Transition to Teaching Program-Missouri - University of Missouri

Document Sample
Transition to Teaching Program-Missouri - University of Missouri Powered By Docstoc
					               Request for Approval of a Proposed Change
                    University of Missouri-St. Louis

1. What is the change being proposed?
State the specific change that is proposed
The University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL) is seeking authority from the Higher
Learning Commission (HLC) to add to the Status and Scope of 1999 (Appendix I)
approval for asynchronous delivery of distance education programs. Currently we are
approved to offer distance education via interactive television, videotape, and broadcast
television. With the growth in technology since our last review, it is important to add
online instruction to the current modes of instruction. Specifically, we would like to add
web-based programs and courses to the list of Distance Education offerings in the
Statement of Institutional Scope and Activities.

This Change Request proposes to clarify our online offerings. No permission was sought
in the past because administrators believed that our online offerings failed to meet HLC’s
definition that “Distance Education Programs
- Includes degree, degree completion and certificate programs
- Students can complete the entire degree, degree completion or certificate at a
    distance, except for the possibility of an orientation or proctored exams at a specific
    site
- The program is asynchronous
- The program is specifically and intentionally designed to be a distance program”
    (Annual Report).

In fact, many of our courses are asynchronous and are offered for degrees and/or
certificates. In some areas we are now offering enough courses that a student could
potentially complete a degree. The difference is that we offer the same courses that we
offer our on-campus courses. We have not and do not intend to design a program other
than the hybrid MBA that is “specifically and intentionally designed to be a distance
program.”

In addition, we seek clarification about the status of our hybrid MBA program. The MBA
was in operation during our last re-accreditation review. Perhaps because it requires some
work on campus it was not addressed under Distance Education in the Status and Scope
of 1999.

UM-St Louis has an outstanding technological infrastructure for teaching on-campus and
on-line courses (please see http://www.umsl.edu/technology/). In fact, on-campus
students are increasingly demanding that faculty use the Blackboard course management
system, which we call My Gateway, to make course materials and grades available
online. University Counsel has ruled that faculty may not distribute grades except
through My Gateway because it is password-protected, thereby assuring students greater
privacy than through email. With the growth of online materials and discussions in face-


                                                                                             1
to-face classes, the difference between online and on-campus delivery systems is
diminishing.

This proposal will demonstrate that UM-St Louis has the capacity to meet HLC’s Best
Practices in Distance Education and deliver asynchronous courses and programs of the
same quality as those offered on-campus. That is,
   - That education is best experienced within a community of learning where
       competent professionals are actively and cooperatively involved with creating,
       providing, and improving the instructional program;
   - That learning is dynamic and interactive, regardless of the setting in which it
       occurs;
   - That instructional programs leading to degrees having integrity are organized
       around substantive and coherent curricula which define expected learning
       outcomes;
   - That institutions accept the obligation to address student needs related to, and to
       provide the resources necessary for, their academic success;
   - That institutions are responsible for the education provided in their name;
   - That institutions undertake the assessment and improvement of their quality,
       giving particular emphasis to student learning;
   - That institutions voluntarily subject themselves to peer review (p. 1).

Undergraduate Programs To Be Offered Online
We seek approval to offer online the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.),
Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS), Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA),
Bachelor of Science in Accounting (BSA), Bachelor of Science in Management
Information Systems (BSMIS), Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.), and Bachelor of
Liberal Studies (BLS). Primarily these programs will have only a few courses offered via
distance education, but we seek approval because there is a possibility that those few
courses could result in a degree being awarded by UMSL. Since many of our students are
non-traditional, we have a great number of undergraduates who take only a few courses
to complete their baccalaureate degree.

The B.N.S. (R.N. to B.S. degree-completion) is an undergraduate degree program
designed to be delivered via a wide variety of formats. It is a collaborative program with
the other two Nursing programs in the University of Missouri System and has been
approved for off-site delivery at four community college sites in the region for several
years. The program’s website
(http://www.umsl.edu/~nursingweb/academic/flex/index.html) describes the RN to BSN
program as offering “registered nurses the option of continuing their education in nursing
via the Internet, or on the University of Missouri-St Louis Campus, or at Outreach Sites
in convenient locations.”

The BLS is the most likely baccalaureate degree for degree completion via distance
education. It consists of two specified minors and the capstone course from one of those
fields. To make the conversion to an online or hybrid format fiscally feasible, the Dean of
Arts and Sciences is rewarding faculty for developing online courses that could be used



                                                                                           2
for a minor or the BLS degree. In addition, some BLS students transfer considerable
hours into the degree so they can complete the baccalaureate more quickly in this
program.

The B.A. in Communication may also deliver sufficient courses online in the near future
for students to be able to complete a degree. They offer a great deal of structured support
for students at http://www.umsl.edu/divisions/artscience/communication/doc_on.htm.

Graduate Programs To Be Offered Online
We seek approval to offer the Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Science (M.S.), Master of
Accounting (MAcc), Master of Nursing (M.S.N.), Master of Music Education (M.M.E.),
Master of Education (M.Ed.), and Educational Specialist (Ed.S.).

The M.Ed. and Ed.S. degrees may soon have enough courses offered online to result in a
student completing a program online. The College of Education not only has a long
history of responding to the needs of educators in the region, they also have won national
awards for their use of educational technology. Their students range from preschool
teachers to university administrators, all of whom may need the convenience of an online
degree program.

The M.A. in Communication website
(http://www.umsl.edu/divisions/artscience/communication/doc_ma.htm) advises students
that faculty will be experimenting with innovative delivery systems. Although they have
offered only one graduate course online to date
(http://www.umsl.edu/divisions/artscience/communication/doc_on.htm), given the
faculty members’ success at online undergraduate courses, this is another degree that is
likely to be available online in the future.

The partially online Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) was in operation during
the 1999 re-accreditation but is not specifically mentioned in the Scope and Status, so we
also would like clarification about whether we should request approval for this existing
program. This weekend-based Internet-enhanced version of the MBA program exists as
an alternative to the traditional part-time evening program. Students meet on campus
monthly, with the remainder of the interaction between instructor and students taking
place online. Students proceed through the program as part of a cohort group and
complete the requirements for the degree in two years.


State the expected outcomes of this proposed change (enrollment growth, enhanced
services, etc.)

The primary reason to offer programs online is to increase enrollments. Enrollments at
the University of Missouri-St. Louis have been stagnant since the last re-accreditation
review in 1999, and undergraduates have decreased. One method the campus has used to
increase enrollments is to reach out to outlying areas through off-campus and online
courses.



