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Professional Options Curriculum for ICT

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Professional Options Curriculum for ICT Powered By Docstoc
					                        University of Denver – University College Proprietary


           Information and Communications Technology
                       Course Descriptions
ICT PREREQUISITE COURSES:
   ICT 3000 FUNDAMENTALS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS (NEW COURSE)
        This course provides an introduction to systems and development concepts,
        information technology, and application software. It includes explanations of how
        information is used in organizations and how IT enables improvement in quality,
        timeliness, and competitive advantage. Students will learn the differences
        between personal productivity software and organizational information systems
        centered on databases and shared content. Coverage includes quality, systems
        theory, decision-making, and the organizational role of information systems.
        Organizational uses of information technology including computing and
        telecommunications systems are stressed. Concepts of organizations, information
        systems growth, and process improvement are introduced. Prerequisites: None.

        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Define systems and quality concepts
        • Describe the organizational uses of information to improve overall quality
        • Present hardware, software, and related information technology concepts
        • Provide the concepts and skills for the specification and design, or the re-
            engineering of organizationally related systems of limited scope using
            information technology
        • Show how information technology can be used to design, facilitate, and
            communicate organizational goals and objectives
        • Explain the concepts of individual decision making, goal setting,
            trustworthiness, and empowerment
        • Describe career paths in Information Systems
        • Discuss the professional and ethical responsibilities of the IS practitioner


   ICT 3100 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (NEW COURSE)
        This course examines the system development and change process, the software
        life cycle, including adherence to a methodological life cycle, and project
        management for software projects. Topics include software development
        paradigms, system engineering, use of modeling tools, function-based analysis
        and design, object-oriented analysis and design, testing, and documenting
        software systems. The course emphasizes the factors essential for effective
        communication and integration between users and systems. It encourages
        interpersonal skill development with clients, users, and others associated with
        development, operation, and maintenance of the system. Software quality issues
        are also considered: software testing, configuration management, quality
        management, process improvement and software maintenance. Students conduct a
        hands-on use case exercise and write a Software Development Plan.
        Prerequisites: ICT 3000 or equivalent experience.


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        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Define the technical and engineering activities of producing a software
            product.
        • Select an appropriate design strategy and apply it to a particular software
            development project.
        • Produce a use case to detail key elements of the requirements definition and to
            build a process model.
        • Explain issues, principles, methods and technology associated with software
            engineering theory and practices (e.g., planning, requirement engineering,
            architecture, design, coding, testing, quality assurance and configuration
            management).
        • Identify and compare user requirements, system requirements and software
            requirements, and the difference between functional and non-functional
            requirements.
        • Discuss the ethical and professional issues that are important to software
            engineers.
        • Explain the basic concepts and issues relevant to the topic of software quality:
            software testing, configuration management, quality management, process
            improvement and software maintenance.
        • Explain the specific design issues involved in the areas of object-oriented
            software development, distributed systems, real-time systems, critical
            systems, component-based systems (reuse) and GUI designs.
        • Using a software methodology, write a Software Development Plan that
            solves a business problem.


   ICT 3300 PROGRAMMING AND DATA STRUCTURES (NEW COURSE)
        This course provides a first exposure to algorithm development, programming,
        computer concepts, and the design and application of data and file structures. It
        includes the use of logical and physical structures for both programs and data. The
        course uses C and C++ to introduce the student to basic programming skills, and
        teaches how to create working computer programs using C and C++. Emphasis is
        placed on basics of C/C++ constructs, Boolean logic, data types, syntax,
        input/output and use of functions. The course progresses to topics such as arrays,
        structures, classes, and simple user interfaces. Prerequisites: ICT 3000, ICT
        3100, or equivalent experience.

        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Explain how data is a representation and measurement of real-world events
        • Describe how the logical and physical structure of data represent characters,
            records, files, and multimedia objects
        • Explain the concepts of classes, abstract data types (ADT), and objects
        • Give IS examples of formal synthetic and analytic problem solving
        • Present a systems view of object representations and compare with data flow
            models




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        •   Demonstrate skills in developing an algorithmic solution to a problem and
            represent it with appropriate program and data objects
        •   Present top-down implementation strategies
        •   Present object implementation concepts
        •   Present modular design, cohesion, and coupling concepts
        •   Present a systems view of verification and validation
        •   Present and expose students to a variety of programming environments,
            development tools, and graphics development environments
        •   Describe concepts and techniques used to represent and operate on data and
            file structures, with simple examples
        •   Explain how to develop structures using abstract data types representing
            arrays, lists, trees, records, and files, and demonstrate how they are applied as
            components of programs and applications
        •   Use index file structures, including key organizations
        •   Explain a variety of fundamental structures that are building blocks for the
            development of programs and IS applications
        •   Provide the foundations for applications of data structures and file processing
            techniques
        •   Solve problems involving files and database representations
        •   Use structured file (database) editors, posting mechanisms, and reports
        •   Demonstrate programming techniques in the design, testing, and debugging of
            programs of some complexity
        •   Describe relative capabilities and limitations of common programming
            languages

   ICT 3400 DATABASE FUNDAMENTALS (MCIS 3400)
        This course introduces databases and database system concepts. The material
        covers information systems design and implementation within a database
        management system environment. Incorporating both lecture content and lab
        exercises, this course gives students a solid comprehension of the benefits and
        limitations of databases, while allowing them to get hands-on experience building
        a user interface to an existing database. All application development will be done
        in a graphical environment, using a popular desktop database workbench.
        Selected file processing issues will also be introduced. Prerequisites: ICT 3000,
        ICT 3100, ICT 3300, or equivalent experience.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Apply relational theory to the design of a database
        • Work with SQL to communicate with a database
        • Demonstrate the database development life cycle
        • Demonstrate an awareness of advanced database topics
        • Discuss database administration and databases on the Internet


   ICT 3500 WEB FUNDAMENTALS (MCIS 3500)
        This course explores the fundamentals of web page design using Hypertext
        Markup Language (HTML). The students learn how to create tables and lists, use


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        graphics, create hyperlinks, and use the text formatting features of HTML to
        create fully functional Web pages. In addition, students will be introduced to use
        of cascading style sheets to enhance the look of your web pages. Prerequisites:
        ICT 3000, ICT 3100, ICT 3300, or equivalent experience.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Learn the basics of the World Wide Web
        • Learn the basics of creating a Basic Web Page
        • Learn how to create anchors
        • Learn how to attach a hyperlink to a Website
        • Learn how to use hyperlinks in other types of documents (other than on the
            web)
        • Learn how to work with fonts, colors and graphics in HTML
        • Learn how to create and modify tables in HTML, and work with those tables
            to create a newspaper-style layout
        • Learn how to create and use frames to display multiple web pages


   ICT 3800 NETWORK & INTERNET FUNDAMENTALS (NEW COURSE)
        This course provides a first course in networking and telecommunications
        technologies, hardware, software, and protocols. Students will gain in-depth
        experience of networking and telecommunications fundamentals including LANs,
        MANs, WANs, intranets, and the Internet. The core of the TCP/IP protocol suite
        will be explored. Voice and data telecommunication concepts, models, standards,
        and protocols will be studied. Students will learn about the ramifications of low-
        level technical characteristics of the network such as delay on applications and the
        user experience. Students are introduced to the process of evaluation, selection,
        and implementation of different communication options within an organization.
        Students develop strategic business solutions that incorporate the use of
        technology, policy/regulation, infrastructure barriers/requirements and economic
        factors that respond to ongoing changes within the telecommunication industry.
        Prerequisites: ICT 3000 or equivalent experience. This course or equivalent
        experience is required for students entering the Broadband, Telecom
        Management, or Telecom Technology specialties.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        •   Organizational Use of Networks: Student should be able to demonstrate an
            awareness of how telecommunication systems are used to support
            organizational communication infrastructure including information systems,
            teleconferencing, and telecommuting.
        •   Management of Networks: Student should be able to explain the issues related
            to the economics, design, and management of computer networks.
        •   Networking Standards & Regulation: Student should be able to identify the
            five most important groups writing telecommunication standards. Describe the
            role that regulation plays in the provision of public telecommunications
            services.



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        •   Distributed vs. Centralized Computing: Student should be able to discuss and
            explain the underlying principles and issues of distributed versus centralized
            computer systems.
        •   Networking Topologies: Student should be able to describe modern
            telecommunications architectures, topologies, and the most important
            signaling protocols.
        •   Network Design: Student should be able to identify the hardware and software
            components of telecommunications systems and how they are organized to
            provide required services.
        •   Service Objectives: Student should be able to demonstrate awareness of the
            responsibilities inherent in providing telecommunication services, including
            security, privacy, reliability, and performance.
        •   Installation Basics: Student should be able to explain how to install equipment
            necessary to implement a telecommunication system, e.g. cable, modems,
            Ethernet connections, gateways, and routers.
        •   Configuring a LAN: Student should be able to demonstrate how to design,
            install, configure, and manage a LAN.
        •   Emerging Telecom Technologies: Student should be able to explain issues
            pertinent to the management and transfer of emerging technologies.
        •   IP Addressing & Routing: Student should be able to demonstrate the ability to
            design a basic IP routed network and it‟s associated IP address scheme.




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ICT FOUNDATIONS COURSES
   ICT 4000 ICT INDUSTRY OVERVIEW (NEW COURSE)
        This course provides an overview of the Information and Communications
        Technology (ICT) industry environment. It exposes students to the diverse types
        of businesses, technologies, products, and services that characterize this rapidly
        changing industry. Typical career options are introduced, the skills needed to
        manage technology as a strategic asset are identified, industry trends are
        reviewed, and critical industry issues are discussed. Students will acquire a broad
        understanding of the industry today, as well as the developments that will shape
        the industry tomorrow. The course establishes a framework for the remainder of
        the ICT master‟s degree program, setting an industry context that is relevant for
        all ICT students, whether they are specializing in database design and
        development, technical management, broadband networks, or one of the many
        other areas of specialization offered in the program. Prerequisites: ICT 3000 or
        equivalent experience.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Industry Overview: Explain the industry structure and sub-areas including the
            major categories of technology creators, extenders, users, service providers,
            venture capitalists, and academia.
        • Industry Areas: Explain the relationship between IT and CE, CS, SE, and IS
            using the “Information Industry Academic Area Focus” (IIAAF) chart.
        • CASI Model: Explain the Content, Applications, Services and Infrastructure
            model. Demonstrate how it maps to a variety of industry stakeholders and
            career opportunities.
        • Program Overview: Outline the MA in ICT program and briefly introduce
            each specialty track. Ask students to relate each specialty to the IIAAF and
            CASI models.
        • Careers: Summarize traditional career options and alternatives as well as
            career migration paths. Discuss the characteristics of work in the current
            global workplace.
        • Career Areas & Progression: Map a variety of careers onto the IIAAF chart.
            Show example career progression paths on the IIAAF chart. Relate to program
            specialties.
        •   Global Business: Explain the role of information technology and
            telecommunications in the global business environment.
        •   Trends: Identify key emerging and future trends and implications for the
            industry.
        •   Management Skills: Analyze the key management skills necessary to
            effectively manage information technology and telecommunications systems.
        •   Economics of Information: Discuss the economics of information, including
            production, distribution, and usage. What are the current economic trends
            associated with information?
        •   Business Ethics: Outline key points of orientation for business ethics in
            information technology and telecommunications.



