speaking and critical thinking skills to work place situations; to recognize more complicated literary devices;
and to write essays and document research using MLA (Modern Language Association) style. Homework: 2-3
hours per week. Prerequisite: English I or Honors English I.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Using the Writing Process.                                  -005 Reading for comprehension.
       -002 Using computer software for word                  -006 Using the media center for research.
            processing and presentation.                      -007 Composing essays using MLA style.
       -003 Applying proper grammar, spelling,                -008 Writing various types of compositions.
            punctuation skills.                               -009 Interacting properly with large and small groups.
       -004 Writing for a specific audience.                  -010 Applying literary themes to different situations
.
                                                               25


HONORS ENGLISH II: (1 credit, Gr. 10)– Honors English II students will work with stylistic analysis as it relates
to higher level thinking and writing and to critical reading skills. Extensive reading, writing, and response
strategies will be emphasized. Students will organize compositions, write a research paper using MLA style,
and focus on recognition and implementation of complicated literary devices. This is a weighted course.
Homework: 3-5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: English I or Honors English I.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Using the Writing Process.                                 -007 Composing essays using MLA style
       -002 Using computer software for word                -008 Writing various types of compositions
            processing and presentation.                    -009 Interacting properly with large and
       -003 Applying proper grammar, spelling,                      small groups.
            punctuation skills                              -010 Applying literary themes to different situations.
       -004 Writing for a specific audience.                -011 Modeling literary styles through
       -005 Reading for comprehension.                              creative writing projects
       -006 Using the media center for research.




ENGLISH III: (1 credit,Gr.11)- English III will concentrate on improving both writing and reading skills. Writing
will focus on developing test taking skills, creative writing, constructing a multi-genre genealogy project; and
technical writing, highlighting letter styles. Reading will be developed through American Literature selections
from the various genres of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama. Homework: approximately 1-2 hours per
week. Prerequisite: English II or Honors English II.
Competencies/Objectives:
      -001 Developing writing skills                                 -004 Writing for various purposes
      -002 Developing reading skills                                 -005 Developing research skills
      -003 Developing test taking skills                             -006 Reading for comprehension

HONORS ENGLISH III: (1 credit, Gr.11) – Honors English III will concentrate on mastery of argument, reading
comprehension, and critical thinking. This is an accelerated English class in which American literature –
including fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama – will be analyzed and discussed. A variety of writing genres
will also be composed to demonstrate a thorough grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works.
Homework: 2-5 hours per week Prerequisite: English II or Honors English II
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Developing writing skills                                  -005 Developing research skills
       -002 Developing reading skills                                  -006 Reading for comprehension
       -003 Developing test-taking skills                              -007 Completing a persuasive research paper
       -004 Writing for various purposes


ENGLISH IV: (1 Credit, Gr.12) – English IV equips students with the skills and strategies for successful college
and everyday reading and writing. Students will apply academic skills when reading from a variety of genres,
including both print and online sources. Writing will emphasize skills which a competent student will be
expected to have mastered; different types of writing models and projects will be included. Homework:
approximately 1 - 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: English III or Honors English III
Competencies/Objectives:
                                                               26


       -001 Expanding vocabulary through context.                   -005 Reading for comprehension.
       -002 Using computer software for word                        -006 Using the media center for research.
            processing and presentation.                            -007 Completing a multi-genre research paper.
       -003 Applying proper grammar, spelling,                      -008 Writing various types of compositions.
       punctuation skills.                                          -009 Interacting properly with large and small
       -004 Writing for a specific audience.                        groups.


HONORS ENGLISH IV: (1 credit, Gr.12) – Honors English IV is an accelerated composition course offered for
dual credit (Maryville High School and Northwest Missouri State University). With proper enrollment and
payment of fees, 3 hours of credit from Northwest Missouri State University may be obtained. This course will
focus on college level writing, including extensive grammar reviews, 2-3 research papers, college enrollment
and scholarship writing, multi-genre research papers prepared using MLA (Modern Language Association)
style, and numerous other composition assignments. This is a weighted course. Homework: 2-5 hours per
week Prerequisite: English III or Honors English III
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Expanding vocabulary through context.                   -006 Using the media center for research.
       -002 Using computer software for word                        -007 Completing a multi-genre research paper.
            processing and presentation.                            -008 Writing various types of compositions.
       -003 Applying proper grammar, spelling,                      -009 Interacting properly with large and small
            punctuation skills.                                           groups.
       -004 Writing for a specific audience.                        -010 Participating in the college application and
       -005 Reading for comprehension.                                   scholarship process.


HONORS WORLD LITERATURE (1 credit, Gr.12) – Honors World Literature is an accelerated course offered for
dual credit (Maryville High School and Northwest Missouri State University). With proper enrollment and
payment of fees, 3 hours of credit from Northwest Missouri State University may be obtained; this course
meets a general education humanities or literature requirement. Honors World Literature will present a general
introduction to literature organized around central themes in our global society. Selected themes will vary, but
each section will include 1) literature from various genres; 2) literature from three centuries; 3) readings from
at least three distinct cultural categories. This is a weighted course. Homework: 2-5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: English III or Honors English III and must be simultaneously enrolled in Honors English IV.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Reading various genres of literature                    -007 Reading for comprehension
       -002 Reading literature from three centuries                 -008 Writing various types of compositions
       -006 Reading literature from distinct cultural               about literature
       categories


MASS MEDIA: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - Mass Media includes learning about the facets of yearbook production -
copy writing, ad sales, yearbook sales, photography, layout, and fund raising. This class requires some after
school and weekend hours. Students must be willing to participate in all yearbook activities and demonstrate
organization and cooperation skills. This course may be taken more than once. Homework: Weekend and
after school hours. Prerequisite: Successful completion of English I.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 To aid students in acquiring skills.                    -003 Develop skills in yearbook photography.
       -002 Preparation of yearbook layouts.
                                                                27


       -004 Develop skills in staff organization.                    -006 Grammar and usage skills.
       -005 Desktop publishing with computers.                       -007 Develop skills in graphic design.
SPEECH I: (½ credit, Gr.11) - This course introduces the student to the study of informal and formal oral
communication. The course is performance oriented with the student preparing and delivering formal
speeches, as well as, participating in informal communication. Speech I is designed to help improve the
student's daily communication skills with emphasis on listening and effective speaking. Grading is based on
quizzes, exams, class participation, class performance, and daily work.
Homework:approximately 1-2 hours per week. Prerequisite: Must be a junior.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 The importance of speech communication.                  -005 Group communication process.
       -002 The verbal and nonverbal characteristics of              -006 Interpersonal communication skills.
            effective communication.                                 -007 Elements of informative speaking.
       -003 Active listening.                                        -008 Elements of persuasive speaking.
       -004 The preparation, process and evaluation of an            -009 Elements of debate.
            interview.


SPEECH II: (1/2 credit / Gr. 12) Speech II is offered for dual credit (Maryville High School and Northwest
Missouri State University). The course will follow guidelines established by the Northwest Missouri State
University Department of Communication. With proper enrollment and payment of fees, 3 hours of credit from
Northwest Missouri State University may be obtained. Speech II is designed to re-inforce and extend the
communication study introduced in the Speech I course curriculum. As expected, there will be numerous
opportunities for students to enhance their communication skills by participating in both group and public
speaking situations. Homework: 2-3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Speech I.This is a weighted course.
Competencies / Objectives:
       -001 Develop competency in areas of:                     -004 Develop understanding and skills in active
                         A. Interpersonal interactions                listening for comprehension, evaluation, and
                         B. Interviewing skills                       empathy
                         C. Group / Team participation          -005 Develop an understanding of and appreciation
                         D. Public communication                      for a multicultural approach to spoken
       -002 Research, organize, present, and cite                     communication
            information for informative, demonstrative,         -006 Assess and critique their own and others’ oral
            and persuasive speeches                                   performances by assessing content,
       -003 Plan a group problem-solving presentation                 organization, and delivery
            and prioritize solutions


FORENSICS & DEBATE:: (1 credit / Gr. 9-12)
This course will focus on preparing students to engage in several forms of public speaking - forensics,
debate, and student congress. Forensics is designed to give students experience in performing in a variety of
speaking forms, such as oratory, extemporaneous speaking, oral interpretation of poetry and prose, dramatic
interpretation, humorous interpretation, duet acting, duo interpretation, storytelling, and radio speaking
events. By discussing both sides of current events and controversial subjects, students will develop tolerance
and will learn trends in Policy Debate, Lincoln-Douglas Debate, and Public Forum Debate. Student Congress is
designed to allow students to use debate skills to write, research, analyze, and participate in legislative
sessions where bills and resolutions are discussed. Designed to help students prepare for competition,
students will be asked to participate, time, or observe while attending at least one competitive speech contest
                                                                     28


per quarter. Forensics & Debate may be taken yearly, and fulfills an English credit needed by all high school
students for graduation. Homework: 2-3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Good memory skills and a willingness
to participate in class and at competive NFL tournaments are strongly recommended.
Competencies / Objectives
               -001 Discover literature pieces that are adaptive to performance
               -002 Practice delivery skills that appeal to a variety of judges
               -003 Develop time management skills to meet class and tournament deadlines
               -004 Assess and critique their own and others’ performances
               -005 Foster competitive communication skills with emphasis on ethics
               -006 Utilize research skills, evaluating and justifying evidence
               -007 Practice writing skills when constructing the Affirmative and Negative cases
               -008 Develop analytical skills to defend, support, and justify cases

                              FOREIGN LANGUAGE

                                        French


FRENCH I: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - Students will be introduced to the language and culture of the French-
speaking world. Students will begin attaining proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing French
with an emphasis on the present tense and sentence structure. Students will acquire a command of essential
vocabulary. Homework: 1-2 hours per week. Prerequisite: Good memory skills and a "B" average in English
is strongly recommended.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Reading very simple French sentences.
       -002 Understanding very simple spoken French sentences.
       -003 Writing very simple French sentences.
       -004 Speaking very simple French sentences.
       -005 Identifying some cultural characteristics of the French- speaking world.


FRENCH II: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - Students will expand the study of French language into learning more
complex structures of grammar, including verb tenses beyond the present. They will increase their proficiency
in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as they expand their vocabulary and continue exploring the culture
of the French-speaking world. Prerequisite: "B" average in French I is recommended.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Reading simple French sentences.
       -002 Understanding simple spoken French sentences.
       -003 Writing simple French sentences.
       -004 Speaking in simple French sentences.
       -005 Identifying some cultural characteristics of the French-speaking world.
                                                                   29


FRENCH III: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - Students will expand the study of the French language into learning more
complex structures of grammar and additional verb tenses. They will increase their proficiency in listening,
speaking, reading and writing as they expand their vocabulary and continue exploring the culture of the
French-speaking world. There are cultural enrichment activities such as a food project, an art unit, the
reading of short stories and the short novel, Le Petit Prince. Prerequisite: "B" average in French II is
recommended.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Reading moderately complex French sentences.
       -002 Understanding moderately complex spoken French sentences.
       -003 Writing moderately complex French sentences.
       -004 Speaking in moderately complex French sentences
       -005 Identify some cultural characteristics of the French-speaking world.


FRENCH IV: (1 credit, Gr. 12) - Students will improve their grammatical, vocabulary, and writing skills. They
will read short stories and an abridged version of the novel Les Miserables. Emphasis is on listening and
speaking when possible. Prerequisite: "B" average in French III is recommended.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Reading fairly complex French sentences.
       -002 Understanding fairly complex spoken French sentences.
       -003 Writing fairly complex French sentences.
       -004 Speaking in fairly complex French sentences.
       -005 Identifying some cultural characteristics of the French-speaking world.




                                      Spanish

SPANISH I: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - Students will be introduced to the language and culture of the Spanish-
speaking world. Students will begin attaining proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish
with an emphasis on the present tense and sentence structure. Students will acquire a command of essential
vocabulary. Homework: 1-2 hours per week. Prerequisite: Good memory skills and a "B" average in English I
or "B" average in eighth grade English is recommended.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Reading very simple Spanish sentences.
       -002 Understanding very simple spoken Spanish sentences.
       -003 Writing very simple Spanish sentences.
       -004 Speaking in very simple Spanish sentences.
       -005 Identifying some cultural characteristics of the Spanish speaking world.
                                                                     30




SPANISH II: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - Students will expand the study of the Spanish language into learning
more complex structures of grammar, including verb tenses beyond the present. They will increase their
proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as they expand their vocabulary and continue exploring
the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: "B" average in Spanish I is recommended.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Reading simple Spanish sentences and paragraphs.
        -002 Understanding simple spoken Spanish sentences.
        -003 Writing simple Spanish sentences.
        -004 Speaking simple Spanish sentences.
        -005 Identifying several cultural characteristics of the Spanish-speaking world.


SPANISH III: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - Students will expand the study of the Spanish language into learning
more complex structures of grammar, including future and conditional verb tenses and more complex use of
verbs
in the past tense. They will increase their proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as they
expand their vocabulary and learn more about the Spanish-speaking world. Spanish III is a weighted class.
It may be taken for dual credit through Northwest Missouri State University. Prerequisite: "B" average in
Spanish II is recommended.
Competencies/Objectives:
         -001 Reading moderately complex Spanish sentences.
         -002 Understanding moderately complex spoken Spanish sentences.
         -003 Writing moderately complex Spanish sentences.
         -004 Speaking moderately complex Spanish sentences.
         -005 Identifying some cultural characteristics of the Hispanic world.