                                                                                          3
Serving our constituents is the second major outcome. The average age of UM-St Louis
undergraduate students at 27.2, and similar to our growing graduate student population,
they are adult learners with family and work responsibilities. In addition, non-traditional
students are very busy with work and families. It is a natural extension of our land-grant
mission to attempt a variety of delivery methods that will meet students’ educational
needs. This is especially true as St. Louis prepares for roadwork on one of the major
freeways between the suburbs and campus. Students and staff alike are looking for
alternative ways to meet their goals during this protracted upgrade.

UM-St Louis’ major service area extends into rural areas without access to local
universities beyond the Associates Degree. As a result of our land-grant commitment, we
have established Residence Centers at outlying community colleges with liberal transfer
policies. This has resulted in a current on-campus undergraduate population that is 78%
transfer students. We anticipate that the majority of online students will be associated
with our partner community colleges, either as AA graduates from them or as community
college faculty and other nearby residents. Teachers, school administrators, social
workers, nurses, local government workers, and business leaders from those areas served
by our community-college partners are expected to make up the major population of
graduate students in the online offerings because of their need to upgrade their skills
without driving long distances.

Online delivery permits students to have access to courses and programs that might not
have sufficient demand in any one site. For example, there is a grave need for
professional preparation and advanced programs in rural areas of Missouri. Rural regions
appreciate convenient methods to upgrade credentials of professionals in their area, even
when the numbers that would attend a particular site are too low to offer an off-campus
section of the course.

To achieve these goals, we expect to evaluate the following outcomes:
- Departments that offer an online program will increase the number of majors in the
   department.
- There will be no significant difference in the achievement of the program’s learning
   outcomes between on-campus and online students.
- Surveys conducted for the program’s Five Year Review will document no significant
   difference in alumni satisfaction with the program between students who studied
   online and those that attended on campus.

Project the impact of this proposed change on the institution’s current mission, the
numbers and types of students to be served, and the breadth of educational offerings:

Mission
The request supports our mission as a metropolitan land-grant university, which is to
provide educational opportunities and access to the people of the St. Louis metropolitan
area. Simply stated, the addition of these online programs will further enhance mission
fulfillment. This request is so integral to our mission that it was even identified in the



                                                                                              4
self-study of 1998-1999. The College of Nursing listed the following as a goal that
reflected the campus’ mission, “Providing access to higher education through distance
learning and educational centers.”

To fulfill its mission, UMSL has a Division of Continuing Education whose dean sits
with other deans on the Provost’s Council. The new dean is starting policies that
encourage departments to deliver online courses through CE. Their website
(http://www.umsl.edu/divisions/conted/credit/index.html) describes the wide variety of
course offerings and distance formats already offered through CE.

UMSL is the region’s only public research university with a range of undergraduate,
graduate and professional programs. By making public baccalaureate and graduate
education more accessible, we will increase the college participation rate in the region.
Perhaps more significantly, working with the community colleges, we will provide a
better-trained workforce, which will help sustain and attract economic development in the
state of Missouri.

Students
The majority of students at UMSL are ethnically diverse working adults. They are mature
and are instrumentally motivated to complete their education primarily to enhance their
career opportunities.

The trend of population growth in outlying areas of the St. Louis region, confirmed by
2000 census information, is reflected in the increasing enrollments at area community
college campuses. The increase in travel time and two-wage earner families has
contributed to many students – and potential students – becoming place-bound; this is
particularly true for working mothers. Indeed, earlier demographic and survey data
revealed that 77 % of students taking courses at UMSL’s Residence Centers were
women, working full- or part–time (93%), nearly one-half married with one-third having
children under the age of 13.

Students in the B.S.N. program are described this way on their website
(http://www.umsl.edu/~nursingweb/academic/flex/index.html): “College of Nursing and
Health Studies recognizes Registered Nurses as adult learners who are licensed
professionals, often with years of experience. The program does not repeat courses and
experiences commonly completed as part of a basic associate degree or diploma nursing
program.”

Past and current enrollments in degree-completion programs at existing off-campus
locations of UMSL show that there continues to be a demand for public higher education
opportunities in rural areas surrounding metropolitan St. Louis as well as the extreme
reaches of suburban St. Louis County. Between 1994 and 2006 at our off-campus
locations, there have been 9577 enrollments and 29,976 credit hours offered in
Elementary Education, Business, Nursing, Criminal Justice, Sociology, Social Work,
Public Policy and Psychology. It is anticipated that the addition of the online delivery of
programs will provide a much smaller increase in enrollments and educational



                                                                                          5
opportunities for area citizens because of the extra demands on students that online
education requires and the current healthy enrollment in online classes. Additionally, not
all programs lend themselves to online asynchronous courses, and not all faculty
members enjoy online teaching. For example, despite a needs assessment that suggested a
great interest in the Master’s Public Policy Administration, faculty in the program
determined that they will offer courses off-site or via instructional television but not
online.

UMSL seeks to meet the needs of area citizens with convenient access to higher
education at the post-associate’s degree and graduate degree level in geographical areas
of the University’s service area that are experiencing population growth and an
underserved level of access to higher education. Since most of the undergraduate
enrollments at the University come as transfer enrollments from area community
colleges, it is a logical to provide access to select courses and degree programs online.

Another great need at an urban campus is the ability to provide degree-completion and
master’s degree coursework for business partners such as United Parcel Service, as well
as professional sites such as hospitals and schools. We need the flexibility to offer
courses that our partners’ employees can take online to complete their degree programs.

Identify from this list the Commission’s policy/policies relevant to this change:

Change in educational offerings: Commission approval is required to extend accreditation
to include
- Degree programs offered through distance delivery methods.

2. What factors led the organization to undertake the proposed change?
Enrollment Needs
Enrollment at UMSL has been stagnant since the University of Missouri System enacted
uniform admissions standards and ruled out any remedial courses in 1981. Since then the
increase in the student body in Fall Semester 2006 is only seven.

Faculty continue to receive announcements from out-of-state private, public, and for-
profit universities that they are offering degree programs via distance education. Many
have realized that they must innovate to recruit and keep students at UMSL.

Convenience and Cost-Benefit for Students
Off-site programs will continue to be important to UMSL because most faculty prefer
face-to-face teaching. In addition, they often live in neighborhoods where UMSL offers
courses at community college partner sites. However, some of our approved sites,
including Poplar Bluff and East Central Community College, are too far to maintain
strong programs over many years. In addition, there aren’t enough students at any one
site to continue the face-to-face programs. Even with Instructional Television, we require
coordinators and faculty to make on-site visits. There aren't currently enough students at
those locations to justify the expense.



                                                                                            6
Increased Skills Among Faculty
More faculty now use our Blackboard course management system, My Gateway, because
more students demand having online assignments, grades, and discussions to enrich their
traditional classes. The Action Plan update in spring 2007 showed the following increase
in usage between spring semesters 2005 and 2006: Over 1,200 courses used My Gateway
in 2005. That grew to over 1,900 courses in 2006. The maximum number of accesses
(“hits”) per day on My Gateway was 2.16 million in 2006, compared to 1.4 million in
WS2005. (FY2006). It will require little change for many faculty members to move to
online courses so they can reach more students.


