Transylvania County Schools by yaofenjin

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									 Mission Statement
      The mission of the Transylvania County Public Schools is to prepare students to become caring &
      productive citizens in an ever changing society through the shared responsibility of students, parents,
      educators, & the community.

 Belief Statements
      All children learn differently and we must value & understand those differences.
      High expectations will result in high achievement.
      All children can learn.
      Through the shared responsibility of students, teachers, parents & community, we can reach our goals.
      Children are our most important resource.
      All children deserve a safe, comfortable, attractive, and inviting atmosphere that fosters learning.
      All educators, students & parents deserve respect.
      Minds & hearts are the focus of education.



Rosman High School                              Transylvania County                          Davidson River School
749 Pickens Highway                       Career Technical Education Office                        100 Ecusta Road
Rosman, NC 28772                                 Country Club Road                              Brevard, NC 28712
Phone: (828) 862-4284                            Brevard, NC 28712                            Phone: (828) 884-9567
Brian Weaver, Principal                         Phone: (828) 884-4188                        Donna Wilde, Principal
                                               Jeff McDaris, Director




                                                                              1
TRANSYLVANIA
COUNTY SCHOOLS                                                                              SUPERINTENDENT
Morris Education Center   Telephone (828) 884-6173
400 Rosenwald Lane        Toll Free 1-800-215-2788
Brevard NC 28712          FAX (828) 884-9524




Dear Parents and Students:

Changes in our county in recent years underscore the importance of a solid education as a foundation for
whatever may arise in one’s career. Economic conditions call for the wise use of available resources.

Two issues frame the program of study for Transylvania County’s high school students. We must offer
programs that prepare students for the future, and we must use our resources wisely. Because of low
enrollment, some courses may be offered web-based, through distance learning, or in combination with
Brevard High School. Through collaboration and creativity, we will be able to continue to offer a wide variety
of courses to our high school students.

It is critically important that you assist us in helping prepare your child for the future. North Carolina
continues to increase graduation requirements and raise academic standards for all students. This course
description booklet includes important information concerning academic and graduation requirements. Every
parent and student should take time to review this information carefully. The completion of a four-year plan
with yearly updates is an important product of planning for graduation and beyond. The Transylvania county
Schools’ mission, “To prepare students to become caring and productive citizens in an ever-changing society
through the shared responsibility of students, parents, educators and community,” is most evident in this
process. We must all work together to insure the success of all students.

Communication is key to the success of our students. Please call on school counselors, academic advisors,
administrators, and teachers at your school to answer the questions I am certain you will have about this
important process. I want each student to have a successful high school experience.

Please feel free to call your school or Scott Elliott, Director of Secondary Education, if you have questions about
this course description handbook.

Sincerely,



Sonna J. Lyda




                                                        2
                                                                              Table of Contents

                                                                                                                                                                                      Pages


Introduction, Advisors, Registration ..........................................................................................................................................5

Important Information, Requirements for Graduation, Diplomas............................................................................................6-7

Weighted Courses, Honor Roll, Graduated NC Driver’s License, Calculation of GPA .............................................................7

Courses of Study ......................................................................................................................................................................8

Understanding Course Descriptions ........................................................................................................................................9

Course Offerings:.................................................................................................................................................................9-15
      English..........................................................................................................................................................................9-10
      Fine Arts .....................................................................................................................................................................10-11
      Foreign Languages .........................................................................................................................................................11
      Math.................................................................................................................................................................................12
      Health/PE ........................................................................................................................................................................13
      Science............................................................................................................................................................................13
      Social Studies..................................................................................................................................................................14
      Teacher Assistants ..........................................................................................................................................................14

CTE Course Offerings .......................................................................................................................................................15-22

RHS Course Alternatives...................................................................................................................................................23-34

      Blue Ridge Community College..................................................................................................................................24-31
      UNCG iSchool ............................................................................................................................................................32-33
      North Carolina Virtual Public School...........................................................................................................................34-35
Four-Year Plan .......................................................................................................................................................................36




                                                                                                     3
                                               Expand Your Horizons!
                                                             Flexible Options for Learning in
                                                              Transylvania County Schools

Are you interested in earning free college credits while still in high school? Are you looking for an honors, AP, or Career and Technical
Education course not offered at your school? Consider the following options:

NC Virtual Public School – Online courses in many subject areas. For more information reference pages 36-37 of this guide or go online
at http://www.ncvps.org/courses/

Blue Ridge Community College – Courses are offered online, at your school campus, and at the BRCC-Transylvania Campus. For more
information reference pages 26-34 of this guide or go online at http://www.blueridge.edu/

UNCG iSchool – Online college courses from UNC-Greensboro. For more information reference pages 35-36 of this guide or go online at
http://web.uncg.edu/dcl/web/ischool/default.asp

Other High Schools – Consider taking a course that is offered at the other high school campus (BHS or RHS). If you are interested in this
option, a school counselor will be glad to explore options and make the scheduling arrangements for you. Here’s what to do:
    1. Pick up a copy of the other school’s course guide in your guidance office.
    2. Visit your school counselor to sit down and review your schedule options.
    3. That’s all! We will do the work for you!




                                         Dates for the PSAT, SAT, and ACT
SAT:
October 4, 2009 ...........................register by September 9       March 14, 2010 .................................... register by February 10
November 1, 2009 ......................register by September 26          May 2, 2010 .............................................. register by March 31
December 6, 2009 ........................register by November 5          June 6, 2009 ..................................................register by May 5
January 24, 2010 ........................register by December 26

PSAT:
     October 17

For more information about the PSAT and SAT, please visit the College Board’s web site at www.collegeboard.com

ACT:
      October 24                            February 6                                     June 12
      December 12                           April 10
Note: Registration deadlines were not available at the time this Course Guide was printed. For up to date deadlines and information about these tests,
visit the ACT web site at http://www.actstudent.org




                                                                             4
                                                                Introduction
The educational programs offered in Transylvania County Schools and the requirements for a North Carolina Diploma are described in this booklet. The
information is designed to assist students and their families in making education plans. Whether the student’s goal is to prepare for continuing education
in college or technical school or to prepare for employment upon graduation from high school, careful thought should be given to the courses that are
taken each year.




                           Responsibility for Registration/Course Selection
Each student, grades 9 – 12, in Transylvania County Schools has a faculty advisor. The advisor, counselors and/or school administrators are to talk with
each student, each year. Ultimately the goals and direction for a student must belong to the student.

High school coursework should be planned to provide sound basic preparation for career goals and higher education requirements. Career and
educational goals often change; therefore, coursework must be annually reviewed and adjusted. Information in this booklet will help assist in the process
of designing the student’s course of study. It should be noted, due to course demand and the maximum number of sections available to teach,
that a course listed in this handbook might not be available.

The following is a description of the registration process. Parents and guardians are encouraged to be aware of the process to support students in
making proper career pathway decisions. Specific questions about the registration process should be directed to the Guidance Counselor or
Administration at Rosman High School.

                        Rosman High School Registration Process 2009-2010
Registration for current 9th – 11th graders will take place from late February to early March. Time will be provided during the school day for registration
activities. In addition, an information session for all rising ninth graders and their parents will be held in the Rosman High School media center on
Tuesday, February 17th. Students and parents may ask specific questions about courses, course of study, and other issues related to registration.

RHS faculty/staff members will meet with rising ninth graders in their classrooms at RMS during registration. They will give students an overview of the
high school Courses of Study and general guidance on course selections. Students will complete a 9th grade registration form at school with teachers’
initials for the four primary academic courses (English, Math, Social Studies, and Science), and the required freshman health and physical education.
After selection of three electives, students will take a copy home for their parents.

Each 9th grade student will develop a Four-Year Plan that outlines the possible sequencing of courses. Rising tenth, eleventh, and twelfth graders will
review and update their Four-Year Plan with their academic advisor during the registration process each year. In addition, an information session for
rising 10th, 11th, & 12th graders and their parents will be held in the Rosman High School media center on Thursday, February 19th. Students will meet
with their advisor during scheduled advisement times. During this time students will review and make any necessary changes to their Four-Year Plan.
After Four-Year Plans have been reviewed by students, copies of course selections will be printed and distributed to students for parents to review.
Scheduling should be completed by the end of May. A Four-Year Plan template can be found in the back of this guide.



                                                       Registration Schedule

Tuesday, February 17            Parent information session for rising 9th graders. Guidance and administration will review the registration process and
                                answer questions. This will be held in the Media Center at 6:30 pm.

Thursday, February 19           Parent information session for rising 10th, 11th, & 12th graders. Guidance and administration will review the registration
                                process and answer questions. This will be held in the Media Center at 6:30 pm.

                                Open House will also be held on this date from 5:30 pm until 7:00 pm.


February 24                     Meet with students via grade level meetings to distribute registration information and to discuss the registration timeline.

March 3-6                       Registration will occur in the Media Center with advisors during the school day. Advisors will discuss and update the 4-
                                Year Plan and answer questions about class selections.


                                                                              5
March 30                       Master schedule of course selections will be completed. Administration and guidance will begin to finalize schedules for
                               each student.

June- July                     Student schedules will be sent home as soon as possible after the last student day. Schedules will be finalized once
                               staffing decisions can be made.




                                                     Important Information
A. Prerequisites
   Some courses must be taken in a logical sequence; therefore, students must adhere to the designated prerequisites. (For example, Spanish I must
   be passed before registering for Spanish II.)

B. Teacher Recommendations/Waivers/Self Selection
   Teachers may make recommendations for placement of students based on student performance on various indicators or other courses students
   have taken. Should a student and parent feel the recommendation is inappropriate, a conference with the Guidance Counselor may be scheduled
   and a waiver may be signed by the student and parent for student placement in a course.

C. Course Loads
   It is expected that every student will take eight courses each year. Certain other exceptions based on career goals may be made for second
   semester seniors.

D. Honors and Advanced Placement Courses
   Honors and AP courses are designed with a more rigorous curriculum than the standard college preparatory North Carolina Standard Course of
   Study. Some core classes have an honors level and participation can be limited due to class size.

E. Enrollment, Course Offerings and Location of Course
   Since career pathways call for a varied number of classes, with limited resources, some courses may be offered at only one high school or the other.
   Courses offered will depend on qualified staff availability and the numbers of students enrolled in each course. Allowances will be made for students
   to travel between schools when practical and necessary for his/her career pathway.



                                              Requirements for Graduation
Minimum course credits required for high school graduation in Transylvania County are twenty-eight credits or four less than the maximum number of
courses the student can take. He/she must complete a course of study.

All Transylvania County students are encouraged to take courses in fine arts, foreign language, career and technical education, and areas of academic
interest to complete their courses of study.

Each student is expected to perform at a Level III or better on all End-of-Course Tests (EOCs). EOCs are required in English I, Algebra I, Algebra II,
Geometry, Biology, Chemistry, Civics and Economics, Physical Science, Physics and United States History.

In addition, students must pass the NC Computer Skills Test. This requirement is typically met in 8th grade. Tenth grade students must pass the N.C.
Writing Test.

Core Curriculum:
Starting with the freshman class of 2009, students will need to complete the Core Curriculum courses in order to graduate. This curriculum differs from
past standards by requiring four math credits and four courses in an elective Concentration Area. Please see the table of graduation requirements
(located on page 9) for a complete list of requirements. These requirements do not apply to students completing the Occupational Course of Study or
special education certificate.

Concentration Area Requirement (Core Curriculum):
Students completing the Core Curriculum are required to complete four courses in a Concentration Area. Students may select four courses from an
approved program in the Arts, Foreign Languages, or Career and Technical Education pathways. Students may elect to complete an Integrated
Concentration Area from an approved list of interdisciplinary studies. The list can be found on page 18 of this guide. Students who would like to propose
their own four course Integrated Concentration Area are encouraged to visit with their school counselor for details and assistance.