SPANISH IV: (1 credit, Gr. 12) - Students will expand vocabulary and increase proficiency in listening,
speaking, reading and writing skills as they learn additional verb tenses and grammar skills, including the
subjunctive and imperative moods. Focus in the course is on using the language in conversation, reading and
writing. Students will read short stories and increase cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world.
Spanish IV is a weighted class. It may be taken for dual credit from Northwest Missouri State University.
Prerequisite: "B" average in Spanish III is recommended.
Competencies/Objectives:
         -001 Reading fairly complex Spanish sentences.
         -002 Understanding fairly complex spoken Spanish sentences.
         -003 Writing fairly complex Spanish sentences.
         -004 Speaking in fairly complex Spanish sentences.
         -005 Identifying some cultural characteristics of the Hispanic world




                                                 MATHEMATICS
                                                                            31




                                                MHS MATH SEQUENCE
   Alternate sequence of courses                 Most common sequence of               Teacher recommendation
                                                 courses                               required
**** Reminder: There are 3 full math credits required for graduation ****

                                                           th
                                                         8 GRADE




                                                                Algebra I
        Algebra I A
                                                                                                  GTA in
                                                                                                 2010-2011
        Algebra I B                                         Advanced                            school year
                                                            Geometry




         Geometry                                            Honors                              Pre-Calculus
                                   Algebra II               Algebra II




                      Statistics                       Finite Mathematics                       AP Calculus




               Math Department Recommendations for Calculators- based on course
       Scientific calculator with trigonometry                  Graphing Calculator: TI-84 Silver Plus
      functions, logarithms, and square root                    Edition. Cost: $130- watch for it to be
                features. Cost: $10-$15                         on sale beginning of August


          Algebra I, Algebra I A, Algebra I B                        Honors Algebra II – recommended
          Algebra II                                                 Precalculus- Required
          Geometry & Advanced Geometry                               AP Calculus – Required
          Finite                                               Calculators such as the TI -89 and TI-92
          Statistics                                           will not be allowed.
                                                               32




ALGEBRA I - A: (1 credit, Gr. 9-11) - The course includes the same topics as Algebra I using the same
textbook. The distinction between the two is the pace of the course. This course is designed to move at a
slower pace and provide more in-class instructional time for each topic. The pace of this course is designed
in such a way that at the end of the year, half of the textbook is completed. This course is the prerequisite for
both Algebra II and Geometry. The topics covered will include basic skills in algebra; working with scientific
notation; precision, accuracy, and tolerance; working with formulas; and working with powers and roots.
Prerequisite: Recommendation of teacher.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Determine various geometric qualities of                -007 Perform basic mathematical operations
           two and three-dimensional figures.                            with signed numbers.
       -002 Apply real-world events to multi-step word              -008 Analyze statistical characteristics of a set
           problems.                                                     of data.
       -003 Use scientific notation to represent very               -009 Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to real-
           large and extremely small quantities.                         world situations.
       -004 Determine the value of an unknown                       -010 Introduce the basic elements of probability.
           quantity in a multi-step equation.                       -011 Apply number sense to real-world
       -005 Incorporate order of operations into                         problem-solving.
           solving algebraic expressions.                           -012 Use functions and their graphs to discover
       -006 Perform algebraic tasks involving                            relationships between dependent and
           polynomials.                                                  independent variables.




ALGEBRA I - B: (1 credit, Gr. 9-11) - This course is the 2nd half of Algebra I. This course is designed to
move at a slower pace and provide more in-class instructional time for each topic. The pace of this course is
designed in such a way that at the end of this course, the entire Algebra I curriculum will have been covered.
This course is the prerequisite for Geometry and Algebra II. The topics covered will include basic skills in
algebra; working with scientific notation; precision, accuracy, and tolerance; working with formulas; and
working with powers and roots. Prerequisite: Algebra I A or recommendation of teacher.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Determine various geometric qualities of                -007 Perform basic mathematical operations
            two and three-dimensional figures.                           with signed numbers.
       -002 Apply real-world events to multi-step word              -008 Analyze statistical characteristics of a set
            problems.                                                    of data.
       -003 Use scientific notation to represent very               -009 Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to real-
            large and extremely small quantities.                        world situations.
       -004 Determine the value of an unknown                       -010 Introduce the basic elements of probability.
            quantity in a multi-step equation.                      -011 Apply number sense to real-world
       -005 Incorporate order of operations into                         problem-solving.
            solving algebraic expressions.                          -012 Use functions and their graphs to discover
       -006 Perform algebraic tasks involving                            relationships between dependent and
            polynomials.                                                 independen variables.


ALGEBRA I: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - Algebra I is a prerequisite to Algebra II and all the upper level mathematics
courses. The following math strands will be strongly emphasized: algebra foundations, functions & relations,
                                                               33


equations, inequalities, polynomials, quadratics, and probability & data analysis. The major focus in all of
these strands will be higher order thinking and reasoning skills. Strong emphasis will be placed upon real
world application problems. Homework: 2-5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Good elementary and middle
school mathematics background and a strong work ethic.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Determine various geometric qualities of                 -007 Perform basic mathematical operations
            two and three-dimensional figures.                             with signed numbers.
       -002 Apply real-world events to multi-step word               -008 Analyze statistical characteristics of a set
            problems.                                                      of data.
       -003 Use scientific notation to represent very                -009 Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to real-
            large and extremely small quantities.                          world situations.
       -004 Determine the value of an unknown                        -010 Introduce the basic elements of probability.
            quantity in a multi-step equation.                       -011 Apply number sense to real-world
       -005 Incorporate order of operations into                           problem-solving.
            solving algebraic expressions.                           -012 Use functions and their graphs to discover
       -006 Perform algebraic tasks involving                              relationships between dependent and
            polynomials.                                                   independent variables.




ALGEBRA II: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - In Algebra II students will review the basic terminology, skills, and
applications of Algebra I. Students will study real numbers concepts including skills involving operations with
positive and negative numbers and zero. Additional studies include solving verbal problems; applying the
properties of polynomials and rational expressions; using linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic and
trigonometric expressions; and complex number systems. Homework: 2-5 hours expected per week.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
Competencies/Objectives:
    -001 Calculate area and volume of complex                -005 Write equations of lines when given various
                    geometric shapes.                             information.
    -002 Evaluate and simplify expressions                   -006 Calculate using scientific notation in four
         including radicals.                                 operations.
    -003 Assess and solve word problems.                     -007 Solve quadratic equations.
    -004 Solve linear equations.                             -008 Convert to and from polar coordinates and
                                                                  rectangular coordinates including vector addition.


ADVANCED GEOMETRY: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - This course is for the students who have taken Algebra I and
will take Algebra II next year. The student will study basic geometry foundations , logic and reasoning,
construction, coordinate geometry, congruence and similarity of triangles, polygons, quadrilaterals, circles,
solids, and transformations. Homework: 3-5 hours per week
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Competencies/Objectives:
    -001Identify points, lines, and planes and use                -002 Develop logic and reasoning skills to solve
         theorems that apply to them                                   problems and proofs
                                                               34


    -003 Construct angles, polygons, and different               -007 Find and use the different properties of
         types of bisectors                                               quadrilaterals
    -004 Use slope and distance formulas to write                -008 Use trigonometry to solve right triangles
         equations of lines                                      -009 Use chords, secants, tangents and arcs to
    -005 Evaluate triangle congruence and similarity                      solve circles
         properties                                              -010 Find surface area and volume of solids
    -006 Use ratios, proportions and similarity in               -011 Find and use different types of
         different polygons                                               transformations


HONORS ALGEBRA II: New course for the 2011-12 school year.
(1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - This course continues to practice the fundamental skills as well as extend the topics of
algebra and trigonometry. Topics include logarithms, trigonometric identities, infinite series, conic sections,
matrices, determinants, and echelon solutions of equations. Much emphasis is placed on abstract word
problems. This course is a prerequisite for ALL dual credit math courses offered at MHS. Homework: 3-5
hours per week. Prerequisites: Algebra I and Advanced Geometry
Competencies/Objectives:
    -001 Linear Functions-graphing, solving and                  -006 Linear Systems- inequalities, linear
        inequalities                                            programming,          solving systems
     -002 Matrices- Operations, Cramer’s Rule,                -007 Conic Sections
       Determinants, Inverses                                 -008 Probability and Statistics- counting, central
    -003 Polynomials and polynomial functions-                      tendancies, binomial theorem.
        graphing, solving, factoring                          -009 Sequences, series, and logic. – Arithmetic and
    -004 Rational and radical Functions- solving,                   geomertric series, truth table
        graphing, domain, asymptotes                          -010 Quadratic Functions- solving, graphing,
    -005 Trigonometry – functions, inverses, graphing,              translating, modeling
       solving            equations, identities               -011 Exponential and Logartithmic functions- solving,
                                                                    graphing, exponential growth


GEO/TRIG/ALG III: This course was discontinued after the 2010-2011 school year

PRE-CALCULUS: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) – Pre-Calculus topics include functions and graphs, systems of
equations and inequalities, and advanced trigonometry concepts. This course is designed for students who
plan to continue study in college level mathematics. A TI-86, TI-84 Plus, or TI-83 Plus graphing calculator is
required, and students are expected to bring it to class daily. This course will be using the same texts and the
same syllabus that the university uses. Homework: 5-8 hours per week. Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II &
Geo/Trig/Algebra III. (4 credit hours from NWMSU in Mathematics 17-117 may be obtained if dual credit is
selected.)
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Work with functions and their graphs.                    -005 Solve systems of equations and
       -002 Finding intercepts, zeros, and solutions of                   inequalities.
             functions.                                              -006 Work with matrices and determinants.
       -003 Work with polynomials and rational                       -007 Trigonometric Functions, their graphs and
             functions.                                                   inverse functions
       -004 Work with logarithmic and exponential                    -008 Analytic Trigonometry/ Law of Sines and
       functions.                                                         Cosines
                                                                     -009 Introduction to Limits
                                                               35




AP (ADVANCED PLACEMENT) CALCULUS: (1 credit, GR.12) This course is an introduction to single variable
calculus. The analysis of graphs of a variety of functions and graphing techniques will be used to demonstrate
concepts such as limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrations. Other topics will include applications of
derivatives and integrals including shell and disk volumes along with the area between 2 curves. The course is
designed to prepare students for taking the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam administered by The
College Board each May (optional). A TI-86 or TI 84 plus silver graphing calculator are required for this class
and should be brought daily. Homework: 5-8 hours per week. Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II,
Geo/Trig/Algebra III, and Pre-Calculus, Students should also be proficient in the use of a graphing calculator.
(4 credit hours from NWMSU in Mathematics 120 may be obtained if dual credit is selected.)
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Evaluate limits of functions and know when               -006 Find points of non-differentiability for a
            limits do not exist - including one-sided                   function.
            limits.                                                 -007 Solve related rate problems.
       -002 Determine the points of continuity or                   -008 Compute differentials.
            discontinuity of a function.                            -009 Analyze a function using the concepts of
       -003 Find the equation of the tangent line to a                   extreme values, increasing, decreasing,
            function at a point.                                         concavity, inflection points, and
       -004 Compute derivatives of functions using                       asymptotes.
            differentiation rules - including higher                -010 Solve applied extreme value problems.
            order derivatives.                                      -011 Compute definite and indefinite integrals.
        -005 Find the derivative of a function defined
           implicitly.


GEOMETRY: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - The student will study the basic figures of geometry, develop an
understanding of the nature of proofs, and learn to write two column proofs. Exercises will reinforce algebraic
and arithmetic skills. Concepts of congruent triangles, including work with lines and angles, will be mastered.
Also included will be a review of ratio and proportion as they apply to similar triangles. The Surface area and
volume formulas of geometric solids will be studied. Homework: 2-3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Algebra I
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Describe a point, line, and plane.                      -007 Pythagorean Theorem.
       -002 Find length and midpoint of a segment.                  -008 Circles.
       -003 Construct angles and different bisectors.               -009 Trigonometric Functions.
       -004 Congruent angles and segment lengths.                   -010 Volume and Surface Area.
       -005 Classify polygons.                                      -011 Equations and Radicals.
       -006 Similar polygons and corresponding
            measures.


FINITE MATHEMATICS: (½ credit, Gr. 11-12) - This course is designed for senior level students. Finite
Mathematics helps to determine the best course of action. This course will help to analyze problems in
business and social sciences and provide methods that help determine the implications and consequences of
various choices available. This class gives an introduction to mathematics that is useful to a variety of useful
form. Predictions and trends can be obtained from mathematical models. Mathematical analysis can provide
a basis for making a good decision. Homework: 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: Algebra I and a Geometry
course. Competencies/Objectives:
                                                                    36


       -001 Functions and Lines.                                         -003 Linear Programming.
       -002 Linear Systems.                                              -004 Mathematics of Finance


STATISTICS: (½ credit, Gr. 10-12) - This course is intended for students who have successfully completed at
least one year of high school Algebra. Statistics will serve as an introductory course in statistical concepts or a
course in mathematics for general education. Statistics is the study of how to collect, organize, analyze and
interpret numerical information. Topics of study will include the following: organizing data, averages,
variation, elementary and binomial probability, graphs and related topics, distribution estimation, sampling,
hypothesis testing and statistical decision making. Homework: 1-2 hours per week. Prerequisite: Algebra I.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Descriptive statistics.                                      -005 Binomial Probability Distribution.
       -002 Organizing Data.                                             -006 Normal Distributions.
       -003 Averages & Variation.                                        -007 Sampling Distributions.
       -004 Probability.                                                 -008 Estimation.