Describe the relationship between the proposed change and ongoing planning.

UMSL’s Action Plan 2004-2008 listed as a priority the development of online programs,
as follows: “Provide incentives for the development of alternative course delivery
(online, ITV, video, accelerated, off-term, and weekend classes), and increase online
degree programs to six.” A report to the Budget and Planning Committee in spring 2007
cite the following measures of progress toward that priority:
1. Incentives- Number and types of incentives offered to programs.
In 2004 incentives included a) online supplemental fees to support the program
(Communication and MBA), b) workload adjustments (Nursing), c) ITV class size limits
(Social Work), and d) support for developing online courses (Education and Business).
By fiscal year 2005, Institutional Research reported that the College of Arts and Sciences
works collaboratively with departments to assist in new online course development. As
an incentive, the college provides upfront development funds for faculty who wish to
develop a new course or to develop an online format for an existing course and then the
department chairs and the academic dean approve the proposed course. Continuing
Education has the ability to recover these initial development costs through course
revenue, once the course is offered. The College of Education provides course release to
buy out faculty courses to support online course development. In addition, the college
provides extra compensation of $3,300 per course to faculty as overload when course
buyouts are not possible.

The Action Plan update in FY 2006 noted that online fees had been approved at $50 per
credit hour, in addition to the program-specific course fees. This fee began to be
implemented in summer semester 2007 to fund incentives and support increased online
course development and offerings. As a result, in spring 2007 UMSL offered 74 courses
via the Internet, 15 of which have multiple sections; 143 distance courses using both ITV
and F2F delivery methods; and 20 video courses in 10 different programs. In 2007 CE
piloted Winter Intersession where the campus offered 12 courses and had 204 students
enrolled in 612 credit hours. The plan is to expand the offerings during the Winter
Intersession 2008.

With the Action Plan ending in 2008, we will begin the design of an updated Action Plan
in fall 2007. We anticipate that the priority for online education will continue since it is
becoming more accepted by faculty and students alike.


                                                                                           7
UMSL is the region’s only public research university with a range of undergraduate,
graduate and professional programs. By making public baccalaureate and graduate
education more accessible, we will increase the college participation rate in the region.

Our faculty have a track record of offering courses online and through increased use of
computer-based resources in their on-campus courses. In our HLC Annual Reports, we
reported the following distance education enrollments:

 Program Name          Primary     Graduate Graduate Undergraduate Undergraduate
                      Modality      2007     2006        2007          2006
BSN in Nursing       Internet             0                    34            28
MBA in Business      Internet           32        29             0             0
Administration
MED in Adult         Internet             70           35                 0                 0
Education
MED in               Video/CD             47         100                  0                 0
Elementary           ROM
Education

It is clear that if the recent trend continues we will need to offer complete degree
programs to satisfy our constituents.

Nursing
The needs of different programs vary considerably. With the exceptional need for nurses
and nurse educators, the greatest need for approved distance education programs is in the
College of Nursing. Current course offerings include the following:
Traditional BSN
        3106 Health Assessment
        3110 Pathophysiology
        3111 Pharmacotherapeutics
        3804 Ethical and Legal Dimensions
        3807 Nursing Research
        3808 Management and Leadership
        3817 Information Management
BSNC
        All courses
MSN
        6104 Values in Health Care
        6106 Policy, Organization and Financing
        6112 Quantitative Methods
        6114 Evidence Based Nursing
        6140 Health Promotion
        6309 Role of the Nurse Educator
        6320 Nursing Program & Curr. Development
        6518 Pathophysiology for ANP


                                                                                            8
       6519 Adv. Pediatric Pathophysiology
       6520 Pharmacology for ANP
       6526 Adv. Health Assess. for Pediatric Nursing Practice
       6529 Adv. Pharmacology for Pediatric Nursing Practice
       6954 Internship I
       6955 Internship II
PhD
       7490 Adv. Quantitative Design
       7491 Adv. Theory Development
       7429 Adv. Quantitative Measurement

Since our PhD program is a collaborative degree with the University of Missouri-
Columbia and the University of Missouri-Kansas City, it is necessary to offer courses
online. The faculty, however, do not want to offer the entire PhD program online. These
courses are listed to demonstrate the campus and college’s commitment and capacity to
offer other online programs. Upon approval by HLC, we anticipate that we’ll start with
the RN to BSN program online, increase the number of courses in the traditional BSN
until it is offered entirely online, and then offer the MSN online.

Education
UMSL’s College of Education prepares one-fifth of all teachers in the state of Missouri,
and many of those alumni return for graduate degrees. Faculty in the College of
Education have a long history of teaching courses off-site to meet the needs of educators.
As the following table shows, our influence is spreading further across the state as we
offer distance education:

 YEAR                                 ITV BROADCAST
                                          LOCATIONS
   2007   Kansas City, Columbia, Sedalia, Lesterville, Nevada, Salem, Park Hills,
          Dora, Popular Bluff, Camdenton, Kirksville, Reeds Spring, Louisiana
   2006   Kansas City, Columbia, Kirksville, Reeds Spring Sedalia, Park Hills,
          Camdenton, Jefferson City, Rolla, Salem, Winona, Nevada, Lesterville
   2005   Kansas City, Columbia, Salem, Kirksville, Reeds Spring, Nevada, Park Hills,
          Rolla, Jefferson City, Winona, Lesterville, Weston, Mexico
   2004   Kansas City, Columbia, Kirksville Rolla, Park Hills, Weston, Mexico,
          Kirksville, Reeds Spring, Nevada, Jefferson City

It was a natural extension of their tradition of using alternative modes of teaching for
Education faculty to offer courses online. Although the enrollments vary somewhat, the
solid enrollment over the last four fiscal years documents the need to offer courses online
so that educators can complete graduate programs online.

Master’s-level Education Online Courses Offered to Students in Missouri
     Fiscal Year       Enrollment     Unduplicated Head Count       Credit Hours
              2007             706                             249          2117
              2006             724                             283          2181


                                                                                          9
              2005               586                              244             1759
              2004               579                              225             1734

Recently Education faculty have become quite active in consulting abroad. This led to
opportunities to recruit teachers in international schools to take online courses. Although
we have no long-term documentation, the strong interest the first year is promising.