                                                                            6
Diplomas and Other Completion Certificates
The document received upon completion of a program depends upon several factors. The various exit documents are described below.

    Graduation Certificate or Certificate of Completion: Students who do not meet the standards for a course of study but satisfy all state and local
            graduation requirements may be eligible to receive a certificate of achievement or graduation certificate.

    Diploma: Students who satisfy all state graduation requirements, including a defined and completed course of study.

    Merit Diploma: Students who satisfy all state and local graduation requirements, including local Board of Education End-of-Course Test standards
             and Senior Project.

All students must complete an approved Course of Study in order to graduate. We strongly urge all students to complete either (or both) the College
Tech Prep or College Prep requirements. This insures that a student is well prepared for further study at a community college or university or for
meaningful employment.

Honor Roll

At the end of each grading period, an honor roll based on a student’s nine weeks’ grades is calculated and published. The A Honor Roll includes
students maintaining an A average (93% or higher) in all classes. The A/B Honor Roll includes students maintaining a B average (85% - 92.9%) or
higher in all classes. A student with a failing grade or an Incomplete in any course is not listed on the Honor Roll.


Graduated North Carolina Driver’s License

To be eligible to hold a graduated North Carolina Driver’s License, a student must pass a minimum of three of four courses taken each semester.

Calculation of Your Grade Point Average

Your weighted GPA determines your class rank. College admissions counselors pay close attention to these numbers. For your weighted GPA, the
points you receive for some courses (Honors and AP) will be greater than the points received for regular courses.

GPA Scale
100 = 4.000        92 = 3.500       84 = 2.500         76 = 1.500        F = 0.00
99 = 4.000         91 = 3.375       83 = 2.375         75 = 1.375        WF = 0.00
98 = 4.000         90 = 3.250       82 = 2.250         74 = 1.250        INC = 0.00
97 = 4.000         89 = 3.125       81 = 2.125         73 = 1.125        P = 0.00
96 = 4.000         88 = 3.000       80 = 2.000         72 = 1.000
95 = 3.875         87 = 2.875       79 = 1.875         71 = 1.000
94 = 3.750         86 = 2.750       78 = 1.750         70 = 1.000
93 = 3.625         85 = 2.625       77 = 1.625
(Add one full point for Honors courses. Add two full points for Advanced Placement courses.)

Weighted Courses

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (DPI) has established which courses are eligible to receive weighted grade points for calculation of
grade point average and class rank. These courses fall into three categories:

    1. In cases where both a regular and an honors or advanced level of a course are offered, one additional grade point will be added.
    2. Foreign language courses beyond the second year level and some math courses are considered to be inherently advanced and grades
       in these courses will receive one additional grade point. (DPI prohibits awarding honors points to any Algebra I course.)
    3. Grades in all AP courses receive two additional points for students who score a minimum score of 2 on the AP exam.

Transfer students will receive weighted grade points for AP and honors courses taken at other schools, when it can be determined that those courses
meet the DPI guidelines.

Beginning with the Class of 2007 North Carolina Scholars distinction will only use unweighted grade point average as a criteria.




                                                                            7
                                                         Transylvania County Schools
                                                              Courses of Study
                                                                                                     College Tech
        Content Area     Core Curriculum *        College Tech Prep         University Prep         University Prep          TC Scholar             NC Scholar
                                4 Credits               4 Credits              4 Credits                4 Credits             4 Credits              4 Credits
          ENGLISH            (9, 10, 11, 12)          (9, 10, 11, 12)        (9, 10, 11, 12)          (9, 10,11, 12)        (9,10, 11, 12)         (9, 10, 11, 12)
                                4 Credits               3 Credits
                                                                                4 Credits               4 Credits               4 Credits              4 Credits
                        (Algebra I, Geometry,     (Algebra I, Geometry,
                                                                          (Algebra I, Geometry    (Algebra I, Geometry,        (Algebra I,            (Algebra I,
                            Algebra II) OR           Algebra II) OR
           MATH                                                             Algebra Ii, and 1       Algebra II, and 1     Geometry, Algebra      Geometry, Algebra
                         Integrated Math I, II,         (Algebra I
                                                                            higher level math       higher level math       II, and 1 higher    II, and 1 higher level
                          III) AND 1 higher         Tech Math I, and
                                                                                 course)                 course)          level math course)         math course)
                               level math             Tech Math II)
                                                                                                                               4 Credits
                                                                                                                          (Earth/Environmen
                              3 Credits                                         3 Credits               3 Credits                  tal,
                                                        3 Credits                                                                                     3 Credits
                        (Earth/Environmental,                             (Earth/Environmental,   (Earth/Environmental,     Biology, 2 upper
                                                  (Earth/Environmental,                                                                         (Earth/Environmental
          SCIENCE           Biology, and a                                    Biology, and a          Biology, and a         level courses-
                                                    a physical science                                                                           Biology, Chemistry
                           physical science                                  physical science        physical science     which one must be
                                                     course, Biology)                                                                                or Physics)
                               course)                                           course)                 course)           a physical science
                                                                                                                           credit- no applied
                                                                                                                                courses)
                                                                                                                               4 Credits
                             3 Credits                 3 Credits               3 Credits               3 Credits                                     3 Credits
                                                                                                                            (World History,
          SOCIAL          (World History,           (World History,         (World History,         (World History,                               (World History,
                                                                                                                          Civics/Economics,
          STUDIES        Civics/Economics,         Civics/Economics,       Civics/Economics,       Civics/Economics,                             Civics/Economics,
                                                                                                                             US History, 1
                            US History)               US History)             US History)             US History)                                   US History)
                                                                                                                          upper level course)
                            Not required
                                                      Not required              2 Credits               2 Credits              2 Credits              2 Credits
         FOREIGN            but HIGHLY
                                                     but HIGHLY           in the SAME foreign     in the SAME foreign        in the SAME        in the SAME foreign
        LANGUAGE           recommended.
                                                     recommended                 language                language          foreign language            language
                          See ELECTIVES


         HEALTH &                                      1 Credit
                              1 Credit                                         1 Credit                1 Credit               1 Credit               1 Credit
         PHYSICAL                                      Health/PE
                              Health/PE                                        Health/PE               Health/PE              Health/PE              Health/PR
        EDUCATION


                            Not required                4 Credits                                       4 Credits
                            but HIGHLY            in one career pathway     Not required but      in one career pathway
        CAREER/CTE                                                                                                             1 Credit               1 Credit
                           recommended.               that includes a        recommended              that includes a
                          See ELECTIVES              completer course                                completer course

            ARTS
                            Not required
        EDUCATION
                            but HIGHLY             Not required but 1      Not required but 1      Not required but 1
          (VISUAL                                                                                                              1 Credit               1 Credit
                           recommended.           credit recommended      credit recommended      credit recommended
        ART, MUSIC,
                          See ELECTIVES
         THEATER)

                       4 Credits in a                                                                                                           2 additional credits
                       Concentration Area                                                                                                       from English, Math,
                       from CTE, ART, or                                                                                                           Science, Social
                                                                                                                           9 Electives and
                       Foreign Language.           10 Elective Credits                                                                           Studies, or Foreign
         ELECTIVES                                                         12 Elective Credits     7 Elective Credits        2 Advanced
                                                                                                                                                   Language and
                                                                                                                               electives
                                                                                                                                                 4 electives with 2
                       9 Credits of
                                                                                                                                                  being advanced
                       additional electives.

                                                                                                                          32 Credits (31 if
                                                                                                                                TA)
                                                                                                                                                     28 Credits
           TOTAL             28 Credits                28 Credits              28 Credits              28 Creidts         3.8 weighted and
                                                                                                                                                3.5 unweighted GPA
                                                                                                                           3.5 unweighted
                                                                                                                                GPA


* Core Curriculum requirements apply to all students in the Freshman class of 2009 and beyond except for students on the Occupational Course of
Study. These requirements replace the College Tech and University Prep requirements.




                                                                                    8
                                    Understanding Course Descriptions
Example:
54162W Art II                                  Grades 10 - 12                                  Prerequisite: Art I
This is an advanced art course that is designed for students who want more art experience (practical and expressive). Students will receive hands-on
experience in the following media: drawing (human form), painting, sculpture, art history, and ceramics (potter’s wheel). Students need to plan to spend
approximately $25.00 on supplies. (Elective.)

                                                                      --------------------
Each course description contains the course number, which in this example is 54162W, and course title, in this case, Art II. It lists the grade levels at
which a student may take a course (10 – 12). A prerequisite is any requirement that must be met before taking a course. In this example, the
prerequisite is Art I, which means you must pass Art I before taking Art II. Some courses require the recommendation of a previous teacher, the approval
of the teacher teaching the course, or a minimum grade in a previous course. Pay close attention to prerequisites because they are designed to help you
select courses that are appropriate for you. If you have questions about prerequisites, speak to a teacher in the appropriate department.

In parentheses after this course you will see the word “elective.” This means that this course will satisfy an elective requirement toward graduation.
Some other things you might see in parentheses and an explanation of their meaning follows:

         Core      - Satisfies a core requirement toward graduation (for example, English, math, health and physical education).

         TCS       - Satisfies a core requirement of the Transylvania County Scholars Program.

         NCS       - Satisfies a core requirement of the North Carolina Scholars Program.

         EOC       - An End-of-Course Test must be passed to receive credit for this course.

         VOCATS - A VOCATS Test must be taken to receive credit for this course.

         AP Exam - To receive AP credit for this course you must achieve a score of 2 on the AP exam.

         Students must pay to take the AP Exams but will be reimbursed if a score of 3 or better is achieved.




                                                        Course Offerings
English Courses
Students are prepared for education beyond high school in all levels of English instruction, including regular English. Activities in Honors and AP
English courses are challenging and the amount of outside reading and writing is more demanding. Students are placed in English on the basis
of the recommendation of the previous English/language arts teacher, achievement in English/language arts, and performance on end-of-grade/end-of-
course tests. Parents or students with questions about placement are encouraged to speak with English teachers, administrators, or guidance
counselors.

10212W English 9                                                    Grade 9                            Prerequisite: None
10215W English 9 Honors                                             Grade 9                            Prerequisite: Recommendation
Students will improve skills in analyzing literature and in effective oral and written communication, and will develop a working knowledge of literary terms.
The focus is on improving language skills with grammar usage and editing. English 9 Honors requires additional analytical composition and more outside
reading. (Core, EOC, TCS, NCS.)

10222W English 10                                     Grade 10                              Prerequisite: English 9
10225W English 10 Honors                              Grade 10                              Prerequisite: Recommendation
Emphasis is placed on improvement of composition and literature skills, while studying world literature. Composition includes samples that focus on real-
world situations. Writing assignments will focus on definitions, cause and effect, and problem and solutions. Research papers and presentations are
required components of the course. Students will continue to improve their public speaking skills. English 10 Honors requires more compositions,
papers, and readings. (Core, EOC, TCS, NCS.)




                                                                             9
10232W English II                                     Grade 11                              Prerequisite: English 10
10235W English II Honors                              Grade 11                              Prerequisite: Recommendation
This course, which focuses on American literature, provides many opportunities to improve skills in writing, reading, and speaking, including writing
compositions about several types of literature. Students will also have a chance to connect American literature with American history. Course work
includes a term paper using MLA style in preparation for senior project. English II Honors involves additional compositions and more outside reading.
(Core, TCS, NCS.)

10237W AP English II                                  Grade 11                    Prerequisite: Recommendation (Teacher Approval )
Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is a college level course designed for students with exceptional ability. Students should be
independent learners, divergent thinkers, problem solvers, and highly curious. They also should have successfully completed two years of honors
English and have a background in world literature, as well as representative pieces in American and English literature. Students are effective writers who
experience few problems with grammar and spelling. (Core, TCS, NCS.)