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        •   Information and Communications Policy: Use the CASI model to identify the
            most important policy issues associated with each layer, including consumer
            data privacy, content copyright, software patent law, and network neutrality.
            Describe open source information licenses and their implications for various
            user groups.
        •   Telecommunications Policy: Describe current issues in telecommunications
            policy and regulation. What are Chairman Powell‟s Four Freedoms and what
            is their status today? What are their implications for consumers, service
            providers, and the government?
        •   Strategic Value: Examine the methods used in managing technology for
            maximum strategic value including financial analysis, market differentiation,
            and operational efficiency. When is outsourcing the best choice? When should
            a firm purchase software? When is in-house development necessary?


   ICT 4005 ICT FUNDAMENTALS (NEW COURSE)
        This course provides a substantive review of the technology at the core of the ICT
        industry. Coverage includes hardware, networking technology, databases,
        information services, applications, and content in enterprise context. The
        application development process is briefly reviewed. A framework is developed
        around data at rest, data in transit, and data being processed. This framework is
        used to detail the roles of a variety of hardware and software artifacts, and their
        use in the production, processing, protection, and use of organizational
        information. The role of the ICT user interface and web systems in providing user
        access to content anytime, anywhere is reviewed. The security requirements
        associated with a variety of information types are introduced, along with the
        current best practices used in information security. Prerequisite: ICT 3100 or
        equivalent experience.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        •   Infrastructure Review: Review the elements of an enterprise information
            infrastructure (CASI model), including hardware (servers, routers, firewalls,
            networks, and clients), software services (DBMS), applications (accounting,
            engineering, etc.) and content.
        •   Role of Infrastructure: Describe the role of technology infrastructure in terms
            of people, processes, devices, tools, and policy implications and how each
            contributes to providing value to the enterprise.
        •   Networks & Hardware: Describe the role of the main hardware components in
            an enterprise: clients, servers, hubs, routers, IDS, firewalls, sensors and
            control systems.
        •   Databases: Illustrate how databases are at the center of most software services
            and enterprise applications. Review a case study illustrating a modern data
            warehouse.
        •   Information Services: Demonstrate how basic software (e.g. database)
            services are used by enterprises to support their specific applications. What


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            are the most common software services available in today‟s information
            market place?
        •   Management of Software Projects: Describe the nine project management
            knowledge and practice areas. Discuss the role of analysis in the software
            development process.
        •   Application Development: Describe the software development life cycle in
            project management terms. How do object oriented processes differ from
            traditional processes? What is the role of software engineering in the SDLC?
        •   User Requirements: Describe the role of ICT user interfaces and web systems
            in providing user access to content anytime, anywhere. How does this impact
            the management process in enterprises?
        •   Information Security: Identify the three states of data needing protection: at
            rest, in transit, being processed. Review the security requirements associated
            with each state, including confidentiality, integrity, and accessibility.


   ICT 4010 ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE (MCIS 4660)
        In this course, students learn how to integrate information and communications
        technologies to effectively and efficiently support business goals. The course
        provides an overview of the global, enterprise-wide architectural framework that
        drives business decisions regarding selection and implementation of ICT systems
        and solutions. Topics include supporting and transforming Global Value Chains;
        e-business designs; creating an enterprise architecture; and the various
        methodologies, tools and techniques used in the design and implementation of the
        enterprise architecture. The course encompasses all aspects of information and
        communications technology, including data networks, applications, operating
        systems, database systems, telecommunications systems, and hardware
        components in the context of a total enterprise-wide framework. Prerequisites:
        ICT 4000, 4005.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will:
        •   Strategic Information Framework: Have a better understanding and
            appreciation of the necessity and use of an Enterprise Architecture within a
            business and its strategic role in providing the necessary framework for the
            effective use of information technologies both within and outside the
            organization.
        •   EA Value: Learn the value of the Enterprise Architecture as an important
            integrative tool to be used by both business and IT managers.
        •   EA Planning and Design: Learn about the key issues in planning, designing,
            developing, implementing and managing an Enterprise Architecture, including
            standards, quality and security issues, as well as a focus on critical factors for
            success.




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        •   Enterprise Applications: Explain the role of information applications and data
            content in a multi-location organizational environment. Discuss the variety of
            content, and introduce the role of content management systems.




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TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT SPECIALTY
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4015 MANAGING TECHNOLOGY FOR STRATEGIC VALUE (NEW COURSE)
        In this course, students acquire an in-depth understanding of the key management
        skills necessary to manage technology for strategic value. It concentrates on
        providing in-depth knowledge of strategic planning, the role of technology in
        business, and business process automation. It also provides students with the
        management skills and tools to prioritize technology investments, and manage
        technology products and projects. Topics include strategic planning and business
        alignment, managing business applications, business process automation, the role
        of web 2.0 in business processes, technology management, budgeting and capital
        investment prioritization, and build/buy decision-making in regards to custom-
        built and off-the-shelf solutions. Prerequisite: ICT 4000.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        •   Strategic Planning: Describe best practices for developing an information
            technology strategic plan.
        •   Business Alignment: Discuss methods of ensuring alignment between
            technology and business strategy.
        •   Strategic Plan Implementation: Explain best practices in translating a strategic
            plan into a series of programs and tactical projects, as well as the
            implementation and support considerations.
        •   Business Applications: Describe the role of technology in automating business
            functions such as Accounting, Budgeting, and Forecasting.
        •   Business Process Automation: Summarize how automating business processes
            through the use of workflow and document management can provide quality,
            increased productivity, and security.
        •   Web 2.0 Functionality: Highlights the impact of Web 2.0 functionality on
            business including enriched media, social networking, enhanced
            personalization, and consumer-created content.
        •   Product /Project /Technology Management: Discuss the primary roles, skills,
            and methods in managing technology products and projects.
        •   Budgeting and Capital Investments: Discuss budgeting, planning, and
            financial analysis strategies for prioritizing technology capital investments
            including return-on-investment (ROI), internal rate of return (IRR), and
            strategic value.


   ICT 4100 PRINCIPLES OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT (MCIS 4620, MOTM 4400)
        See below.




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   ICT 4020 BUSINESS FORECASTING AND PLANNING (NEW COURSE)
        Business forecasting and planning brings together a wide diversity of skills:
        economic, financial, marketing, and technical analysis. This course brings
        together these concepts and extends prior coursework with coverage of budgeting,
        finance, costing, business planning, revenue forecasting, P&L statements, and
        balance sheet analysis as applied to information systems and services. Topics
        include the economics of software and other intellectual property, network effects,
        usage and sharing effects, sunk costs and monopoly effects, capacity and resource
        planning issues, and an introduction to the related regulatory issues. Students will
        develop budgets or business plans for several increasingly difficult scenarios
        addressing a range of technology applications and services. Prerequisites: none.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Demonstrate the ability to develop a budget plan for a software application
            used within an enterprise.
        • Demonstrate the ability to develop a business plan for a startup firm offering a
            software-as-a-service application to small businesses (e.g., a payroll
            processing application).
        • Demonstrate the ability to develop a business plan for a firm offering a
            wireless network connectivity service in a small rural location.
        • Demonstrate the ability to read and interpret the primary elements of financial
            statements, including income statements, balance sheets, and P&L statements.

   ICT 4025 TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION MANAGEMENT (MOTM 4540) (NEW
   COURSE)
        Leaders of innovative firms build commitment to new directions, re-design
        structures to support new missions, and transform cultures. This course
        concentrates on the implementation of the business strategy through effective
        structures and systems. Students will analyze key aspects of strategic deployment,
        including organizational structure, cross-functional teams, performance planning
        and enhancement, reward systems, recruiting, and the development of knowledge
        workers. In this course students integrate all the areas of knowledge covered in
        the ICT Foundations and Technology Management specialty courses. This should
        be the last of the four required courses taken in the Technology Management
        specialty. Prerequisites: ICT 4010, ICT 4015, ICT 4020, ICT 4100.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Describe the role of innovation in creating and sustaining high performance
            organizations in the 21st Century
        • Discuss how to link innovation to business performance
        • Explain the processes for systematic innovation across the organization
        • Discuss how disruptive technologies affect organizations
        • Identify opportunities for innovation in the student‟s organization
        • Develop a detailed strategy proposal for implementing a specific innovation in
            the student‟s organization




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ADVANCED STUDY COURSES
   ICT 4050 COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS (MOTM 4260 & MOTM 4530)
        Competitive analysis and benchmarking are powerful techniques that allow an
        organization to understand the requisite steps in identifying new possibilities and
        dramatically improving performance and service, factors that are critical to
        customers. Students acquire the ability to understand their organizations from the
        perspective of the customer and compare their performance to both competitors
        and those organizations that customers consider the best. Prerequisites: none.
        The objectives of this course are to:
         • Introduce students to the philosophy, functionality and applications of
             competitive analysis
         • Basic principles of information gathering
         • Basic principles of analysis
         • To introduce students to the various aspects and uses of the Internet (within
             the context of competitive analysis & intelligence)

   ICT 4055 BUSINESS SOCIAL INTELLIGENCE (MOTM 4175)
        Information overload is a prevailing issue in 21st century business, and managers
        need something that enables them to “read between the lines”. That “something”
        is social intelligence. The Social Intelligence course equips students with a skill
        set that applies to both their professional and personal lives, enabling them to
        cultivate a “social radar” - understanding how environments operate according to
        laws that are unwritten and unrepresented on any org chart. Prerequisites: none.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Identify and analyze the components and theories of social intelligence
         • Examine the role of social intelligence in a modern organization
         • Compare and contrast the various social intelligence tools and applications
              in use today
         • Evaluate the value of implementing social intelligence
              metrics/methodologies within their respective organizations.