Master’s-level Education Online Courses Offered at International Schools
     Fiscal Year       Enrollment   Unduplicated Head Count          Credit Hours
              2007              63                              25            189

                             LOCATION OF STUDENTS
    Albania, China, Croatia, Guatemala, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan,
    Macedonia, Malaysia, Rep. of Georgia, Russia, Serbia & Montenegro,
    Slovakia, Slovenia, Thailand, Ukraine, and Venezuela

These strong enrollments are possible because of the diverse and large number of courses
that the College of Education offers online, as the following chart shows:

Summer 2007
ADU ED 6413       Improvement of Instruction in Adult Education
ADU ED 6494       Directed Readings in Adult Learning
ADU ED 6990       Internship (2 sections)
EDUC 5006         Advanced Psychology of Teaching and Learning
EDUC 5006         Advanced Methods of Teaching Reading
EDUC 5006         Advanced Methods of Teaching Reading and Analysis and Correction
                  of Reading Disorders
SECED 6420        Improvement of Secondary School Teaching
SPCED 6320        Advanced Studies in Classroom Management
Winter 2007
ADU ED 6404       Seminar Adult Education Research
ADU ED 6410       The Adult Learner (2 sections)
ADU ED 6494       Directed Readings in Adult Learning
ADU ED 6497       Problems Adult Education
ED REM 6707       Classroom Measurement and Evaluation
EDUC      5006    Counseling Techniques for Students with Special Needs and Their
                  Parents
ELED       6448   Diagnosis and Remediation in Math Disabilities
SEC ED     6416   Curriculum Construction for Secondary Schools
SPC ED     6410   Families and Schools in Inclusive Communities
TCH ED     5310   Designing Instruction
TCH ED     6030   Instruction, Learning, and Assessment
TCH ED     6910   Teacher Research


                                                                                         10
Fall 2006
ADU ED 6414      Curr Theory/Dev in Adult Ed
ADU ED 6420      Survey of Human Res Dev/Adult Ed
ADU ED 6494      Directed Readings in Adult Learn
ECH ED 6412      Foundations of Early Child Educ
ED PSY 6225      Pschology of Adolescence
ED REM 6750      Adv Research Design in Educ
ELE ED 6410      Curr Research in ECH/Elem Prog
HIR ED 6430      The Community College
HIR ED 6440      Issues in Institutional Research
HIR ED 6476      Org/Admin of Higher Education
HIR ED 6477      History & Philosophy of Amer Higher Ed
SEC ED 6415      Secondary School Curriculum
SPC ED 4301      Special Education Orientation
SPC ED 6372      Screening/Diagnosis of Dev Delays
SPC ED 6412      Psych of Excep Children
SPC ED 6412      Psych of Excep Children (International)
SPC ED 6440      Disab, Sch, Culture & Student
SPC ED 6441      Curr/Tchng for Div Lrnrs & Students
TCH ED 6040      Teacher Research
Summer 2006
ADU ED 6410      The Adult Learner
ADU ED 6494      Directed Readings in Adult Learning
ECH ED 6415      Org & Develop of ECH Programs
ECH ED 6321      Parent & Community Resources
ELE ED 6410      Current Research in ECH/Early Primary
ED ED     6109   Lrng & Dev in Secondary Sch Setting
EDUC      5006   Adv. Psychology of Tchg/Lrng
EDUC      5006   Teaching Reading: Analysis
EDUC      5006   Teaching Reading: Content
SPC ED 6320      Adv. Studies Classroom Mgmt
Winter 2006
ADU ED 6413      Improvement of Instruc in Adult Ed
ADU ED 6432      Teaching in the Community College
ADU ED 6494      Directed Readings in Adult Learning
ECH ED 6321      Parent & Comm Res in Early Ed
ECH ED 6413      Educational Role of Play
ED ADM 6306      Special Ed Administration
ED ADM 6403      Problems in School Public Relations
ED ADM 6504      Org Change in Spec Ed Admin
ED REM 6707      Classroom Meas & Eval


                                                           11
EDUC        5006   Counseling Techniques for Student
EDUC        5006   How the Brain Learns
ELE ED      6410   Current Research in ECH/ELEM Pgm
ELE ED      6448   Diagn/Remed in Math Disability
HIR ED      6405   Financial Issues in Higher Ed
HIR ED      6406   Governance of Higher Education
HIR ED      6430   The Community College
HIR ED      6441   Issues in Institutional Research II
SPC ED      6410   Families/Sch Inclusive Commun
TCH ED      5310   Designing Instruction
TCH ED      6030   Instruc, Learning, & Assessment
Fall 2005
ADU ED         Adult Learning and Development
            6230
ADU ED         History of Adult Education
            6411
ADU ED         Directed Readings in Adult Learning
            6494
ECH ED         Foundations of Early Childhood Ed
            6412
ED ADM         Staff Dev & Su for Spec Ed Admin
            6407
ED PSY         The Psychology of Adolescence
            6225
ELE ED         Current Research in ECH & Elem
            6410
HIR ED         Legal Aspects of Higher Education
            6420
HIR ED         The Community College
            6430
HIR ED         Issues in Institutional Research I
            6440
HIR ED         Org and Admin of Higher Education
            6476
SEC ED         The Secondary School Curriculum
            6415
SPC ED         Special Ed Orientation
            4301
SPC ED         Screening/Diagnosis Of Devel Delays
            6372
SPC ED         Psychology of Exceptional Children
            6412
SPC ED         Cur Res Psy Learn Disabilities
            6416
SPC ED         Disability, Schooling, and Culture
            6440
               Curriculum and Teaching for Diverse Students and Learners with
SPC ED 6441 Disabilities
SPC ED 6492 Practicum Special Education
Summer 2007
EDUC      5006 Advanced Psychology of Teaching and Learning
EDUC      5006 Advanced Methods of Teaching Reading
EDUC      5006 Advanced Methods of Teaching Reading and Analysis and
               Correction of Reading Disorders
SECED 6420 Improvement of Secondary School Teaching
SPCED 6320 Advanced Studies in Classroom Management
Winter 2007
ED REM 6707 Classroom Measurement and Evaluation


                                                                                12
EDUC      5006 Counseling Techniques for Students with Special Needs and
               Their Parents
ELED      6448 Diagnosis and Remediation in Math Disabilities
SEC ED 6416 Curriculum Construction for Secondary Schools
SPC ED 6410 Families and Schools in Inclusive Communities
TCH ED 5310 Designing Instruction
TCH ED 6030 Instruction, Learning, and Assessment
TCH ED 6910 Teacher Research
Fall 2006
ADU ED 6414 Curriculum Theory/Development in Adult Education
ADU ED 6420 Survey of Human Res Dev/Adult Education
ADU ED 6494 Directed Readings in Adult Learning
ECH ED 6412 Foundations of Early Child Education
ED PSY 6225 Psychology of Adolescence
ED REM 6750 Advanced Research Design in Education
ELE ED 6410 Curriculum Research in ECH/Elementary Programs
HIR ED 6430 The Community College
HIR ED 6440 Issues in Institutional Research
HIR ED 6476 Org/Admin of Higher Education
HIR ED 6477 History & Philosophy of American Higher Education
SEC ED 6415 Secondary School Curriculum
SPC ED 4301 Special Education Orientation
SPC ED 6372 Screening/Diagnosis of Developmental Delays
SPC ED 6412 Psych of Excep Children
SPC ED 6412 Psych of Excep Children (International)
SPC ED 6440 Disab, Sch, Culture & Student
SPC ED 6441 Curr/Tchng for Div Learners & Students
TCH ED 6040 Teacher Research
Summer 2006
ADU ED 6410 The Adult Learner
ADU ED 6494 Directed Readings in Adult Learning
ECH ED 6415 Org & Develop of ECH Programs
ECH ED 6321 Parent & Community Resources
ELE ED 6410 Current Research in ECH/Early Primary
ED ED     6109 Learning & Development in Secondary School Setting
EDUC      5006 Advanced Psychology of Teaching/Learning
EDUC      5006 Teaching Reading: Analysis
EDUC      5006 Teaching Reading: Content
SPC ED 6320 Advanced Studies Classroom Mgmt
Winter 2006
ADU ED 6413 Improvement of Instruction in Adult Education


