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Families Learning Together Summer Packet - UIC

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                       The Families Learning Together Summer Packet
                                                SUMMER 2010
The Families Learning Together Summer Packet includes ideas to support your child’s
learning for the summer. You are your child’s greatest teacher. Working together on the
summer packet will support your child’s literacy and prepare them for the upcoming
school year. These ideas are here to support you and your child in talking, reading,
thinking, seeing the world and playing together. The interaction amongst you and your
child will help them develop emergent literacy skills.

Review our book selections and the activities that go along with the reading. It is a great
idea to do activities both in and out of the house to help make learning fun. Choose the
books and activities that you, your child, and your family would like to do.

The summer packet is divided into four parts: talking, reading, activities, and a weekly
calendar. There is a new theme to explore together every two weeks. The themes are the
same themes children learn in preschool: Family, Friends, Wind & Water, Colors,
Shadows and Things That Grow.

Talking: Talking with your child will help them build vocabulary, language development,
confidence, and listening skills. Through communication, we share our ideas with the
world and we listen and learn from others. When you talk to your child you are supporting
an important task.

Reading: Reading prepares your child academically. Through reading, your child will have
endless opportunities to explore the world and build literacy skills. Even twenty minutes of
reading a day will encourage a love of learning. The Chicago Public Library has an
extensive selection of quality children’s literature in many languages. Take advantage of
your local library branch this summer. A book list is included on every calendar in the
Summer Packet. This list includes books your child will read in school. Reading the same
book more than once is encouraged.

Activities: Children learn a lot from real world experiences. Through trying new food,
seeing new sights, and smelling new smells, your child will develop vocabulary and a
better understanding of the world around them. Reading and talking about these
experiences is a great way to learn. When participating in “hands-on” activities along with
reading, learning is even stronger. The activities included in the Summer Packet aim to
make literacy a part of everyday life. Many of the activities are about the books you will
read. You can do activities in and out of your house.

Family field trips to museums and festivals are fun activities. Going on field trips can also
be educational. While you are at the library inquire about the Free Passes to museums.
There are weekly passes (if available) for the following: Adler Planetarium, Art Institute,
Brookfield Zoo, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago Children’s Museum, DuSable
Museum of African American History, Field Museum, Tribune McCormick Freedom
Museum, Mexican Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of Contemporary Art, Peggy Notebaert
Nature Museum, Museum of Science and Industry, and Shedd Aquarium. Library passes
can be found at the information desk of your local library branch. You can also call the
main library number at 312-747-4300 or check out the website www.chipublib.org.
Weekly activity calendars also give field trip suggestions.

Each day, after your child completes the activities and/or reading, a sticker should be put
on the calendar. Mark your child’s progress and praise them for all of their hard work.
Remember that building literacy is not something that happens overnight. Your child is at
a phase now, where many short literacy activities support development. Enjoy reading
with your child this summer and try to find creative ways to show your child that literacy
is a necessary part of our everyday lives.


Please take a moment to write three goals for your child’s learning this
summer:
1.


2.


3.
                                                                                       May 30- June 5, 2010 FAMILY CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.
Sunday             Monday           Tuesday            Wednesday          Thursday         Friday    Saturday        NOTES
30                 31               1                  2                  3                4         5




                              Let’s talk about family!
                              What is family? Who is in your family? Describe the people in your family.
                              Let’s read about family:
                              On the way to the library let your child know that you will be looking for books about family.
                              Choose some of the books below about family:
                              Abuela by Arthur Borros                    Corduroy by Don Freeman
                              A Birthday Basket for Tia by Pat Mora      Over the Meadow by Ezra Jack Keats
                              Brothers & Sisters by Ellen B. Senisi      Noisy Nora by Rosemary Wells
                              All Kinds of Families by Norma Simon       Oonga Boonga by Frieda Wishinsky

Let’s do “family” activities:
Read a story and identify family members within the illustrations. Ask your child to explain their answers.
Have your child draw a picture of your family. Ask your child to explain the picture. Label the picture and display it proudly.
Read a story and use different voices for different characters. Play with different voices and ask your child to help you come
up with voices for the characters in the story.
Choose a field trip this week. Ideas: McCormick Freedom Museum; Chicago Historical Society.
                                                                                      June 6- June 12, 2010 FAMILY CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.
Sunday             Monday           Tuesday            Wednesday          Thursday         Friday     Saturday       NOTES
6                  7                8                  9                  10               11         12




