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					Issuance Date: December 22, 2009
Closing Date: Feb. 12, 2010
Closing Time: 11:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time

Subject:        Request for Applications (RFA) Number M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001
                “Development Grants Program (DGP)”

Dear Applicants:

The United States Government, through the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Office
of Development Partners (ODP), Division of Private and Voluntary Cooperation (PVC), is
seeking applications from prospective partners that are either Private and Voluntary
Organizations based in the United States (U.S. PVOs) or indigenous, local NGOs (LNGOs) for
the Development Grant Program (DGP). Section 674 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act
(CAA) of 2008 authorizes the DGP.

The Development Grants Program (DGP) will support successful applications for development
activities in the following four sectors for FY 2009 funding: climate change adaptation,
microenterprise, water and sanitation, and dairy. The recipient of a DGP grant will be
responsible for ensuring achievement of the program objectives contributing to USAID’s
development efforts in specified countries. Applications should consider Agency priorities in
Food Security, Global Climate Change, and Global Engagement with new partners, including
Muslim majority countries and Muslim communities. Please refer to the Funding Opportunity for
a complete statement of goals, expected results, and criteria for selection of successful concept
papers and full applications.

Subject to the availability of funds, USAID intends to provide approximately $40 million in total
USAID FY 2009 funding to be obligated in FY2010 and expended up to three years. USAID
reserves the right to fund any or none of the applications submitted. Applications received after
the deadline may be able to resubmit them for the FY 2010 DGP.

For the purposes of this program, this RFA is being issued and consists of this cover letter and
the following:

       1.   Section I – Funding Opportunity Description
       2.   Section II – Award Information
       3.   Section III – Eligibility Information
       4.   Section IV – Application and Submission Information
       5.   Section V – Instructions for the Full Application
       6.   Section VI – Full Application Evaluation Criteria
       7.   Appendices

If your organization decides to submit an application, it should be received no later than 11:00
am on February 12, 2010. Applicants must meet the requirements of eligibility of this RFA.


Following are the estimated dates of major procurement events:
 Application Timeline

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             DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

Date                   Event
February 12, 2010      Deadline for receipt of Concept Papers (Step 1)
March 19, 2010         Applicants notified of decisions by USAID Mission. Invitations to
                       selected Applicants to submit Full Application (Step 2)
April 30, 2010         Submission deadline for Full Application
June 11, 2010          Applicants notified whether they are recommended for awards


It is the responsibility of the recipient of the application document to ensure that it has been
received from www.grants.gov in its entirety and USAID bears no responsibility for data errors
resulting from transmission or conversion processes.

In the event of an inconsistency between the documents comprising this RFA, it shall be
resolved by the following descending order of precedence:

       (a)       Section III - Selection Criteria;
       (b)       Section II - Grant Application Instructions;
       (c)       Section I - Definitions and Acronyms, Program Background and Overview;
       (d)       This Cover Letter.

For the purposes of this RFA, the term "Grant" is synonymous with "Cooperative Agreement,"
"Grantee" is synonymous with "Recipient," and "Grant Officer" is synonymous with "Agreement
Officer."

Issuance of this RFA does not constitute an award commitment on the part of the Government,
nor does it commit the Government to pay for costs incurred in the preparation and submission
of an application. In addition, final award of any resultant grant(s) cannot be made until funds
have been fully appropriated, allocated, and committed through internal USAID procedures.
While it is anticipated that these procedures will be successfully completed, potential applicants
are hereby notified of these requirements and conditions for award. Applications are submitted
at the risk of the applicant; should circumstances prevent award of a cooperative agreement, all
preparation and submission costs are at the applicant's expense.

Pursuant to 22 CFR 226.81, USAID policy is not to award profit under assistance instruments.
However, all reasonable, allocable, and allowable expenses, both direct and indirect, which are
related to the grant program and are in accordance with applicable cost standards (22 CFR 226,
OMB Circular A-122 for non-profit organization, OMB Circular A-21 for universities, and the
Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 31 for-profit organizations), may be paid under the
grant. The federal grant process is now web-enabled, allowing for applications to be received
on-line. USAID bears no responsibility for data errors resulting from transmission or conversion
processes associated with electronic submissions. To be eligible for award, the applicant must
provide all required information in its application, including the requirements found in any
attachments to the Grants.gov opportunity.

Once you have reviewed the RFA, we welcome your questions. Any questions concerning
this RFA should be submitted in writing no later than January 12, 2010 to QA-
DGP2@usaid.gov. Responses will be posted on www.grants.gov within two weeks as an
amendment to the RFA as well as on the PVC website. If there are problems downloading the
RFA from www.grants.gov, please contact support@grants.gov. The RFA can also be
downloaded from the PVC website: http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/cross-
cutting_programs/private_voluntary_cooperation/dgp.html

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             DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

We appreciate your interest in partnering with USAID and wish you the best.