                                                                           13
ADU ED      6432   Teaching in the Community College
ADU ED      6494   Directed Readings in Adult Learning
ECH ED      6321   Parent & Comm Res in Early Education
ECH ED      6413   Educational Role of Play
ED ADM      6306   Special Education Administration
ED ADM      6403   Problems in School Public Relations
ED ADM      6504   Org Change in Special Education Administration
ED REM      6707   Classroom Measurement & Evaluation
EDUC        5006   Counseling Techniques for Students
EDUC        5006   How the Brain Learns
ELE ED      6410   Current Research in ECH/ELEM Programs
ELE ED      6448   Diagn/Remed in Math Disability
HIR ED      6405   Financial Issues in Higher Education
HIR ED      6406   Governance of Higher Education
HIR ED      6430   The Community College
HIR ED      6441   Issues in Institutional Research II
SPC ED      6410   Families/Schools Inclusive Communities
TCH ED      5310   Designing Instruction
TCH ED      6030   Instruction, Learning, & Assessment
Fall 2005
ADU ED      6230 Adult Learning and Development
ADU ED      6411 History of Adult Education
ADU ED      6494 Directed Readings in Adult Learning
ECH ED      6412 Foundations of Early Childhood Education
ED ADM      6407 Staff Dev & Su for Spec Education Administration
ED PSY      6225 The Psychology of Adolescence
ELE ED      6410 Current Research in ECH & Elementary Education
HIR ED      6420 Legal Aspects of Higher Education
HIR ED      6430 The Community College
HIR ED      6440 Issues in Institutional Research I
HIR ED      6476 Organization and Administration of Higher Education
SEC ED      6415 The Secondary School Curriculum
SPC ED      4301 Special Education Orientation
SPC ED      6372 Screening/Diagnosis of Developmental Delays
SPC ED      6412 Psychology of Exceptional Children
SPC ED      6416 Cur Res Psy Learn Disabilities
SPC ED      6440 Disability, Schooling, and Culture
                 Curriculum and Teaching for Diverse Students and Learners
SPC ED      6441 with Disabilities
SPC ED      6492 Practicum Special Education




                                                                             14
Arts and Sciences
Departments in the College of Arts and Sciences are less likely to have a population of
professionals that need convenient courses offered online. To date, only the following
courses have been offered online:
Anthropology
1025 World Cultures
1033 World Archaeology
Economics
1003 Microeconomics in the News
1004 Macroeconomics in the News
Geography
1001 Intro to Geography
English
3120 Business Writing
4800 Linguistics
4820 History of the English Language
History
????
Philosophy
2254 Business Ethics
2256 Bioethics
3360 Formal Logic
3380 Philosophy of Science
4460 Advanced Formal Logic
Physics
 4306 Emergent Microscopy Practices
Psychology
 4376 Mental Health and Aging
Sociology
1010 Intro to Sociology
2180 Alcohol, Drugs and Society
3280 Society and Technology
3200 Sociology of Deviant Behavior

Fine Arts and Communication
Theatre, Dance, and Media Studies
       History of Film
Music
       Music History I
       Music History II
Communication
COMM 3395: Communication in Conflict
COMM 1030: Interpersonal Communication I (Required of all majors)
COMM 1135: Communication Theory (Required of all majors)
COMM 2231: Communication in the Organization (Required of all majors)




                                                                                          15
COMM 2232: Effective Communication in the Organization: Tools for Leadership
(hybrid web/video based course)
COMM 3332: Intercultural Communication (Required of all majors)
COMM 3336: Communication in Advertising
COMM 3337: Male / Female Communication
COMM 6431: Seminar in Organizational Communication (Required of all graduate
communication students)
Because of their extensive offerings, faculty in Communication have compiled and
posted online the principles and practices of web-based instruction used in the
department. In addition, the Department of Communication's Online Handbook includes
a treatment of the most commonly used resources that faculty use in web-based
communication courses.

Experimental International Offerings
College of Business and the Economics Department in the College of Arts and Sciences
are piloting distance-learning courses with the Gulf University for Science and
Technology (GUST) in Kuwait. In fall 2006 COBA offered the class The Global
Corporation that was available to GUST students through video transmission. No GUST
students enrolled in the course, but guest lecturers in Kuwait have made presentations to
the UMSL students. In Winter 2007 a GUST faculty member offered a course on Energy
Economics that was open to students at both institutions and again transmitted via video.
Neither university has made a long-term commitment to this effort. We are focusing on
technical feasibility and student interest at this point. So far, the technology has
performed quite well.

Overall, the number of courses we currently offer online is expected to increase with
HLC’s clarification of our status so that students will be able to complete a degree.

3. What necessary approvals have been obtained to implement the
proposed change?

-   Identify the internal approvals required and provide documentation confirming
    these actions
Since all courses and subsequent programs are existing programs, no internal approvals
are required. The University of Missouri System requires that the campuses inform the
Vice President for Academic Affairs when we deliver a program online. Before we
deliver a program completely online we will inform the Vice President.


-   Identify the external approvals required and provide documentation confirming
    these actions
The Missouri Coordinating Board of Higher Education does not currently require
universities to submit requests for approval for existing degree programs offered online.
All offerings will exclusively be existing programs. Since we will offer online only
approved university programs on the Department’s inventory



                                                                                         16
(http://www.dhe.mo.gov/mdhe/institutions/institution.jsp?branchid=1040-00) and which
we also offer on campus, no approvals were sought.


4. What impact might the proposed change have on challenges
   identified by the Commission as part of or subsequent to the last
   comprehensive visit?

-   Identify challenges directly related to the proposed change.

The Commission identified no challenges during the last visit in February 1999. In fact,
the Commission’s Evaluation Team noted that Continuing Education, which would have
responsibility for the management of the program, "a model for others across the nation."
We are optimistic that CE’s strong leadership of online programs as well will meet the
same level of quality.