                        Let’s talk about family!
                        You and your child can discuss family in many ways. What other families do you enjoy spending time with?
                        When you are with your family, who makes you laugh? What do you like most about family?
                        Let’s read about family:
                        Julius, the Baby of the World by Kevin Henkes       Time for Bed by Mem Fox
                        The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter              Peter’s Chair by Ezra Jack Keats
                        A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams               Nothing in the Mailbox by Carolyn Ford


Let’s do “family” activities: Enjoy these hand-on activities that make your child’s learning even stronger.
Look through a family photo album together.
Talk about family members. Use the words: Mom, Dad, Boy, Girl, and Baby. Next, try to come up with words that rhyme. For
example: Boy-Toy, Mom-Tom, etc. Rhyming helps build phonological awareness and supports your child’s early literacy skills.
Sit down at the dinner table with your family and have everyone go around and name one book that they like to read.
When making a meal, have your child help. Read a recipe and ask your child to identify numbers and letters that will help you
cook your meal. Be sure to let your child know that their “reading” helped you cook a delicious meal! If your child is excited by
reading and it is fun, rather than a chore, they will continue to love to learn how to read.
Choose a field trip for the week. Ideas: DuSable Museum of African American History; Mexican Museum of Fine Arts.
                                                                                      June 13-June 19 2010 FRIENDS CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.

Sunday           Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday          Thursday          Friday          Saturday        NOTES
13               14                15                16                 17                18              19




                          Let’s talk about friends!
                          Tell your child a story about you and a friend. How did you meet? What makes them special?
                          Ask your child: What is a friend? Who are some of your friends? What do friends do together?
                          Let’s read about friends:
                          As children practice reading and enjoy reading activities they are on their way to independent reading.


                             Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin, Jr.                      Dandelion by Don Freeman
                             Four Friends in Autumn by Tomie de Paola                         A Letter for Amy by Ezra Jack Keats
                             Kipper’s A to Z: An Alphabet Adventure by Mick Inkpen            Hooray, a Pinata by Elisa Kleven

Let’s do “friend” activities: It’s great to teach your children that lessons in books are connected to the real world.

Read a book about friends to your child. Stop on a page halfway through and ask your child “I wonder what will happen next?”
Talk about all of the possibilities and review them after the book is finished.
When your child is playing with a friend or sibling, help them trace their hands onto a piece of paper. Ask your child to write
his/her name on the top and the name of their friend. Then, together, write the word “friends.”
Choose a field trip for the week. Ideas: Invite a friend to a festival or to the lakefront.
                                                                                     June 20-June 26, 2010 FRIENDS CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.

Sunday           Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday          Thursday          Friday    Saturday         NOTES
20               21                22                23                 24                25        26




                             Let’s talk about friends!
                             What is the best thing about a friend? Why are friends important to you? What are five words that
                             come to your mind when you think of a friend?
                             Let’s read about friends:
                             Reading and discussing what you’ve read helps build vocabulary and knowledge about the subject.
                                   Friends by Helme Heine                       Hush by Mingfong Ho
                                   The Leaving Morning by Angela Johnson        Mathew and Tilly by Rebecca Jones
                                   A Letter for Amy by Ezra Jack Keats          Golden Bear by Ruth Young
                                   Road Builders by B. G. Hennessy              Me and You by Genevieve Cote

Let’s do “friend” activities: Learning really “sticks” when you get excited about it and step out of books and into the world.

Ask your child why friendship is important. Write down a list together. Ex.) Friendship is important because playing alone can
get boring.
Write and send a letter to a friend.
Take out book, magazine or newspaper and ask your child to find the first letter in their name. Explain how different letters
don’t always look the same.
Choose a field trip for the week. Ideas: Invite a friend to the Museum of Science and Industry or Adler Planetarium.
                                                                         June 27-July 3, 2010 WIND AND WATER CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.

Sunday           Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday          Thursday          Friday      Saturday       NOTES
27               28                29                30                 1                 2           3




                      Let’s talk about wind and water!
                      Wind and water are fascinating for children. Tell your child a story about the wind, like a time you flew a
                      kite on a windy day. Ask your child to tell you a story about water.
                      Let’s read about wind and water:
                      Children enjoy reading a book many times, and your child will start to memorize the words. When you point
                      to the words that they are “reading” this is a first step toward their independent reading.