10242W English 12                                       Grade 12                            Prerequisite: English 11
10245W English 12 Honors                                Grade 12                            Prerequisite: Recommendation
This course includes a study of English literature and a grammar review in preparation for college writing, with an emphasis on writing, research, and
communication. All students will be required to complete a senior project to receive credit for this course, including a term paper, based on MLA
guidelines, a portfolio, and a presentation. English 12 Honors requires additional compositions and outside reading. (Core, TCS, NCS.)

10247W AP English 12                                      Grade 12                           Prerequisite: Recommendation
Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition is a college level course designed for students with exceptional ability. The students are self-
disciplined, mature, and intellectually curious and are achieving at the highest level. They have earned A’s or B’s in three years of honors or AP English
and have background in major American literature. Composition and outside reading are emphasized. All students will be required to complete a senior
project to receive credit for this course, including a term paper, based on MLA guidelines, a portfolio, and a presentation, and attend after school labs.
(Core, TCS, NCS, AP Exam.)

Film as Literature                                    Grades 11-12                             Prerequisite: None
This course examines popular film using the structures commonly found in literature. Through formal and informal discussion, written projects and other
class assignments, the student will be able to demonstrate their critical thinking skills, research skills, and writing skills. Prerequisite: None

Genre Studies: The Novel                                Grades 10-12                                Prerequisite: None
Students will read several novels from around the world examining them for similarities and differences that make each one a classic in its own right.
Through formal and informal discussion, written projects and other class assignments, the student will be able to demonstrate their critical thinking skills,
research skills, and writing skills. Prerequisite: None

10322F/10322S Yearbook /Newspaper                      Grades 10 – 12                       Prerequisite: Teacher Approval
Students will study finance, sales design, copy and photography to complete the school’s yearbook and newspaper. Students must be able to work
independently and cannot have any discipline referrals. After school work is required. Off-campus work may also be needed. Students must complete
an application prior to registration process. Students will be selected depending on qualities they bring and opening slots. Class space is limited

Fine Arts Courses
54152W Art One                               Grades 9 - 12                                  Prerequisite: None
Art One is designed to build on the foundation of knowledge that students acquire at the middle school level. The course focuses on the study of the
elements and principles of design through their deliberate use in various two-dimensional and three-dimensional artworks. The students use a variety of
media and become proficient in the vocabulary of art. Students will use art history and art criticism throughout the course as a means to better
understand art in relation to life.

54162W Art Two                                Grades 10 -12                                 Prerequisite: Art
The study of the elements of art and principles of design continue in the Art Two class in a more student-centered way. The lessons are focused more
on problem solving and critical thinking. Students will have more choice in selecting media appropriate to convey their ideas. Lessons will also include
researching art periods and styles so that students can understand how different artists and cultures have used art as a way of communicating.

54175W Honors Visual Art Three                Grades 11 –12              Prerequisite: Art I, II and Teacher Approval
Honors Visual Arts III is an advanced level course and involves more in-depth knowledge of art processes, media, history and the development of such.
Focus includes work that requires students to take significant responsibility for their study and production of visual art. Research, analysis, reflection,
application, production and performance are expected.

54185W Honors Visual Art Four               Grades 12                  Prerequisite: Art I, II, IIIH, and Teacher Approval
This course is even more advanced than Honors Visual Art III. Students are expected to become initiators of learning and accomplishment, as well as
demonstrate leadership and expertise in the visual arts. Higher expectations exist for the quality of work generated.



                                                                             10
52302W Choral Music I                                 Grades 9 – 12                                    Prerequisite: None
This is an introductory course in vocal music. Students with an interest in choral music with little background in music are encouraged to participate.
(Elective.)

52312W Choral Music II                                   Grades 9 – 12                               Prerequisite: Approval
Students will continue to develop their musical skills in advanced vocal technique, sight-singing, and ensemble performance. Chorus members will be
involved in numerous concerts. (Elective.)

52322W Vocal Music III                                  Grades10-12                                 Prerequisite: Approval
Also called Chorus III, this course continues to build on the comprehensive music education that students received in Chorus II. Students in this course
will continue to develop ensemble skills and music theory application and practice. Students participating in the Chorus III course are expected to meet
all the competency goals and objectives provided in the standard course of study.

52332W Vocal Music IV                                  Grades10-12                                 Prerequisite: Approval
Also called Chorus IV, this course continues to build on the comprehensive music education students have received in Chorus III. Students in this course
will continue to develop ensemble skills and music theory application and practice. Students in Chorus IV are expected to audition for state-level choirs.
Students participating in a Chorus IV course are expected to meet all of the competency goals and objectives provided in the standard course of study.

52552F/52552S Band                                      Grades 9 – 12                               Prerequisite: Approval
This ensemble studies the best literature for wind ensemble and band with the emphasis on performance and sight-reading skills. Marching band
rehearsals alternate with concert band for a portion of first semester, and jazz band rehearses concurrently with concert band on occasion after marching
season. All facets of the band program maintain an active performance schedule. Sign up for both semesters (551A and 551B). Honors credit is
available for second semester seniors who qualify. (Elective.)

53152W Theater Arts I                                    Grades 9 - 12                       Prerequisite: Teacher Approval
The course will be an introduction to theater literature and history. Students will develop acting skills and will perform in a minimum of one theatrical
presentation. Must have approval of 8th grade drama instructor. (Elective.)

53162W/53172W/53182W Theater Arts II -IV                         Grades 10 – 12               Prerequisite: Theater Arts I
While continuing studies and exploration of literature and history, students will develop skills and acting in presentations. (Elective.)

Foreign Language Courses
Two years of foreign language are required for admission at colleges and universities in the University of North Carolina system, though some schools
require three foreign language credits for admission. All foreign language courses at level III or higher receives honors credit. A grade of C or better in
the previous level of a foreign language is a prerequisite for enrolling in the next level, which should be completed with in the next two semesters.

10512W Spanish I                                     Grades 10-11                             Prerequisite: None
Conversational Spanish will be used to teach basic Spanish grammar and vocabulary

10522W Spanish II                                      Grades 10 – 12                      Prerequisite: Spanish I
A second year of Spanish is offered for students interested and for those who plan to attend college or complete a college prep course of study.

10535W Spanish III          Grades 11 - 12         Prerequisite: Teacher Approval and C or better in English/Spanish II
Review of basic Spanish grammar through speaking, listening, and writing activities. Level III will be a continuation and expansion of work done in levels
I and II. Teacher approval.

10545W Spanish IV                     Grades 12                          Prerequisite: Spanish III and Teacher Approval
A continuation of Spanish III including an independent study of selected literature and some tutorial assignments in which the students coach beginning
or less advanced students.




                                                                              11
Math Courses
Math placement is determined by recommendations from previous math teachers, performance in previous math courses, and end-of-grade/end-of
course test results. To complete the College Tech Prep Course of Study, a student should complete, at minimum, Algebra I, Technical Math I, and
Technical Math II. To complete the College Prep/University Course of Study, a student must complete four math courses, with at least one beyond
Algebra II. Pre-Calculus, AP Statistics, AP Calculus, or Advanced Functions and Modeling will all meet this requirement. Parents or students with
concerns about placement are encouraged to speak to math teachers, administrators, or guidance counselors.

20180W Foundations of Algebra                Grades 9 – 12                        Prerequisite: Recommendation
This course is designed for students who need additional preparation in Algebra topics prior to proceeding to the next level of mathematics (Algebra I or
Integrated Math I). This course can count toward the four math credits required for graduation, but it does not fulfill Core Curriculum requirements.

20232W Algebra I                               Grades 9 - 12                        Prerequisite: Recommendation
Students will study algebraic concepts including operations with real numbers and polynomials, relations and functions, systems of equations, creation
and application of linear functions and an introduction to non-linear functions. Students use graphing calculators to further develop understanding.
Satisfies the graduation requirement for Algebra I. All Algebra I students must pass the North Carolina End of Course test to receive credit for the
course. (Core, EOC, TCS, NCS.)

20302W Geometry                                                                            Prerequisite: Algebra I
Continues students’ study of geometric concepts building upon middle school topics. Students will move from an inductive to deductive method of proof
in their study of geometric figures. Two and three-dimensional reasoning skills will be emphasized and students will broaden their use of the coordinate
plan to include transformations of geometric figures. Honors credit available. All Geometry students must pass the North Carolina End of Course test to
receive credit for the course. (Core, EOC, TCS, NCS)

20242W Algebra II                                                                 Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra I
Continues the study of advanced algebraic concepts including functions, polynomials, rational expressions, complex numbers, systems of equations and
inequalities, matrices, and conic sections. Students use the graphing calculator to further develop understanding. Honors credit available. All Algebra II
students must pass the North Carolina End of Course test to receive credit for the course. (Core, EOC, TCS, NCS)

20152W Technical Mathematics I                                                                Prerequisite: None
Continues students’ study of algebra and geometry, building on middle school and Algebra I topics. Problem solving, measurement, special relationships
in right triangles, transformations, and geometric applications of algebra are the topics to be studied in an applications centered environment. Designed
for the student in the College Tech Prep Course of Study only. Emphasis on contextual learning, hands on experiences, and applications of algebra in
workplace settings. Students who take Technical Math one must take Technical Math II, at some point, to receive credit. (Core)

20172W Technical Math II                                                         Prerequisite: Technical Math I
Designed for the student in the College Tech Prep course of study. Continues students’ study of Algebra and geometry, building upon middle and high
school topics. Geometry, functions, and statistical methods for estimation and prediction are the topics to be studied in an application-centered
environment. Students will master geometric concepts. Students who take Technical Math one must take Technical Math II, at some point, to
receive credit. (Core.)

20522W Advanced Functions and Modeling                                               Prerequisite: Algebra I
In 2000, the UNC Board of Governors voted to increase the minimum course requirements needed to admission To any of the 15 UNC 4-year campuses.
The new requirement includes one additional unit of math that has Algebra II as the prerequisite. Advanced Functions was designed to provide a
standard course satisfying this requirement. It includes material selected from Pre-Calculus and Discrete Math. This class will provide students an in-
depth study of modeling and applying functions. Home, work, recreation, consumer issues, public policy, and scientific investigations are just a few of
the areas from which applications will originate.

20705W Pre-Calculus                                                              Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra II or AFM
This is an honors level study of trigonometry, advanced functions, analytic geometry, and data analysis in preparation for Calculus, Honors Credit
available. (Core, TCS, NCS)

20767W AP Calculus                                                                Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus
Advanced Placement Calculus is a challenging and rigorous college level mathematics course, which develops the student’s understanding of concepts
of calculus and provides experience with its methods and applications. Students are required to have a commitment to the AP standards and a
willingness to attend additional AP Calculus labs. Students are required to take the AP Calculus exam in the spring. (Core, TCS, NCS)




                                                                            12
Health and Physical Education Courses
90112G (Girls) & 90112B (Boys) Health and Physical Education                           Grade 9                 Prerequisite: None
This course fulfills the requirement for graduation. Health focuses on personal health, family living education, and alcohol/drug abuse. Physical
Education includes team and individual sports, fitness, conditioning, and recreation. (Core, TCS, NCS.)