-   Describe how the organization has addressed the challenge(s).

    N/A



5. What are the organization’s plans to implement and sustain the
   proposed change?
-   Describe the involvement of appropriately credentialed faculty and experienced
    staff necessary to accomplish the proposed change (curriculum development and
    oversight, evaluation of instruction, and assessment of learning outcomes).

As addressed in the Action Plan above, regular faculty have been involved in the redesign
of courses to be offered online. The learning outcomes for the online programs do not
vary from those offered on or off-site.

The Action Plan describes the progress toward meeting the priority, “Further develop
appropriate staff and academic support structure,” which provides independent evidence
of the campus’ capacity to implement and sustain the online programs. The Measures of
the priority include:
1. The number of training and professional development programs offered and the
number of faculty and staff who participated.
2. The number of calls to IT support units and the time to resolve.
3. The number of faculty and professional staff who attend professional meetings and the
dollar amount of faculty (administrative appointments above the level of chair not
included) travel support (institutional and grant funds).
4. Funding for and usage of Library resources.
5. Adequacy of campus support as measured by FSSE (faculty) and NSSE (students).
6. Usage of MyGateway.



                                                                                       17
Progress reported by Institutional Research toward these goals include the following:
       1. The Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) offered 53 events and had 825
       attendees in FY2004. By FY2006 the CTL had offered 39 events and had 1,175
       attendees. Also in 2006 Information Technology Services (ITS) had
       approximately 660 registrants for 81 events, including the Technology and Career
       Briefings.
       2. In FY2005 of the 16,188 service tickets 13,995 (86.45%) were closed by the
       Technology Support Center (TSC) with an average talk time of 5 minutes and 25
       seconds. By FY2006 the number of service tickets dropped to 16,007, with13,409
       (84%) closed by the TSC. The average time spent to answer a call was 4 minutes
       3 seconds, a 33% improvement from the year before.
       3. In FY2005 484 faculty/staff attended professional meetings with $322,006 in
       travel support from institutional sources and $206,966 from other sources. In
       FY2006 that grew to 517 faculty/staff attending with $496,401 travel support
       from institutional sources and $227,080 from other sources.
       4. Funding/usage of library resources: The majority of electronic databases are
       mounted centrally and provided to all UM campuses through the Library Systems
       Office, which provides over $2.5 million in electronic resources and the campus
       spends an additional
       $198,437 in FY2005. That grew to an additional $183,886 in FY2006. During
       FY2007 the campus will fund the Library’s request for funding to restore and
       maintain the viability of both the serial and monographic collections, provide
       additional funding for electronic resources, and support additional technical staff.
       As a result of the report of the Campus Review Team during its Five-Year
       Review, the campus will increase funding for collections as well as to improve the
       FTE student/library expenditures ratio.
       5. NSSE Supportive Campus Environment
       Freshmen 55 in FY2004; 56.8 FY07 (3% increase)
       Seniors 49.0 (FY2004); 52.5 FY 2007 (6.7% increase)
       FSSE – 70% of responding faculty thought UMSL provides the support students
       need to succeed academically (Quite a bit/Very much) (FY2005) up from 66%
       (FY2004) (5.7% increase)

-   Describe the administrative structure (accountability processes, leadership roles)
    necessary to support this proposed change.

Top-level administrative and academic personnel provide oversight for the programs and
regularly review their quality. Each semester, the deans and directors of the various
colleges involved in the programs are to review the work of their academic staff and
monitor their activity so that the highest standards can be maintained. Students taking
courses online are to be surveyed at the end of the term to rate the quality of each course.

In addition, each participating college has an Associate Dean or other administrator for
Continuing Education who is currently charged with scheduling off-site and distance
education courses. The only additional requirement for them to implement distance



                                                                                           18
education programs is to assure that appropriate courses are scheduled so that students
can complete degrees online. These administrators report directly to the dean of the
respective academic college with dotted lines to the Dean of Continuing Education.

Because of our campus’ long history of off-campus course offerings, there are policies in
place that require the academic programs to approve all faculty involved in distance
education. The standards for faculty teaching online remain the same as for on-campus
teaching. If an adjunct faculty member teaches a distance graduate course, then the dean
of the Graduate School must also approve that faculty member’s credentials for that
particular course, just as she does for on-campus courses. It is a tradition in our off-
campus model for the University to have the same ratio of tenure-track to adjunct faculty
as that provided to students on campus. We expect to maintain that goal for online
delivery as well.

Faculty teaching online are expected to teach the same courses with the same objectives
as those that are offered on-campus or off-site. Since 94% of all programs at UM-St
Louis have specified learning outcomes, online students are expected to meet the same
outcomes as those who take those courses on campus. In fact, we expect that most
students will take some of their courses online and others on campus so it is crucial for
online students to have the same preparation as those studying exclusively on campus.

-   Describe how the organization will make learning resources and support services
    available to students (student support services, library resources, academic
    advising, and financial aid counseling).

Student Online Resources
Since almost all support services are already offered online for on-campus students,
online students will receive similar services for registration, fee-payment, testing, and
library search services through the University’s integrated systems and administrative
support.

Library holdings are computerized; students can now conduct reference searches via
telecommunications. Entire texts of an increasing number of periodicals are now
available on-line. The library’s password-protected page on My Gateway provides
resources to both faculty and students. Faculty can place an item on reserve and request
an instruction session for their class through this portal. Students can search for reserve
items by a professor’s name or by the name of the course. Faculty and students alike have
access to online subject guides, the UM-St. Louis Library Catalog, statewide MERLIN
and MOBIUS Catalogs, Database searching, Interlibrary Loan, and Library Instruction
(Tutorials, How-Tos, etc.). They can also e-mail a reference question or sign up for a
research consultation.

The student portal on My Gateway lists links to tools that students often need. On “My
Academic Toolbox” are links for an enrollment certification letter, class schedule, DARS
report, e-bill student account, e-mail forwarding address, creating a friendly e-mail
address, accessing grades and GPA, online testing appointments, registration times, and



                                                                                            19
both the online and telephone registration systems. Advising links are listed under
“Academic Planning Tools” These include links to academic advising, academic
calendars, choosing a major, the Bulletin (catalog), course schedules, final exam
schedule, and policies. This demonstrates how even on-campus students are accustomed
to seeking information online. Online students should feel just as comfortable with these
services, since they are the same for both groups.

Information on accessing web-based courses using My Gateway is available to students
on any of the computer labs on North and South campuses. Alternatively, there is a
comprehensive tutorial available online for students who are unable to drive to campus.