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PROJECT MANAGEMENT SPECIALTY
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4100 PRINCIPLES OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT (MOTM 4400, MCIS 4620) (NEW
   COURSE)
        This course is designed to provide students with practical skills in project and
        change management. The course introduces the various elements of the project
        management process including exposure to the fundamentals of project
        management tools and techniques as well as the software used in project and
        program planning, budgeting, and tracking. The course provides a framework for
        the concepts and tools covered in the remainder of the program. Topics include
        techniques to initiate, plan, execute, control, report and close a project. Project
        integration, scope, time, working with teams, cost, quality control and risk
        management are emphasized as is managing the change in organizations resulting
        from new or upgraded information systems. Students learn project management
        skills through hands-on exercises using project management tools and simulation
        software to emphasize the real world application of project and change
        management techniques. Prerequisites: none.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Describe the project management framework and basic project management
              terminology.
         • Describe the nine project management knowledge and practice areas.
         • Explain the role of requirements gathering as an essential component of the
              project planning process.
         • Apply fundamental project management processes, tools, and techniques for
              project planning and integration management to mange scope, schedule,
              cost, quality, resources, and risks.
         • Identify and demonstrate reporting and controls techniques (scope, risk
              assessment).
         • Explain the role of the project manager as a change agent.
         • Identify and demonstrate interpersonal project management skills
              (communicating, influencing, and presenting).
         • Explain the project life cycle, including the most common variants, and
              identify the most appropriate process for a given set of circumstances.
         • Use project management information systems (PMIS) software to support
              activities through the project management life cycle.
         • Construct and present a project plan incorporating the knowledge and
              practice areas learned in the course using MS Project.

   ICT 4105 PROJECT CONTRACTS & PROCUREMENT (MOTM 4410)
        Contracts are at the heart of project management. This course examines the role of
        contracts in all aspects of project management but concentrates on writing and
        responding to RFPs, solicitations, bids, common clauses and approaches to
        negotiation. It also covers the Principles of Project Mgmt (PMBOK® Guide)
        guidelines for effective procurement management. Prerequisites: ICT 4100.


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        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Become familiar with the role of procurement in an organization
         • Understand and use a RFI (Request for Information), RFP (Request for
              Proposal) & RFQ (Request for Quotation).
         • Understand the basics of negotiation strategies and styles
         • Understand the various types of contracts and their uses.

   ICT 4110 PROJECT MANAGEMENT TOOLS & TECHNIQUES (MOTM 4460)
        This course introduces students to project management tools and techniques and
        provides an overview of the application of such tools and techniques in project
        management processes. A focused examination of scheduling, cost, quality, and
        risk management processes using advanced tools and techniques is included.
        Emphasis is placed on both project planning and execution processes.
        Prerequisites: ICT 4100.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Demonstrate a working knowledge of tools and techniques applicable to
              project management.
         • Identify opportunities for using tools and techniques to improve
              performance in all PM knowledge and practice areas.
         • Apply advanced tools and techniques in scheduling, cost, risk, and quality
              processes.
         • Develop procedures and techniques to enhance opportunities and reduce
              threats to the project‟s objectives.
         • Use advanced features in PMIS and simulation software to support PM
              activities.
         • Construct and present a comprehensive risk and quality management plan
              applying the knowledge acquired during the course.

   ICT 4115 PROJECT MANAGEMENT DYNAMICS (MOTM 4470)
        Complex projects require a high level of team coordination as well as advanced
        project management skills. Special emphasis is given to managing team
        dynamics, dealing with changing project requirements, and the use of virtual
        tools. Prerequisites: ICT 4100, ICT 4110.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Apply systems thinking to integrate the various parts of a complex project
              plan into a seamless whole
         • Construct a project plan and consolidate subprojects to create a master
              project.
         • Understand and practice the various key roles of the project leadership team
         • Develop processes and tools to manage risks and to monitor and control
              projects
         • Use project management information tools to help plan, evaluate, monitor
              and control a project through its lifecycle as well as flag potential problems
              and identify solutions.
         • Present progress reports and highlights to executives.


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LEAN SIX SIGMA SPECIALTY
        The Lean Six Sigma Black Belt curriculum provides a detailed understanding of
        Lean Six Sigma, including the DMAIC methodology and key Lean tools.
        Students learn how to apply a data-driven problem-solving methodology to
        improve critical processes within any organization. The program is technically
        challenging to ensure that all graduates gain the knowledge and skills needed to
        implement solutions and produce hard financial results. This online program is
        offered in partnership with the Breakthrough Management Group International
        (BMGI), a leading provider of Lean Six Sigma instruction. The program instructs
        students in the advanced concepts and tools Black Belts require to successfully
        identify, define, implement and close Lean Six Sigma projects. To help ensure
        success, students are matched with a Master Black Belt instructor for 1:1
        guidance throughout the program. Students must complete exercises and a Black
        Belt project, both of which are reviewed by a dedicated Lean Six Sigma
        instructor. Finally, students must pass comprehensive exams to earn the highly
        regarded Black Belt certification.
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4120 LEAN SIX SIGMA: GETTING STARTED, DEFINE AND MEASURE (NEW COURSE)
       In the getting started course, students use Lean tools and techniques to define and
       scope a problem, determine project objectives and benefits, and create a project
       charter. The student also learn to define the „as is‟ process, validate the
       measurement system and measure outputs, and quantify process performance.
       Prerequisites: none.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
            • ID the Business Gap
            • Document the Process
            • Collect & Translate the VOC
            • Define Metrics & Defects
            • Establish Preliminary Baseline and Entitlement
            • Develop Problem & Objective Statements
            • Estimate Financial Benefit
            • Confirm Improvement Methodology
            • Define Project Roles & Resp.
            • ID Project Risks
            • Establish Project Timeline
            • Create Communications Plan
            • Create Value Stream Map
            • Create Process Flow Diagram
            • Expose Simplification Opportunities
            • Run a SCORE Event
            • Analyze Measurement Systems
            • Improve Measurement Systems (If needed)
            • Collect Data (Y‟s)
            • Examine Process Stability
            • Perform Capability Analysis


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   ICT 4125 LEAN SIX SIGMA: ANALYZE (NEW COURSE)
        In the second course, students apply Lean tools and techniques to identify
        potential causes (x‟s), investigate the significance of x‟s, identify significant
        causes, and provide a preliminary definition of process outcomes as a function of
        causes [y=f(x)]. Prerequisites: ICT 4120.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
            • Develop List of Potential Causes
            • Narrow Down List of Potential Causes (x‟s)
            • Collect Data on x‟s
            • Perform Graphical Analysis
            • Perform Statistical Analysis
            • Conduct Waste Analysis
            • Evaluate the Impact of the x‟s on Y
            • State Preliminary Y = f(x‟s)

   ICT 4130 LEAN SIX SIGMA: IMPROVE AND CONTROL (NEW COURSE)
        In the third course, students apply Lean tools and techniques to generate potential
        solutions, select and test a solution, develop an implementation plan, and create a
        control and monitoring plan. Students also learn the methods and techniques for
        implementing a full scale solution and finalizing transition. Prerequisites: ICT
        4120, ICT 4125.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
            • Generate Potential Solutions
            • Create Future State VSM
            • Evaluate Potential Solution
            • State y = f(x‟s)
            • Run a SCORE Event
            • Create Future State VSM
            • Develop Implementation Plan
            • Mistake Proof the Process
            • Determine the x‟s to Control and Methods
            • Complete MSA on Critical x‟s
            • Determine y‟s to Monitor & Metrics Reporting
            • Revise/Develop Process Documentation
            • Implement Solution
            • Evaluate Implementation
            • Develop Transition Plan
            • Handoff to Process Owner
            • Capture Lessons Learned
            • Write Final Report/Presentation




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ADVANCED STUDY COURSES
   ICT 4150 LEADING SUCCESSFUL PROJECTS (MOTM 4480)
        Successful projects fit the organizational vision and strategy. This course has been
        designed to integrate project management efforts with leadership, the
        measurement of success, and effective change management. Attention is given to
        communication planning, accountability, and delegation. Prerequisites: ICT 4100.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Examine key leadership skills required for a project manager to succeed.
         • Evaluate their potential as a team leader or member and compare with the
              key leadership skills.
         • Assess best project accountability structures for achieving results.
         • Create appropriate methodologies and measures of success for projects in
              alignment with the strategic direction of the organization.
         • Explain what works and what gets in the way of team leadership.

   ICT 4155 STRATEGIC ALLIANCES (MOTM 4230)
        Business-to-business alliances extend the capability of the organization and help
        to leverage available resources. Strategic alliances also provide an alternative to
        vertical integration and as a way to complement the firm‟s core competencies.
        This course defines and discusses the roles of various types of business alliances,
        including strategic alliances, partnerships, and joint ventures, and explores
        strategies for profitably managing and exploiting these external business
        relationships. Prerequisites: none.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Identify the major benefits and potential risk factors of entering into a
              strategic alliance with a domestic/international partner.
         • Apply risk management techniques to successfully manage a strategic
              partnership
         • Formulate a plan for initiating, developing and implementing a strategic
              alliance with a domestic or foreign partner.
         • Develop a strategic initiative that is strongly supported by factual analysis
              and value propositions
         • Define the structure of the strategic initiative including organization, risks,
              success factors, technology and investment
         • Leverage your strategic initiative for competitive advantage
         • Conduct critical analysis and evaluation of competitive and market factors
              that affect the business plan




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SOFTWARE DESIGN AND PROGRAMMING SPECIALTY
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4300 WEB ENABLED INFORMATION SYSTEMS (NEW COURSE)
        This course is an introduction to the design of web enabled information systems.
        The course reviews modern design and programming principals, introduces
        database design and object oriented principals, and introduces security issues and
        best practices related to web application development. The course introduces
        object-oriented modeling methods, including use cases, class, and activity
        diagrams that describe the informational and behavioral content of a system‟s
        objects. Basic OOM design tools are introduced. The class addresses
        organizational concerns around web applications, exploitation of technology in
        today's market, and retention of data integrity. This should be the first course
        taken in each of the following specialties: Software Design and Programming,
        Database Design and Administration, Web Design and Development, and
        Information Systems Security. Prerequisite: ICT 3000, ICT 3100, ICT 3300, or
        equivalent experience.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Describe modern design and programming principles.
         • Explain current database design models
         • Identify major aspects of object-oriented principles.
         • Analyze the organizational implications of the database approach and
              environment.
         • Model the workflow associated with developing a web enabled information
              system.
         • Demonstrate familiarity with the ANSI/X3/SPARC model of data
              independence.
         • Describe the relationship between user clients, web servers, database
              servers, and other network element that make up a web-enabled system.
         • Explain the value in using object oriented methods and models in
              developing a new information system.
         • Describe the differences between client-side applets and server-side
              applications, and how the choice of one over the other affects software
              design methodologies.
         • Describe modern programming principals, especially as related to web
              enabled systems.
         • Explain the evolution of database management system technology and
              architecture.
         • Use terminology encountered in DBMS discussions, both theoretical and
              practical.
         • Demonstrate the ability to use common OOM tools to produce simple use
              cases, class, and activity diagrams.
         • Describe how security is integrated into all aspects of web enabled
              application development.
         • Discuss organizational concerns regarding web applications, data integrity,
              and the uses of data.