90152G (Girls) & 90152B (Boys) Advanced PE                   Grades 9—12               Prerequisite: Health & PE Approval
This course provides a means for the advanced student to improve his/her strength (Weight Training), and flexibility, agility, and endurance (Aerobic
Training). Second semester ninth graders who have passed health and physical education first semester and have teacher’s approval, may take this
course. (Elective))


90152A PE for Athletes (Boys)                   Grades 9-12                            Prerequisite: Members of RHS Athletic Team
This course is provided for RHS Athletes. You must be an Athlete and a member of an athletic team. This course will provide you with weight
training specific to your sport, as well as improve flexibility, agility, and endurance. Must have coaches’ approval. 9th graders may take 2nd semester
provided they passed 1st semester. (Elective)

90152A PE for Athletes (Girls)                  Grades 9-12                            Prerequisite: Members of RHS Athletic Team
This course is provided for RHS Athletes. You must be an Athlete and a member of an athletic team. This course will provide you with weight
training specific to your sport, as well as improve flexibility, agility, and endurance. Must have coaches’ approval. 9th graders may take 2nd semester
provided they passed 1st semester. (Elective)

Science Courses
To graduate from high school you must complete a course in Earth/Environmental Science, Biology, and a Physical Science course. The Physical
Science requirement may be satisfied by taking Physical Science, Chemistry, or Physics.

30425W Advanced Environmental Science                    Grades 11-12           Prerequisite: Physical Science,Biology,Teacher Recommendation
This is a second year course for students who desire a more hands-on approach to learning about the world around them. Field projects are a major
component and include data analysis and lab reports. Topics such as forest science, hydrology, aquatic and field biology are included. Water quality, air
quality, soil quality, and classroom. (Core or Elective, NCS)

30382W Earth/Environmental Science                     Grades 9                           Prerequisite: None
This course is a requirement for graduation. Topics studied in Earth Science include geology, meteorology, weather, Earth history and astronomy, Earth's
structure, atmosphere, weathering, and the solar system with an emphasis placed on their role in Earth's ecology. (Core, NCS.)

30102W Physical Science                               Grade 11                                     Prerequisite: Algebra I
This course is the study of the major concepts of chemistry and physics. This course serves as a foundation for higher-level science courses. This
course meets the physical science requirement for graduation. (Core, EOC, NCS)

30202W Biology                                            Grade 10                                   Prerequisite: See Description
This course, required for graduation, presents the fundamentals of biology including the nature and continuity of life, the structure and function of living
things, genetics, evolution, and the relationship of living things to the environment. (Core, EOC, TCS, NCS.)

 30205W Honors Biology                                      Grades11-12                                    Prerequisite: Teacher Approval
The honors level course will require a more in-depth study and work on concepts covered involving the fundamentals of biology including the nature and
continuity of life, the structure and function of living things, genetics, evolution, and the relationship of living things to the environment. (Core, EOC, TCS,
NCS)

30212W Biology II                             Grade 11-12                         Prerequisite: C or better in Biology I & Teacher Recommendation
This course has labs, dissection, and individual projects with an emphasis on biological terminology. This course is designed to prepare a college-bound
student for a college biology lab course. (Elective, TCS, NCS)

30502W Chemistry           Grades 10 – 12            Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra II and Biology I, Teacher Recommendation
Chemistry is a lab-oriented course designed to promote an understanding and appreciation of matter and energy as it relates to our surroundings.
Emphasis will be placed on ways in which events at the level of atoms influence everything going on around us. (Core or Elective, EOC, TCS, NCS.)

30605W Physics                               Grades 10-12                          Prerequisite: Algebra I
This course is the study of energy and matter and their relationships in the physical world. This course is helpful to students who are pursuing any
science degree. (Core, EOC, NCS)




                                                                              13
Social Studies Courses
To graduate from high school, students must take Civics & Economics or Civics & Economics honors, a World History course, and U.S. History or U.S.
History honors. The course sequence is World History in ninth grade, Civics & Economics in tenth, and U.S. History in eleventh grade. All students are
encouraged to choose additional social studies electives as interest and post-high school plans require.

40242W World History                                      Grade 9                     Prerequisite: None
Required 9th grade social science course. This course is an overview of the political, social and economic factors that helped shape the world. Students
in the honors level of this course will be required to read, write, think, and produce assignments at a higher level of difficulty. Honors credit available.

40522W Civics & Economics                               Grade 10                                        Prerequisite: World History
This course helps students understand how our government operates and how it is organized. Emphasis is placed on the Constitution, economics, the
responsibility of citizenship, and the legal system. Students in the honors level of this course will be required to read, write, think, and produce
assignments at a higher level of difficulty. Honors credit available. (Core, EOC, TCS, NCS.)

40212W United States History                            Grade 11                   Prerequisite: Civics & Economics & World History
This course is an overview of American history from exploration to the present with emphasis and focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. The focus is on
concepts with knowledge, critical thinking, and citizenship emphasized. Students in the honors level of this course will be required to read, write, think,
and produce assignments at a higher level of difficulty. Honors credit available. (Core, EOC, TCS, NCS.)

40905W World Humanities                               Grades 11-12                                 Prerequisite: Teacher Approval
This is an Honors course. It is a in-depth course which covers world history since WWII, current world geography, daily news events, and significant
cultural developments.

Teacher's Assistants
95152W Media Technology Assistant                           Grade 11-12                      Prerequisite: Librarian Approval
Upperclassmen may serve as media center assistants for credit. (Elective)

99819O Teacher’s Assistant                                     Grade 12                  Prerequisite: Teacher Approval
Seniors may arrange to serve as teachers or office assistants. No credit is awarded for this course; thus no effect on GPA or class rank. (Elective.)

Other Electives
95202W Character Development and Leadership: Grades 11-12                                   Prerequisite: Teacher Approval
This course will address issues that affect everyone on a daily basis. Each week will consist of ethical dilemmas, character traits of successful people,
and current events. Life skills such as goal setting, job interviews, and community service will be practiced. Classes will revolve around guest speakers,
short reading assignments, and class discussions.




                                                                             14
Transylvania County Schools
Career Technical Education (CTE)
Course and Program Information

Welcome to the Career and Technical Education Course Descriptions Handbook. This document contains descriptions and
other information designed to assist students and parents in making the best decisions possible for a successful future.

All Career and Technical Education programs have work-based learning strategies appropriate for the courses available to
students. These work-based learning strategies may include: field trips, shadowing, program specific projects, paid and/or
unpaid internships, and supervised learning experiences. These opportunities are used to enhance learning experiences and
do not take the place of required coursework for graduation

Supervised learning experiences and Career-Technical Student Organizations (CTSO) leadership activities are integral
components of the programs and courses and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional
competencies.

CTSO Opportunities include:
 DECA – Marketing                                   FFA – Agriculture
 FBLA – Business                                    Skills USA–Trade and Industrial
 FCCLA – Family and Consumer Sciences               HOSA – Health Occupations


Students in Transylvania County Schools pursuing a College Tech Prep Course of Study or a combined University/College
Tech Prep Course of Study must complete at least four units of Career & Technical Education credit in a career pathway, with
at least one course being a capstone level course.


Please note: Some courses and programs are only offered at one campus. Students may take courses at any campus. If a
desired course is not offered at one of our campuses, students may take that course or courses at another other school.
Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from another campus. Students are encouraged to check with
the Principal or Assistant Principal and the Guidance Department for course selections at other campuses. Students may also
discuss their interests and selections with the Career Development Coordinator.

Additional: Courses listed herein with low numbers after registration may not be offered at any campus for the upcoming
year. Students should be aware that course availability is dependent upon registration and pathway/cluster requirements.
Cancellation of a particular course can result from low registration number.




                                                            15
                                  Transylvania County Schools - Integrated Concentration Areas
                                                            Career Technical Education
             1                          2                                   3                             4                    5

Printing Graphics I        Printing Graphics II       Printing Graphics II               Art I (A)                       (if applicable)

Construction I             Construction II            Construction II                    Spanish I (F)

Masonry I                  Masonry II                 Masonry II                         Spanish I (F)
                           Travel, Tourism, and
Marketing                  Recreation Marketing       Small Business Entrepreneurship    Mandarin Chinese I (F)
                           Travel, Tourism, and
Marketing                  Recreation Marketing       Small Business Entrepreneurship    Russian I (F)
                           Travel, Tourism, and
Marketing                  Recreation Marketing       Small Business Entrepreneurship    Spanish I (F)

Criminal Justice I         Criminal Justice II        Criminal Justice II                Spanish I (F)

Criminal Justice I         Criminal Justice II        Criminal Justice II                Psychology (T)

Health Team Relations      Medical Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                Anatomy and Physiology (T)

Biomedical Technology      Medical Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                Anatomy and Physiology (T)

Health Team Relations      Allied Health Sciences I   Medical Sciences II                Anatomy and Physiology (T)

Biomedical Technology      Allied Health Sciences I   Medical Sciences II                Anatomy and Physiology (T)

Health Team Relations      Medical Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                Latin I (F)

Health Team Relations      Medical Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                Spanish I (F)

Biomedical Technology      Medical Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                Latin I (F)

Biomedical Technology      Medical Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                Spanish I (F)
                           Biotechnology and          Biotechnology and Agriscience
Agriscience Applications   Agriscience Research I     Research II                        AP Biology (T)
                           Biotechnology and          Biotechnology and Agriscience
Agriscience Applications   Agriscience Research I     Research II                        Chemistry or AP Chemistry (T)

Agriscience Applications   Horticulture I             Horticulture II                    AP Biology (T)
Agriscience Applications   Horticulture I             Horticulture II                    Spanish I (F)

Computer Applications I    Computer Applications II   Printing Graphics I                Journalism (T)

Computer Applications I    Computer Applications II   Printing Graphics I                Yearbook (T)

Health Team Relations      Allied Health Sciences I   Medical Sciences II                Latin I (F)

Health Team Relations      Allied Health Sciences I   Medical Sciences II                Spanish I (F)

Biomedical Technology      Allied Health Sciences I   Medical Sciences II                Latin I (F)

Biomedical Technology      Allied Health Sciences I   Medical Sciences II                Spanish I (F)

Health Team Relations      Medical Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                Chemistry or AP Chemistry (T)

Health Team Relations      Allied Health Sciences I   Medical Sciences II                Chemistry or AP Chemistry (T)

Health Team Relations      Medical Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                AP Biology (T)

Health Team Relations      Allied Health Sciences I   Medical Sciences II                AP Biology (T)




                                                                                16
Biomedical Technology          Medical Sciences I               Medical Sciences II                         Chemistry or AP Chemistry (T)

Biomedical Technology          Allied Health Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                         Chemistry or AP Chemistry (T)

Biomedical Technology          Allied Health Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                         AP Biology (T)


Biomedical Technology          Allied Health Sciences I         Medical Sciences II                         AP Biology (T)


Foods I - Fundamentals         Foods II - Advanced              Foods II - Food Science                     Chemistry or AP Chemistry (T)

Printing Graphics I            Printing Graphics II             Printing Graphics II                        Journalism (T)

Printing Graphics I            Printing Graphics II             Printing Graphics II                        Yearbook (T)
                               Sports & Entertainment
Marketing                      Marketing I                      Marketing Management                        Psychology (T)
                               Sports & Entertainment
Marketing                      Marketing I                      Marketing Management                        AP Statistics (T)
                                                                                                            Advanced Functions & Modeling
Drafting I                     Drafting-Engineering II          Drafting-Engineering III                    (T)
                                                                                                            Pre-Calculus-Honors or AP
Drafting I                     Drafting-Engineering II          Drafting-Engineering III                    Calculus (T)
                               Computer                         Computer
Networking I                   Engineering I                    Engineering II                              AP Computer Science (T)
                                                                               Arts Education
Arts I (A)                     Arts II (A)                      Theatre I (A)                               Theatre II (A)
Chorus I (A)                   Chorus II (A)                    Theatre I (A)                               Theatre II (A)
Arts I (A)                     Arts II (A)                      Printing Graphics I                         Printing Graphics II            Printing Graphics II
Band I (A)                     Band II (A)                      Chorus I (A)                                Chorus II (A)
Arts I (A)                     Arts II (A)                      Drafting I                                  Drafting II
Arts I (A)                     Arts II (A)                      Marketing                                   Fashion Merchandising
Arts I (A)                     Arts II (A)                      Marketing                                   Drafting I
Theatre I                      Theatre II                       Construction I                              Construction II                 Construction II
                                                                  Foreign Language Education
Spanish I (F)                  Spanish II (F)                   Masonry I                                   Masonry II                      Masonry II
Spanish I (F)                  Spanish II (F)                   Construction I                              Construction II                 Construction II
(F)Spanish I                   Spanish II (F)                   Spanish III (F)                             Marketing
American Sign Lang. I (F)      American Sign Lang. II (F)        Level I & II of a different Language (F)
  Level I & II of the same        Level I & II of a different
      Language (F)                    Language (F)
  Levels I, II, & III of the   Level I - any other Language
   same Language (F)                         (F)
                  KEY:
                  Career Technical                              (F) = Foreign Language                      (A) = Performing and
          BLACK = Courses                                             Courses                                     Visual Arts Courses
                  CTE Capstone                                  (T) = Traditional Academic
   BOLD ITALICS = Courses                                             Courses




                                                                                      17
                                                  Agriculture Education
Agriscience Applications                     Course Number: 6810

This course provides instruction that focuses on integrating biological/physical sciences with technology as related to the
environment, natural resources, food production, and science and agribusiness. Topics of instruction include agricultural
awareness and literacy, leadership and FFA, employability skills, introduction to all aspects of the total agricultural industry.
Skills in biology, language, writing, computers, math, and physics are reinforced in this course. Prerequisite: None; Note:
This is a recommended course for 9th graders interested in Agriculture Education.