                                                        SCIENCE



                             Options for 3 Year Science Requirements



       Biology A                                                                       Biology

                            If ≥80% and/or teacher recommendation


                                                              Physical
        Biology B                                             Science                            Micro/
                                                                                                 Genetic
                                                                                                   s




          Material                         Principles                                                              College
          Science                              Of                                                                  Biology
         Technology                       Technology        Chemistry        Physics          Biology
                                                                37




BIOLOGY A: (1 credit, Gr. 9-10) - The first of two hands-on science courses designed for non-college bound
students. Focus will be on Life science. Homework: 0-1 hours per week. Prerequisite: None.
        Competencies/Objectives:
         -001 The scientific method.                                  -005 Classification
         -002 Ecology                                                 -006 Plants
         -003 The cell                                                -007 Animals
         -004 Genetics


BIOLOGY B: (1 credit, Gr. 10-11) - The second of two hands-on science courses designed for non-college
bound students. Focus will be on Life science principles in greater depth in preparation for the Biology exit
exam. which will be taken at the end of this course. Homework: 1-2 hours per week. Prerequisite: Biology A
or Biology.
Competencies/Objectives:
         -001 The scientific method.                                  -005 Classification
         -002 Ecology                                                 -006 Plants
         -003 The cell                                                -007 Animals
         -004 Genetics




BIOLOGY: (1 credit, Gr. 9) - This course is a prerequisite for Zoology, Micro-Biology, Genetics and Human
Biology. In this survey course the student will study living things. Students explore such topics as: the
meaning of life, structure and function of cells, chemistry of life, energy for organisms (i.e. photosynthesis and
respiration), reproduction, heredity, classification, evolution of living things, and ecology. Students will use
scientific equipment and develop proper laboratory techniques and thinking skills. Biology exit exam will be
taken at the end of this course. Homework: 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
                -001 Microscopic (and other equipment)          -009 General principles of heredity.
                           components and techniques.           -010 Structure and function of DNA and its
                -002 Scientific method of investigation and           relationship to heredity.
                               scientific thinking.              -011 Adaptations, speciation and population
                -003 Characteristics and organizational       changes.
                         levels of life.                         -012 Plant and animal nutrition and energy
                 -004 Origin of life forms.                   relationships.
                -005 Inorganic and organic chemistry of          -013 Environmental awareness and interrelationships
life.                                                                between organisms and between organisms and
                -006 Structure and function of cells.                nonliving things.
                -007 Cellular transport mechanisms.              -014 Classification of organisms.
  -008 Cell division and reproduction                            -015 Disease awareness.
        processes.
                                                                38




PHYSICAL SCIENCE: (1 credit, Gr. 10) - This course is highly recommended for all sophomores. It is the
prerequisite for Chemistry, Principles of Technology I, Material Science, and Physics. This is an introductory
level course to provide the background necessary for all chemistry and physics classes offered to upper
classmen. Students will investigate such topics as structure, properties and interactions of matter and its
relationship to forces, heat, light and sound. This class will provide hands-on activities and labs while
developing problem solving skills. Homework: 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Biology.
Competencies/Objectives:
               -001 Lab skills and safety.                     -005 Work, power and energy.
               -002 Structure of matter.                       -006 Thermal energy.
               -003 Chemical reactions and bonding.            -007 Waves--light and sound.
               -004 Motion and forces.                         -008 Electricity
       .
MICRO-BIOLOGY: (½ credit, Gr. 10-12) - In this course the student will study the structure and function of
viruses, bacteria, protozoa, fungi, and algae. The disease capabilities of these various microbes is strongly
emphasized. Half the class time is spent in performing various laboratory investigations which include
bacterial staining techniques, culturing techniques, fermentation processes, milk analysis, antibiotic
comparison, water analysis and general microscopic observation. Lab fee will be charged.
 Homework: 4-5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Biology.
Competencies/Objectives:
               -001 Prokaryote and eukaryote cell            -004 Microorganism classification.
                    structure and function.                  -005 Cause and effect of specific infectious diseases.
               -002 Cellular transport mechanisms.           -006 Biological and industrial importance of
               -003 Microorganism (virus, bacteria,               microorganisms.
                    protozoan, fungi and alga)               -007 Historical development of microbe and disease
                    structure and function.                       research.


GENETICS: (½ credit, Gr. 10-12) - Genetics provides the student with a study of the various aspects of
heredity. Some of the major topics covered are history, mitosis, meiosis. DNA and protein synthesis,
dominance/recessiveness, sex-linkage, cross-over, nondisjunction, and pedigree charts. Mendelian ,fruit fly,
and human genetics are studied in laboratory investigations and problems. Students will learn to determine
genetic ratios, probabilities, and predictions by conducting actual crosses in plants and fruit flies. Half the
class time is spent in performing various laboratory investigations. Homework: 4-5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: Biology.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Structure and function of DNA and its            -005 Hereditary crosses (monohybrid, dihybrid, sex-
            relationship to heredity.                             linked, backcross, testcross).
       -002 Asexual and sexual reproduction.                 -006 Hereditary concepts.
       -003 Mitosis and meiosis/fertilization.               -007 Genetic applications in medicine, agriculture and
       -004 Cause and effect of specific human                   industry.
       -008 genetic diseases.
                                                              39




HUMAN BIOLOGY: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - In the course, students will study the major organ systems of the
human body with emphasis on anatomy and physiology of the organs, tissue, and cells. Using acceptable
dissecting techniques and identifying the structure and function of human body parts are important of this
course.
 Homework: 4-5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Biology.
Competencies/Objectives:
          -001 Anatomy of cells, tissues and organs of             -004 Associate anatomy to physiology within
               major body systems.                                      cells, tissues and organ systems.
          -002 Physiology of cells, tissues and organs of          -005 Relate the function of one system to that of
               major body systems.                                      others.
          -003 Compare and contrast body systems.                  -006 Analyze various diseases and associate
               2/21/00                                                  them to body dysfunction.


MATERIAL SCIENCE: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - Material Science blends the basic principles of chemistry and
physics into a hands-on laboratory course. By observing, creating, experimenting and building projects,
students will learn about materials and their properties. The major units covered will be solids, metals,
ceramics and plastics. Students who take this course will develop skills and proficiencies by using actual
equipment used throughout industry. Prerequisite: PreChem/Physics.
Competencies/Objectives:
          -001 Solids - - chemical and physical                    -003 Ceramics - - properties and uses.
               properties.                                         -004 Polymers - - properties and uses.
          -002 Metals - - properties and uses.


CHEMISTRY: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - The purpose of this course is to provide the student the basic principles
of chemistry. It is a lecture and laboratory course. The course involves a study of basic molecular structure,
periodic relationships, and thermodynamic approach to reaction systems. High school science credit is
received and with proper enrollment and payment of fees, 4 hours of credit from Northwest Missouri State
University may be obtained. Homework: 4-5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Algebra I, PreChem/Physics. (4
credit hours from NWMSU if dual credit is selected)
Competencies/Objectives:
          -001 Atomic structure.                                   -005 Gas Laws.
          -002 Writing and balancing chemical equations.           -006 Acid - base equilibria.
          -003 The Mole Concept.                                   -007 Chemical bonding.
          -004 Periodic table properties.


PHYSICS: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - This is a combined lecture and laboratory course designed to provide the
necessary background in physics to fill general education requirements and to fill general physics needs for
pre-professional programs. Major topics covered are structure and properties of matter, motion mechanics,
work, energy, momentum, elasticity, waves, temperature, and heat. This is a dual credit course. High School
credit may be received and 4 hours of credit from Northwest Missouri State University with proper enrollment
and payment of fees. Homework: 5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: Algebra II must have been taken previously or be taken concurrently.
Competencies/Objectives:
          -001 Description of motion.                              -002 Force and motion.
                                                                   40


       -003 Work, energy and momentum.                                    -005 Heat.
       -004 Circular and rotational motion.                               -006 Thermodynamics.


PRINCIPLES OF TECHNOLOGY I: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - Principles of Technology is a one year
course in applied science designed to teach modern technology to secondary and adult level students.
Each topic presented shows how technical concepts are analyzed and applied to equipment and devices
in electrical, mechanical, thermal, and fluid energy systems. The class involves theory and hands-on
lab activities, demonstrations, video tapes and use of physics concepts for problem solving. Units
taught include: Force, Work, Rate, Resistance, Energy. Homework: 3-5 hours per week. Prerequisite:
None, although Algebra I is helpful.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Mechanical system - - force, work,                  -003 Electrical system - - force, work, rate,
            rate, resistance, energy.                                 resistance, energy.
       -002 Fluid system - - force, work, rate,                 -004 Thermal system - - force, rate, resistance,
            resistance, energy.                                 energy.




COLLEGE BIOLOGY: –Dual Credit (1 credit 11-12)
This is a three credit-hour general course in biology, and a one credit hour general biology lab course. These
courses provide students with a broad understanding of the basic principles of biological science such as cells,
energy production, photosynthesis, genetics, plant and animal physiology, ecology and diversity. These
courses satisfy part of the general education requirement for Northwest Missouri State University.
Course Rationale: These courses are designed to provide students with a broad understanding of biological
science so that after successful completion, students should understand the intricate relationship between
living organisms and their environment. Students should be able to more intelligently act upon important
issues facing our society.
Course Objectives:
       -001 The organization and characterization of life;
       -002 The process of scientific inquiry;
       -003 How living things acquire and use energy for survival, growth, and reproduction;
       -004 How living things reproduce including the nature of heredity and inheritance;
       -005 The evolutionary principles and the outcome of evolutionary pressures on living organisms;
       -006 Life’s unity and diversity including the evolutionary relationships among living organisms;
       -007 The relationship between form and function in living things, particularly in humans;
       -008 Taxonomic categories of life;
       -009 Population growth and interaction, ecological relationships in ecosystems;
       -010 The impact of humans on the environment and human health.
                                                                     41




                                      SOCIAL STUDIES


AMERICAN GOVERNMENT: (½ credit, Gr. 9) - American Government is a survey course, with emphasis
placed on United States citizens civic responsibilities. Students will evaluate the developmental processes of
the American system. In this study the Missouri and United States Constitutions will be evaluated and
critiqued. Students must receive a passing grade for the Missouri and United State Constitutions tests for
graduation from Maryville High School. Homework: 1-2 hours per week. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Explain the purposes of governments.                           different types of government.
        -002 Various political parties and philosophy           -006 Historical development of the United States development
        -003 Functionality of lobbying groups and political     -007 Roles of government of different levels
             action                                             -008 Political and organizational principles of federal
             committees in the American legal system.                and state governments.
        -004 Relationships among minority and majority          -009 The role of laws and their enforcement in dealing with
             groups                                                  problems
        -005 Historical experiences and development of


GEOGRAPHY: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - This course has two distinct divisions of study. The first, physical
geography, covers the physical environment of the world. This will include the atmosphere, biosphere,
lithosphere, and the hydrosphere as well as how these all form a physical complex that is interrelated forming
the earth’s environment. The second division is a combination of human and regional geography. This covers
the cultural, political, and economic elements of all areas of the world. It also includes the study of how
humanity has adapted to and changed the world environment. Homework: 3 hours per week. Prerequisite:
None.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Interpret the world in spatial terms utilizing map and geographic tools and organizing spatial information.
        -002 Evaluate the concepts of places and regions, physical and human characteristics and       perceptions.
        -003 Analyze the world’s physical systems, processes and distributions.
        -004 Explain world human systems, characteristics, distribution, migration, cooperation, conflict and
            interdependence.
        -005 Evaluate the modifications, distributions, and effects of the environment and society.
        -006 Analyze the application of geography to the past in order to plan for the future.




WORLD HISTORY: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - World History is a chronological survey course emphasizing social
studies and content knowledge. This course will provide students with opportunities to comprehend the nature
of civilization and their own place in history. The scope of the course starts with pre historic times and concludes
with the beginnings of the 21st century. Homework: 2 ½ hours per week. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
                                                                42


        -001 Compare the events of the past and               -006 Evaluate philosophical differences in various forms
             present                                                 of government.
        -002 Describe and identify causes,                    -007 Analyze different types of sources.
             consequences, and sequences of historic          -008 Assess and utilize maps to acquire and record
             events and developments.                                information.
        -003 Differentiate between various forms of           -009 Organization of thoughts into a rational manner.
             human conflict and cooperation.                  -010 Cooperatively work together in small groups while
        -004 Analyze economic choices of government.                 resolving differences.
        -005 Describe peaceful changes in government.


HONORS WORLD HISTORY: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - World History is a chronological survey course emphasizing
the foundations and evolution of civilization. This course will provide students with opportunities to comprehend
the nature of civilization and their own unique foot print left in history. The scope of the course starts with pre
historic times and concludes with the beginnings of the 21st century. Homework: 3 ½ hours per week.
Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Compare the events of the past and               -006 Evaluate philosophical differences in various forms
        present                                                   of government.
        -002 Describe and identify causes,                    -007 Analyze different types of primary and secondary
             consequences, and sequences of historic              sources.
             events and developments.                         -008 Assess and utilize maps to acquire and record
        -003 Differentiate between various forms of               information.
             human conflict and cooperation.                  -009 Organization of thoughts into a rational manner.
        -004 Analyze economic choices of government.           -010 Cooperatively work together in small groups
        -005 Explain the foundations of civilization                 while resolving differences.
                  throughout the world.


PSYCHOLOGY: (½ credit, Gr. 10-12) - Psychology is the study of mental processes and behavior. Students
will understand differences between abilities we are born with and those which are learned and how to help
each other learn and investigate the feelings and behaviors of individuals in social settings. There will be
some examination of how beliefs and feelings influence a person's behavior. Role playing, student interaction
and discussion will be important aspects of the course. Homework: 1-3 hours per week. Prerequisite:
None.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Interpreting different types of sources.         -004 Being able to organize thoughts into a rational
        -002 Identifying the various forms of mental              manner.
             conflict in our culture.                         -005 Acquire the ability to work in groups regardless
        -003 Making comparisons between past and                     of differences.
             present.                                          -006 Historical development of psychology.


AMERICAN HISTORY/ HONORS AMERICAN HISTORY: (1 credit, Gr. 11) - This course surveys American
History from Reconstruction (1877) to the present. Time is given to relating the importance of history to
modern day society. Credit in American History is required for graduation from high school in Missouri.
Students that enroll in Advanced American History and who meet the enrollment criteria and complete the
additional course work may receive 3 hours of credit from NWMSU if selected. Dual credit class members will
be expected to do more research, analysis, and writing. Homework: 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
                                                                           43


           -001 Evaluating comparisons between past and               -004 Explain the process of development and peaceful
                present.                                                    change in American government.
           -002 Examine the democratic decision-making                -005 Define the various forms of human conflict.
                at all levels of government.                          -006 Utilize different types of sources.
           -003 Analyze the economic choices of the                   -007 Utilize maps to acquire and record information.
                Government.                                           -008 Organize of thoughts into rational manner.
                                                                      -009 Cooperatively work in groups regardless of
                                                                            differences
.