In addition to university-wide resources, the College of Education’s E. Desmond Lee
Technology and Learning Center (http://tlc.umsl.edu/index.cfm) offers considerable
support for online students. As their home page explains,
        The E. Desmond Lee Technology and Learning Center (TLC) is a place to learn
        about the latest developments in educational technology. Using our state of the art
        environment, we aim to mirror and model excellent technology integration for
        today's classrooms. Serving College of Education faculty and students, as well as
        educators in the St. Louis region, we are committed to helping our clientele use
        technology in new and exciting ways.
The center’s resources page (http://tlc.umsl.edu/resources/index.cfm) links to brochures
and software help-sheets that instruct students that may have technological questions.

The center also provides a link to the COE Application Set. This resource is especially
helpful to select Education students, teachers, faculty and administrators because it offers
them “seamless, secure access to instructional and administrative applications and
information required to enable continuous learning.” Since the applications and
information are easily Web-enabled and rapidly delivered to any device, at any location,
over any connection-including low-bandwidth and wireless, partner schools and
universities can operate more efficiently and manage their limited IT resources more
effectively. Online students in the Ed.S. in Educational Leadership are likely to make use
of the Application Set.

Departments that offer entirely online programs will be required to offer online advising
for students that opt to take their program entirely online.

Faculty Resources for Online Teaching
In addition to student resources, it is critical that faculty have resources to adapt their
traditional courses to online delivery. Support mechanisms in place to assist with new
online course development include personnel in Continuing Education, the Center for
Teaching and Learning (CTL), and Information Technology Services (ITS), who
routinely assist faculty with the redesign of existing courses and the development of new
courses for alternative methods of delivery.




                                                                                          20
The Associate Vice Chancellor for Technology produced a Faculty/Staff Technology
Guide that summarizes technological resources available for research and teaching at
http://www.umsl.edu/technology/publications/factechguide/.

Included on that site is a description of the My Gateway Online Course Management
System, which was introduced at UM-St. Louis at the beginning of Fall Semester 2000.
They describe the services this way:

       My Gateway provides students and faculty with access to course materials, and a
       variety of programs that enable classroom communication and interaction using
       virtually any computer with a web browser and an Internet connection.
       The My Gateway support team provides the following services for the course
       management system.
       • Account Creations and Deletions
       • Course Creation, Course Copies /Combinations, Archiving and Course
           Deletion
       • Instructor and Student Enrollment
       • My Gateway Orientation and Training
       • My Gateway and Listservs
       • Online Help
They also provide a dedicated, easily remembered email address (mygateway@umsl.edu)
where faculty can access support.

Faculty have their own password-protected site on My Gateway. In the Faculty Toolbox
there are links to the Faculty Accomplishment System for annual reports, Degree Audit
for Advisors, the Early Alert system where the Student Success Center can be notified
about poorly performing students, Email Forwarding, Grade Submission, Mid-Semester
Feedback where faculty can survey students about how the course is going, Photo Rosters
of students in classes, and official enrollment Rosters for the class. From My Gateway
faculty can also monitor their email box size, download software, or contact the Campus
Mediation Service.

The major support in Information Technology Services is the Faculty Resource Center
(FRC), which has been supporting faculty members’ use of technology for teaching from
the earliest days of synchronous distance education. They have many articles and services
available on their website.

The FRC’s Welcome Center
(http://www.umsl.edu/technology/frc/DEID/1introduction/1aindex.html), for example,
summarizes well how they support faculty teaching online:
        The University of Missouri-St. Louis has a great technology infrastructure in
        place for both faculty and students. Using technology to increase communication
        and feedback among our students and faculty members ultimately provides
        additional ways to engage students and keep them informed and on track with
        their courses. Because the online learning and teaching environment presents
        opportunities and constraints that differ from traditional face-to-face classroom


                                                                                       21
       experience, instructors may want to learn on-their-own from the research and
       teaching experiences of others involved in distance education. ‘Distance’ here
       refers to the asynchronous nature of using technology, in that students do not have
       to be place-bound or time-bound. They may choose when and where the course
       content is reviewed and learning activities are completed.

       With the incorporation of communication technologies, such as compressed
       video, CD-ROMs, DVDs, e-mail, and the Web, distance education is being used
       by an increasing number of schools, colleges, and universities. A person may be
       able to use communication technologies, but can that person teach effectively
       with these technologies? That's where Roadmap to Effective Distance Education
       Instructional Design comes in.

       Roadmap to Effective Distance Education Instructional Design grew out of
       several studies indicating that technology professionals helping instructors, and
       some faculty developing their own online instruction, had GREAT technology
       skill --in areas of video production, web development, and graphic design.
       However, these course developers did not have the educational theory necessary
       to create and sustain online learning among their students. So where are
       instructors and technology professionals going to learn about instructional design
       for online learning? Enter Roadmap to Effective Distance Education Instructional
       Design.

       The materials that you'll interact with are designed to take you on a journey of
       discovery to help you better design distance education programs. Our goal is to
       provide you with the basic instructional design tools you need to succeed when
       developing distance education courses.

An example of the work of the FRC is at
http://www.umsl.edu/technology/frc/worddocs/mygateway2.htm, where it introduces
faculty to the resources available through My Gateway,
        As new online tools such as My Gateway are introduced, it is important to
        consider how the various tool features within these systems can be used to support
        teaching and learning. Assembled are the collective thoughts of UMSL colleagues
        and others in higher education institutions who have had longer experience in
        implementing online instruction than those of us at UM-St. Louis.
They then link to the features in My Gateway and explain how faculty can best use them.

In addition, the FRC has articles and staff available for consultation on issues such as fair
use of copyrighted material. They describe their library in a way that reflects the land-
grant research mission of UM-St Louis, “Resource materials are being produced at a
rapid pace as increasing numbers of faculty and students integrate technology and pursue
the scholarship of teaching, learning and technology”
(http://www.umsl.edu/technology/frc/resourcemat.html).




                                                                                          22
-   Provide financial data that document the organization’s capacity to implement and
    sustain the proposed change (projected budgets, recent audit reports, revenue
    streams, cost of facilities, and projected facility and equipment costs).

Currently, campus funding from the state of Missouri and tuition income provides the
financial resources for all existing off-campus courses, including faculty and staff salaries
and benefits, and administrative services. We intend to apply that same model for the
online programs.

As an indication of the institutionalization of the online course offerings, many of the
colleges provide course release time for the development of new courses, and Academic
Affairs funds replacement costs for faculty development leaves for online course
development.

After the course is developed, most departments do not offer any incentive for faculty to
teach online classes. Since the courses are the same as those taught on-campus, the same
funding is used to offer a course, no matter what the delivery system.

    Financials for online

-   Specify the timeline used to implement the proposed change.

Upon HLC approval, the Associate Deans will plan a course schedule that will allow
students to complete degrees online. Departments will notify existing and potential online
students of the new delivery mode as soon as their program’s schedule is in place.