Horticulture I                Course Number: 6841           (Fall semester only)

This course provides instruction on the broad field of horticulture with emphasis on the scientific and technical knowledge
for a career in horticulture. Topics in this course include plant growth and development, plant nutrition, media selection,
basic plant identification, pest management, chemical disposal, customer relations, career opportunities, and leadership
development. Skills in biology, chemistry, and algebra are reinforced in this course. Prerequisite: None

Horticulture II                      Course Number: 6842                   (Spring Semester Only)

This course covers instruction that expands the scientific knowledge and skills to include more advanced scientific
computations, and communication skills needed in the horticulture industry. Topics include greenhouse plant production
and management, bedding plant production, watering systems, light effects, basic landscape design, installation and
maintenance, lawn and turf-grass management, career planning, and leadership/personal development. Skills in biology,
chemistry, and algebra are reinforced in this class. Prerequisite: Horticulture I

Horticulture II – Landscape Construction                   Course Number: 6882
This course provides hands-on instruction and emphasizes safety skills needed by landscape technicians in the field. This
course is based on the North Carolina Landscape Contractor’s Association skill standards for a Certified Landscape
Technician. Students are instructed in interpreting landscape designs, identifying landscape plants, and
planting/maintaining trees, shrubs and turf. Landscape construction is emphasized in the areas of grading and drainage,
irrigation, paver installation and the use/ maintenance of landscape equipment. Current topic discussions provide students
an understanding of careers and the employability skills needed to enter the landscape industry. Prerequisite: Horticulture I

Environmental and Natural Resources I                Course Number: 6851

This course provides an introduction to environmental studies, which includes topics of instruction in renewable and non-
renewable natural resources, history of the environment, personal development, water and air quality, waste management,
land use regulations, soils, meteorology, fisheries, forestry, and wildlife habitat. Prerequisite: None

Environmental and Natural Resources II               Course Number: 6852

This course covers instruction in best management practices in methods of environmental monitoring and conservation, air
and water regulations, sampling methodologies, prescribing conservation techniques, and wildlife and forestry management.
Prerequisite: Environmental and Natural Resources I




                                                               18
                               Business & Information Technologies Education
Computer Applications I              Course Number 6411

This course is designed to help students master beginning and advanced skills in the areas of word processing, database
management, and spreadsheet, telecommunications, and desktop tool applications. Emphasis is on concepts of desktop
publishing and presentation graphics as well as skill development in computer application software; computer architecture;
operating systems, environments and utilities; ethical issues pertaining to information systems; and computer information
system careers. Communication skills and critical thinking are reinforced through the software applications.

Recommended: Keyboarding Skill, which is defined as 35 words per minute and exhibit proper keyboarding techniques.

Computer Applications II             Course Number 6412

This course is designed to help students master beginning and advanced skills in the areas of desktop publishing,
presentation graphics, and integrated software applications while building mastery of telecommunications, web page design,
and on-line services. Emphasis is placed on skill development and refinement of skills in computer application software,
common applications of computer information systems in organizations, computer systems planning and acquisition,
systems analysis and design, information systems security, and the social and economic impact of computer information
systems in an international marketplace. Communication skills and critical thinking are reinforced through the software
applications. Work-based learning strategies appropriate to this course are school-based enterprises, internships, cooperative
education, and apprenticeship. Prerequisite: Computer Applications I

Computerized Accounting I            Course Number         6311

This course is designed to help students understand the basic principles of the accounting cycle. Emphasis is placed on
analysis and the recording business transactions, preparation and interpretation of financial statements, accounting systems,
banking and payroll activities, basic types of business ownership, and an accounting career orientation. Mathematical skills
and critical thinking are reinforced. Recommended for 10th grade and above

Business Law          Course Number 6215

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic legal principles common to business and personal activities.
Topics include personal concepts to assist students when evaluating contracts, maximizing purchasing power through credit,
purchasing appropriate insurance, and renting and owning real estate. Business concepts such as contracting, ethics, starting
a business, hiring employees, managing employees, or representing other businesses as employee or contractor are included.
Skills in critical thinking are reinforced in this course along with oral and written communication skills.
Prerequisite: None; Recommended for 10th grade and above

E – Commerce I        Course Number: 6415          NOTE: Honors Course

With the technological changes occurring at “dot.com” speed in today’s business world, it is imperative that students possess
the necessary business and technology skills to function in the global marketplace. A course, which combines fundamental
business and marketing skills with web site development skills, is essential for students entering not only the “dot.com”
world, but the world of business as well. E-Commerce is one such course. This course provides a competency-based course of
study focused on goals and objectives, which allows students to learn essential business, marketing, and web site
development skills. Areas of study include the electronic commerce environment; social, legal, and ethical issues of e-
commerce; web site design considerations; and web site development. The students will apply the skills they have learned in
the production of an e-commerce web site as a capstone project for the course. Prerequisite: Computer Applications II

Small Business / Entrepreneurship Course Number: 6235
(Also taught in Marketing Education under Course Number: 6615)

This course is designed for students interested in the start up and operation of a small business. Students will learn the
concepts of becoming an entrepreneur. Emphasis is placed on economics, marketing, product and location considerations,
pricing, promotion, leading, and controlling. Prerequisite: The student must have completed two technical credits in the
same career pathway.


                                                             19
                                    Family and Consumer Sciences Education
Foods I – Fundamentals               Course Number: 7045

This course examines nutritional needs of the individual. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of diet to health and on the
selection of food to satisfy needs. Skills in science and mathematics are reinforced in this course. Prerequisite: None

Foods II – Advanced                  Course Number: 7046

This course focuses on advanced food preparation techniques while applying nutrition, food science, and test kitchen
concepts using new technology. Food safety and sanitation receive special emphasis, with students taking the exam for the
ServSafe credential from the National Restaurant Association. Students develop skills in preparing foods such as beverages,
salads and dressing, yeast breads, and cake fillings and frostings. A real or simulated in-school food business component
allows students to apply instructional strategies and workplace readiness skills to an authentic experience. Prerequisite:
Foods I – Fundamentals

Apparel Development I                Course Number: 7035

This course examines clothing production in the areas of preparation for clothing construction, basic clothing construction
techniques, consumer decisions, textiles, historical perspectives and design, and career opportunities. Emphasis is placed on
students applying these construction and design skills to apparel and home fashion. Prerequisite: None

Apparel Development II               Course Number: 7036

This course focuses on advanced clothing and housing apparel development. The use of fibers and fabrics is combined with
design and construction techniques to develop and produce a clothing or housing apparel product. A real or simulated
business apparel enterprise and FCCLA activities allow students to apply instructional strategies and workplace readiness
skills to an authentic experience and to develop a portfolio. Prerequisite: Apparel Development I

Foods II – Foods Technology          Course Number: 7009

This is a field course recently released for draft implementation. A full course description is not available yet. This course
will provide expanded options for students interested in all aspects of the food service and recreation industry. Prerequisite:
Foods I



                                                   Health Occupations
Allied Health Sciences I                     Course Number: 7211

This course investigates the health care delivery system, its services, occupations, and related sciences. Topics include the
study of the language of medicine, medical mathematics, microbiology, anatomy and physiology, diseases/disorders,
diagnoses, treatments, patient/client care regimens, career development, and future technological innovations. Skills in
science, mathematics, communications, social studies and health are reinforced in this course. Recommended for 11th grade;
Also highly Recommended: Biology and Health Education

Allied Health Sciences II                      Course Number: 7212Note:
This is taught during 1 st and 2nd Block in the Spring Semester only.



This course is designed to prepare potential health care workers, preferably seniors, to become effective and efficient multi-
skilled health team members. Emphasis is placed on the development of proficiency in employability skills, emergency care
skills, safety skills, clerical skills, and health care skills. The work-based learning strategy appropriate for this course is a
minimum 90-hour clinical internship where student interns deliver health care in local hospitals,
medical/dental/veterinarian offices nursing/convalescent/retirement facilities, wellness centers, etc. Skills in science,
mathematics, communications, health, and social studies are reinforced in this course. Students must be able to provide their
own transportation to and from clinical experiences. Prerequisite: Allied Health Sciences I or Medical Sciences I.



                                                               20
Biomedical Technology                         Course Number: 7200

This survey course challenges students to investigate current and 21st century medical and health care practices using
computerized databases, the Internet, media, and visiting health team professionals. Topics include the world of biomedical
technology, the language of medicine, present and evolving biomedical specialties, Bio-medical ethics: crises and alternatives,
and health career development. Skills in science, mathematics, communications, health, and social studies are reinforced in
this course. Prerequisite: None; Recommended Prerequisite: Biology and recommended for 10th grade and above only

Health Team Relations                         Course Number: 7210

This course is designed to assist potential health care workers in their role and function as health team members. Topics
include terminology, the history of health care, health care agencies, ethics, legal responsibilities, careers, holistic health,
human needs, change, cultural awareness, communication, medical math, leadership, and career decision-making. Basic
academic skills, employability skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and the use of technology are reinforced in this course.
Prerequisite: None

Medical Sciences II                   Course Number: 7222

This specialized course is designed to prepare potential health care workers, preferably seniors, for performance in an
advanced technical or professional health career. Emphasis is placed on research, communications, safety, computer literacy,
health team relations, problem solving and decision-making. Skills in mathematics, science, and communications are
reinforced in this course. Work-based learning strategies include the development of individualized clinical skills specifically
related to a selected mentorship (minimum of 45 hours) with an exemplary health professional. Students must be able to
provide their own transportation to and from clinical experiences. Prerequisites: Allied Health Sciences I or Medical
Sciences I; Recommended for 11th grade and above

Health Occupations Advanced Studies                  Course Number: 7299

This culminating course is for seniors who are career-focused in a health or medical career. The three parts of the course
include a research paper, a product, and a presentation. Students demonstrate their abilities to use content and apply
knowledge to real-world situations in a selected career. In addition, they will also demonstrate their abilities to write, speak,
apply knowledge, problem solve, and use life skills such as time management and organization. Students work under the
guidance of a teacher-facilitator in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based
personnel. HOSA membership provides avenues for applying leadership skills, reinforcing writing and speaking skills, and
participating in volunteer activities. Prerequisite: Three credits in Health Occupations Education



                                            Trade and Industrial Education
Carpentry I (Construction Technology I)              Course Number:          7721

This course provides a basic introduction to construction work and the technical aspects of carpentry. Topics include safety,
measurement, and the identification, selection, and use of tools, equipment, lumber, materials, and fasteners. Basic skills,
leadership, career development, thinking and reasoning skills, mathematics, and principles of technology are reinforced.
Prerequisite: Recommended for 10th grade and above

Carpentry II (Construction Technology II) Course Number: 7722

This course covers advanced technical aspects of carpentry with emphasis on development of skills introduced in level I.
Topics include plans, framing, footings, foundations, roofing, flashing, wall sheathing, insulation, vapor barriers, gypsum
board, and underlayment. Skills in measurement, leadership, safety, mathematics, and problem solving are reinforced in this
course. Prerequisites: Carpentry I




                                                                21
Carpentry III (Construction Technology III)         Course Number: 7723

This course covers issues related to planning, management, finance, sales, labor, technology, community, health,
environment, and safety. Topics include estimating, leveling instruments, forms, special framing, interior and exterior
finishing, cabinets, built-ins, and metal studs. Skills in technical subjects, production, leadership, safety, problem solving,
reading, and mathematics are reinforced in this course. Prerequisite: Carpentry II; Instructor approval is also highly
recommended – Please discuss with instructor prior to registration.