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          •   Describe the three most common threats to data, processes, and systems
              from malicious actors, and the best defense practices used to protect these
              elements of web enabled information systems.

   ICT 4305 OBJECT-ORIENTED METHODS (MCIS 4030, 4035) (NEW COURSE)
        This course introduces the object-oriented view of software analysis, modeling,
        and design. It defines all of the relevant concepts needed to understand the
        paradigm. A complete graphical notational scheme is taught for the purpose of
        diagramming objects and object interactions. The course covers the design,
        evolution, modification, and test/verifications phases of object-oriented
        development in some depth. Since project management plays a key role in the
        success of object-oriented development, its relation to the development process is
        discussed. The course also surveys the various object-oriented languages and
        tools available. Prerequisites: ICT 4300.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Analyze a problem using abstraction or decomposition techniques that yield
              a system defined in terms of inter-communicating objects which satisfy a
              functional specification
         • Describe patterns in general, their characteristics and structure, and their
              role in the development process
         • Identify several common design and analysis patterns and discuss their
              usage, advantages and disadvantages
         • Develop class diagrams (object models) that describe the informational and
              behavioral content of a system of object classes
         • Develop activity diagrams from use cases that describe threads of
              information transformation within the system
         • Develop interaction diagrams that identify the role of object classes in
              supporting information transformation within the system
         • Prepare diagrams or models using standard UML graphical notation
         • Discuss the role of analysis in the overall software development process
         • Understand and appreciate of the necessity and use of an object-oriented
              development methodology – the Unified Process
         • Understand the strategic role of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) in
              modeling both analysis and design models of the Unified Process
         • Assess the complexity of object-oriented solutions to business and real-time
              problems through the application of design patterns
         • Develop sample OO analysis and design models from problem scenarios
         • Identify communication and persistence framework and discuss the
              consequences of employing such a framework
         • Demonstrate various techniques for mapping UML object classes into
              implementations as an OOP relational database.
         • Describe the basic components of and differences between modern object
              oriented programming languages
         • Understand/describe the purpose of Web Services and associated protocols
              such as XML and SOAP




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          •   Describe how several common techniques of "refactoring" can be utilized to
              improve object oriented methods

   ICT 4310 DISTRIBUTED CLIENT-SERVER (MCIS 4305)
        This course discusses the concepts of client/server computing as it pertains to the
        design and development of client/server applications for various business
        solutions. Topics include client and server hardware and operating systems;
        client/server application design; incorporating client/server application design;
        distributed system planning, analysis, and development; and network topologies
        and architecture. Students learn to design event-driven applications using
        applications management tools. Prerequisites: ICT 4300.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Given a business process that requires distributed computing for its
              implementation, the student shall be able to describe and justify a
              recommended client/server distributed computing architecture model that
              will support the business process.
         • Given a business process that requires distributed computing for its
              implementation, the student shall be able to select an appropriate software
              development methodology and platform and create a project plan for
              implementation of a client/server application system.
         • Given a client/server design, the student will be able to evaluate that design
              and make recommendations for improvement based on specific criteria.
         • Given a business process that requires a client/server application and a
              distributed relational database, the students will be able to address complex
              managerial issues associated with implementation, maintenance, and
              operations.

   ICT 4315 OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (MCIS 4140)
        This course covers modern programming techniques using object-oriented
        methods. The course will familiarize the student with development tools and the
        syntax of a programming language by developing simple programs that use
        control flow techniques and basic input/output techniques. Basic methods to
        harden code against malicious attack are introduced, and basic verification
        techniques presented. Prerequisites: ICT 4300 & ICT 4305.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Demonstrate Object Oriented Programming concepts, including
              composition, inheritance, and polymorphism.
         • Translate UML models including use cases and class diagrams into working
              software modules.
         • Demonstrate how code can be hardened against the most common malicious
              attacks, and verified with basic techniques.




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ADVANCED STUDY COURSES
   ICT 4351 .NET PROGRAMMING WITH C# (MCIS 4501)
        Students learn to identify and describe the fundamentals of the .NET architecture;
        explain various .NET components, their respective responsibilities and functions;
        identify and explain .NET design issues and development solutions; identify and
        describe the fundamental .NET components; explain CLR execution, and have
        some familiarity with predominant .NET languages. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT
        4305, ICT 4315.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Explain fundamental .NET definitions.
         • Identify and describe the fundamentals of the .NET architecture.
         • Explain various .NET components, their respective responsibilities and
              functions.
         • Identify and explain .NET design issues and development solutions.
         • Identify and describe the fundamental .NET components.
         • Explain CLR execution.
         • Have some familiarity with predominant .NET languages

   ICT 4352 ADVANCED C# PROGRAMMING (MCIS 4140)
        Microsoft‟s .NET platform is a revolutionary advance in application development
        technology that greatly simplifies application development. Part of this suite of
        tools under the .NET umbrella is a set of new and enhanced programming
        languages designed to run under .NET, the most significant of which is the new
        C# programming language. C# is a language that is similar to both C++ and Java,
        but extends and improves upon both languages. It is a fully object-oriented
        programming language, unlike C++, and takes lessons from Java to further ease
        software development. Advanced techniques such as collections, exception
        handling, delegates, threading, synchronization, and memory management are
        covered. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4305, ICT 4315.

        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Identify how the C# language fits in with the broader .Net environment
         • Discuss how to use Visual Studio 2008 to develop and debug programs
         • Apply basic programming constructs
         • Describe object-oriented development
         • Identify the many types of collections that the .Net framework provides
         • Define reflections and generics
         • Discuss events and delegates
         • Explain data and file access

   ICT 4361 JAVA PROGRAMMING (MCIS 4145)
        This course enhances the student‟s experience in object-oriented design and
        software development by performing and discussing OO design for re-use of
        general purpose applications and small Java applets, including appropriately using



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        the Java API and Abstract Windowing Toolkit. Other topics covered include the
        use of Java as an object-oriented programming language including encapsulation,
        simple inheritance, and polymorphism; design of Java classes using Java
        interfaces and packages; implementation of design patterns in working Java code,
        and demonstration of Java Base Classes, including AWT. Java foundation classes
        including Swing and JavaBeans will be discussed briefly, along with the selection
        and application of current design and development tools. Note: This course does
        NOT address JavaScript. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4305, ICT 4315.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Install and run the Java runtime environment
        • Develop, compile, and run Java applications
        • Design, build, and run Java GUI applications using Swing and AWT
        • Develop simple web applications using the J2EE framework




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DATABASE DESIGN AND ADMINISTRATION SPECIALTY
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4300 WEB ENABLED INFORMATION SYSTEMS
        See Above
   ICT 4405 DATABASE DESIGN & PROGRAMMING (MCIS 4425, 4428) (NEW COURSE)
        This course concentrates on the relational DB model and the conceptual, logical,
        and physical phases of database design and development. Entity-relationship
        modeling, data normalization to third normal form, and Structured Query
        Language programming are core components of the class. It includes additional
        data modeling techniques and upper Normal Forms (Boyce/Codd, Fourth, and
        Fifth). It delves into the concepts of database integrity and transaction
        management, concurrency protocols (locking and time stamping), and security
        schemes. Prerequisites: ICT 3400 or equivalent experience, ICT 4300.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Apply the fundamental techniques of data modeling to a real project of your
              own choosing.
         • Decompose data sets into First, Second, and Third Normal Form.
         • Answer the question "Why is data normalization necessary?"
         • Query a live database using Structured Query Language (SQL) and MySQL.
         • Populate and query a relational database using SQL
         • Discuss the generic architecture of a database management system (DBMS)
         • Discuss OLTP and OLAP environments
         • Illustrate database design on client-server and thin-client networks
         • Decompose data sets into Boyce-Codd, Fourth, and Fifth Normal Forms
         • Describe database indexing concepts and techniques
         • Explain data dictionaries and their relationship to database management
              systems
         • Explain the difference between query processing and transaction processing
         • Demonstrate knowledge of database transactions, recovery, and concurrency
              control
         • Describe the differences between locking and time-stamping protocols
         • Describe the complexities of database security and the related issue of
              individual privacy
         • Discuss database performance issues and give examples of common
              situations

   ICT 4410 DATA WAREHOUSING DESIGN (MCIS 4480)
        Organizations with vision and courage are gaining competitive advantage by
        implementing data warehouses. Under the guidance of an executive sponsor, a
        team of data administrators, database specialists, and organizational analysts
        creates these contemporary decision support environments. Building a data
        warehouse is fundamentally different than building a subject area database for an
        operational system. In this course students use such data warehouse (DW)


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        concepts as partitioning, granularity, record of source, and metadata while
        learning how to build a viable decision support environment. Students further
        their understanding of such topics as architecture development, data migration
        and integration, use of operational data stores, and transactional systems.
        Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4405.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Define Decision Support System concepts and applications
         • Discuss the impact of the human decision making process in business
         • Discuss data models for OLTP and OLAP environments
         • Elaborate on the types of DSS
         • Discuss and illustrate DSS architecture and platforms
         • Identify the characteristics and functionality of DSS software tools
         • Discuss the implementation procedures for a DSS
         • Discuss the use of Expert Systems
         • Discuss Data Warehousing concepts and fundamentals
         • Analyze the contents of a Data Warehouse
         • Discuss the construction of a Data Warehouse System
         • Discuss Systems Integration and the future of DSS
         • Discuss the history and significance of Knowledge Management

   ICT 4415 DB BACKUP & RECOVERY WITH LAB (MCIS 4495)
        This course explores basic database recovery and backup strategies and tactics
        using a working database system. Topics include preparing backup, recovery and
        disaster plans, and performing complete and incomplete database recoveries using
        the Export/Import utility. Using ICT E-labs, students also gain experience with
        troubleshooting utilities, RAM architecture, and setting up a standby database.
        Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4405.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Deploy backup and recovery strategies to safeguard databases
         • Perform recovery operations to maintain consistent and available data
         • Failover to hot standby databases for high availability
         • Exploit automated backup and recovery techniques with Recovery Manager
         • Implement flashback and log-mining to rollback user and logical errors


ADVANCED STUDY COURSES
   ICT 4451 DB PROGRAMMING: ORACLE PL/SQL (MCIS 4435)
        This course builds on ICT 4405 Database Design and Programming, allowing
        students to transform a database schema design into a database application
        prototype using Oracle's PL/SQL. Topics include advanced SQL DDL, DML, and
        scripting, PL/SQL constructs, stored procedures, modular design and
        development, software development processes, views, sequences, cursors,
        dynamic SQL, error handling, locking, as well as performance and tuning, and
        database security. Using virtual E-Labs, students design and develop a database
        and related PL/SQL applications. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4405.