    WESTERN CIVILIZATIONS- DUAL CREDIT: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) – This course will be an introductory course
    in western civilizations from the Ancient World to the present. This course will focus on common
    developments in Western Civilization that can be observed throughout history as well as look at unique
    contributions by various societies. Homework: 2 ½ hours per week. Prerequisite: None.
    Competencies/Objectives:
            -001Compare the events of the past and present                 -006 Evaluate philosophical differences in
             -002 Describe and identify causes, consequences,                   various forms of government.
                and sequences of historic events and                       -007 Analyze different types of sources.
                developments                                               -008 Assess and utilize maps to acquire and record
             -003 Differentiate between various forms of                        information.
                 human conflict and cooperation.                           -009 Organization of thoughts into a rational manner
             -004 Analyze the development and evolution of                 - 010 Cooperatively work together in smalgroups while
                 human civilations throughout history.                     resolving      .............. differences.
             -005Evaluate primary documents that influenced
                 the development of Western Civilization


    CIVIL WAR: (½ credit, Gr. 11-12) - Civil War is a semester course that includes an in-depth study of the causes
    and effects of the war. The major military campaigns, personalities, and conditions of both the Northern and
    Southern culture will be examined. The course will also allow some flexibility for students to research topics of
    interest. Homework: 1-5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Junior-Senior level, passed or taking American History.
    Competencies/Objectives:
           -001 Analyze the institutional and economical goals of the North and the South that
                influenced the war.
           -002 Explain the significance of the Constitutional crisis of Southern secession.
           -003 Evaluate the roles of the military and civilian leaders.
           -004 Rationalize the main issues of the war.
           -005 Clarify the sequence of events in the Civil War.
           -006 Describe the hardships of the environment of war.
           -007 Evaluate the alternative courses of action open to political and military leaders.
           -008 Analyze different types of sources.
           -009 Assess and utilize maps, graphs, geographic representations, tables and tools and technologies to acquire,
                process, and record information.
           -010 Organization of thoughts into rational manner.
                                                                      44


CURRENT WORLD: (½ credit, Gr. 11-12) - Current World deals with the structure and mechanism of local,
state, and national governments. It will analyze, through the use of media, how the United States compares to
other countries and regions of the world. It will analyze the problems of government in a modern setting. The
course will explore how events throughout the world affect our society. The students will also examine
different ways in which they can affect change in our society. Homework: 1-5 hours per week. Prerequisite:
None.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Analyze and utilize statistical information
        -002 Develop an understanding of how our modern world has been formed by recent historical events from World
             War II to the       present.
        -003 Analyze and critique United States foreign policy.
        -004 Utilizing maps to understand the implication of political geography.
        -005 Analyze the ways cultural institutions affect everyday life.
        -006 Analyze the implications of economic geography.
        -007 Identify various propaganda and mass media technique.
        -008 Communicate different view points.
        -009 Participation in class discussions.
        -010 Analyze and understand the decision making process and the possible impact of these decisions.


 PERSONAL FINANCE: (½ credit, Gr. 11-12) – An understanding of economic systems and consumerism
provides the resources needed for student to explore business careers. The content in this area is vital to the
career planning of students as they develop workplace and personal skills including knowledge of resume
building and interviewing techniques, banking, credit, taxes, insurance, investment and personal finance. (This
class DOES NOT count as a Social Studies credit for college admission purposes. It is a requirement for
Maryville RII graduation.) Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
            -001 Fundamentals of Economics                                    -005 Credit
           -002 College/Career Planning                                       -006 International Economics
           -003 Money and Banking                                             -007 Consumer Education
           -004Saving and Investing

                                                        FINE ARTS

ART I: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - Art I is a basic course in art upon which all other art courses are designed.
Students will study the five elements of design: line, texture, value, shape, or space, and color. Two and three
dimensional types of art will be included with practical experiences in using a variety of materials in artistic
expression. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Drawing skills                                                 -006 Painting
        -002 Basic design problems                                          -007 Color theory
        -003 Three dimensional construction                                 -008 Typography
        -004 Ceramics                                                       -009 Figure Drawing
        -005 Graphic Arts                                                   -010 Printmaking


DRAWING I & II: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - Drawing is a semester course in which students will explore a broad
range of approaches to art through sketching and formal drawing techniques. Students will learn to draw from both
                                                                 45


observation and imagination. Development of technical skills and artistic vocabulary will include contour drawings,
black and white value studies, color theory, still life, portraits, figure drawing, plus alternative approaches which
encourage the constant creative process of art making. Students are also required to keep a personal sketchbook
and study specific artists, culture, and art historical movements.
Prerequisite: Drawing I (B average in Art I); Drawing II (B average in Drawing I)
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Value scale (pencil, colored pencil)              -007 Cartooning.
       -002 Observation Drawing                               -008 Experimentation with different media (Charcoal,
       -003 Drawing from the imagination                           pastel, ink)
       -004 Contour Drawing                                   -009 Texture Drawing (hatching, stippling, etc)
       -005 Portraitures                                      -010 Drawing that displays emotion (detail to light)
       -006 Figure Drawing                                    -011 3 point perspective drawing


PAINTING I & II: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - Painting is a semester course in which students will explore a broad
range of approaches to art through experimental and formal painting techniques. Students will learn to paint
from both observation and imagination. We will explore acrylic, tempera, watercolor, and oil paints while
diving into color theory, art interpretation, abstract painting and realism. We will explore different art periods
and the artists styles associated with those time periods. Prerequisite: Painting I (B average in Art I); Painting II
(B average in Painting I)
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Experimental process of using variety of                  -005 Direct Observational Painting using
             brushes & palette knives                                      reflection, light, and transparency
       -002 Still Life from direct observation (using                 -006 Variety of painting techniques (including
             realism and abstract painting)                                blocking out, wash, stippling, dry brush)
       -003 Landscape painting with attention                         -007 Use of a variety of paints (including acrylic,
       -004 Painting using palette knives to mix and                       tempera, watercolor, oil)
             apply paint


CERAMICS I & II: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - Ceramics is a semester course in which students will explore a
broad range of techniques and approaches to art through hand built and wheel thrown clay. Students will learn
to approach ceramic artwork as both functional and decorative sculptural objects. Development of technical
skills and artistic vocabulary will be stressed while exploring different methods of firing and glazing.
Prerequisite: B average in Art I.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Hand building skills (slab, coil, drape)                  -004 Glazing techniques (including bisque
       -002 Wheel Throwing                                                          glazing, underglazing & Sgrifitto)
       -003 Sculpture building using hand building                    -005 Ceramics vocabulary
techniques


FIBER ART: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) - Fibers is a semester course in which students will explore a broad range
art media including but not limited to fabric dying (batik, tie-dye), printmaking, weaving, and papermaking.
Students will experiment with different materials as we explore many art methods. We will study a broad
variety of art materials used throughout history as well as the artists that work with these materials.
Prerequisite: B average in Art I
Competencies/Objectives:
                                                                      46


        -001 Printmaking                                                   -004 Papermaking
        -002 Weaving                                                       -005 Media Exploriation
        -003 Fabric dying
                               (including batik and tie-
dye)


BAND (Marching/Symphonic): (1 credit (½ credit Marching, ½ credit Symphonic), Gr. 9-12) - The course
consists of marching band the first quarter and symphonic band the last three quarters of the year. Students
are expected to devote time outside of the school day for individual practice, rehearsals, performances, and
day trips away from Maryville. During the marching season, the band regularly travels to band contests. The
marching band performs at all home football games in addition to Saturday band contests. Students are
expected to audition in November for chair placements in the symphonic band. The symphonic band
rehearses daily and performs two or three concerts during the last three quarters Students in the symphonic
band are exposed to a wide selection and variety of music, ranging from pop to original band literature.
Students are also provided the opportunity to participate in solo and ensemble work during the spring
semester. Band is a yearlong class and may be repeated for credit. Students wishing to be in the marching or
concert band must have participated in band the semester prior. Schedule conflicts with band during the fall
or spring semesters should be brought to the directors’ attention ASAP.
Prerequisite: Middle School or Junior High Band or a demonstrated ability to play an appropriate musical
instrument.
       Marching Band Competencies/Objectives:
              -001 Mastery and memorization of the music.
              -002 Marching: 8 to 5, high-knee, roll step, mark time, and adjusted stride.
              -003 Commands.
              -004 Posture and instrument carriage.
              -005 Facings and flanks.
              -006 Corner.
              -007 Showmanship.
              -008 Continued development of rhythmic accuracy, tone, and intonation.
              -009 Advanced development of balance and blend within the large ensemble.
       Symphonic Band Competencies/Objectives:
              -001 Continued development of rhythmic accuracy, tone, and intonation.
              -002 Advanced rhythm-reading skills through complexity of music as well as in-class rhythmic instruction.
              -003 Advanced techniques in balance and blend within both small and large ensembles.
              -004 Large group and individual sight-reading skills.
              -005 Performance of music from different historical periods and cultural backgrounds.


ADVANCED MUSIC STUDIES: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - Advanced Music Studies provides juniors and seniors
the opportunity to enhance their skills in musical performance. Students in this course will be given advanced
private instruction in areas of performance, music theory, and music history. Students in this course are
required to prepare audition music for All-District and All-State Band/Choir as well as preparing solos and/or
ensembles for District and State Festivals. Prerequisite: Instructor permission is required.
Competencies/Objectives: (Instrumental)                                    -003 Advanced techniques in intonation for solo
        -001 Continued development of in time, in tone,                         and small ensembles.
              and in tune.                                                 -004 Major, minor and chromatic scales full
        -002 Advanced rhythm reading skills through                             range of instrument.
              technical studies.
                                                               47


       -005 Preparation and guidelines for audition and              -003 Music theory skills – pitch & rhythm
            solo performance.                                              reading.
       -006 Performance of music from different                      -004 Style analysis of nationalistic and historical
            historical periods and cultural backgrounds.                   content.
Competencies/Objectives: (Vocal)                                     -005 Solo singing.
       -001 Vocalizes and body alignment for flexibility             -006 Performance critiques.
            and stamina.                                             -007 Incorporating IPA and foreign language
       -002 Health and wellness for singers, physiology                    diction
            of the singer’s body/ mechanism.
       .
CONCERT CHOIR: (1 credit, Gr. 9 -12) - This is an advanced course for students with above average singing
skills. Students study music theory and musical styles and work on perfecting vocal techniques, sight – reading
and musicianship. Public performance is an integral part of this course and Concert Choir members are expected
to devote the necessary time outside the regular school day for these performances. Members of this choir are
bound by the grade point and attendance requirements of MHSSHA. Concert choir may be taken yearly, and fulfills
the fine arts credit needed by all high school students for graduation.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mixed Chorus and/or audition and permission of the Instructor.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Daily vocalizes for flexibility.                         -005 Quartet performances of selected
       -002 Musical works representative                    literature.
             of the different eras of history.                       -006 A cappella singing.
       -003 Music Theory skills – pitch and rhythm                   -007 Proper performance practice.
reading.                                                             -008 Memorization of pitches, words, and
       -004 Group sight-reading.                            phrasing.
                                                                     -009 Ear training - Pitch-matching and tuning.


SPECTRUM/CHAMBER CHOIR: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) – Spectrum is an auditioned group of male and female singers
that demonstrate the highest level of vocal music performance. Emphasis is placed on the study of vocal health
and technique, breath control; group balance and intonation; sight reading skills and ear training; melodic,
harmonic, and rhythmic concepts; rehearsal skills, practice habits, and performance etiquette. Through the
combination of choral singing and dance movements, the ensemble will also perform as a show choir. Ensemble
members will be required to compete at various competions that include Distict/State Festivals and selected Show
Choir competitions/Invitationals. Members of this choir are bound by the grade point and attendance
requirements of MHSSHA. Concert choir may be taken yearly, and fulfills the fine arts credit needed by all high
school students for graduation.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mixed Chorus and/or audition and permission of the Instructor.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Daily vocalizes for flexibility.                -005 Quartet performances
       -002 Musical works representative of the                     of selected literature.
            different eras of history.                      -006 A cappella singing.
       -003 Music Theory skills –                           -007 Proper performance practice.
             pitch and rhythm reading.                      -008 Memorization of pitches, words, and phrasing.
       -004 Group sight-reading.                            -009 Various forms of dance/movement.


MIXED CHOIR: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - Mixed Choir is a non-auditioned group, designed for male and female
singers with a desire to learn and practice proper vocal technique and further their musical knowledge of
music theory, sight-singing and performance. Mixed Choir participates in two major concerts a year, which
                                                                   48


are generally scheduled in the evening – outside of the school day. After successful completion, Mixed Chorus
members become eligible to audition for Concert Choir and Spectrum. This class can be repeated for credit,
and fulfills the fine arts credit needed by all high school students for graduation. Prerequisite: A desire to
sing.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Vocalizes for flexibility.                                 -004 Small group performances of selected
        -002 Musical works representative of the                             literature.
             different eras of history.                                 -005 Proper performance practice.
        -003 Music Theory skills – pitch and rhythm                     -006 Memorization of pitches, and words, and
             reading.                                                        phrasing.
                                                                        -007 Ear training - Pitch-matching and tuning.


GUITAR: (1credit, Gr. 11-12) – This course is designed for the novice guitar player to help develop adequate
skills and understandings to play standard popular and folk guitar literature in various social, cultural, and
individual contexts. Futhermore, students will acquire a functional level of musical literacy relative to playing
the guitar. Only acoustic guitars will used for this course (provided by school) and is limited to 10 students
per section. Finally, a fee of $5 is required from each student.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Basic Guitar Literacy – Traditional/Tabliture.
        -002 Music Theory Skills – pitch and rhythm reading.
        -003 Listen to and evaluate performances and recordings.
        -004 Self-Directed Learning.