Drafting I                           Course Number: 7921

This course introduces students to the use of graphic tools used to communicate and understand ideas found in the areas of
architecture, manufacturing, engineering, science, and mathematics. Topics include problem-solving strategies, sketching,
geometric construction techniques, CAD (computer aided drafting), orthographic projection, and oblique and isometric
drawings. Skills in communication, mathematics, science, leadership, and problem solving are reinforced in this course.
Prerequisite: None

Welding Technology I                 Course Number: 7661

This course covers basic industrial and construction welding practices, occupation characteristics, and employment
opportunities. Topics include safety, tools, print reading, measurement, thermal cutting processes, basemetal preparation and
shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). Recommended for 10th grade and above

Welding Technology II                Course Number: 7662

This course introduces advanced welding and cutting practices used in industry and construction and emphasizes hands-on
experience. Topics include weld fit-up and testing, metal properties, gas metal (GMAW), flux cored (FCAW), and shielded
metal (SMAW) arc welding. Prerequisite: Welding I




                                                              22
Rosman High School
                                                   Course Alternatives
To complete elective credits, students may choose alternatives to courses offered on Rosman High’s campus. Most options
will need approval by Mrs. Sue Fox, Interim Guidance Counselor. Off-campus courses should be scheduled to avoid conflicts
with one’s required courses on campus. In addition, students who are considering off-campus courses are required to take a
minimum of two courses each semester on campus. Off-campus courses should be scheduled at the beginning or end of the
school day rather than in the middle.

In considering elective options for off-campus alternatives, the following individual needs should be considered: Course of
Study and student’s Four Year Plan, intended pathway, transportation to off-campus classes, plans after graduation, time
commitment for college courses, calendar conflicts between Transylvania County Schools and community college programs,
and any necessary fees to be paid by the student. Below are elective options for Rosman High students (age 16 and above)
for 2009-2010.

                               Dual Enrollment at Blue Ridge Community College
College bound juniors and seniors have the opportunity to ease the transition between high school and college by taking dual
enrollment courses. Students may choose to take courses at Blue Ridge Community College not offered at Rosman High
School. Through the Huskins Program community colleges can make available to high school students college level academic
and advanced courses not otherwise available to them. Huskins programs offer courses directly related to preparing students
for further education at the community college level or four-year college or university.

Students may not elect to take courses to fulfill core academic requirements (four English, four math’s, three sciences, three
social studies, PE, two years of foreign language) when these courses are offered on Rosman High’s campus. Courses that are
part of the Early College Articulation Program will earn both high school credit and college credit. The best part is that these
courses are offered tuition free when students meet the following criteria:

1. Should have at least a 2.5 G.P.A. and have regular school attendance.
2. Must complete the “Permission Form for Dual Enrollment of High School Students” which can be obtained from Mrs. Fox
    and must be presented at Blue Ridge at the time of registration.
3. Must be enrolled in 2 courses each semester at Rosman High School.
4. Must complete an application, complete placement tests, and meet any designated course prerequisites for Blue Ridge
    Community College (BRCC)
5. Pay for textbooks, technology/activity/insurance fees and any supplies/materials required for the course at BRCC.
6. At the end of the course the student must present their grades to guidance.
7. Attend community college courses regularly.

A list of course offerings will be available in guidance as soon as posted by the college. In addition, students are encouraged
to check the school’s website at www.blueridge.edu or with the admissions office of Blue Ridge Community College in
Brevard.



                                         Dual Enrollment at Brevard College
Juniors and seniors may also choose to apply for admission at Brevard College to be a part time student. An agreement
between Transylvania County Schools and Brevard College allows students to earn high school credit for courses taken at
Brevard College in a variety of subject areas for a reasonable fee. In some cases, depending on courses taken and the college
to which a student transfers, these credits also apply to college requirements. Students selecting this option must meet
admission requirements. Unlike dual enrollment at the community college, students will be responsible for the cost of tuition in
addition to fees, and books. Students must also meet the minimum criteria as listed for dual enrollment at Blue Ridge
Community College. Students will have options for the courses to be counted as high school only credit or for both college
and high school credits. The number of dual-enrolled students at Brevard College is limited. Please consult with your
guidance counselor if you have questions.




                                                               23
                                         Huskins Bill Courses
                  Applied Technology/Elective Credits – Blue Ridge Community College
In addition to college level academic courses, the Huskins Program makes available to high school students, technical courses
related to preparing students for employment in current or emerging occupations. To enroll in this program,
     • Students must be 16 years old and enrolled in at least two courses per semester on the high school campus. Students
         must provide their own transportation.
     • High school students are not allowed to take developmental courses.
     • Huskins program students will pay the student fees, the required insurance, and purchase their books and supplies.
     • Students should secure a Huskins Application Packet from Mrs. Fox and complete it.
     • Students are required to complete an application for BRCC, take the ASSET (BRCC’s placement test), obtain
         recommendations and high school transcript, and participate in an interview.
     • Participation in Applied Technology courses at the Flat Rock campus should not interfere with the student’s course
         schedule needs at Rosman High School.

Most Huskins Applied Technology classes are available in the mornings from 8:00 until 11:00 a.m. Automotive Technology
classes are available mornings or afternoons from 12:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m.

                           Online Courses at Community Colleges
     (Blue Ridge Community College, Haywood Community College, A-B Tech, or an approved
                                          college)
Independent students who are self-motivated may be interested in taking a variety of courses online. Courses are offered
through BRCC, Haywood Community College (HCC), and A-B Tech. Students who desire to enroll in these courses need to
meet the above criteria described under dual enrollment at BRCC and the Huskins Bill Courses. These courses allow a
maximum amount of flexibility in time, but obviously require a disciplined student. A student can participate in an online
course along with a full schedule at Rosman High School. Or, a student may enroll in an online course and complete it from
home during 1st or 4th periods.

Some online courses do require fees for texts or supplies. Registration for online courses is completed directly with the
community college after student completes a dual enrollment form. For more information, please contact the Admissions
Office of the community college program. Below are websites:
    www.blueridge.edu/Academics/Schedule/View Courses
    http://potemkin.haywood.edu
    http://www.abtech.edu/vcampus




                                           Blue Ridge Community College
Tuition Free College Courses        Three Program Options

        Blue Ridge Community College in partnership with Transylvania County Schools is proud to provide educational
opportunities to the students of Brevard High School. Students have the option of attending Blue Ridge Community College
while still in high school in an effort to provide students with a smooth, seamless, and logical transition from high school to
community college and beyond.
        The Dual Enrollment Program allows students to take courses at the college campus during the traditional school
day, provided they have met the community college requirements and required course prerequisites. Students earn college
credit as well as high school elective credit. Many of these courses are honors (5.0) weighted electives for high school
graduation. If the students makes a grade of C or higher, the course will be recognized by all of the 16 universities in the
North Carolina University System, plus many private college and universities. Students must by 16 years of age or older and




                                                              24
enrolled in high school at least half-time. Students pay no tuition; only student fees, the required insurance, books, and
supplies.
        The Huskins Program provides courses students may take on the Brevard High School Campus (Criminal Justice) or
in Automotive Systems Technology at Blue Ridge Community College Campus in Brevard. Students in the Criminal Justice
courses enjoy these courses without payment (the fees are waived and Transylvania County Schools purchases books).
Students in the Automotive Systems Technology pay no tuition; only student fees, the required insurance, books, and
supplies.
        Students in grades 9-12 can enroll in NCCCS Learn and Earn Online courses as long as they have met the community
college requirements and required course prerequisites. Tuition and fees for these courses are waived. Books for the Learn
and Earn courses must be paid for by the student, but may be eligible for reimbursement from Transylvania County Schools.
Students will take their book receipts to their school principal for more information.
        For more information contact the High School Guidance Office or call Glenda McCarson at Blue Ridge Community
College at 883-2520.

More specific details are available in the course listing of this publication.




                                               Fall 2009
                                               Courses for High School Students
                                               August – December 2009

Students must be 16 years old. Tuition is free, but students are required to pay fees, insurance, books, and supplies. Fee
amounts will range from $5 to $30 and textbooks will range from $40 to $150 depending on courses.

Additional courses are available during evening hours.

First Block
*ART 111           Art Appreciation                                                 3 Credit Hours
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:00-9:15a
This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design
principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students
should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This course has been approved to satisfy
the Comprehensive Articulation general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.

*MAT 171/171A Pre-Calculus Algebra/Lab                                              4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or scores 500+ on SAT Math;
Mondays through Fridays, 8:00-8:50a
This course is the first of two courses designed to emphasize topics which are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis
is placed on equations and inequalities, functions (linear, polynomial, rational), systems of equations and inequalities, and
parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems and use appropriate models for
analysis and predictions. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general
education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics.

*REL 110           World Religions                                                3 Credit Hours
Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:00-9:15a
This course introduces the world’s major religious traditions. Topics include Primal religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam,
Judaism, and Christianity. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, beliefs, and practices of
the religions studied. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education
core requirement in humanities/fine arts.




                                                                 25
*SOC 210          Introduction to Sociology                                         3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or score 500+ on SAT Critical Reading
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:00-9:15a
This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization,
research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations.
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay
among individuals, groups, and societies. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation
Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

Fourth Block
*ASL 111/181      Elementary ASL I/ASL Lab 1                                    4 Credit Hours
Mondays through Fridays, 1:45-3:00p; August-October (Internet/On-Campus Combo)
This course introduces the fundamental elements of American Sign Language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed
on the development of basic expressive and receptive skills. Upon completion, students will be able to comprehend and
respond with grammatical accuracy to expressive American Sign Language and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course
has been approved to satisfy the comprehensive articulation agreement general education core requirement in
humanities/fine arts.

*ASL 112/182       Elementary ASL II/ASL Lab 2                                  4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: ASL 111
Mondays through Fridays, 1:45-3:00p; October–December (Internet/On-Campus Combo)
This course is a continuation of ASL 111 focusing on the fundamental elements of American Sign Language in a cultural
context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of expressive and receptive skills. Upon completion, students
should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing accuracy to expressive American Sign Language and
demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved to satisfy the comprehensive articulation agreement general
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.

*BIO 140/140A      Environmental Biology/Environmental Biology Lab              4 Credit Hours
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 1:40-3:30p
This course introduces environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. Topics include ecological
concepts, population growth, natural resources and a focus on current environmental problems from scientific, social,
political, and economic perspectives. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of
environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved to satisfy the
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. A lab fee is
required.