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        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Handle data in PL/SQL blocks
         • Utilize PL/SQL processing
         • Create stored procedures
         • Create stored functions
         • Create packages
         • Identify direct and indirect program unit dependencies
         • Create triggers
         • Utilize Oracle-supplied packages
         • Optimize SQL and PL/SQL statement processing

   ICT 4461 SQL SERVER WITH LAB (MCIS 4423)
        This course is an introduction to Microsoft SQL Server 2005 for both the DBA
        and Developer. The key new features of SQL Server 2005 are introduced and
        explored, and the various editions of SQL Server 2005 are contrasted. In-depth
        coverage is provided on how to use the new Microsoft SQL Server Management
        Studio for both administrative and development tasks. Special emphasis is given
        to query optimization techniques. An introduction to SQL Integration Services,
        SQL Analysis Services and SQL Reporting Services is also presented.
        Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4405.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Understand the differences between the various editions of SQL Server
              2005, and identify when a particular version should be used.
         • Be familiar and comfortable with the features and functionality of the SQL
              Management Studio when it is used for administrative and development
              tasks.
         • Be familiar with the enhancements to T-SQL, and be comfortable with T-
              SQL in general.
         • Understand how and when to use SQL Server stored procedures, using both
              T-SQL and CLR languages.
         • Understand how to design and implement a fault-tolerant SQL Server 2005
              infrastructure.
         • Have some familiarity with SQL Server Integration Services and SQL
              Server Reporting Services.
         • Be familiar with common maintenance tasks for a SQL Server 2005
              database.

   ICT 4462 TRANSACT – SQL PROGRAMMING (MCIS 4440)
        Transact-SQL is the primary programming interface between applications and the
        Microsoft SQL Server database. Transact-SQL can be sent from programs or
        applications to the SQL Server database or can be built into reusable database
        stored procedures. This course focuses on Transact-SQL in a stored procedure
        context. Topics include: basic and advanced SQL, SQL functions, stored
        procedure declaration and execution, cursors, temp tables, error handling,
        transaction management, security, and performance issues. The course uses a



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        combination of lecture, textbook reading assignments, and hands-on lab
        assignments to meet its objectives. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4405.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Solidify and extend their understanding of relational concepts and basic
              SQL as begun in the Database Fundamentals course.
         • Understand the role of Transact-SQL within SQL Server
         • Understand advanced SQL statements
         • Understand Transact-SQL specific functions and constructs
         • Understand stored procedure development and execution concepts including
              program control, error handling, transaction management, nested stored
              procedures, and performance considerations.
         • Understand basics of Transact-SQL Triggers
         • Understand the concept of CLR Stored Procedures

   ICT 4485 OBJECT-ORIENTED DATABASES (MCIS 4485)

        This course examines object-oriented data structures and database sites to give the
        student a strong foundation in cross-platform, object-oriented methodology. The
        concept of intelligent databases is developed and evaluated using current database
        products. Finally, the focus expands to an analysis of cross-platform development
        tools. Students design and build an object-oriented database and examine the tools
        available to build client/server applications upon this database. Prerequisites:
        ICT 4300, ICT 4405.

        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Explain Object-Oriented concepts and terms
         • Identify the advantages and disadvantages of object-relational and object-
             oriented databases
         • Model an object-oriented database
         • Implement object-relational and object-oriented database structures
             Describe and explain the evolving standards and concepts in object-oriented
             database technology




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WEB DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT SPECIALTY
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4300 WEB ENABLED INFORMATION SYSTEMS
        See Above
   ICT 4505 WEBSITE DESIGN & MANAGEMENT (MCIS 4520)
        This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of web page and site
        development. A graphical web authoring tool is used in tandem with a web
        focused imaging application to explore HTML, DHTML, optimization of images
        for web use, and site management. Weekly projects lead to the creation of the
        student's own multilevel website. Emphasis is on a clear navigational scheme and
        pages that demonstrate increasingly sophisticated web development and site
        planning/construction skills. Prerequisites: ICT 3500 or equivalent experience,
        ICT 4300.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Develop a website using the site development process
         • Demonstrate a mastery of basic web page creation using web authoring
              tools covered in class and in tutorials.
         • Use of web authoring tools for maintaining links, managing files, and
              updating files locally and on a remote server.
         • Create and implement graphics on web pages that demonstrate
              understanding of the unique factors in the preparation of graphics for the
              web.

   ICT 4510 ADVANCED WEBSITE DESIGN & MANAGEMENT (MCIS 4525)

        This course explores advanced techniques for web programming using current
        web technologies. Use of JavaScripts, CSS beyond font control, AJAX, and XML
        are covered. Students create an interactive website. This is a hands-on course
        where students apply what they learn as they learn it. Students demonstrate
        mastery of the materials by applying the principles introduced in class to
        laboratory exercises, class discussions, and projects. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT
        4505.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
            • Plan Site Navigation
            • Create Web forms
            • Create Advanced Cascading Style Sheets
            • Write and debug JavaScript
            • Discuss the Document Object Model and innerHTML
            • Create well-formed XML documents
            • Create AJAX enabled Web pages
            • Discuss server-side scripting languages
            • Create a dynamic Website



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   ICT 4515 USABILITY DESIGN FOR WEBSITES (MCIS 4595)
        This course expands the student's basic knowledge of Web page and website
        development (ICT 4505) by providing in-depth understanding of how to design
        Web applications with the user in mind. Students gain knowledge about how the
        fields of human factors engineering and psychology (e.g., visual perception,
        cognition, learning, and memory) relate to usability design as well as how
        usability assessments are conducted. Usability guidelines, design problems and
        design strengths, and best practices for common functions such as Web
        navigation, menus, scrolling, graphics and icons are explored. The class is a
        combination of lectures and lab experiences, culminating in the student's
        developing a website, conducting a usability evaluation, and reporting on the
        results and recommendations from the evaluation. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT
        4505.

        At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to:
         • Develop a website, following the latest usability guidelines published by the
             US Government Dept of Health and Human Services
         • Identify the fundamental aspects of human psychology and human factors
             engineering that affect usability of a website
         • Discuss the importance of accessibility (vs. usability) in designing a website
         • Describe various methods of conducting usability assessments of websites
             and how to apply results of such assessments to improve web design.

ADVANCED STUDY COURSES
   ICT 4540 XML APPS DEVELOPMENT (MCIS 4540)
        XML is an open, text-based markup language that provides structural and
        semantic information to data. This "data about data," or metadata, provides
        additional meaning and context to the application using it, and allows for a new
        level of management and manipulation of web-based information. This course
        focuses on the implementation of XML and covers XML basics including its
        structure and syntax, scripting XML, document classes, and XML as data.
        Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4505, ICT 4510.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Explain the syntax of XML.
         • Create well-formed XML documents.
         • Display an XML document in a Web browser.
         • Create a data island in a Web page.
         • Display XML data in a Web table.
         • Create a Document Type Definition.
         • Create valid XML documents.
         • Describe Schemas




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   ICT 4550 FLASH I WITH LAB (MCIS 4550)
        This course provides an introduction to the Flash Platform focusing on the design
        and development of rich, visual projects. Students learn the basics of authoring in
        the Flash environment through readings, lectures, and projects dealing with the
        creation and modification of Flash assets, working with the timeline and stage to
        create compelling animation sequences, importing external assets, and developing
        basic interactivity. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4505, ICT 4510.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Create/Modify graphic elements within Flash
         • Construct composite elements
         • Work within single and multiple layers
         • Manage and organize Flash elements
         • Perform tweening animation
         • Code basic interactivity using buttons
         • Work with Sound and Video medium
         • Explain different type of Publishing formats in Flash

   ICT 4555 FLASH II: ACTION SCRIPT DEVELOPMENT WITH LAB (MCIS 4555)
        Flash ActionScript Development Participation in this course provides a solid
        understanding of ActionScript programming concepts. Students learn basic
        syntax and become familiar with many of the classes and methods available to
        them when writing for the Flash Platform. This course provides a strong
        emphasis on the development of custom classes and their proper implementation
        for Flash-based application development. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4505, ICT
        4510, ICT 4550.

        At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to:
         • Use pre‐built methods, functions, and properties.
         • Apply conditional logic to projects.
         • Make use of array structures and looping mechanisms.
         • Create custom classes and methods.
         • Employ event listeners and callback functions.
         • Hook into the library panel asset pool.
         • Use pre‐built components effectively.
         • Employ a number of debug tools during development.
         • Use sound and video elements within a project.


