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Communication

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Communication Powered By Docstoc
					Improving communication in your
         organization


       by Toronto Training and HR

               June 2011
           3-4      Introduction to Toronto Training and
                    HR
Contents   5-6
           7-9
                    Evolution of communication
                    Creating the right climate
           10-11    Drill
           12-14    Employee communication
           15-17    Email policy
           18-19    Mistakes made by managers
           20-21    Communication styles
           22-25    Pension communication
           26-32    Gossip and the grapevine
           33-37    Example-agency in the justice
                    system
           38-50    Effective communication
           51-52    Case study
           53-54    Conclusion and questions




                   Page 2
Introduction




     Page 3
Introduction to Toronto Training
            and HR
• Toronto Training and HR is a specialist training and human
  resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden
• 10 years in banking
• 10 years in training and human resources
• Freelance practitioner since 2006
• The core services provided by Toronto Training and HR are:
              - Training course design
              - Training course delivery
              - Reducing costs
              - Saving time
              - Improving employee engagement & morale
              - Services for job seekers

                            Page 4
  Evolution of
communication




      Page 5
  Evolution of communication
1900: Scientific management
1930: Hawthorne studies
1940: Weber‟s administrative management
1950: Maslow‟s hierarchy of needs and
     McGregor‟s Theories X and Y
1960: Systems thinking
1980: Human Relations theory
2000: The learning organization




                    Page 6
Creating the right climate




           Page 7
Creating the right climate 1 of 2
HONESTY AND TRUST
Face to face communication
Freedom of speech
Personal feedback
Active listening
Non-verbal communication




                     Page 8
Creating the right climate 2 of 2
OPEN CLIMATE
Employees are valued
There is a high level of trust
Conflict is invited and resolved positively
Creative dissent is welcomed
Employee input is solicited
Employees are well-informed through formal
channels
Feedback is ongoing


                      Page 9
Drill




 Page 10
Drill




Page 11
Employee communication




          Page 12
Employee communication 1 of 2
Have a shared purpose
Convince your leaders
Engage your people
Consider your channels
Keep the personal touch
Work collaboratively
Measure your results




                     Page 13
Employee communication 2 of 2
Employee communication is essential to create an
engaged workforce that‟s committed to working
towards a shared goal
Ensure that leaders realize the importance of
communication and take time to share their vision
for the organization
Create communication that is two-way, not only
top-down
Measure the success of your actions


                      Page 14
Email policy




    Page 15
           Email policy 1 of 2
Hand out printed copies of the policy, publish it on
your intranet and ensure it is included in all staff
handbooks.
Make sure the email policy is included in all new
starter information packs.
Include the important elements of the policy in the
employment contract so that there is a signature
that the employee has read and understood them.



                       Page 16
          Email policy 2 of 2
These should cover the banning of defamatory,
sexual and racist remarks in email and it should be
clear that breach of the rules can lead to
termination of employment.
Organize email training courses or webinars to
explain the email risks to user and why the policy
is so important.
Send an email reminder about the policy‟s key
points from time to time!


                      Page 17
Mistakes made by
    managers




      Page 18
  Mistakes made by managers
Making controversial announcements without doing
the groundwork first
Lying
Ignoring the realities of power
Underestimating the intelligence of the audience
Confusing process with outcome
Using inappropriate forms of communication
Ignoring acts of omission



                     Page 19
Communication styles




        Page 20
       Communication styles
Expressives
Systematics
Sympathetics
Directs




               Page 21
Pensions communication




         Page 22
Pensions communication 1 of 3
Manage risk by ensuring all legal obligations are fulfilled
Educate members on how to get the most out of their
pension plans
Make it simple for each member to understand and track
the growth of their pension
Demonstrate the value of the pension plan as part of the
company‟s total compensation
Keep the member engaged in planning for their
retirement
Build understanding around any changes to their plan


                          Page 23
Pensions communication 2 of 3
GET TO KNOW THE AUDIENCE
How do they prefer to receive pension
information?
What pension information is important to them?
What are the gaps in their understanding of the
plan?




                      Page 24
Pensions communication 3 of 3
TACTICS
Comply with statutory requirements around member
communications
Explain the consequences of any pension elections
Communicate highly relevant or material information likely
to influence the conduct of a member
Include clear disclaimers may mitigate risk
Develop a policy that emphasizes proactive communication
Regularly review and update member communications
Use “plain language” to explain complex pension concepts



                         Page 25
Gossip and the grapevine




          Page 26
Gossip and the grapevine 1 of 6
BENEFITS FOR INDIVIDUALS
Expressing and communicating emotion
Gaining support and reassurance from others
Reducing uncertainty and anxiety
Problem solving and sense making
Inclusion and acceptance by others




                     Page 27
Gossip and the grapevine 2 of 6
BENEFITS FOR ORGANIZATIONS
Expression of care and concern about people or
the organization
Sharing of information and knowledge
Development of inter and intra organizational
networks
Establishment of work/team relationships
Dissemination of organizational culture and
values


                     Page 28
Gossip and the grapevine 3 of 6
CONCLUSIONS TO BE DRAWN
Accept that gossip and informal channels of
communication exist in organizations
Acknowledge that these channels cannot be
formally managed or controlled, but can have
beneficial features
Recognize that informal communication is not a
substitute for formal communication, neither is it
totally separate or unrelated