*COM 231           Public Speaking                                               3 Credit Hours
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:45-3:00p
This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group
discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special
occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and
participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This course has been approved to satisfy the
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in speech/communication.

*HUM 123            Appalachian Culture                                               3 Credit Hours
Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:45-3:00p
This course provides an interdisciplinary study of the unique features of Appalachian culture. Topics include historical
political, sociological, psychological, and artistic features which distinguish this region. Upon completion, students should be
able to demonstrate a broad-based awareness and appreciation of Appalachian culture. This course has been approved to
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective course requirement.




                                                               26
*PSY 150          General Psychology                                            3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or score 500+ on SAT Critical Reading
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:45-3:00p
This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology,
biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social
psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the
science of psychology. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general
education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

North Carolina Community College System Learn & Earn Online Courses
Qualified students in participating high schools can take a variety of online college credit courses at no cost to them or to their families.
Students in grades 9-12 can enroll in NCCCS Learn & Earn Online Courses as long as they have met community college requirements
and required course prerequisites. Tuition and fees for the courses are waived. Books for the Learn & Earn Online Courses must be paid
for by the student, but may be eligible for reimbursement from Transylvania County Schools. Students will take their book receipts to their
school principal for more information.

ACC 120        Principles of Financial Accounting                                 4 Credit Hours
This course introduces business decision-making accounting information systems. Emphasis is placed on analyzing,
summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare
financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations. This
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective course
requirement.

BUS 110             Introduction to Business                                      3 Credit Hours
This course provides a survey of the business world. Topics include the basic principles and practices of contemporary
business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of business concepts as a foundation
for studying other business subjects. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for
transferability as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

*CIS 110            Introduction to Computers                                   3 Credit Hours
This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include
identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon
completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the
computer to solve problems. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general
education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics (quantitative Option).

*ENG 111            Expository Writing                                              3 Credit Hours
*ACA 115            Success & Study Skills, see description below                    1 Credit Hour
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or score 500+ on SAT Critical Reading; Co-Requisite: ACA 115
This course is the required first course in a series of two designed to develop the ability to produce clear expository prose.
Emphasis is placed on the writing process including audience analysis, topic selection, thesis support and development,
editing and revision. Upon completion, student should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using
standard written English. This course will also teach the process of academic research emphasizing MLA documentation.
This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in
English Composition.

*ACA 115            Success & Study Skills                                            1 Credit Hour
This course is a co-requisite of ENG 111 and must be taken together.
This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives.
Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-
setting, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully
meet educational goals. This course must be completed as a prerequisite or co-requisite of ENG 111.




                                                                     27
*HIS 111           World Civilizations I                                          3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or score 500+ on SAT Critical Reading
This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African,
American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should
be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in
social/behavioral sciences.

Public Services Technology Pathway
Criminal Justice Technology 1; Mondays through Fridays, Fourth Block
CJC 112            Criminology                                                        3 Credit Hours
This course introduces deviant behavior as it relates to criminal activity. Topics include theories of crime causation; statistical
analysis of criminal behavior; past, present, and future social control initiatives; and other related topics. Upon completion,
students should be able to explain and discuss various theories of crime causation and societal response

CJC 244           Footwear and Tire Imprints                                    3 Credit Hours
This course provides a study of the fundamental concepts of footwear and tire imprint evidence as related to forensic science.
Topics include proper photographic recording, casting, recognition of wear patterns and imprint identification. Upon
completion, the student should be able to recognize, record, photograph, and identify footwear and tire imprints.




                                              Spring 2010
                                              Courses for High School Students       January – May, 2010

Students must be 16 years old. Tuition is free, but students are required to pay fees, insurance, books, and supplies. Fee
amounts will range from $5 to $30 and textbooks will range from $40 to $150 depending on courses.

Additional courses are available during evening hours.

First Block

*HUM 123 Appalachian Culture                                                          3 Credit Hours
Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:00-9:15a
This course provides an interdisciplinary study of the unique features of Appalachian culture. Topics include historical
political, sociological, psychological, and artistic features which distinguish this region. Upon completion, students should be
able to demonstrate a broad-based awareness and appreciation of Appalachian culture. This course has been approved to
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

*MAT 151/151A Statistics I/Statistics I Lab                                        4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or scores 500+ on SAT Math;
Mondays through Fridays, 8:00-8:50a
This course provides a project-based approach to study of basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, and
decision-making. Emphasis is placed on measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, regression, discrete and
continuous probability distributions, quality control, population parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Upon
completion, students should be able to describe important characteristics of a set of data and draw inferences about a
population from sample data. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general
education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics.




                                                                28
*PSY 150      General Psychology                                                3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or score 500+ on SAT Critical Reading
Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:00-9:15a
This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology,
biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social
psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the
science of psychology. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general
education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

*SOC 210      Introduction to Sociology                                             3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or score 500+ on SAT Critical Reading
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:00-9:15a
This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization,
research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations.
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay
among individuals, groups, and societies. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation
Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

Fourth Block

*ART 111      Art Appreciation                                                      3 Credit Hours
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:45-3:00p
This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design
principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students
should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This course has been approved to satisfy
the Comprehensive Articulation general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.

*HIS 112      World Civilizations II                                            3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or score 500+ on SAT Critical Reading
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:45-3:00p
This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe,
India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political,
socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations. This course has been approved to satisfy the
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

*REL 110       World Religions                                                    3 Credit Hours
Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:45-3:00p
This course introduces the world’s major religious traditions. Topics include Primal religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam,
Judaism, and Christianity. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, beliefs, and practices of
the religions studied. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education
core requirement in humanities/fine arts.


North Carolina Community College System Learn & Earn Online Courses
Qualified students in participating high schools can take a variety of online college credit courses at no cost to them or to their families.
Students in grades 9-12 can enroll in NCCCS Learn & Earn Online Courses as long as they have met community college requirements
and required course prerequisites. Tuition and fees for the courses are waived. Books for the Learn & Earn Online Courses must be paid
for by the student, but may be eligible for reimbursement from Transylvania County Schools. Students will take their book receipts to their
school principal for more information.

ACC 120        Principles of Financial Accounting                                 4 Credit Hours
This course introduces business decision-making accounting information systems. Emphasis is placed on analyzing,
summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare
financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations. This
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective course
requirement.




                                                                     29
BUS 110       Introduction to Business                                            3 Credit Hours
This course provides a survey of the business world. Topics include the basic principles and practices of contemporary
business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of business concepts as a foundation
for studying other business subjects. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

*CIS 110      Introduction to Computers                                         3 Credit Hours
This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include
identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon
completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the
computer to solve problems. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general
education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics (quantitative Option).

*ENG 111      Expository Writing                                                    3 Credit Hours
*ACA 115      Success & Study Skills, see description below                          1 Credit Hour
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or score 500+ on SAT Critical Reading; Co-Requisite: ACA 115
This course is the required first course in a series of two designed to develop the ability to produce clear expository prose.
Emphasis is placed on the writing process including audience analysis, topic selection, thesis support and development,
editing and revision. Upon completion, student should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using
standard written English. This course will also teach the process of academic research emphasizing MLA documentation.
This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in
English Composition.

*ACA 115            Success & Study Skills                                            1 Credit Hour
This course is a co-requisite of ENG 111 and must be taken together.
This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives.
Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-
setting, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully
meet educational goals. This course must be completed as a prerequisite or co-requisite of ENG 111.

*HIS 111      World Civilizations I                                               3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: BRCC Placement Test or score 500+ on SAT Critical Reading
This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African,
American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should
be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in
social/behavioral sciences.

*POL 130      State and Local Government                                             3 Credit Hours
This course includes state and local political institutions and practices in the context of American federalism. Emphasis is
placed on procedural and policy differences as well as political issues in state, regional, and local governments of North
Carolina. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss various problems associated with
intergovernmental politics and their effect on the community and the individual. This course has been approved to satisfy the
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective course requirement.

Public Services Technology Pathway

Criminal Justice Technology 1, Mondays through Fridays, Fourth Block
CJC 112            Criminology                                                        3 Credit Hours
This course introduces deviant behavior as it relates to criminal activity. Topics include theories of crime causation; statistical
analysis of criminal behavior; past, present, and future social control initiatives; and other related topics. Upon completion,
students should be able to explain and discuss various theories of crime causation and societal response

CJC 244           Footwear and Tire Imprints                                    3 Credit Hours
This course provides a study of the fundamental concepts of footwear and tire imprint evidence as related to forensic science.
Topics include proper photographic recording, casting, recognition of wear patterns and imprint identification. Upon
completion, the student should be able to recognize, record, photograph, and identify footwear and tire imprints.




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                               Automotive Systems Technology
                                     Huskins Program
                                         2009-2010
                               Junior or Senior Year
                               Fall Semester                                  Class    Lab     Credit
                               M-F 8:00am-10:50am
                               AUT 110     Intro to Auto Technology                2      2        3
                               AUT 161     Basic Auto Electricity                  4      3        5
                               AUT 186     PC Skills for Auto Techs                2      2        3
                                                                                       Total      11    Credit Hours

                               Spring Semester
                               M-F 7:50am-11:00am
                               AUT 163   Adv Auto Electricity                      2      3        3
                               AUT 163A Adv Auto Electricity Lab                   0      3        1
                               AUT 151   Brake Systems                             2      3        3
                               AUT 151A Brake Systems Lab                          0      3        1
                                                                                       Total       8    Credit Hours

                               Junior or Senior Year
                               Fall Semester                                  Class    Lab     Credit
                               M-F 12:00n-3:10pm
                               AUT 141     Suspension & Steering Sys               2      3        3
                               AUT 141A Suspension & Steering Lab                  0      3        1
                               AUT 181     Engine Performance 1                    2      3        3
                               AUT 181A Engine Performance 1 Lab                   0      3        1
                                                                                       Total       8    Credit Hours

                               Spring Semester
                               M-F 12:00n-2:40pm
                               AUT 183   Engine Performance                        2      6        4
                               AUT 171   Auto Climate Control                      2      4        4
                                                                                       Total       8    Credit Hours


COSTS
Fees-(per semester) $38.30 approximately
Books-$250.00 approximately (covers all four semesters)




                                                       Manicuring/Nail‐Technology 
                                                               2009‐2010
The Manicuring/Nail Technology curriculum provides competency‐based knowledge, scientific/artistic principles, and hands‐on fundamentals 
associated with the nail technology industry. The curriculum provides a simulated salon environment which enables students to develop manipulative 
skills. Graduates should be prepared to take the North Carolina Cosmetology State Board Licensing Exam and upon passing be licensed and qualify for 
employment in beauty and nail salons, and in related businesses. 
 
                                                          Location: BRCC Transylvania Center 
                                               Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday evening 5:00pm‐9:50pm 
 
Fall Semester 
COS 121 Manicure/Nail Technology I                                     6 Credit Hours 
This course covers techniques of nail technology, hand and arm massage, and recognition of nail diseases and disorders. Topics include OSHA/safety, 
sanitation, bacteriology, product knowledge, salesmanship, manicures, artificial applications, pedicures, massage, and other related topics. Upon 
completion, students should be able to safely and competently perform nail care, including manicures, pedicures, massage, decorating, and artificial 
applications in a salon setting. 
 
Spring Semester 
COS 222            Manicure/Nail Technology II                                  6 Credit Hours 
Prerequisite: COS 121 




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This course covers advanced techniques of nail technology, hand and arm massage. Topics include OSHA/safety, product knowledge, customer 
service, salesmanship, artificial applications, nail art, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence 
necessary for the licensing examination, including advanced nail care, artificial enhancements and decorations. 
 