   ICT 4560 WEB GRAPHICS PRODUCTION (MCIS 4560)
        This course introduces the fundamental concepts and techniques of digital
        graphics creation and image processing for both online publication and website
        interface design. Students learn the basics of correcting color and image flaws in
        scanned images, bitmap painting tools, vector drawing tools, typography,
        masking, rollovers and image slicing, production techniques, and selective




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        optimization. Integration of images into a website layout employing CSS is also
        covered. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4505, ICT 4510.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Work with bitmapped images
         • Work with vector images
         • Work with Text Assets
         • Enhance imported content
         • Implement masking effects
         • Work with layer effects and blend modes
         • Create GIF-based animation
         • Create a full webpage composition
         • Have a basic understanding of web design concepts

   ICT 4561 WEB PORTAL DEVELOPMENT WITH LAB (MCIS 4561)
        This course introduces students to programming web applications using PHP and
        MySQL. The course covers the core functionality of PHP to build web
        applications. Topics include form processing, database access and object oriented
        programming with PHP and MySQL. Students write a small scale web portal that
        includes an address book, an appointment book/calendar, a photo album and a
        bulletin board. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4505, ICT 4510.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will have learned:
          •   PHP Fundamentals: Language syntax; data types; strings; arrays; classes
              and objects; date and time manipulation; regular expressions
          •   Web techniques: CGI (The Common Gateway Interface); processing form
              data; cookies; maintaining state and sessions; interacting with the web
              server; file upload
          •   Database interaction: connecting to a database using Pear::DB; error
              handling with Pear::DB; querying with Pear::DB; creating, updating, and
              deleting database records with Pear::DB
          •   Putting it all together: Using page templates for a common look and feel;
              writing modular and extensible applications; complex form processing;
              tracking hierarchical data

   ICT 4570 WEB SCRIPTING WITH JAVASCRIPT/ECMA (MCIS 4570)
        This course presents students with the principles and uses of client-side scripting.
        In addition to presenting real world examples of JavaScript, students build a
        simple website utilizing JavaScript to enrich the visitor experience. In addition to
        learning how to write beginner and intermediate scripts, students are introduced to
        advanced JavaScript topics including the Document Object Model (DOM) and
        Object Oriented JavaScript. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4505, ICT 4510.

        At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to:
         • Describe and use:
            ─ The environment for JavaScript


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            ─JavaScript literals and variables
            ─JavaScript control structures
            ─JavaScript objects
            ─Regular expressions in JavaScript
          • Write JavaScript code to:
           ─ Validate HTML forms
           ─ Display a clock and timer
           ─ Change the appearance of a web page
           ─ Maintain state and use Cookies
           ─ Run correctly in multiple web browsers
          • You should also know how to:
           ─ Research JavaScript tips and tricks online
           ─ Develop reusable JavaScript libraries
           ─ Understand the use of JavaScript in pages on the web

   ICT 4575 DYNAMIC CONTENT: COLD FUSION (MCIS 4575)
        This course introduces students to the concept of developing Web-based
        applications using ColdFusion programming environment. The course covers the
        essentials of connecting data sources, using the CFML language, for presentation
        through a Web interface. Topics covered include retrieving and updating data,
        creating forms, creating search interfaces, publishing and maintaining data
        through the Web. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4505, ICT 4510.

        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Identify the process in creating a web application.
         • Create a relational database
         • Write Structured Query Language (SQL) statements
         • Construct composite elements
         • Create web forms to add, edit and delete database information
         • Create a design document for a web database application
         • Implement multiple methods of reusing code
         • Define and use ColdFusion variables
         • Write various conditional logic statements
         • Create a content management system

   ICT 4576 RICH INTERNET APPLICATIONS: FLEX (NEW COURSE)
        This course introduces students to the concept of developing Rich Internet
        Applications using Flex. This course covers the essentials of developing an
        engaging user experience, connecting to external data from numerous sources,
        and developing with best architectural and coding practices. Topics covered
        include development with Flex Builder, MXML and ActionScript programming,
        visual features of the development API, and data access functions. Although the
        focus of this course is on Flex application development, a number of ecosystem
        topics are touched on: using Flash IDE for skinning and visuals, using AIR for
        desktop deployment, using BlazeDS for multi-user applications, and using Flash
        Catalyst for improving the designer/developer workflow. Please note, during this


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        course each student builds their own working Flex RIA. Prerequisites: ICT 3400
        or equivalent experience, ICT 4300, ICT 4505, ICT 4510.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Apply best architectural and coding practices
        • Use Flash IDE for skinning and visuals
        • Use AIR for desktop deployment
        • Use BlazeDS for multi-user applications
        • Use Flash Catalyst for improving the designer/developer workflow
        • Build a Flex RIA




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INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY SPECIALTY
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4300 WEB ENABLED INFORMATION SYSTEMS
        See Above
   ICT 4605 IS SECURITY PRINCIPLES (MCIS 4640)
        This course is the first of two pertaining to the ten security subject domains in the
        Common Body of Knowledge created and maintained by the International
        Information System Security Certification Consortium, Inc. (ISC)2 . Coursework
        examines the first five domains: security management practices, access control
        systems, network security, cryptography, and security architecture. Topics include
        development of effective security policies, access control techniques, VPN,
        encryption and common flaws associated with system architectures. All topics are
        discussed in the context of a total enterprise-wide framework. Prerequisites: ICT
        4300.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Author a high level Information Systems Security Policy.
         • Explain different types of security breaches that must be addressed and
              overcome.
         • Describe the activities associated with managing, administering and
              controlling the security program within an enterprise or business
              environment.
   ICT 4610 TCP/IP NETWORKS (MCIS 4700)
        This course explores the basic operation of the TCP/IP protocol stack including its
        history, development, current applications, and future implications. The full range
        of TCP/IP protocols from IP and TCP to basic RPC issues and application
        protocols such as SMTP, FTP, and HTTP are studied. Students also study TCP/IP
        capabilities, alternatives, security, and performance issues, Mechanisms for
        Internet connectivity for homes and businesses are also covered. Prerequisites:
        ICT 4300.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Identify and explain critical events in the history of the Internet, explain the
              applications which stimulated its growth. Determine how these may affect
              the future of the Internet
         • Define and explain terms and acronyms used in the Internet community
         • Explain the underlying technology of the Internet, the TCP/IP protocol suite,
              Internet applications, and how to apply them
         • Analyze the development of the Internet and assess its potential role as a
              model for the development of a national information infrastructure
         • Develop a block diagram of a Internet Connection from a home dial-in
              perspective and a business Local Area Network system, showing all of the
              major components required for a functioning system
         • Examine performance and reliability issues when recommending an Internet
              access strategy for a small or large business


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   ICT 4615 COMPUTER AND PHYSICAL SECURITY (MCIS 4675)
        Controlling access to computers and controlling access to a building can no longer
        be viewed as two separate worlds. Today, IT access control and physical security
        need to be integrated if organizations are to be fully protected from threats. This
        course concentrates on seeing IT access control as integrated with physical
        security within an organization. Students investigate how various technologies
        and methodologies can work together to manage access to computer systems; how
        to manage elements of physical security; and the issues involved in creating a
        unified and complete enterprise security system. Security technologies to
        physically protect an organization's people, facility and resources, access control
        techniques and administration, identification and authentication techniques and
        methods of attack are emphasized. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4610.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Describe the requirements and select the appropriate logical access control
              mechanisms given a set of systems requiring protection and a set of users
              who access those systems.
         • Describe the essential differences between discretionary access controls and
              mandatory access controls and the models that implement them.
         • Explain the strengths and weaknesses of remote access security protocols
              and mechanisms to determine the best set of solutions for a given network
              access problem.
         • Describe the problems with passwords and how multi-factor access control
              systems eliminate the need for traditional passwords and password
              management systems.
         • Describe the typical security elements contained within a Secure
              Compartmentalized Information Facility (SCIF).
         • Explain the operational value of and the difference between physical threat
              assessment and physical vulnerability assessment applicable to the
              information technology (IT) environment.
         • Describe the human and technological features and options for achieving the
              effective layered perimeter and asset protection plan applicable to IT.
         • Describe the convergence of physical and logical access controls, including
              integration of access control and other management systems, identification
              technologies, and challenges in implementation.

ADVANCED STUDY COURSES
   ICT 4670 DISASTER RECOVERY & OPS SECURITY (MCIS 4670)
        This course focuses on the planning and operations security required to
        effectively recover from natural disasters and security attacks and to ensure the
        operations and integrity of computer systems and staff. Topics include defining
        continuity requirements, choosing appropriate recovery strategies and
        understanding the key elements of a continuity plan. Students create a Business
        Continuity Plan including business impact analysis, recovery strategies, and
        recovery plan implementation. The course also provides an understanding of


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        controls over resources, facilities, hardware, systems, and the people who create,
        modify, and use them. Control mechanisms and operations security "best
        practices" will be identified. Prerequisites: ICT 3000 or equivalent experience.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
        • Apply Operational Security concepts to:
            ─ Design, implement, and manage controls over facilities, computer
                systems, and the personnel responsible for their creation and maintenance
            ─ Measure, analyze, and evaluate the effectiveness of Administrative
                Management controls.
        • Plan for Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity
           ─ Identify and prioritize key business functions
           ─ Project the impact of various types and severity of interruption events on
               the business.
        • Plan and test emergency responses to counter business interruption.


   ICT 4685 CYBER-SECURITY LAW (MCIS 4685)
        Some commentators have indicated that the Internet is like the Wild West, with
        no real rules or people to enforce them. Nothing could be further from the truth.
        Dozens of federal and state laws govern cyber-crime. Many other laws establish
        security obligations. As a means of assuring compliance with privacy
        requirements, security must also be maintained in order to protect company
        assets, prevent interruption of computer activity, or interference of company
        image, data, products, or services. This course explores the civil and criminal
        bases for liability regarding lapses in computer security and legal methods of
        defending companies from unauthorized computer activity. Students learn about
        techniques for investigating illegal or unauthorized computer behavior. Forensic
        methods for gathering evidence of such behavior are also discussed. Efforts to
        maintain secure systems are fraught with ethical issues which must be resolved in
        the course of performing the security functions described. Students learn about
        generally accepted ethical standards and, specifically, about the Code of Ethics of
        the CISSP. Prerequisites: ICT 3000 or equivalent experience.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Analyze statutes and regulations to understand the behavior required or
              prohibited and the policy underlying the rule.
         • Apply deductive reasoning to apply specific rules to a factual situation.
         • Show writing and language skills to make meaning specific and
              understandable to those who need to enforce it later.
         • Explain the primary statutes relating to computer security including, among
              others:
              ─ 18 USC 1030, The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act
              ─ CRS, Colorado Computer Crime Act
              ─ 18 USC 2501 & 18 USC 2701, Electronic Communications Privacy Act
              ─ The Privacy Protection Act
              ─ 18 USC 1028, The Counterfeit Access Device Act
              ─ 18 USC 1029, Counterfeit Access Document Act



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              ─ 18 USC 1831, The Economic Espionage Act
              ─ Restatement of Law Trade Secrets
              ─ Colorado Theft of Trade Secrets Act
          •   Describe the judicial system and the relationship of facts to statutory
              requirements and making a statutory claim.