MUSIC APPRECIATON Dual Credit (1 credit 11-12) See Mr. Shouse

FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC Dual Credit (1 credit 11-12) See Mr. Shouse

CONCERT CHOIR: (1 credit, Gr. 10 -12) - This is an advanced course for students with above average singing
skills. It involves male and female voices in the highest level of vocal music performance. Students study music
theory and musical styles and work on perfecting vocal techniques, sight – reading and musicianship. Public
performance is an integral part of this course and Concert Choir members are expected to devote the necessary
time outside the regular school day for these performances. Members of this choir are bound by the grade point
and attendance requirements of MHSSHA. Concert choir may be taken yearly, and fulfills the fine arts credit
needed by all high school students for graduation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mixed Chorus and/or
audition and permission of the Instructor.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Daily vocalizes for flexibility.                           -005 Quartet performances of selected
        -002 Musical works representative of the               literature.
             different eras of history.                                 -006 A cappella singing.
        -003 Music Theory skills – pitch and rhythm                     -007 Proper performance practice.
reading.                                                                -008 Memorization of pitches, words, and
        -004 Group sight-reading.                                       phrasing.
                                                                        -009 Ear training - Pitch-matching and tuning.
                                                                      49


DRAMA: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - Drama is designed to introduce students to or further their experience in this
performing art. The class will study the basics of drama, such as movement, character, voice, and motivation,
as well as the history of drama. Scene work will be extensive, as students ill be expected not only to perform
scenes from great playwrights of the theater, but also create, perform, and film their own pieces.
Improvisational skills will be focused on throughout the year, as students develop the skills to think quickly on
their feet. Drama may be taken yearly, and fulfills the fine arts credit needed by all high school students for
graduation. Homework: approximately 2-3 hours per week. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
      -001 Theater History                                                 -004 Elements of Directing
      -002 Elements of Pantomime                                           -005 Improvisation
      -003 Elements of Performance




                                            HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION




HEALTH: (½ credit, Gr. 9) - This course will meet the high school health education requirement. Health
provides a general study of health-related issues facing young people today. The areas covered affect an
individual's everyday living. The areas include awareness of mental health, venereal diseases, smoking,
alcohol, cancer, drug abuse, first aid, exercise, and quackery. Each student will do individual research on
selected topics related to health. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
    -001 The student will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between mental, social, and physical health.
    -002 The student will demonstrate an understanding of the body systems and how nutrition effects the body during
         exercise.
    -003 The student will develop the knowledge of the effects that illegal drugs, alcohol and tobacco have in the human
         body and society.
    -004 The student will know and understand various birth control methods available and the various sexually
         transmitted diseases that can be contracted.
    -005 The student will demonstrate refusal skills and conflict resolution skills.
    -006 The student will understand and demonstrate first aid and lifesaving skills.


INTRODUCTION TO LIFETIME ACTIVITIES: (1 credit, Gr. 9)
This course provides an introduction for the study of activities including softball, volleyball, basketball, and
other physical activities. Students will develop skills in the activities as well as knowledge of the rules for each
activity. The student is required to dress out and participate daily. Prerequisite: None
Competencies/Objectives:
     -001 The student will demonstrate basic skills in a variety of physical activities.
     -002 The student will be able to use a variety of strategies to succeed in sports and recreational activities.
     -003 The student will demonstrate basic knowledge of activities to better enable them to take part in various
                                                                      50


           activities.
     -004 The student will demonstrate good sportsmanship
     -005 The student will demonstrate the enjoyment, satisfaction and benefits of regular physical exercise.


LIFETIME ACTIVITIES I: (½ credit, Gr. 10-12) - Lifetime Activities I provides for the study of activities
including softball, golf, archery, horseshoes, croquet, speedball, volleyball, and basketball. Students will
develop skills in the activities, knowledge of the rules, and will pass a written test in each activity. Daily
participation is stressed and showers will be required at the end of class unless otherwise directed by the
instructor. This class may only be taken one time. Prerequisite: 1 credit in Freshman Physical Education.
Competencies/Objectives:
    -001 The students will demonstrate basic sport skills in golf, volleyball, softball, pickle ball, soccer, Frisbee, bowling,
         basketball, and various card games.
    -002 The student will be able to use a variety of strategies to succeed in sports and recreational activities.
    -003 The student will demonstrate basic sport knowledge to better enable them to take part in various            activities.
    -004 The student will demonstrate attitudes of cooperation, honesty, self-control, and responsibility.
    -005 The student will demonstrate good sportsmanship.
    -006 The student will demonstrate the enjoyment, satisfaction and benefits of regular physical activity.


LIFETIME ACTIVITIES II: (½ credit, Gr. 10-12) - Lifetime Activities II provides for the study of activities
including bowling, badminton, swimming, flag football, table tennis, pickle ball, shuffleboard, soccer, and
table games. Students will develop skills in the activities, knowledge of the rules, and will pass a written test
in each activity. Daily participation is stressed and showers will be required at the end of each activity. Daily
participation will be stressed and showers will be required at the end of each class unless otherwise directed
by the instructor.
Prerequisite: 1 credit in Freshman Physical Education.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 The students will demonstrate basic sport skills in golf, volleyball, softball, pickle ball, soccer, Frisbee,
         bowling, basketball, and various card games.
       -002 The student will be able to use a variety of strategies to succeed in sports and recreational activities.
       -003 The student will demonstrate basic sport knowledge to better enable them to take part in various
             activities.
       -004 The student will demonstrate attitudes of cooperation, honesty, self-control, and responsibility.
       -005 The student will demonstrate good sportsmanship.
       -006 The student will demonstrate the enjoyment, satisfaction and benefits of regular physical activity.
ADVANCED FITNESS: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) – This course emphasizes weight training, cardiovascular
development, plyometrics, agility, and flexibility. The exercise program will be sequenced from day to day to
assure a well-rounded, total program. Students may repeat this course if there is room. Students must
provide weather appropriate gym clothing for the course. Showers are required at the end of each class unless
otherwise directed by the instructor. Prerequisite: 1 credit in Physical Education.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Practical application of weight training.               -004 Cardiovascular endurance.
       -002 Enhance range of motion.                                -005 Sports speed/quickness/power/endurance.
       -003 Agility and reaction time.
                                                                 51


ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - Adapted Physical Education allows students to
experience physical education activity with success. The program allows for experiences in many different
activities, not just traditional sport activities. Adapted Physical Education allows for special instruction in areas
of individual needs. This course may be repeated if needed upon teacher recommendation. This will take the
place of Freshman Physical Education for these students. Prerequisite: Teacher referral or recommendation
(special education, physical disabilities, students with special needs).
Competencies/Objectives: TBA




                             PRACTICAL ARTS:BUSINESS



COMPUTER APPLICATIONS:             (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - Usage of business software including word processing,
data base, spreadsheet, presentation, Internet and electronic communications. Targeted to students, college
or employment-bound, who want to expand their computer knowledge. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
                 -001 Demonstrate improvement in speed and accuracy of keyboarding
                 -002 Execute Basic Computer Operations
                 -003 Demonstrate mastery of Word Processing Applications by mastering 80% of the sub-components
                 -004 Demonstrate mastery of Spreadsheet Applications by mastering 80% of the sub-components
                 -005 Demonstrate mastery of Database Applications by mastering 80% of the sub-components
                 -006 Demonstrate mastery of Presentation Software by mastering 80% of the sub-components
                 -007 Identify safe Internet practices.


DIGITAL PUBLISHING: (1 semester, 1/2 creditp Practical Arts Gr.10-12), Prerequisite: Computer
Applications
Students will examine the basics of graphic design, text design, and electronic publishing in general. Students
will use Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and In Design to create professional-looking documents such as
brochures, flyers, stationery, business cards, calendars, promotional posters, menus, and other identity
products.
Competencies/Objectives:
               -001 Perform print publication set-up                          -003 Manage and edit images
               -002 Manage and manipulate                                     -004 Demonstrate design concepts
       typography                                                             -005 Perform print process


MULTIMEDIA: (1 semester, 1/2 credit Practical Arts, Gr.10-12) Prerequisite: Computer Applications. Students
will work with multimedia software to develop electronic and video presentations. They will learn how to
manipulate text, art and graphics, photography, animation, audio, and video for presentations in various
media formats.
Competencies/Objectives:
                                                               52


             -001 Apply copyright and fair use laws                        -003 Create video files
                   when designing multimedia                                 -004 Create audio files
                   products                                                  -005 Edit and export video
             -002 Manage a variety of electronic files


WEB DESIGN: (1 semester, 1/2 credit Practical Arts,Gr.10-12) Prerequisite: Computer Applications.
This course deals with the use of web page software such as Dreamweaver, graphics applications such as
Photoshop, Illustrator, and Fireworks, and other Web authoring tools to design, edit, launch, and maintain
Web sites and pages. Such topics as Web page standards, Web design elements, user interfaces, special
effects, navigation, and emerging Web technologies will be included.
Competencies/Objectives:
                -001 Evaluate web pages and resources                        -003 Create, edit, and optimize images
                -002 Design an effective web site                            -004 Use web publishing techniques


ADVANCED WEB DESIGN : (1 semester, 1/2 credit Practical Arts, Gr 10-12)Prerequisite: Computer
Applications and Web Design. Focus on expanding your web design skills and build on what you learned in the
first course. You’ll explore several advanced features of the Macromedia Web Design Suite. Build on your
existing Dreamweaver skills, and become familiar with several interactive design techniques using
Flash. Individual and group projects are assigned, and frequently involve the creation of ―real world‖ interactive
web sites.
Competencies/Objectives:
                -001 Create and apply effective web                          -003 Create and incorporate Flash
                    page management techniques                      plug-ins
                -002 Create and modify JavaScript                            -004 Apply animation tools
       images
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) – This course can earn a student 3 hours of dual credit at
Northwest Missouri State University. Focus is on the use of business software and equipment,
communications, video conferencing, networking, desktop publishing, multimedia projects, and web page
development. Students will be using self-paced industry certified training materials and will have the
opportunity to gain recognized worldwide certification within the training area. Students may enroll for 1
period. Prerequisite: Advanced Computer Applications.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Define and utilize appropriate computer                 -004 Recognize hardware and software
             resources, including networks and                   capabilities and                    limitations.
             personal computers.                                     -005 Utilize on-line help and other resources to
       -002 Demonstrate basic and advanced features              answer                    questions about
             and functions of particular word                    computer-based applications.
             processing, spreadsheet,                               -006 Identify impacts of computers on society.
                          presentation, database, and               -007 Identify ethical issues associated with
             integrated applications.                            computer                  technology.
        -003 Utilize appropriate methods to locate and              -008 Develop the ability to work successfully in
             evaluate information on the WWW.                    a self-                   directed learning
                                                                 environmen
                                                                     53


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS: (½ credit, Grades 11-12) - This course will provide students with an
understanding of terminology and the study of the impact that international business has on daily lives.
Examine the influence of geography, cultural diversity, trade requirements, and the differences in
communication that affect business. Exploration of international career opportunities and analysis of the
economic forces that international business has on local, regional and national economies. Prerequisite:
None.
Competencies/Objectives:
            -001 Identify international career                               -005 Examine international marketing
                  opportunities.                                            strategies.
            -002 Examine international business                      -006 Apply international economic concepts.
                  structures.                                        -007 Analyze international financial systems.
            -003 Describe cultural diversity/customs.                -008 Explore international trade law.
            -004 Recognize international informational               -009 Describe import/export methods.
                  resources.                                         -010 Explore global organizational structures.




BUSINESS LAW: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - First Semester-Contract law, criminal, civil and procedural law. Core
personal law topics of juvenile justice, consumer law, family law, housing law and individual rights and liberty.
Prerequisite: None.
  Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Justify the need for a legal system.                         -003 Explore tort law.
        -002 Explore criminal law.                                        -004 Explore international law.
 Second Semester Topics include sole proprietorship, corporations, sales, credits, negotiable instruments,
agency and ....................................     employment, bailments and business associations. Students will
be introduced to organizational and employment related law.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Examine rights and responsibilities of adults.               -003 Identify contracts.
        -002 Examine rights and responsibilities of minors.               -004 Utilize legal resources.


BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - A basic course of business principles and management,
business terminology, problem-solving and decision-making as well as procedures and concepts that will aid
in becoming effective members of the business community. It will also provide students with an
understanding of activities, problems and decisions involved in successfully operating a business or creating a
business plan. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Identify skills necessary to obtain and maintain a business career.
        -002 Identify the many activities, problems, and decisions involved in operating a business successfully.
        -003 Prepare an industry standard business plan.
        -004 Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of human resource skills in order to manage
              employees and the work environment.
        -005 Evaluate and make decisions about running a successful business by using Virtual Business
        Software.
                                                                  54


ACCOUNTING: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) – First Semester-Basic principles and concepts of double-entry
accounting; sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation forms of business organizations; and the
accounting cycle from the opening entry to the post-closing trial balance. Manual and computerize
accounting procedures will be used. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
     -001 Complete the various steps in the accounting cycle for a service business organized as a proprietorship.
     -002 Journalize and post transactions.
     -003 Accurately manage a checking account.
     -004 Prepare financial statements for a service business organized as a proprietorship.
     -005 Use special journals and subsidiary ledgers to record financial changes to a merchandising business.
     -006 Prepare payroll records.
     -007 Prepare records and financial statements for a merchandising business organized as a corporation.
     -008 Prepare records and financial statements related to a business organized as a partnership.


NETWORK ADMINISTRATION: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) – In this course, students will build on their knowledge
of computers as they gain skills required to install, configure, upgrade, troubleshoot, and repair PC hardware
components and systems. Students will develop skills maintaining networks using various Windows-based
operating systems to manage, install, maintain, and troubleshoot applications, operation of peripherals,
wiring, and other network components.
Prerequisite: Advanced Computer Applications
Competencies/Objectives:
               -001 Basic Computer Concepts                                     -006 Connectivity
               -002 Networking Concepts                                         -007 Software
               -003 Safety                                                      -008 Network Operations
               -004 Communications                                              -009 System Risk Management
               -005 Hardware                                                    -010 Troubleshooting




COOPERATIVE EDUCATION: (1or2 credits, Gr.12) – 1to 4 hours release time. This is an organized program
offered for seniors to enable them to gain firsthand employment experience in the following occupational
areas: vocational agriculture, marketing education, office education, trade and industrial and occupational
food service. Release time for part of the student’s class schedule is provided to enhance occupational
opportunities. Students must also take a coordinated related class in the area of their cooperative education
experience and must provide their own transportation to and from the employment site. Prerequisite: None.
Recommendation: Students must apply during the spring of his/her junior year and meet program
requirements stated in the Board policy. Special circumstances may be considered.
                                                                    55


COOPERATIVE EDUCATION GUIDLINES: Students may be enrolled in a cooperative education program
following consultation with counselors and program coordinator, provided the student will meet all
requirements for graduation and provided suitable job placement can be secured by the student or program
coordinator, which is commensurate with the student’s chosen career objective. Students enrolled in the
cooperative education program shall be limited to a maximum of four (4) 1-hour class periods per day for a
maximum of 2 credits per year.