COSTS  
Tuition is FREE 
Fees – (per semester) $28.30 approximately 
Book/Workbooks ‐ $250.00 approximately (covers both semesters) 
Nail Kit ‐ $145.00 approximately (covers both semesters) 
Uniform/Shoes/Name Tag ‐ $100.00 approximately 




Schedule of Courses 2009 – 2010

UNCG iSchool is an award-winning, nationally accredited program that gives high school juniors and seniors a head start on their college education – at
no cost. The N.C. State Legislature funds both tuition and textbooks for UNCG iSchool students in North Carolina’s public high schools. Students are
able to take the same university classes that are offered on campus – but offered online as part of the regular school day. They earn credit from both their
high school and UNCG. With a UNCG transcript and a grade of C or higher, they can transfer the credit-hours they earn to the college or university of
their choice*. These are college courses, and as such, require student motivation and academic responsibility. For an interactive course catalog,
demonstration and instructions on how to register, visit:http://ischool.uncg.edu

ATY 213 Cultural Anthropology (3 Credit Hours)
What is wrong with the rest of the world that it doesn’t think or act like we do? With as much as we share biologically with people everywhere in the
world, it’s astounding how many radically different cultures there are and how little we know about most of them. Explore the meaning of “being
human” from the rainforests of the Amazon to the deserts of Central Asia, from great cities to humble villages – put your own cultural biases to the test
as we examine the enormous diversity of our little planet.

BCN 225 Masterpieces of Cinema (3 Credit Hours)
Movies have influenced style, morality and public opinion from the earliest days of flickering black-and-white images up through today’s digital
blockbusters. Take a cinematic journey through the annals of film and examine the movies as an art form. Learn to deconstruct the components of a film
and critically analyze the contributions of writers, directors and cinematographers as you view some of the most important films of all time. (MPAA
Rating of PG-13 or lower)

DCE 200 Dance Appreciation (3 Credit Hours)
Dance is a form of self and cultural expression that has roots in every society from the most primitive to the most modern. It conveys every emotion
from grief to joy and has given meaning and identity to peoples since the dawn of time. As with every art form, there are basic elements that need to be
understood before we can truly appreciate dance for what it is and why it is. Movement and music are forever linked in most people’s minds, but dance
is also tied to many visual art forms as well. Experience dance as an observer and as a participant.

ESS 220 Physical Fitness for Life (3 Credit Hours)
Every time you open the newspaper or turn on the TV you read or hear about the latest health crisis in our society: obesity, heart disease, diabetes, you
name it. The truth is that many health problems can be avoided or lessened by developing and committing to a physical fitness program that we can live
with and enjoy (yes, enjoy) throughout our lifetimes. It’s never too late to start. A healthier, happier life can be yours by starting today, and we’ll show
you how to begin planning your physical fitness program.

MUS 100 Music Appreciation (3 Credit Hours)
Music Appreciation is an exciting and unexpected journey through Western music. The tuneful town of Musi copolis is holding its annual music festival
and you’re invited. The town’s eccentric and eclectic characters take you through the forms, eras and styles of Western music where you’ll meet
important composers and hear some of their major works. You don’t need any musical training so come along, the festival is about to begin.

PHI 121 Contemporary Moral Problems (3 Credit Hours)
One of the quickest ways to find an argument is to pick an issue, any issue, and defend one side of it. As our society becomes more complicated, we
frequently find our communities polarized by topics in today’s newspaper. Last week’s hot-button issue is quickly replaced by this week’s. As active
participants in society we feel compelled to weigh in on one side or the other, armed only with the tiniest bit of information. Where do you stand (or




                                                                            32
think you stand) on topics such as abortion, euthanasia, global warming, war, sexual mores, capital punishment and a host of others? There is always
more to every story than meets the eye (or ear) and as responsible citizens we must learn more than we can get
from thirty-second sound bites.

PSC 100 American Politics (3 Credit Hours)
Americans approach politics with a unique set of assumptions and values. What is it that sets Americans apart from the rest of the world? And how is
this game of politics played? How do our formal and informal institutions interact with one another to create policy? Political Science 100 is a survey of
American political culture, constitutional development, and the structure and functions of our national government and informal institutions, such as
political parties. At the end of this course students will be able to explain the distinctive and unusual features of America’s democracy, and the
importance of the Constitution as a foundation for the system.

PSC 105 Political Issues (3 Credit Hours)
Are you a Socialist, an Anarchist, or a Libertarian? Would you torture your fellow man? Experience political science like never before. Examine
political ideologies and competing theories about freedom, justice and equality through out history and around the world. Challenge your political
opinions and rethink your responsibilities using introspective examinations of current global political issues including gay marriage, universal
healthcare, torture, and terrorism. Using interactive multimedia case studies, logic trees, and a final comprehensive game, PSC 105 will capture your
imagination, elevate your critical thinking skills and transform your ideological core. Defy yourself. Define yourself.

PSY 121 General Psychology (3 Credit Hours)
This course will survey the many subtopics that together comprise the modern science of psychology. We will begin by looking at how the science of
psychology is conducted, then exploring such areas as the nervous system, perception, learning, conditioning, memory, language, thinking, problem-
solving, motivation and emotion. The course concludes with a focus on social influences on thinking and behavior, and on the nature of psychological
disorders and their treatment.

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (3 Credit Hours)
Peter Berger once claimed, “It can be said that the first wisdom of sociology is this – things are not what they seem. ”In other words, the sociological
point of view is not part of our culture in the U.S. Most of us believe that human behavior, feeling, and thinking are psychological or individual in
origin. Sociology, on the other hand, sees the influence of social factors on human behavior, emotion, and thought. The objective in this course is to see
the world through social lenses.

SOC 201 Social Problems (3 Credit Hours)
A trouble, something that bothers us, affects us personally. An issue, something that bothers a group, community, or society, affects us socially.
Troubles and issues are intricately connected. I’m overweight; it’s a personal trouble. Fifty-eight percent of adult Americans are overweight; it’s a
social issue. This course examines social problems as both troubles and issues. As troubles, we look closely at how race, food, disease, income, alcohol,
and other problems modify and change our personal lives. As issues, we look at how these troubles are linked to broader social, cultural, and historical
patterns.

*UNCG iSchool course credit transfers anywhere UNCG credit is accepted. If you are
unsure, we suggest contacting the institution to find out exactly how it will transfer. If a
student chooses to attend UNCG, they retain the course grade along with credit hours.
iSchool Schedule of Courses 2009 – 2010




                                                                              33
North Carolina Virtual Public School
COURSE CATALOGUE (SPRING 2009)

SUBJECT                      COURSE CODE    TITLE                                         DURATION   CREDIT
                             5220Q          Music Appreciation                            Block      1
Arts
                             5415Q          Art I Drawing and Design                      Block      1
                             6514Q          Digital Communications                        Block      1
Career Technical Education   6200Q          Principles of Business and Personal Finance   Block      1
                             6615Q          Small Business Entrepreneurship               Block      1
Elective                     9520Q          Success 101                                   Block      1
                             1021Q          English I                                     Block      1
                             1022Q          English II                                    Block      1
English                      1023Q          English III                                   Block      1
                             1024Q          English IV                                    Block      1
                             1031Q          Journalism                                    Block      1
Health                       9013Q          Healthful Living                              9 Weeks    0.5
                             4052O          Civics and Economics Honors                   Block      1
                             3040O          Earth /Environmental Science                  Block      1
                             6415O          e-Commerce I Honors                           Block      1
                             6416O          e-Commerce II Honors                          Block      1
                             1021O          English I Honors                              Block      1
                             1022O          English II Honors                             Block      1
                             1023O          English III Honors                            Block      1
                             1024O          English IV Honors                             Block      1
                             1043O/1043QZ   French III Honors                             Block      1
Honors
                             1044O          French IV Honors                              Block      1
                             1062Q/1062QZ   German III Honors                             Block      1
                             1063O          German IV Honors                              Block      1
                             1082O/1082QZ   Latin III Honors                              Block      1
                             2070O          Pre-Calculus Honors                           Block      1
                             4080O          Psychology Honors                             Block      1
                             1053O/1053QZ   Spanish III Honors                            Block      1
                             1054O          Spanish IV Honors                             Block      1
                             4024O          World History Honors                          Block      1
                             2025Q/2025QZ   Advanced Functions and Modeling               Block      1
                             2023Q/2023QZ   Algebra I                                     Block      1
Math
                             2024Q/2024QZ   Algebra II                                    Block      1
                             2030Q/2030QZ   Geometry                                      Block      1
                             3010Q          Physical Science                              Block      1
Science
                             3038Q          Earth/Environmental Science                   Block      1
                             4052Q          Civics and Economics                          Block      1
                             4010Q          Medieval Studies                              Block      1
Social Studies               4080Q          Psychology                                    Block      1
                             4021Q          US History                                    Block      1
                             4024Q          World History                                 Block      1




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North Carolina Virtual Public School
COURSE CATALOGUE (SPRING 2009)
SUBJECT                COURSE CODE    TITLE             DURATION   CREDIT
Test Prep              9510Q          SAT Prep          Block      1
                       1080Q/1080QZ   Latin I           Block      1
                       1081Q/1081QZ   Latin II          Block      1
                       1051Q/1051QZ   Spanish I         Block      1
                       1052Q/1052QZ   Spanish II        Block      1
World Languages
                       1041Q/1041QZ   French I          Block      1
                       1042Q/1042QZ   French II         Block      1
                       1060Q/1060QZ   German I          Block      1
                       1061Q/1061QZ   German II         Block      1




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              RHS Four Year Plan of Study Worksheet

                Name                                                                NCWise#

                       College University Prep        Transylvania County Scholar
                       College Tech Prep              North Carolina Scholar
                       College Tech University Prep

(1) Freshman Year                                      (2) Sophomore Year
English                                                English
Math                                                   Math
Science                                                Science
Social Studies                                         Social Studies
Health & P.E.                                          Elective
Elective                                               Elective
Elective                                               Elective
Elective                                               Elective
(3) Junior Year                                        (4) Senior Year
English                                                English
Math                                                   Math/Elective
Science                                                Elective
Social Studies                                         Elective
Elective                                               Elective
Elective                                               Elective
Elective                                               Elective
Elective                                               Elective
Plans After H.S.                                       Career Interest

Checklist for CP             In addition to CP requirements                 Checklist for CTP
English 1                             NCS                     TCS           English 1
English 2                          3.5 GPA                  3.5 GPA         English 2
English 3                          Unweight                 Unweight        English 3
English 4                                                      &            English 4
Alg 1/Geom                                                  3.8 GPA         Alg 1               or Alg 1
Geom/Alg 2                       2 additional               Weighted        Geom                  Tech 1
Alg 2/Adv. Fun                      credits                                 Alg 2                 Tech 2
Adv.Fun./Pre-Cal.                 Eng/Sci/SS                                Earth-Env
Earth-Env.                         for Lang            4th Science          ICP
Biology                                                                     Biology
Chemistry                                                                   W. Hist.
W. Hist.                          2 second                   4th Social     Civics
Civics                            level/adv                   Studies       U.S.
U.S.                                                                        CTE (1)
For. Lang.                                                                  CTE (2)
For. Lang.                                                   (1) Art Ed.    CTE (3)
Health/PE                                                                   CTE (4)
Elective                                                                    Health/PE
Elective                                                      (1) CTE       Elective
Elective                                                                    Elective
Elective                             28                          32         Elective
Elective                           Credit                      Credit       Elective
Elective                           Total                       Total        Elective
Elective                                                                    Elective
Elective                                                                    Elective
Elective                                                                    Elective
Elective                                                                    Elective
Elective                                                                    Elective
28 Credits                                                                  28 Credits




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