   ICT 4690 COMPUTER FORENSICS WITH LAB (MCIS 4690)
        This course is concerned with providing an overview of the methods and tools
        utilized for collecting and preserving electronic digital evidence for the computer
        forensic process; the forensic examination, analysis, and report writing; and
        preparing for courtroom testimony about the forensic results. The course is
        supplemented by hands-on-exercises, case studies, and a moot court exercise in
        which each student testifies. Prerequisites: ICT 4300, ICT 4605, ICT 4610.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Explain the fundamentals of the science of computer forensics and]
              demonstrate the ability to perform a basic computer forensic analysis
         • Use industry best-practices for the preservation of digital evidence for the
              computer forensic process and report writing
         • Explain the federal and state laws that apply to the forensic analysis of
              computer
         • Experience the process of testifying in court concerning the results of a
              computer forensic examination and analysis

   ICT 4695 APPLICATION SECURITY (MCIS 4695)
        In this course, students explore the security concepts that apply to application
        software development. Topics include design models, lifecycle management,
        actual vs. perceived specifications and change control process. Students learn
        ways to detect systems defects, and recover from attacks. Prerequisites: ICT
        4300, ICT 4605, ICT 4610.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Integrate architecture reviews and security assessments into the software life
              cycle development processes
         • Describe security principles and architecture basics, including the impact of
              security products and security infrastructure components on applications
         • Evaluate various types of software controls and implementation
         • Apply database concepts and security issues
         • Evaluate middleware, application, database and operating system security
         • Make trade-off decisions in balancing security against other architectural
              goals such as high availability and reliability




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TELECOMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT SPECIALTY
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4800 TELECOM NETWORKS (TELE 4812, 4837) (NEW COURSE)
        This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of digital networks, including
        the digital bit streams and associated network components, such as channel banks,
        DSU/CSU‟s, routers and intelligent multiplexers. This class covers the principles
        of voice digitization, digital transmission, multiplexing, digital switching, CCITT
        signaling systems, call distribution systems, voice storage systems, PBX systems,
        networks and teleconferencing, management and performance monitoring. DS-1
        framing, channelization, signaling, and line coding are fully explored. The
        transport of IP packets over SONET and ATM systems are examined. The
        differences between packet and switched services are explored by comparing
        TCP/IP to traditional telephony signaling and transport. New developments and
        trends in data communications will also be discussed. Prerequisites: ICT 3800 or
        equivalent experience.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Explain the process of voice digitization.
         • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of various digital transmission
              hardware and protocols.
         • Explain the CCITT signaling systems recommendations.
         • Explain the TCP/IP stack and its usage in modern packet networks.
         • Describe the relationship between TCP/IP and modern digital circuit
              switched networks that use DSL, SONET, and ATM.
         • Given the voice communication requirements of an organization, including
              potential applications for voice processing technologies, develop a plan
              showing the basic system and network connections
         • Develop requirements for digital access networks.
         • Document the recommended layout.
         • Determine the steps necessary to build a functional configuration as
              specified by the design and implementation plan.
         • Compare and contrast different access devices
         • Explain different techniques and tests to verify the functionality of the
              network to ensure it functions as specified.

   ICT 4805 CONVERGENCE TECHNOLOGIES (TELE 4872, 4706) (NEW COURSE)
        This course examines the advances in digital technology that are driving the
        convergence of the telecommunications and computing industries. This course
        delineates the top telecommunications macro-trends currently impacting the
        worldwide telecom industry, providing a definition for each macro-trend as well
        as a related high-level technical/business impact analysis. The differences
        between centrally controlled and edge controlled networks are examined.
        Technologies covered include the rise of edge-controlled services, fixed mobile
        convergence, Voice Over IP, video streaming, and social networks. Prerequisites:
        ICT 4800.


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        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Describe and compare past developments, present technology and future
              trends in digital communications.
         • Describe the operation of data, voice, wireless and optical communication
              systems and their convergence.
         • Create information in a variety of digital media and formats such as web
              design, digital video, digital audio and digital photo imaging.
         • Compare and contrast the different methods and formats for the storage and
              transmission of digital information including radio transmission, fiber optic
              transmission and web-based dissemination.
         • Explain a variety of digital file types and packet protocols.
         • Evaluate concepts of voice, data and multiple format information networks
              using both fiber optic and copper-based technologies.
         • Use mathematics and scientific principles as they apply to digital
              communication.

   ICT 4810 CLIENT RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT (TELE 4110)
        With the constantly increasing competition in the information and
        communications technology market, understanding and serving the customer has
        never been more important. Students in this course learn to research and identify
        customer needs, measure customer satisfaction, and evaluate competition in the
        market. Students also examine effective systems for managing customer service
        and methods of relationship management. Prerequisites: none.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Identify and assess customer needs and wants in the telecom/broadband,
              CATV & Internet sectors
         • Measure customer satisfaction and evaluate organizational performance in
              meeting customer expectations
         • Assess customer relationship management techniques and systems; evaluate
              effectiveness of techniques and systems for their organization
         • Demonstrate how to create and leverage a client relations management
              strategy as a competitive advantage

   ICT 4815 GLOBAL TELECOM REGULATION (TELE 4140, 4705) (NEW COURSE)
        This is an introductory course in telecommunications policy and regulation. The
        course concentrates on global and domestic policy-making institutions, the policy
        making process, and the values and goals for telecommunications policy-making
        in an information society. It evaluates current and alternative theories of
        regulation in terms of economic incentives and market impacts. Students are
        introduced to current legal and regulatory issues of interconnection between
        carriers and issues surrounding wireless networks. Other topics covered are
        international and federal spectrum policies, the state of regulations, competition
        across technologies, and homeland security. Students also are exposed to the FCC
        rules and regulations, as well as IEEE requirements to meet the FCC regulations.
        Prerequisites: ICT 4800.



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        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Explain the statutory & legal bases for government intervention into the
              marketplace.
         • Discuss the basic features of the Telecommunications Act of 1996
         • Acquire the knowledge for making, costing and pricing decisions in an
              emerging competitive telecommunications market.
         • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of traditional Rate of return regulation
              and understand the bases for alternative forms of regulation.
         • Analyze the changes which undermined the regulatory assumptions and
              determine how they led to competition in telecommunications
         • Compare and contrast the institutional structure, jurisdictions and
              interrelationships of government regulatory bodies.

ADVANCED STUDY COURSES
        None




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BROADBAND NETWORKS SPECIALTY
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4800 TELECOM NETWORKS (TELE 4812)
        See Above
   ICT 4820 BROADBAND TRANSPORT (TELE 4842, 4819, 4821) (NEW COURSE)
        This course is designed to provide an overview of broadband communications
        systems, with a focus on layer 2 systems and technologies. A simple
        communications network is introduced and expanded to include high-speed
        digital data communications. Broadband network examples such as SONET,
        ATM and IN supported by BISDN platforms are discussed. A variety of public
        carrier transport technologies are explored in some detail, including spread
        spectrum wireless networks, fiber-optic systems, CATV cable and DSL access
        technologies. Network design, installation and systems management, including
        security and troubleshooting issues are analyzed. The underlying engineering of
        these systems is explored, including network, traffic, and capacity planning.
        Attention is given to the advantages and disadvantages of various options for
        broadband transport, and how they are used today in both core and edge networks.
        Prerequisites: ICT 4800.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Demonstrate the ability to apply basic engineering principals for
              communications systems to broadband networks.
         • Compare the differences between time, space, and frequency (or
              wavelength) multiplexing.
         • Develop basic and advanced transport systems concepts for various
              technologies.
         • Understand the principles behind broadband wireless transport systems and
              their applications
         • Describe the fundamental components of fiber optic systems.
         • Identify the uses and methods of installation for different types of cables.
         • Recognize the need for multiplexing equipment for fiber systems.
         • Use optical system networking design concepts to plan a system.
         • Recognize global applications of fiber optic systems.
         • Describe the use of basic traffic engineering principals including queuing
              theory, measures of traffic density, and call arrival models.
         • Compare and contrast different components of a cable, wireless and fiber
              optic system.
         • Develop a block diagram of a cable system showing all the major
              components required for a functioning system.
         • Explain how fiber optics is replacing copper cable in the backbone feeder
              portion of broadband networks.
         • Compare and contrast applications of a Host Digital Terminal (HDT),
              interactive TV, and Video on demand.
         • Compare and contrast Direct Broadcast Systems, SMATV, and MMDS.



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   ICT 4825 NETWORK MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (TELE 4838)
        This course provides an extensive introduction to the concept of Network
        management. The fundamentals of network management, the SNMP framework,
        and OSI systems management are discussed. In addition, students become
        familiar with commercially available network management platforms.
        Prerequisites: ICT 4800.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Explain the underlying concepts and technologies of NMS, and whether and
              how to apply them in business use
         • Determine the steps necessary to install a given NMS technology for
              support of an existing or proposed corporate or enterprise network
              infrastructure
         • Develop a simple block diagram of a typical NMS system, showing all of
              the major components required for a functioning system
         • Assemble all the hardware, software and services.
         • Examine performance and reliability issues when recommending a NMS
              strategy for a small or large business
         • Explain how to monitor network performance and factors that impact on
              performance.

   ICT 4830 BROADBAND WIRELESS NETWORKS (EXPAND TELE 4703)
        This course examines wireless telecommunication networks. The wireless
        telecom industry is studied from standards, carriers, and technology perspectives.
        Various wireless telecom networks and protocols are presented. The “triple play”
        convergence of voice, video, and data over wireless networks is analyzed. Voice
        Over IP is also studied with reference to Quality of Service. Prerequisites: ICT
        4800 & ICT 4820.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Recognize the fundamental concepts of communications.
         • Describe the fundamental components of a wireless network.
         • Identify the technologies utilized in a wireless network.
         • Recognize the standards for wireless networks including the Institute of
              Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) 802.11 Standard.
         • Determine the interface and carrier requirements for a wireless network.
         • Recognize the protocols that are utilized for wireless networks.
         • Recognize how voice, data, and video transmission are converging on a
              wireless network.
         • Become proficient and fast at solving problems similar to the problems on
              the certification tests by working and analyzing the solutions for key
              concepts.