       -   Students enrolled in the cooperative education program are required to be in a related class.
       -   Students shall file a written application of admission to the cooperative education program following
           completion of the interview process with the cooperative education coordinator and upon written approval by
           parents or guardian.
       -   Periodic progress reports and evaluation of the student shall be made jointly by the respective work supervisor
           and cooperative education program coordinator.
       -   In order to fulfill State requirements for high school credit in the cooperative education program, students
           must work 10 clock hours per week for 1/2 unit of credit per semester and/or, 20 or more hours weekly of off
           campus work for one unit of credit per semester. No more than two units of credit may be awarded during
           any school year for the off campus experience.
       -   Students will submit weekly, written assignments that document their work experience as well as assess
           specific learning objectives.
       -   Students may receive pay for their services during the cooperative education experience.




                                                        PRACTICAL ARTS:
                                                      CONSUMER SCIENCES



CHILD DEVELOPMENT: (½ credit, Gr. 9-12) - This is a study of the prenatal growth and development and
the postnatal care of children. You will learn about children's physical, mental, emotional, and social growth
and development, as well as their care and guidance. Observation and actual experience with children and
their parents are an integral part of this instruction. Parenting skills concerning the needs of babies and
young children will be explored. You will also study the causes and effects of child abuse, the special needs of
certain children, and factors to consider when choosing child care facilities. Homework: occasionally.
Prerequisite: None.
 Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Assuming leadership roles as responsible                     -006 Distinguishing health concerns at
             family members and citizens.                                               developmental stages.
        -002 Describing diverse roles in parenting.                      -007 Identifying guidance for creating safe
        -003 Analyzing health concerns and needs                                        environment.
            during                                                       -008 Comparing child care options.
            prenatal development.                                        -009 Influencing change in environments.
        -004 Explaining developmental stages.                            -010 Researching key careers.
        -005 Justifying interaction choices.


FAMILY LIVING: (½ credit, Gr. 9-12) - Do you want to know yourself better? This course will provide insight
into individuality and personality development. It will help you to better understand your feelings, attitudes,
and priorities. Study includes family and peer communication skills that help to deal with conflict and crisis.
                                                              56

Important teen decisions, such as, drugs, alcohol, and early pregnancies are discussed. Establishing and
maintaining relationships; preparation for marriage, parenthood, and the various stages of family living from
birth to aging will be studied. Homework: occasionally. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Assuming leadership roles as responsible               -005 Exploring family life issues within a diverse
            family members and citizens.                                society.
       -002 Developing a positive self-concept.                    -006 Making responsible parenting decisions.
       -003 Demonstrate effective communication                    -007 Influencing change in environments.
            skills among family, peers, and others.                -008 Researching key careers
       -004 Explaining the progression of relationships
            and families.
       .
FASHION FOR 21ST CENTURY: (½ credit, Gr. 9-12) - You will study the way you can coordinate clothing
and mix and match your clothes to extend your wardrobe. This course will include a study of clothing design
as well as selection. The choices you make as a consumer affect your family as well as the textile industry.
You will find out why. You will be better able to care for your clothes by understanding the way different
textiles perform. In class, you will sew one or more garments using the sewing machine. Material will be
needed for your own projects. Homework: occasionally. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Recognizing functions of dress.
       -002 Differentiating clothing for multiple roles.   -007 Describing alteration techniques.
       -003 Recognizing wardrobe needs for multiple        -008 Comparing quality and features of construction
            roles.                                              equipment and aids.
       -004 Identifying consumer protection                -009 Selecting patterns with specific construction
            regulations.                                        techniques.
       -005 Preparing a clothing budget.                   -010 Identifying types of small businesses.
       -006 Evaluating care methods of textile             -011 Meeting the needs of the special population.
            products.                                       -012 Recognizing careers in clothing and textiles.
NUTRITION AND WELLNESS: (½ credit, Gr. 10-12) - In this course you will study the relationship of nutrition
to individual health and well being. Emphasis is given to the study of basic food groups, food handling, safety
and sanitation, and food buying practices, including cost saving suggestions. You will plan and prepare
menus to meet individual and family food needs and patterns of living. There will be several types of hands-
on food experiences. Homework: occasionally. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Assuming leadership roles as responsible               -005 Managing resources to promote good
            family members and citizens.                                health.
       -002 Appraising influences on personal food                 -006 Developing food preparation skills.
            choices.                                               -007 Developing social competence.
       -003 Comprehending nutrition principles.                    -008 Influencing change in environment.
       -004 Recognizing relationships between                      -009 Researching key careers.
            nutrition and wellness.


SINGLES LIVING/RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: (½ credit, Gr. 11-12) - This is a study of the knowledge and
skills needed by individuals in preparing for their role as consumers, and/or wage earners. Experiences are
provided in the following areas: human development and personal relationships; consumer education and
money management; nutrition and food consumerism and preparation; clothing and textiles; and housing and
living environments. You will learn to understand relationships with others, understand and make
                                                                 57


management decisions, learn skills of food preparation that meet nutritional requirements, know principles of
clothing planning, buying, and care, and housing needs. Homework: occasionally. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Assuming Leadership Roles as Responsible           -004 Analyzing the Role of the Consumer.
            Family Members and Citizens.                       -005 Planning for Financial Security.
       -002 Assessing Individual, Family, and                  -006 Demonstrating Management of Individual and
            Community Resources.                                    Family Resources.
       -003 Developing Employment Skills.


HOUSING & HUMAN ENVIRONMENTS: (½ credit, Gr. 9-12) An introduction to the applications of textile and
design principles of selecting, decorating, and furnishing the home. Students will become familiar with
terminology, trends, material, problems, and solutions. Homework: occasionally. Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Assuming Leadership Roles as Responsible                   -004 Creating a Living Environment.
            Family Members and Citizens.                               -005 Maintaining the Living Environment.
       -002 Choosing a Living Environment.                             -006 Influencing Change in Environments.
       -003 Securing a Living Environment.                             -007 Researching Key Careers
       .
CULINARY ARTS/PROSTART:              (2 credits, Gr. 11-12) - This is an occupational course that introduces the
student to the Food Service industry. It reviews the various types of occupations in the food industry along
with the career and job opportunities available to the student. An overview of the industry methods of
operation and special skills required will be studied. Students will work in the classroom and in the
laboratory. Time will also be devoted to job seeking skills and career planning. Homework: occasionally.
Prerequisite: None
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Personal Qualities and Skills.                             -006 Breakfast Foods and Sandwiches.
       -002 Long-Term Work Qualities and Skills.                       -007 Fruits and Vegetables.
       -003 Successful Customer Relations.                             -008 Salads and Garnishes.
       -004 Kitchen Basics.                                            -009 Business Math.
       -005 Foodservice Equipment.                                     -010 Controlling Food Service Costs.


FOOD MANAGEMENT: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) - This course is an occupational program with emphasis placed
on service, management, operational procedures and advanced food preparation. The student will have the
opportunity to provide good service by preparing food items and serving customers. Homework:
occasionally.
Prerequisite: None.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Orientation.                                       -005 Identifying Nutrition Basics.
       -002 Identifying Food Service Economics.                -006 Performing Front-of-the-House Duties.
       -003 Practicing Sanitation.
       -004 Demonstrating Safety.


FOODS COOP: (2 credits, Gr. 12) - *** See Cooperative Education under Practical Arts, Business. ***
Prerequisite: None. Recommendation: Student must apply during the spring of his/her junior year and meet
program requirements stated in the Board policy.
                                                                    58




CHILD CARE: (3 credits, Gr. 11-12) – CDA CERTIFICATION and NCMC ARTICULATION. The Child Care
Program prepares individuals to become Child Development Associates; to assist with the care and guidance
of infants and young children under the supervision of professional personnel. Child Care work requires a
wide variety of aptitudes and skills including patience, creativity, ability to motivate, teach and influence
others, and in some cases, leadership, organizational and administrative abilities. The Child Care curriculum
involves both classroom and hands-on experience working with infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and school-
age children. The program prepares individuals as child care assistants and teachers, to assume major
responsibilities of caring for and guiding the development of children. The students may experience student
teaching in both the school setting and day care. Training will also be provided for students to obtain the
Child Development Associate (CDA) credential.
Homework: Occasional Recommendation: Child Development and the desire to be with children.
College Articulation Credits: Upon successful completion of 2 years of Child Care; you may be eligible for
college credits at North Central Missouri College at Trenton. For more information, contact the Child Care
instructor or the director at Northwest Technical School.
Competencies/Objectives:
-001 Child Growth and Development: Candidate understands how children acquire language and creative expression and
     develop physically, cognitively, and socially.
-002 Learning Environment and Curriculum: Candidate establishes an environment that provides learning experiences that
     meet each child's needs, capabilities, and interests.
-003 Child Observation and Assessment: Candidate observes and assesses what children know and can do in order to
     provide curriculum that meets their developmental and learning needs.
-004 Families and Communities: Candidate works collaboratively with families and agencies/organizations to meet
     children's needs and to encourage the community's involvement with early care and education.
-005 Health, Safety and Nutrition: Candidate establishes and maintains an environment that ensures children's healthy
     development, safety, and nourishment.
-006 Interactions with Children: Candidate establishes supportive relationships with children and guides them as
     individuals and as a part of a group.
-007 Program Planning and Developing: Candidate establishes, implements, and evaluates an early care and education
     program.
-008 Professional Development and Leadership: Candidate serves children and families in a professional manner and
     participates in the community as a representative of early childhood care and education.
                                                                 59




                                       PRACTICAL ARTS:
                                       HEALTH SERVICES
                                          TECHNOLOGY
Health Services Technology is a ―College Preparatory‖ program for all medical and health related fields.
Students
may enroll in Health Services Technology for one, two, or three hours. Courses in health, chemistry, and
microbiology are helpful. Strong writing, spelling, math skills and study habits are recommended. Today’s
society
has a high interest in health services careers. Students who choose the health service career path are not only
preparing for a position of humanitarian contribution, but are also choosing a high demand/high wage career.
Health Services Technology involves classroom, lab and job shadowing experiences. Those interested in
obtaining
CNA certification will do a clinical rotation taking place during the school year. If necessary, this clinical
rotation can also be scheduled either on designated Saturdays or at the end of the school year. It will consist
then of 5-7 eight-hour days of clinical experience at a Maryville nursing home. Those interested in obtaining
their CNA need to take both Body Structure & Function and Medical Terminology and Health Fundamentals on
consecutive periods. TB skin test is a requirement for all enrolled students. If not a senior, permission to be in
the class may be granted upon approval by instructor and counselor. Involvement with SkillsUSA is highly
encouraged in this course. For C.N.A. certified students who enroll with NCMC School of Practical Nursing,
several hours will be credited towards their required laboratory hours in the Fundamentals of Nursing course.
Students enrolled in all 3 Health Service Technology classes will receive 1 science embedded credit.


BODY STRUCTURE & FUNCTION AND MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY: (1 credit, Gr. 12) – This
course provides the basic knowledge of body parts, systems, and how the body works as a whole. Thus it
provides
the essential foundation necessary in order to further correlate and understand health and disease processes.
It is
essential to understand as well as being able to spell and use the appropriate terms correctly in order to be a
competent health professional. Homework: 3-5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Biology
Competencies/Objectives:
          -001 Recognize concepts of the body as a whole       -002 Apply concepts of the body and its systems to
              and systems.                                          health care               delivery.


HEALTH CAREERS EXPLORATION: (1 credit, Gr. 12) – This course will identify the numerous health
pathways and entities. It will also help to further investigate in more detail what career a student might be
interested in. Professionalism, employability skills, and public relations aspects will be addressed.
Homework: occasionally. Prerequisite: None Recommendation:Computer Skills
                                                                  60


Competencies/Objectives:
     -001 State and describe at least four                     -004 List traits necessary to be an effective leader.
            interpersonal relationship skills essential to     -005 Explore health care interests.
            being                                              -006 Develop a professional health career portfolio.
            a good health care team member.                    -007 Demonstrate necessary skills for CPR and first aid
       -002 Demonstrate knowledge of employment                      certification.
            skills during field trips and job shadowing.       -008 Participate in volunteerism through Youth Health
       -003 Utilize communication and observation                    Service Corps
            skills – written and practicum.


HEALTH FUNDAMENTALS: (1 credit, Gr. 12) – This course will give a basic understanding of comfort,
physical needs, infection control, body mechanics, safety, and assessment skills that are essential health
components to be aware of when working in the health field. Homework: 1-2 hours per week. Prerequisite:
None
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Apply interpersonal relationship skills to         -006 Perform special procedures - clinicals.
            health care team during job shadowing and          -007 Measure vital signs - clinicals.
            clinical.                                          -008 Assist with intake and output - clinicals.
       -002 Demonstrate knowledge of employment                -009 Administer personal care with emphasis on the
            skills by calling in when absent.                        elderly - clinicals.
       -003 Recognize concepts of the body as a whole          -010 Assist with ambulation and movement.
            and systems.                                       -011 Demonstrate leadership skills.
       -004 Utilize communication and observation              -012 Apply principles of proper nutrition to self and
            skills – written and during clinicals.                   patients
       -005 Employ safety considerations - clinicals.