                      Rata Pata Scata Fata by Phillis Gershator               Gilberto and the Wind by Marie Hall Ets
                      The Wind Blew by Pat Hutchins                           The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats
                      The Desert is My Mother by Pat Mora                     One Dark Night by Hazel Hutchins
                      Find a book at the library about wind and water.        A Hat for Minerva Louise by Janet M. Stoeke


Let’s do “wind and water” activities: Learning is the most fun when it feels like playing!
During bath time, talk about where water comes from. Why is water important? Why should we not waste water?
Put ice in a bowl and talk about how ice is made. Explain that when water gets very cold it freezes. The same thing happens
outside in Chicago in the winter.
Have your child draw a picture of a windy day and have him/her explain the picture. Meanwhile, write down their explanation on
the picture and display it proudly. Have your child help by writing the letters and words that they know.
Choose a field trip for the week. Idea: Water exhibit at Chicago Children’s Museum, Navy Pier or a nice walk at the lakefront.
                                                                          July 4-July 10, 2010 WIND AND WATER CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.

Sunday           Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday          Thursday          Friday   Saturday       NOTES
4                5                 6                 7                  8                 9        10




                         Let’s talk about wind and water!
                         Where does wind come from? How can you tell if it is windy outside? What are some activities that can
                         only be done in the wind? (Sailing, flying a kite, playing with pin wheels, etc.)
                         Let’s read about wind and water:
                         You already read to your children- give them a chance to “read” back to you- the best they can. Have
                         them use the illustrations to tell you the story.
                         Raindrop, Plop! By Wendy Chayette Lewison             Rabbits and Raindrops by Jim Arnosky
                         Swimmy by Leo Lionni                                  Bringing the Rain to Kapitie Plain by Verna Aardema
                         Jimmy’s Boa and the Big Splash Birthday Bash          See How They Grow: Kitten by Jane Burton
                         by Trinka H. Noble
                         The Very Noisy Night by Diana Hendry                  On a Wintry Morning by Dori Chaconas
Let’s do “wind and water” activities: Children learn a lot outside, and exercise make them stronger and builds coordination.
Wind and Water both start with “W”. What else can you find around your house that starts with ”W”?
On a windy day go outside and try to find as many things as you can that move in the wind. Example: Your hair, leaves, grass, etc.
Water your plants or the trees outside. Why do plants need water to live?
Choose a field trip for the week. Ideas: Water Activities at Chicago or Kohl’s Children’s Museum or Shedd Aquarium
                                                                                      July 11–July 17, 2010 COLORS CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.

Sunday           Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday          Thursday          Friday      Saturday      NOTES
11               12                13                14                 15                16          17




                             Let’s talk about colors!
                             Colors are exciting. Talk with your child about colors. What is her/his favorite color? What colors do
                             you see around the house? What colors are outside in nature?
                             Let’s read about colors:
                             Read the world around you. Identify letters and sounds on street signs, storefronts and menus. This
                             helps your child understand that reading is something you do all day long.
                             How is the Crayon Made? by Ox Charles            Dog’s Colorful Day by Emma Dodd
                             Where is the Green Sheep by Mem Fox              The Lion and the Little Red Bird by Elisa Kleven
                             New Shoes for Silvia by Johanna Hurwitz             dear juno by Soyung Pak
                              Color Dance by Ann Jonas                       Max’s Dragon Shirt by Rosemary Wells
Let’s do “color” activities: Remember, even when children “pretend” to read and write they are still learning a whole lot.
Encourage your child, soon enough the “pretend” will become “real”.
Read about colors. Identify five colors in the story and find five matching crayons, markers or colored pencils. Write the names
of the colors in the appropriate color.
Learn how to say three colors in a different language. In Spanish, for example, green is verde, blue is azul and red is rojo.
Write a list for the grocery store. Have your child draw pictures of the items you need and use their letters as much as they
can. Be sure to take the list with you to the grocery store and refer to it often. Show your child how helpful they are.
Choose a field trip for the week. Ideas: Art Institute; Gardens and Conservatory at Lincoln Park Zoo.
                                                                                       July 18-July 24, 2010 COLORS CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.

Sunday           Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday          Thursday          Friday       Saturday       NOTES
18               19                20                21                 22                23           24




                           Let’s talk about colors!
                           What color are your eyes? What color is the sun? What color is the moon? What colors are in a
                           rainbow?
                           Let’s read about colors: If you read to your child every day you help build a great habit.

                             New Shoes for Silvia by Johanna Hurwitz                See How They Grow: Chick by Jane Burton
                             Mouse Paint by Ellen Stoll Walsh                       Cat’s Colors by Jane Cabrera
                             I Went Walking by Sue Williams                         Chickens Aren’t the Only Ones by Ruth Heller
                             Talk to your librarian about a great “color” book. The Tortilla Factory by Gary Paulsen


Let’s do “color” activities:
Read a book about colors. Make a beautiful drawing and then write the names of the colors that you used.
Write 5 colors on 5 small strips of paper. Find an item in the house that matches each color and tape the strip next to it.
Read a book about colors. After each page, stop and find the color words. Then point to each letter, like R- E-D. Then say
“RED”! Do this for each color in the book. For example- G-R-E-E-N- “GREEN”!
Write a real shopping list together. Include fruits and vegetable with different colors and write the colors. Yellow bananas….
Choose a field trip for the week. Ideas: Walk through a park or forest preserve and find 10 or more different colors in nature.
                                                                      July 25-July 31, 2010 THINGS THAT GROW CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.