                       Page 29
Gossip and the grapevine 4 of 6
CONCLUSIONS TO BE DRAWN
Reflect upon the information communicated as
gossip and consider the possible ethical benefits and
harms
Seek other sources of verification of „soft
information‟ – for example in formal data, statistics
and reports
Consider what the emotions expressed through
gossip might represent in terms of underlying
organizational issues

                       Page 30
Gossip and the grapevine 5 of 6
BREAKING THE SILENCE
What behaviours are rewarded by the organization
and what typical patterns of behaviour do you
notice at meetings?
What stories and gossip are circulating in the
„unmanaged spaces‟? For example, tales of the
unexpected? Heroes, villains and fools?
What metaphors (see above) are used to describe
the culture? For example, this place is like…?


                     Page 31
Gossip and the grapevine 6 of 6
BREAKING THE SILENCE
What/who would be included in the „unofficial
onboarding program‟?
What are the „organizational secrets‟? The things
that most people know, but which cannot be
talked about openly? Why are these issues not
confronted?




                      Page 32
Example-agency in the
   justice system




         Page 33
 Example-agency in the justice
        system 1 of 4
BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION & CO-
OPERATION
Blaming
Competing priorities
Confidentiality
Costs
Performance measures
Politics
Poor feedback


                 Page 34
 Example-agency in the justice
        system 2 of 4
BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION & CO-
OPERATION
Resistance
Right communication structure
Silo mentality
Stereotypes
Territorial imperatives




                 Page 35
 Example-agency in the justice
        system 3 of 4
STRATEGIES TO OVERCOME BARRIERS
Accountability
Appreciation
Common goals
Constructive feedback
Electronic exchange protocols
Institutionalized protocols
Interpersonal exchanges
Service-orientated architecture
Shared successes
Trust


                    Page 36
 Example-agency in the justice
        system 4 of 4
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Accessibility
Compromise
Constructive approaches
Context
Flexibility
Privacy
Professionalism
Reciprocity
Sensitivity
System-centred policies


                          Page 37
Effective communication




          Page 38
Effective communication 1 of 12
Communicate using a conversational style
Ask open-ended questions then stop talking
Listen with your eyes, ears and heart
Provide regular frequent feedback, recognition and
praise
Avoid bundling grievances




                      Page 39
Effective communication 2 of 12
AVOIDING BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
STUMBLES
Keep the conversation real
Be accountable
Have heart




                 Page 40
Effective communication 3 of 12
BECOMING A BETTER COMMUNICATOR
Why supervisors fail to communicate
Misunderstanding the nature of communication
Misinterpreting the supervisor‟s role in
communication
Undervaluing the importance of communication




                    Page 41
Effective communication 4 of 12
BECOMING A BETTER COMMUNICATOR
Say what needs to be said as plainly as possible
and as soon as you can possibly say it
Be prepared
Remember who you are talking to
Stick to the truth
Remember half-truths are also half-lies
Check for understanding
Don‟t communicate when you are angry


                      Page 42
Effective communication 5 of 12
BECOMING A BETTER COMMUNICATOR
Be yourself
Use examples
Don‟t be afraid to repeat yourself
Remember Goldilocks
Be consistent
Don‟t take cheap shots
If you don‟t know, say so
Remember, shorter is better


                   Page 43
Effective communication 6 of 12
BECOMING A BETTER COMMUNICATOR
Give reasons for actions, not just policy references
Know when to shut up
Write like you talk
Dare to be passionate
Listen to yourself




                       Page 44
Effective communication 7 of 12
PERSUADING EMPLOYEES
Let go of the assumption that employees are just
like you
Analyze employee demographics
Conduct research to determine employee needs
and preferences
Reduce the volume
Simplify the story
Create the right balance between global and local


                      Page 45
Effective communication 8 of 12
PERSUADING EMPLOYEES
Unchain senior leaders
Set managers up for success
Make communication a contact sport
Measure effectiveness




                    Page 46
Effective communication 9 of 12
PERSUADING EMPLOYEES
Why are they not listening?
Employees are a captive audience
Employees are just like senior managers
Employee expectations about communication
haven‟t changed




                      Page 47
 Effective communication 10 of 12
BETTER PREACHING/SERMONS
Design a dynamic format rather than a static one
Keep your outline clear and simple
Oral design should be oriented to time rather than
space
Emphasize main ideas by placement and
reiteration
Use carefully worded transitions as you move
through the presentation


                      Page 48
 Effective communication 11 of 12
BETTER PREACHING/SERMONS
Plan carefully for a combination of inductive and
deductive movement
Use language best suited to the ear, not the eye
Plan the introductory segments carefully
Plan the closing segments of the design carefully
Plan the whole design from the audience‟s point of
view



                      Page 49
 Effective communication 12 of 12
FRAMING MESSAGES FOR MAXIMUM IMPACT
Circumvent obstacles
Correct organizational disconnects
Change the style, change the frame




                 Page 50
Case study




   Page 51
Case study




   Page 52
Conclusion & Questions




         Page 53
            Conclusion
Summary
Questions




               Page 54

				
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