                                                     PRACTICAL ARTS:
                                              INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY



COLLISION REPAIR: (3 credits, Gr. 11-12) - The Collision Repair Technology Program is designed to develop
job entry level skills and to prepare students for continued training in related fields. Emphasis will be given
to: safety, identification and use of hand and power tools, body and frame construction and repair, welding of
metals and thermo plastics, metal straightening, product and procedure for refinishing and management skills
including estimating and part procurement. Students will explore career opportunities in automotive industry
and related fields and develop leadership through Skills USA activities. Pre-employment training will be
stressed in all activities. Homework: 1-2 hours per week. Prerequisite: None Recommendation: Industrial
Technology, Art, Elements of Math, Principles of Technology and/or Material Science.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Demonstrate skills in leadership, communication, management; and list opportunities in the collision repair
            field.
       -002 Identify the basic construction of vehicles.
                                                                      61


       -003 Read a metric and fractional inch ruler and solve problems involving volume and ratios.
       -004 Use of hand and power tools/equipment and use safe practices in raising and supporting vehicles.
       -005 Use of safety procedures in all aspects of the collision repair field.
       -006 Write a damage report in logical sequence.
       -007 Demonstrate approved welds and cutting procedures for collision repair.
       -008 Analyze and repair sheet metal damage and composite plastic damages.
       -009 Remove and replace cosmetic, bolt-on and weld-on panels, bumpers and absorbers.
       -010 Identify and maintain refinishing equipment; apply corrosion protection; perform proper spraying techniques
            and equipment maintenance; mix and apply appropriate primer/sealant, topcoats and clear coats.
       -011 Remove and install fixed and moveable glass; moldings, trim and interior components.
       -012 Remove and install mechanical, electrical and hydraulic systems/components.
       -013 Analyze unibody alignment utilizing universal frame machine; full-frame body utilizing self-centering frame
            gauges; body damage with trim gauge and tape measure; perform repairs on unibody and full-frame vehicles
            with mechanical and hydraulic repair equipment.
       -014 Perform major component and section replacement.


AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY: (3 credits, Gr. 11-12) - Automotive Service Technology is a program
designed to develop entry level job skills and proficiency of young men and women who wish to earn a living
as an automotive technician or through employment in other related occupations. The automotive technician
uses a variety of hand and power tools. Instruction will involve class work, demonstrations and actual hands-
on laboratory work. It is a course designed for adult and/or secondary students with a one or two year option,
who intend to make Automotive Technology their chosen occupation. Homework: 1-2 hours per week.
Prerequisite: None. Recommendation: Industrial Technology, Elements of Math and Elements of Algebra A or
Algebra I, Principles of Technology and/or Material Science.
Competencies/Objectives:
              -001 Introduction to Automotive Technology
                   A. Safety
                   B. Shop Operation
                   C. Components and Careers
              -002 Electrical Careers
                   A. General Electrical System Diagnosis
                   B. Battery Diagnosis and Services
                   C. Starting System Diagnosis and Repair
                   D. Charging System Diagnosis and Repair
                   E. Lighting System Diagnosis and Repair
                   F. Gauges and Electrical Accessories
              -003 Engine Performance
                   A. Ignition Systems
                   B. Fuel and Exhaust Systems
                   C. Emission Control Systems
              -004 Engine Repair
                   A. General Engine Diagnosis – Remove and Replace
                   B. Cylinder Head and Valve Train Diagnosis and Repair
                   C. Short Block Diagnosis and Repair
                   D. Engine Completion and Start-Up Procedure
                   AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY Continued next page
                                                                    62


AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY Continued
                   E. Lubrication and Cooling System Diagnosis and Repair
              -005 Steering and Suspension Systems
                    A. Steering Systems
                    B. Diagnosis and Repair Front Suspension Systems
                       C. Diagnosis and Repair Rear Suspension Systems
                   D. Tire and Wheel Alignment Diagnosis and Repair
              -006 Brakes
                   A. Diagnosis and Repair Hydraulic Systems
                   B. Diagnosis and Repair Drum Brakes
                   C. Diagnosis and Repair Disc Brakes
                   D. Diagnosis and Repair Power Assist Brakes
              -007 Manual Drive Train and Axles
                     A. Clutch Diagnosis and Repair
                    B. Manual Transmission/Transaxle Diagnosis and Repair
                    C. Drive Shaft, CV-Joint and FWD Bearings Diagnosis and Repair
                      D. Differential Diagnosis and Repair
                      E. Four-Wheel-Drive Diagnosis and Repair
              -008 Automatic Transmission and Transaxle
                        A. In-Car Transmission and Transaxle Diagnosis and Maintenance
                        B. Out-of-Vehicle Transmission and Transaxle Repair
              -009 Heating and Air Conditioning
                    A. Air Conditioning
                    B. Heating System




BUILDING TRADES: (3 credits, Gr. 11-12) – Electricians, carpenters, and HVAC technicians help fill the ranks
of what is known as the Building Construction Trades. The Building Trades Program covers units of technical
knowledge, hand tools, power tools and practical experiences as related to the care and use of hand and
power tools. The course offers in-depth instruction in three main areas (electricity, carpentry and HVAC). The
course will provide for classroom presentation, shop work, and practical experience application accomplished
by completing the class project, a single dwelling house. For students who meet pre-determined criteria the
course is designed to provide entry-level skills for acceptance in the Construction Apprenticeship Tech Prep
Consortium. The hands-on work will begin at the foundation and end with the finishing touches on a house
ready for occupancy built by students. Homework: All book work done in class. Prerequisite: None
Recommendation: Industrial Technology, Drafting, Elements of Math and Elements of Algebra A or Algebra I,
Woodworking, Principles of Technology.
Competencies/Objectives:
    -001 Demonstrate occupational safety habits in all laboratory activities.
    -002 Develop and demonstrate the necessary skills in the Building Trades to qualify for employment in this area.
    -003 Be acquainted with the many related construction crafts.
    -004 Demonstrate pride in the work and an appreciation for craftsmanship in a finished product.
    -005 Demonstrate own ability to solve problems.
    -006 Demonstrate an understanding of labor and management, through on-site activities.
    -007 Demonstrate the development of leadership qualities.
    -008 Demonstrate ability to cooperate with fellow workers in the occupational area involved.
    -009 Demonstrate individual initiative and responsibilities as a worker.
                                                                      63




WELDING AND MACHINE SHOP TECHNOLOGY: (3 credits, Gr. 11-12) - The Welding and Machine Tool
Program is a two-year (1,050 clock hours) program of instruction designed to impart skill and knowledge of
Welding and Machines. The welding program ultimately leads to an opportunity for American Welding Society
Certification, D1.1 Code. The Machine Tool portion of the course will augment the welding program and teach
students the fundamentals of machine tool technology including precision measuring and related
mathematics. The Welding/Machine Tool course is offered to secondary and post-secondary students and
consists of classroom instruction, lab practice and projects. All students will practice welding and machine
shop principles in the lab under the direct supervision of a skilled and competent instructor. The theory
portion of the course requires reading, research, lectures, and classroom demonstrations with the use of
visual and audio/visual aids. Homework: 1-2 hours per week. Prerequisite: None. Recommendation:
Industrial Technology, Elements of Math and Elements of Algebra A or Algebra I, Principles of Technology.
NOTE: Principles of Technology is required for those students who wish to receive a vocational certificate or a
certificate of advanced standing for continuing education at North Central Missouri College.
Competencies/Objectives:
    -001 Describe the safety rules and regulations found in a welding/machine shop.
     -002 Pass a guided bench test on samples using all four types of welding: smaw, mig, tig, and oxyacetylene.
    -003 Demonstrate the skills in oxyacetylene welding, brazing, and cutting.
    -004 Demonstrate the skills in SMAW, GMAW, and GTAW in flat, vertical, and overhead positions, fillet and v-groove
         welds.
    -005 Interpret and write welding symbols.
    -006 Read and interpret blueprints.
    -007 Demonstrate the skills needed to operate machine shop equipment
          (mill, lathe, surface grinder, drill press and band saw).
    -008 Demonstrate skills in leadership, communication and management.

                                            TS: AGRICULTURE
                                        PRACTICAL ARTS:
                                           AGRICULTURE
                                                                     64


AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE I: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) – Designed for non-rural and rural students, this
introductory course in agriculture gives special attention to leadership, FFA, Supervised Agricultural
Experience (SAE) Programs, animal science, and agricultural mechanics/construction. Students will have
opportunities to explore potential agricultural careers and give consideration to their own career choices,
develop personal goals, and develop leadership abilities through the FFA and its opportunities for the student.
Homework: occasional. Prerequisite: None. Not to be taken in conjunction with Agricultural Science I-
Structures
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Demonstrate effective leadership characteristics and knowledge of leadership style.
       -002 Identify key components of the National FFA Organization and its related opportunities in agriculture.
       -003 Investigate career opportunities in the agriculture, food, fiber, and natural resources industry.
       -004 Create and manage finances effectively through a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program using
             the Missouri Agricultural Record Book for Secondary Students.
       -005 Describe the basic components of animal science, such as nutrition and reproduction, as related to beef,
             swine, sheep, dairy, poultry, equine, and specialty animals.
       -006 Describe and evaluate animal products and their uses.
       -007 Demonstrate proper safety procedures for operating machinery, equipment, and/or tools within the
       agriculture shop.
       -008 Demonstrate basic principles of woodworking and finishing, arc welding, and oxy-acetylene cutting.


AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE II: (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) – With an emphasis on leadership, crop science, soils, and
agricultural mechanics/construction, this second year introductory course in agriculture further develops
students skills in various facets of the agriculture industry. Public speaking, parliamentary procedure and
careers related to the agriculture, food, fiber, and natural resource industry are also addressed in this course.
Homework: occasional. Prerequisite: Ag Science I. Not to be taken in conjunction with Agricultural Science
II-Structures.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Demonstrate effective communication and presentation skills.
       -002 Demonstrate the process for identifying and securing careers, such as resumes and interview skills.
       -003 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program.
       -004 Describe the basics of plant science including growth, development and plant processes.
       -005 Describe factors of crop science such as crop production practices and crop uses.
       -006 Determine the importance of soil, soil formation factors, and soil management practices.
       -007 Demonstrate knowledge of forest management and the importance of forest products.
       -008 Demonstrate proper safety procedures for operating machinery, equipment, and/or tools within the
       agriculture shop.
       -009 Fabricate projects utilizing proper procedures for arc and oxy-acetylene welding, woodworking, and
       painting.
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE I-STRUCTURES (BUILDING MAINTENANCE I): (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) This
introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the design and construction of articles made of
wood and metal through the safe use of wood-turning hand and power tools and machines, to understand
industrial processes, to read working drawings and to identify quality wood products. This course also
introduces students to basic home wiring, plumbing, drywall work and various other basic home repairs. Units
in leadership, FFA, Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Programs, and careers will also be covered.
Homework: Occasional. Prerequisite: None. Not to be taken in conjunction with Agricultural Science I.
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NOTE: Lab fees apply for cost of projects and expendable supplies. The projects, when completed and fully
paid are the property of the student.
Competencies/Objectives:
      -001 Demonstrate proper safety procedures for operating machinery, equipment, and/or tools within the
                   agriculture shop.
    -002 Design building plans, including a list and bill of materials, as well as the construction design for the
                  proposed project plans.
    -003 Identification of wood and metal working tools and equipment.
    -004 Demonstrate basic principles of woodworking and finishing, arc welding, and oxy-acetylene cutting.
    -005 Demonstrate proper practices when dealing with electricity and wiring.
    -006 Demonstrate proper practices for plumbing and identify methods for upkeep of pipes.
    -007 Identify key components of leadership, FFA, and careers, as related to opportunities in agriculture.
    -008 Create and manage finances effectively through a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program using the
         Missouri Agricultural Record Book for Secondary Students.


AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE II-STRUCTURES (BUILDING MAINTENANCE II): (1 credit, Gr. 10-12) – This
course is a continuation of concepts learned in Agricultural Science I-Structures. This course is designed to
acquaint students with the design and construction of articles made of wood and metal through the safe use
of wood-turning hand and power tools and machines, to understand industrial processes, to read working
drawings and to identify quality wood products. This course also introduces students to basic home wiring,
plumbing, drywall work and various other basic home repairs. Units in leadership, communication, Supervised
Agricultural Experience (SAE) Programs, and careers will also be covered. Homework: Occasional.
Prerequisite: Agricultural Science I-Structures, Agricultural Science I. Not to be taken in conjunction with
Agricultural Science II. NOTE: Lab fees apply for cost of projects and expendable supplies. The projects,
when completed and fully paid are the property of the student.
Competencies/Objectives:
    -001 Demonstrate proper safety procedures for operating machinery, equipment, and/or tools within the
                  agriculture shop.
    -002 Design building plans, including a list and bill of materials, as well as the construction design for the proposed
        project plans.
    -003 Identification of wood and metal working tools and equipment.
    -004 Demonstrate basic principles of woodworking and finishing, arc welding, and oxy-acetylene cutting.
    -005 Demonstrate proper practices when dealing with electricity and wiring.
    -006 Demonstrate proper practices for plumbing and identify methods for upkeep of pipes.
    -007 Identify key components of leadership, communication, and careers, as related to opportunities in agriculture.
    -008 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program.
*Upon completion of Agricultural Science I and II or Agricultural Science I-Structures and II-Structures, in
addition to one of the following advanced approved courses (Agricultural Structures, Animal Science,
Greenhouse Operation and Management, Landscape and Turf Management), students will meet the criteria for
one science requirement.


AGRICULTURAL CONSTRUCTION: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) – Project construction, welding, cutting,
woodworking, metals, and finishing are all areas addressed in Agricultural Construction. This advanced level
course will examine safety in the shop while designing and fabricating projects from metal and wood.
Creating building plans, lists and bill of materials will also be examined in the course. Homework:
Occasional. Prerequisite: Ag Science I and II. This class is offered every other year, rotates with Agricultural
                                                                       66


Structures. NOTE: Lab fees apply for cost of projects and expendable supplies. The projects, when
completed and fully paid are the property of the student.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Demonstrate proper safety procedures for operating machinery, equipment, and/or tools within the
            agriculture shop.
        -002 Demonstrate the necessary skills for operating and maintaining various types of welders found in the shop
            laboratory.
        -003 Design building plans, including a list and bill of materials, as well as the construction design for the
            proposed project plans.
        -004 Demonstrate the necessary skills and procedures for operating and maintaining oxy-acetylene welders and
            torches.
        -005 Utilize woodworking tools to properly construct a project comprised of wood.
        -006 Demonstrate proper techniques for finishing projects after construction is completed.
        -007 Fabricate projects utilizing various materials including the selection of specific types of metals and woods.
        -008 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program utilizing the Missouri Agricultural
            Record Book for Secondary Students.