Sunday           Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday          Thursday          Friday       Saturday       NOTES
25               26                27                28                 29                30           31




                             Let’s talk about things that grow!
                             Look together at a baby picture and a more recent picture of your child. You child has grown so
                             much! How have they changed?
                             Let’s read about things that grow:
                             Writing about what you have read with your child after you read helps build comprehension.

                              As Big as You by Elaine Greenstein                  Kids Pick the Funnies Poems by Bruce Lansky
                              Spring by Ron Hirshi                                Watch Me Grow: Bear by Lisa Magloff
                              Leo, the Late Bloomer by Robert Kraus               Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey
                              The Carrot Seed by Ruth Krauss                      Growing Things by Dawn Sirett and Lara Tankel


Let’s do “things that grow” activities: Making connections between a text and real life helps with comprehension.

Read a story that has food in an illustration. Talk about how we eat certain healthy foods to help us grow big and strong.
Read books about things that grow. Look outside and write a list of things you see in nature that grow.
Read a book about a character that your child knows well. Ask your child what he/she thinks the character would be like in real
life? What food would they like? Are they funny? Are they nice? Would they be fun to play with?
Choose a field trip. Ideas: Garfield Park Conservatory; Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum
                                                               AUGUST 1-August 7, 2010 THINGS THAT GROW CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.

Sunday           Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday          Thursday          Friday       Saturday        NOTES
1                2                 3                 4                  5                 6            7




                           Let’s talk about things that grow!
                           Drawing is a good way to start talking about something. Draw a picture of a tree and then ask your
                           child to do the same. Then draw more pictures of things that grow and talk about the drawings.

                           Let’s read about things that grow:
                           I Heard Said the Bird by Polly Berend                   Animals Born Alive and Well by Ruth Heller
                           See How They Grow: Duck by Jane Burton                  The Ugly Vegetable by Grace Lin
                           Just Enough by Teri Daniels                             Watch Me Grow: Bear by Lisa Magloff
                           Spring by Ron Hirshi                                    Write a little book about things that grow

Let’s do “things that grow” activities:
Grow something! Place a plant cutting in water in a clear cup or bottle and watch the roots grow, or plant a seed in a garden or
pot. Talk about how plants grow. Water the plant often and have your child monitor the growth.
With your child, draw pictures of fruit. Ask your child to guess what the picture is, and then write the name of the fruit
together. Talk about the first letter of each word as you point to it- banana starts with “b”, apple starts with “a” etc.
Choose a field trip for the week. Idea: Walk through a park and find 10 things that grow; visit a weekly farmers market.
                                                                                        August 8-14, 2010 SHADOWS CALENDAR
Put a sticker for each day you read and do an activity. Write a quick note about your work.

Sunday           Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday          Thursday          Friday   Saturday      NOTES
8                9                 10                11                 12                13       14




                               Let’s talk about shadows!
                               Shadows are interesting and fun, but can be hard to understand. How are they caused? Look
                               outside- do you see any shadows? What is a shadow?
                               Let’s read about shadows:
                               Modeling for your children is a great way that they learn. It is important that they see you
                               reading books and magazines, and writing grocery lists and letters, etc.
                               Good Night Moon by Margaret Wise Brown Dreams by Ezra Jack Keats
                               Snowmen at Night by Caralyn Buehner          Oh, Look! by Patricia Polacco
                               Play with Me by Marie Hall Ets               This Little Light of Mine by Reg Sandland
                               Kittens’ First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes     Fun with Shadows by Sharon & Jeff Siamon &
                                                                            Cynthia Benjamin
Let’s do “shadow” activities: When you read about something and then go outside and touch and smell nature and hear sounds,
learning is fun and wonderful.
Look outside (while sunny) and find shadows on the ground and on buildings etc. Talk about what you see. Also, go outside and
touch the shadows, and walk on them too.
Read a shadow book. Find all the shadows in the pictures and talk about what you see.
Choose your favorite “shadows” book and read it to your family before bedtime.
Choose a field trip for the week. Idea: Museum of Contemporary Art; Trip to the Beach.

				
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