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ADVANCED STUDY COURSES
   ICT 4850 SIGNALING PROTOCOLS (INCORPORATE TELE 4860, 4876, 4878) (NEW
   COURSE)
        This course provides an overview of the voice processing industry and the
        technologies which are available now and planned for the future, including
        carrier-based intelligent network (IN) services, voice signaling protocols, both
        traditional and voice over IP (VoIP). This course provides a broad introduction to
        VoIP. VoIP issues covered include the technological, economic, and regulatory
        factors that have contributed to the current state of voice services. Additional
        topics covered include: motivation and business drivers, enabling infrastructure
        and protocols, traffic and performance issues, packet voice technologies including
        SIP, voice coding techniques and standards, and an introduction to the Asterisk
        open source soft switch. Prerequisites: ICT 4800, ICT 4820.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Define and explain terms and acronyms used in the interactive voice
              processing community
         • Understand the underlying technologies of interactive voice processing, and
              whether and how to apply them in business use
         • Explain the underlying technologies of Intelligent Networks
         • Evaluate the fitness of any given network technology for support of a
              corporate or enterprise interactive voice processing infrastructure
         • Develop a simple block diagram of a connected business interactive voice
              processing system, showing all of the major components required for a
              functioning system
         • Examine performance and reliability issues when recommending a digital
              voice technology strategy for a small or large business
         • Discuss interactive voice processing current events in terms of appropriate
              concepts and vocabulary
         • Determine the steps necessary to construct an Intelligent Network system.
         • Develop a block diagram of an Intelligent Network system, showing all of
              the major components required for a functioning system
         • Document the performance and reliability issues when creating a new
              Intelligent Network service
         • Define and explain terms and acronyms used in the VoIP community
         • Explain the underlying technologies of VoIP, and whether and how to apply
              them in business use
         • Evaluate the fitness of any given network technology for support of a
              corporate or enterprise VoIP infrastructure
         • Develop a simple block diagram of a connected business VoIP system,
              showing all of the major components required for a functioning system
         • Examine performance and reliability issues when recommending a VoIP
              strategy for a small or large business
         • Discuss VoIP current events in terms of appropriate concepts and
              vocabulary




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   ICT 4860 DESIGN & IMPLEMENTATION OF WIRELESS NETWORKS (TELE 4704)
        This course focuses on using analytical and simulation methods to evaluate,
        design, and manage wireless networks and protocols. Topics include network
        design, planning and engineering, site surveys, integration and testing, QoS, and
        OSS. Strategies to improve performance and troubleshooting challenges, such as
        multipath interference problems, are investigated. Prerequisites: ICT 4800, ICT
        4830.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Understand how to gather and document needed information by
              interviewing prospective clients
         • Explain the technical aspects and information collection procedures
              involved in an RF Site Survey
         • Familiarization of Site Survey test tools and familiarity how to use them.
         • Wireless network site planning
         • Customer reporting requirements and reporting methodology




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TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY SPECIALTY
CORE COURSES
   ICT 4800 TELECOM NETWORKS (TELE 4812, 4837)
        See Above
   ICT 4835 ENTERPRISE NETWORKS (TELE 4877)
        This course provides an advanced understanding of enterprise computer networks.
        Topics covered include network analysis and design, switching, routing, traffic
        analysis, and the logical and physical design of complex networks. The course
        also covers integration, testing and implementation issues. Prerequisites: ICT
        4800.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Compare and contrast different the data communications hardware, software
              and transmission facilities.
         • Explain the four-layer network model, a foundation for data
              communications and networking.
         • Explain detail architecture of four layers relating to the OSI model.
         • Describe the internet/intranet architecture and associated protocols.
         • Design a LAN, WAN and backbone network.
         • Design an IP address plan for a small organization.
         • Implement a small routed network using RIP routing, and show the routing
              table for each router.
         • Explain the differences between RIP, OSPF and BGP in their common
              usages.
         • Explain the client- server architecture.
         • Describe the issues involved in network design, management, and security.
         • Describe the new technologies, which will affect network applications in the
              future.

   ICT 4840 WIRELESS APPLICATION SERVICES (TELE 4700, 4701) (NEW COURSE)
        This course explores basic operations of wireless data services, including popular
        wireless applications such as WAP, SMS, MMS, IM, mobile email, and TV/video
        services. Voice mobility standards such as GSM and TDMA are introduced.
        Various applications are analyzed in terms of their access protocols and services,
        transport requirements, and content types, as well as implementation and quality
        of service management issues. Issues specific to voice are addressed, including
        cellular network design, traffic concepts, mobility handoff signaling, radio
        resources management, authentication and encryption, services platforms and
        addressing. The course also covers mobile station procedures such as cell
        selection and reselection, handover, location updating, roaming, mobile originated
        and mobile terminated calls. Service provider strategies and trends in convergence
        are also examined. Prerequisites: ICT 4800.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Explain fundamental concepts of wireless data services.


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          •   Describe principle protocols and call flows for WAP, SMS, MMS, IM,
              mobile email and TV/video services.
          •   Explain current video and voice content applications that use wireless
              networks.
          •   Identify and explain basic service management issues for wireless data
              services.
          •   Identify and describe network operator strategies for wireless data services.
          •   Identify and explain network operator challenges and typical solutions from
              case studies in the course.
          •   Identify key 1G, 2G, 2.5 G and 3G wireless standards.
          •   Understand cellular concept and multiple access techniques
          •   Assess speech coding techniques for wireless and implications on network
              capacity
          •   Outline the functionality of GSM System Components and Network
              Structure
          •   Understand the role of the different GSM interfaces
          •   Understand Channel Concept: Physical & Logical Channels – Burst
              Structures
          •   Display understanding of the security features in GSM
          •   Outline basic traffic cases: Call to & from a MS, Handover, Registration,
              Roaming, Paging, etc
          •   Identify limitations of GSM and the reason behind the birth of 3G standards.

   ICT 4845 NETWORK SECURITY WITH LAB (MCIS 4679)
        In this lab, students gain experience in designing and configuring secure networks
        using methodologies, best practices, and security tools. Architecting and
        deploying a secure network are also emphasized. Students focus on real world
        examples of perimeter security and internal network security, which can be used
        in any environment, simple or complex. Prerequisites: ICT 4800, ICT 4835.
        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Conduct basic security test using the tools and techniques employed by
              professional testers against any network or system.
         • Understand ICMP, TCP, and UDP and how they are used to transfer
              information in a networked environment.
         • Exhibit the ability to analyze testing data at the packet level through the use
              of a packet sniffer.
         • Analyze and communicate identified risks to management and technical
              staff.
         • Configure and deploy basic firewall and IDS systems.
         • Demonstrate the ability to identify testing tools, installation of tools, and
              application of tools.
         • Keep up-to-date on security knowledge and skills by utilizing resources of
              security professionals.
         • Align business objectives with security risks.




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ADVANCED STUDY COURSES
   ICT 4861 WIRELESS LANS (TELE 4200)
        Due to their low cost, convenience, and the desire for mobility, Wireless Local
        Area Networks (WLAN) have become a ubiquitous technology. Whether at home,
        at work, or in the local coffee shop, we have come to rely on WLANs to keep us
        connected to our digital world. This course reviews the technologies leading up to
        WLANs, including the latest IEEE 802.x standards governing WLAN design and
        performance. The course takes the student through the latest concepts of signal
        propagation, basic RF theory, and site survey procedures for deploying WLAN
        networks. Security issues are also addressed. Prerequisites: ICT 4800, ICT 4835.

        At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:
         • Design a wireless LAN (WLAN) based on stated requirements.
         • Explain the primary communication methodologies employed in WLAN
             networks.
         • Discuss the history of wireless standards that apply to WLAN.
         • Describe in detail the physical layer and data link layer protocols used in
             WLAN environments.
         • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the various WLAN
             configurations such as mobility, capacity, and security.
         • Identify the hardware and media necessary to implement a WLAN network.
         • Discuss the future of wireless LAN standards and developments




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SPECIAL TOPICS, INTERNSHIPS, AND CAPSTONE
   ICT 4701 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ICT
        From time to time a special topics course may be offered that addresses a new
        issue, a developing concept, industry trends, or new technology.

   ICT 4901 CAPSTONE PROJECT (MCIS 4901)
        The Capstone Project provides students the opportunity to research and explore a
        problem or issue within their field of study. Similar in weight to a thesis, but
        more flexible, this culminating academic endeavor requires students to synthesize
        and apply core concepts acquired from their master‟s degree program. The student
        selects an approved Capstone advisor, who is also knowledgeable in the field of
        study, to serve as a resource, subject-matter expert, and evaluator during the entire
        process. Grading focuses on the quality and professionalism of applied research
        and writing; critical and creative thinking; problem-solving skills; demonstration
        of appropriate method of inquiry, and contribution to the field and topic of study.
        Please see the Capstone Guidelines for additional details. Prerequisites: An
        approved Capstone Proposal (approved by the Capstone Advisor and the
        Academic Director); unconditional admittance as a degree candidate; completion
        of at least 36 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a GPA of 3.0 or
        better; a grade of “B” or better in the writing requirement; and completion of all
        Capstone Project Registration forms according to the Capstone Guidelines.

        Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
           • Select and apply appropriate method of inquiry to explore a relevant
              issue/problem in their chosen field of study
           • Incorporate a level of completeness, quality and professionalism which
              supports project‟s publication on the world wide web
           • Demonstrate knowledge and correct application of the Chicago Manual of
              Style
           • Work cooperatively with the Capstone advisor to explain how their project
              contributes to the field/topic of study
           • Demonstrate critical thinking through the integration of all sections of a
              Capstone Project (as described in the Capstone

   ICT 4902 CAPSTONE COURSE (MCIS 4992)
        Students in this class develop and present solutions to several significant case
        studies from the point of view of a senior information systems manager, program
        manager, or senior technical staff. They also may evaluate other student solutions
        as members of a simulated program review board. They integrate the case study
        material with previous industrial and academic experience in solving individually
        selected problems. Prerequisites: Unconditional acceptance as a degree



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        candidate, completion of at least 36 quarter-hours (including all core courses)
        with a GPA of 3.0 or better, and a B or better in the writing requirement.

   ICT 4980 ICT INTERNSHIP (MCIS 4980)
        The ICT internship is designed to offer students a practical educational experience
        in an industry related setting. The internship is an individualized learning
        experience that is directly related to the knowledge and skills covered in the ICT
        master‟s degree program. Students are responsible for finding their own
        internship site and proposing their internship ideas. University College sends
        notification to all ICT students if they hear of internship possibilities. Students
        may also work through the DU career center to explore opportunities for
        internship experiences. The objectives, activities, responsibilities, and
        deliverables for the internship are defined in a training plan that is developed by
        the student jointly with the internship supervisor at the sponsoring organization.
        The training plan is approved by the academic director. Prerequisites: The student
        must be unconditionally accepted in the ICT degree program, have completed a
        minimum of 28 hours of graduate coursework, including at least two core
        courses, and have earned a GPA of 3.0 or better. Enrollment must be approved by
        the academic director.

   ICT 4991 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ICT


   ICT 4992 DIRECTED STUDY IN ICT




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