AGRICULTURAL STRUCTURES: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) – Building construction, concrete, electricity, plumbing,
and fencing are all areas addressed in Agricultural Structures. This advanced level course will examine safety
in the shop while designing and fabricating projects. Creating building plans, lists and bill of materials will
also be examined in the course. Homework: Occasional. Prerequisite: Ag Science I and II. This class is
offered every other year, rotates with Agricultural Construction. NOTE: Lab fees apply for cost of projects and
expendable supplies. The projects, when completed and fully paid are the property of the student.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Demonstrate proper safety procedures for operating machinery, equipment, and/or tools
             within the agriculture shop.
        -002 Demonstrate the necessary skills for farmstead planning and building construction.
        -003 Design building plans, including a list and bill of materials, as well as the construction design for the
            proposed project plans.
        -004 Demonstrate the necessary skills and procedures for ordering, preparing, and pouring concrete.
        -005 Demonstrate proper practices when dealing with electricity and wiring.
        -006 Demonstrate proper practices for plumbing and identify methods for upkeep of pipes.
        -007 Describe techniques for building and mending fences.
        -008 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program utilizing the Missouri Agricultural
            Record Book for Secondary Students.


AGRICULTURAL POWER: (½ credit, Gr. 11-12) – Instruction will include: principles of small gasoline engines,
overhaul and trouble shooting, and principles of electricity, wiring and electric motors. Homework:
Occasional. Prerequisite:Ag Science I and II.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Demonstrate proper safety procedures for operating machinery, equipment, and/or tools within the
agriculture shop.
        -002 Design building plans, including a list and bill of materials, as well as the construction design for the
            proposed project plans.
        -003 Explain the principles of operation of various engines.
                                                                    67


       -004 Identify and utilize the various tools necessary when working with small gasoline engines and electric
            motors.
       -005 Demonstrate proper practices when dealing with electricity and wiring.
       -006 Utilize a service manual when dealing with an engine/motor.
       -007 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program utilizing the Missouri Agricultural
Record Book for                        Secondary Students.


ANIMAL SCIENCE: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) – Animal nutrition, reproduction, genetics, health, and management
are all addressed in Animal Science. This advanced level course will examine selection and management of
animals, in addition to animal husbandry practices. Marketing and feeding of animals will also be examined in
the course. Homework: Occasional. Prerequisite: Ag Science I and II. Dual credit course through Missouri
State University.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Identify and demonstrate the importance of maintaining a properly balanced nutritional diet for
              animals in different stages of their lives.
       -002 Describe the importance of genetics and its effects on animals and the agricultural industry.
       -003 Identify the importance of animal health and methods to maintain animal health.
       -004 Discuss current and future issues relating to animal agriculture.
       -005 Identify factors involved in livestock and poultry production, as well as small animals.
       -006 Develop a feeding program based on different animal needs.
       -007 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program utilizing the Missouri Agricultural
            Record Book for Secondary Students.




GREENHOUSE OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) – Greenhouse Operation and
Management is an advanced course emphasizing the horticulture industry. Plant growth and development,
propagation, and plant environments are all topics stressed in this course. The course also includes the study
of pesticides and how they are used. Time is spent in the greenhouse growing poinsettias during the fall
semester and bedding and vegetable plants during the spring semester. Marketing and sales techniques of
greenhouse crops are also included, as well as basic plant identification, plant care, bulb culture and care, and
fruit and vegetable gardening. Homework: Occasional. Prerequisite: Ag Science I and II. This class is
offered every other year, rotates with Landscape and Turf Management.
Competencies/Objectives:
                                                                    68


       - 001 Describe the differences in greenhouse structures, including the interior and exterior layouts, climate
              control factors, and type of greenhouse business operation.
       - 002 Identify the effects of environmental controls, pests, diseases and disorders, and how to safely control them
              in the greenhouse environment.
        - 003 Demonstrate proper techniques for plant care, such as fertilizing, watering, and preparing plants for sale.
       -004 Start plants by sexual and asexual propagation methods.
       -005 Describe different marketing strategies for selling greenhouse crops.
       -006 Investigate career opportunities within the horticulture industry.
       -007 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program utilizing the Missouri
            Agricultural Record Book for Secondary Students.


LANDSCAPE AND TURF MANAGEMENT: (1 credit, Gr. 11-12) – Landscape and turf management is an
advanced course emphasizing the horticulture industry. The use of plants to improve the environment
through principles of landscape and turf design and management are focused on throughout the course.
Time will also be spent on plant use and identification for the landscape. Career exploration, economic
importance, and application of ornamental landscaping in our society are emphasized in the course.
Homework: Occasional. Prerequisite: Ag Science I and II. This class is offered every other year, rotates with
Greenhouse Operation and Management.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Explain the importance of the landscaping and turf grass industries, as well as potential career opportunities
            involved within the industry.
       -002 Describe the principles behind plant growth and plant selection for the landscape.
       -003 Identify trees, shrubs, ground covers, turf grasses, and various other plants that could be used in a
           landscape.
       -004 Demonstrate proper techniques for plant care, such as fertilizing, watering, and applying pesticides safely in
           the landscape.
       -005 Demonstrate the proper techniques for installation and maintenance of trees and shrubs in the landscape.
       -006 Describe how to install, maintain, and renovate lawns and other turf grass areas.
       -007 Create a landscape design using the principles of landscape design, site analysis, base maps with design
           symbols, and cost estimates.
       -008 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program utilizing the Missouri Agricultural
           Record Book for Secondary Students.


 AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS: (½ credit, Gr. 11-12) - Ag Communications is designed to prepare
students who will be entering agricultural related careers, especially those that emphasize agricultural sales,
biotechnology, public speaking, correspondence, and record keeping. Lessons in marketing plans,
promotions, customer relations, and financial analysis are areas that will be focused on relating to the
marketing of agricultural products. Homework: Occasional. Prerequisite: Ag Science I and II.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Describe agriculture as an industry and the career opportunities related to agricultural communications.
       -002 Demonstrate the process for locating a job, including resume, interview, and communication skills.
       -003 Create a sales presentation, using concepts of marketing plans, for an agricultural related product.
       -004 Identify methods of communication, through written and verbal, in spreading the word about
       agriculture.
       -005 Evaluate the effectiveness of various methods of communication.
       -006 Define entrepreneurship and its potential business opportunities.
                                                                        69


        -007 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program utilizing the Missouri Agricultural
      Record Book for .........................   Secondary Students.




AG SALES, MARKETING & MANAGEMENT: (½ credit, Gr. 11-12) - Ag Sales, Marketing and Management is
designed to prepare students who will be entering agricultural related careers, especially those that emphasize
agricultural business, sales and marketing. Sales techniques, marketing plans, promotions, customer
relations, and financial analysis are areas that will be focused on relating to the marketing of agricultural
products.
Homework: Occasional. Prerequisite: Ag Science I and II.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Describe agriculture as an industry and the career opportunities related to agribusiness sales, marketing,
             and management.
        -002 Define the basic economic principles in agribusiness.
        -003 Demonstrate the process for locating a job, including resume, interview, and communication skills.
        -004 Create a sales presentation, using concepts of marketing plans, for an agricultural related product.
        -005 Identify methods of communicating with customers to better meet their sales needs.
        -006 Evaluate the effectiveness of various promotional activities.
        -007 Define entrepreneurship and its potential business opportunities.
        -008 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program utilizing the Missouri
              Agricultural Record Book for Secondary Students.


CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES: (½ credit, Gr. 11-12) – Natural resource conservation, forestry, fish
and wildlife conservation and management as it relates to our society are emphasized in this course. Units of
instruction will focus on conservation management systems in the county and state. Conservation laws
concerning hunting, trapping, and fishing will also be studied. Homework: Occasional. Prerequisite: Ag
Science I and II.
Competencies/Objectives:
        -001 Identify and describe potential careers in the conservation and natural resources industry.
        -002 Evaluate the legal, moral, and ethical issues faced within conservation and natural resources.
        -003 Describe the concepts involved in forest management, including tree identification, improving forest
              production and habitat management.
        -004 Describe the recreational, social, aesthetic, scientific, and educational values of fish and wildlife
             resources.
        -005 Assess management practices that improve fish and wildlife populations and habitats.
        -006 Outline the life histories of specific fish and wildlife species.
        -007 Describe fish and wildlife regulations, emphasizing how regulations are made and enforced, in Missouri.
        -008 Analyze and evaluate the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) Program utilizing the Missouri
                Agricultural Record Book for Secondary Students.
                                                              70


AG COOP: (2 credits, Gr. 12) - ***See Cooperative Education under Practical Arts, Business*** Prerequisite:
None. Recommendation: Students must apply during the spring of his/her junior year and meet program
requirements stated in Board Policy.




                                                        GENERAL
                                                   ELECTIVE COURSES



A PLUS MENTOR: (½ or 1 credit, Gr. 12) This course is designed to help A+ students to complete the 50
hours of unpaid tutoring as a required component of the A+ program. Each student will be assigned a
certified staff member from one of the Maryville R-II School District buildings to work under. Each student
assigned to the Eugene Field Elementary School or the Maryville Middle School must provide his/her own
transportation to and from the building. Prerequisite: Possess 2.5 cumulative GPA, 95% Attendance, have
completed and signed an A Plus Participation Agreement.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Organizational Skills.                                 -005 Research skills.
       -002 Ability to work with others.                           -006 Creativity in the classroom.
       -003 Effective oral and written communication.              -007 Perform 50 hours of mentoring.
       -004 Classroom management skills.


CADET TEACHING: (1 credit, 2 hours during 1 semester; Gr. 12) - This course provides an opportunity for
students interested in a teaching career to work with an elementary classroom teacher in the area of the
student's interest. Students will make bulletin boards, duplicate materials, grade and file papers. They will
                                                               71


perform duties necessary to everyday classroom management as designed by their supervising teachers. Each
student must provide his/her own transportation to and from the building assigned for Cadet Teaching. This
course requires two hours out of every regular school day. The student must be an active member of Future
Teachers of America. The sponsors of this organization will serve as supervisors of the Cadet Teachers and
will oversee related assignments. Prerequisite: Cumulative grade point average of "B" and approval by FTA
sponsors and a supervising teacher. Students must participate in FTA activities for at least one year prior to
enrolling in Cadet Teaching.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Organizational Skills.                                    -005 Research skills.
       -002 Ability to work with others.                              -006 Creativity in the classroom.
       -003 Effective oral and written communication.                 -007 Awareness of the responsibilities involved
       -004 Classroom management skills.                          in the                  teaching profession.


COLLEGE RELEASE: (No High School Credit, Gr. 12) Prerequisite: Cumulative G.P.A. of 3.25, completed
and/or registered to complete a College Preparatory Educational Program (NWMSU entrance requirements as
stipulated by the Board of Education), and have completed or enrolled to complete all advanced elective course
work available at Maryville R-II High School in the student's chosen subject area.


DRIVER EDUCATION: (1/4 credit, Gr. 9-12) - This course is offered during the summer when school is not
in session. Before enrolling in the course, a student should assure that the course will be offered when he/she
wants to take it.   The course is the State of Missouri approved Drivers Training course consisting of 30 hours
of classroom instruction, 6 hours of behind-the-wheel practice driving, and 6 hours of observation of other
drivers. Students will learn to drive a vehicle safely and to follow the rules of the road. They will be graded as
PASS-FAIL only. Prerequisite: Students must be 15 years of age when the course begins.


LIBRARY PRACTICUM: (½ or 1 credit, Gr. 12) - Library Practicum is a course in which the student learns by
doing. Students taking the course will serve as assistants in the library while learning prescribed set of library
skills. Enrollment is limited to two students per hour in order to provide the librarian the time to work with
each student. Participants will learn to use various machines and computers in library practicum and they will
also have opportunities for art and clerical work. Prerequisite: Cumulative G.P.A. of 3.00, good attendance
(95%+) and Librarian's approval to take the course.
Competencies/Objectives:
       -001 Organizational skills.                                   -005 Complete tasks independently.
       -002 Time management.                                         -006 Apply Dewey Decimal System.
       -003 Locate appropriate library materials.                    -007 Operation of Library Media Center's
       -004 Ability to work with others.                                   hardware and software.


OFFICE ASSISTANT: (½ or 1 credit, Gr. 12) - This course offers hands-on office experience, where students
are to practice proper telephone procedures, deliver messages, make copies, operate office equipment, and
perform miscellaneous office tasks under the direct supervision of office personnel and administrators.
Assistants will be assigned to the main office, Northwest Technical School office, and Superintendent office.
Prerequisite: 1 credit of Computer Applications, possess a 3.00 cumulative GPA and good attendance.
                                                               72



                                       SPECIAL SERVICES COURSES




ACADEMIC SUPPORT: (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - This course is designed to help students with serious problems
related to academic failure, poor attendance, inappropriate behavior and/or health and safety issues. Credit is
arranged according to the amount of time spent in the class based on individual student needs. Prerequisite:
Referral by School Administration.


BASIC SKILLS (EMH, LD, BD): (1 credit, Gr. 9-12) - Available to qualified students. Credit is arranged
according to the amount of time spent in the class based on individual student needs. In this program,
academic skills are emphasized on the individual basis. Skills are applied to functional and job-related
experiences. Supportive services are provided for students integrated into the regular program. Students
should learn to apply academic skills to daily tasks, to develop to potential, to function at an independent
level, and to be realistic in goal expectations. Prerequisite: Before placement in the program, students must
undergo screening and diagnostic evaluation.

				
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