6. What are the organization’s strategies to evaluate the proposed
   change?
-   Describe the measures the organization will use to document the achievement of its
    expected outcomes.
-   Describe how the assessment of student learning is integrated into the assessment
    program.

Academic personnel will provide oversight for the online programs. At the course level,
course evaluations are required of every course, online and on-campus.
All academic programs at UM-St Louis undergo a required Five-Year Program Review.
Reviews of the online programs will take place during the regularly scheduled review of
that program. Data that faculty provide for the program review’s self-study include how
students’ knowledge and skills are evaluated and what changes have been made as a
result of the assessment results. A site visit is required during the program review
conducted by an external reviewer from another campus (normally another comparator
urban public research university) and at least three faculty members from other
departments on campus. The University of Missouri System conducts a periodic review
of the program review process on each of the four campuses to assure the quality of the


                                                                                          23
review process itself. UM-St Louis underwent the System review in 2006. Evidence of
the campus’ extensive program review process is at
htpp://www.umsl.edu/services/academic/assessment
    .




                                                                                      24
                                      Appendix I

                  North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
                   Commission on Institutions of Higher Education

                            30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
                               Chicago, IL 60602 - 2504
                                   (800) 621 - 7440

                         RECORD OF STATUS AND SCOPE

                    UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI - SAINT LOUIS
                             8001 Natural Bridge Rd.
                           St. Louis, MO 63121 - 4499

                             Statement of Affiliation Status

Status: Accredited (1960 - .)
Highest degree awarded: Doctor's.
Most recent action: September 17, 1999.
Stipulations on affiliation status: None.
New degree sites: Prior Commission approval required.
Progress reports required: None.
Monitoring reports required: None.
Contingency reports required: None.
Other visits required: None.
Last comprehensive evaluation: 1998 - 99.
Next comprehensive evaluation: 2008 - 09.

                     Statement of Institutional Scope and Activities

Legal status: Public institution.
F/97 undergraduate enrollment: 9292(h); 6256(f).
F/97 graduate enrollment: 2566(h); 1166(f).
Number of degree programs: Bachelor's (43); Master's (25); Doctor's (12).
Full service degree sites other than home campus: None.
Other degree sites: None.
Course sites:
- - In state: 5 sites.
Distance education: Degrees are offered through Interactive TV, and courses are offered
through Videotape/ Broadcast TV.




                                                                                     25
                                   Appendix II
                  Cost and Income at St Louis Community College

                                         UM-ST. LOUIS
                                SOUTH COUNTY EDUCATION CENTER
                                    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
                 # of
                class   Head-    Enroll-   Credit                        UG       GR     Cost/ Cr
SEMESTER          es    count     ment     hours     Cost     Income   Income   Income     Hr

FALL '03            7      72        86      255     29,902   49,623   49,623        0   U - $195
         A&S        5      51        59      177     19,088   34,444   34,444        0   G - $237
     Business       2      21        27       78     10,814   15,179   15,179        0
    Education       0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0
      Nursing       0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0

WINTER '04          9     104       120      360     20,956   70,434   68,305    2,129   U - $195
        A&S         6      85        99      297     17,563   58,174   56,045    2,129   G - $237
    Business        3      19        21       63      3,393   12,260   12,260        0
   Education        0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0
     Nursing        0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0

*Prior to FY2005, benefits costs were not included
SUMMER
'04                 1       39       39      117      2,304   24,476   24,476        0   U - $209
        A&S         1       39       39      117      2,304   24,476   24,476        0   G - $254
    Business        0        0        0        0          0        0        0        0
  Education         0        0        0        0          0        0        0        0
     Nursing        0        0        0        0          0        0        0        0

FALL '04            6      67        66      198     16,226   41,557   40,794      763   U - $209
       A&S          4      63        60      180     13,843   37,791   37,028     763    G - $254
   Business         2       4         6       18      2,383    3,766    3,766       0
  Education         0       0         0        0          0        0        0       0
    Nursing         0       0         0        0          0        0        0       0

SPRING '05          8     106       112      348     27,234   69,577   66,526    3,052   U - $209
       A&S          6      90        96      300     22,950   59,536   56,484    3,052   G - $254
   Business         2      16        16       48      4,284   10,042   10,042        0
  Education         0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0
    Nursing         0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0

  SUMMER
        '05         2      28        35      105      7,484   22,733   22,733        0   U - $217
      A&S           2      28        35      105      7,483   22,733   22,733        0   G - $263
   Business         0       0         0        0          1        0        0        0
  Education         0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0
    Nursing         0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0

FALL '05            6      78        90      270     19,879   57,156   57,156        0   U - $217
       A&S          4      55        62      186     13,739   38,970   38,970        0   G - $263
   Business         2      23        28       84      6,140   18,186   18,186        0
  Education         0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0
    Nursing         0       0         0        0          0        0        0        0




                                                                                               26
SPRING '06            4      55        56      168     14,578    36,512    35,723     790    U - $217
       A&S            3      49        50      150     13,013    32,615    31,826     790    G - $263
   Business           1       6         6       18      1,565     3,897     3,897       0
  Education           0       0         0        0          0         0         0       0
    Nursing           0       0         0        0          0         0         0       0

SUMMER
'06                   2      23        23       69      7,891    15,684    15,684       0    U - $227
        A&S           1      16        16       48      6,212    10,910    10,910       0    G - $276
    Business          1       7         7       21      1,679     4,773     4,773       0
  Education           0       0         0        0          0         0         0       0
     Nursing          0       0         0        0          0         0         0       0

FALL '06              5      54        57      171     18,343    38,868    38,868       0    U - $227
       A&S            3      46        48      144     13,471    32,731    32,731       0    G - $276
   Business           2       8         9       27      4,872     6,137     6,137       0
  Education           0       0         0        0          0         0         0       0
    Nursing           0       0         0        0          0         0         0       0

SPRING '07            4      32        34      102     14,185    23,185    23,185       0    U - $227
       A&S            2      19        20       60     10,937    13,638    13,638       0    G - $276
   Business           2      13        14       42      3,248     9,547     9,547       0
  Education           0       0         0        0          0         0         0       0
    Nursing           0       0         0        0          0         0         0       0

SUMMER
'07                   1      21        21       63      2,872    16,889    13,446    3,443   U - $236
        A&S           1      21        21       63      2,872    16,889    13,446    3,443   G - $287
    Business          0       0         0        0          0         0         0        0
  Education           0       0         0        0          0         0         0        0
     Nursing          0       0         0        0          0         0         0        0

    TOTAL           55      679       739     2226    181,854   466,694   456,518   10,176

Headcount: # of individual students enrolled (no duplicates)
Enrollments: total # of students enrolled for the semester
June 20, 2007




                                                                                                   27

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:19
posted:10/20/2011
language:English
pages:27