Sincerely,



Karen D.Turner                                    Portia Persley
                                                  Office of Acquisition and Assistance
Office of Development Partners                    USAID/M/OAA
USAID/ODP




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           DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

ACRONYMS

ADS         Automated Directives System
CA          Cooperative Agreement
CAP         Capable Partners NGO Strengthening Program
CBO         Community-Based Organizations
CD          Compact Disk
C02         Carbon Dioxide
CFR         Code of Federal Regulations
CO2e        Carbon Dioxide equivalent
CSO         Civil Society Organizations
CTO         Cognizant Technical Officer
CV          Curriculum Vitae
DCA         Development Credit Authority
DGP         Development Grants Program
DDR         Disaster Risk Reduction
EEO         Equal Employment Opportunity
FICA        Federal Insurance Contributions Act
FY          (US Government) Fiscal Year (October 1 – September 30)
GCC         Global Climate Change
GDA         Global Development Alliance
GIS         Geographic Information Systems
GPS         Global Positioning System
IIE         Initial Environmental Examination
INGO        International Non-Governmental Organizations
MDG         Millennium Development Goals
MFI         Microfinance Institution
MS          Microsoft
MSE         Micro and Small Enterprises
LNGOs       Local Non-Governmental Organizations (also referred to as “indigenous NGOs”)
NICRA       Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement
ODP         Office of Development Partners
OFDA        Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance
OFAC        Office of Foreign Assets Control
OMB         Office of Management and Budget
POU         Point of Use (Water projects)
PMP         Program Monitoring Plan
PPP         Public-Private Partnerships
PVC         Private and Voluntary Cooperation Division
RFA         Request for Applications
RFCP        Request for Concept Papers
TBD         To Be Determined
TDY         Temporary Duty Assignment
US PVOs     Private Voluntary Organizations
UN          United Nations
UNFCCC      United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
UNSC        United Nations Security Council
USAID/W     United States Agency for International Development/Washington
USG         United States Government
WRM         Water Resources Management
WSSH        Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene

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                 DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001


    Office Name:
    Office of Development Partners
    Private and Voluntary Cooperation Division
    USAID/ODP/PVC
                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS




                   ACRONYMS ......................................................................................................... 4

SECTION 1. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION..................................................... 7
           A. BACKGROUND.............................................................................................. 8
           B. PROGRAM PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES.............................................. 8
           C. AGENCY PRIORITIES.................................................................................. 9
           D. USAID MANAGEMENT OF THE DGP..................................................... 11
           E. CAPACITY BUILDING ASSISTANCE ...................................................... 11
           F. SUBSTANTIAL INVOLVEMENT................................................................ 12
           G. KEY PERSONNEL ...................................................................................... 13
           H. REPORTING................................................................................................. 13
           I. AUTHORIZED GEOGRAPHIC CODE ...................................................... 14
           J. GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS AND SECTORS ................................................. 14
           K. DETAILED SECTOR DESCRIPTIONS .................................................... 15

SECTION 2. AWARD INFORMATION .................................................................................. 31

SECTION 3. ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION........................................................................... 31
           A. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS................................................................. 31
           B. DGP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS......................................................... 31

SECTION 4. CONCEPT PAPER SUBMISSION INFORMATION...................................... 33
           A. CONCEPT PAPER SUBMISSION (STEP 1) ........................................ 33
           B. CONCEPT PAPER FORMAT AND INSTRUCTIONS.......................... 33
           C. CONCEPT PAPER EVALUATION CRITERIA...................................... 35

SECTION 5: FULL APPLICATION......................................................................................... 37
           A. FULL APPLICATION SUBMISSION (STEP 2....................................... 37
           B. FULL APPLICATION FORMAT AND INSTRUCTIONS....................... 37
           C. COST/BUSINESS APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS ........................... 42
           D. FULL APPLICATION SELECTION REVIEW CRITERIA .................... 45
           E. ENVIRONMENTAL PROCEDURES....................................................... 46

SECTION 6. AGENCY POLICIES AND CERTIFICATIONS.............................................. 47
           A. BRANDING .................................................................................................. 47
           B. MARKING UNDER ASSISTANCE INSTRUMENTS ............................. 47
           C. USAID DISABILITY POLICY .................................................................... 52
           D. CERTIFICATIONS...................................................................................... 52


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                   DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

APPENDICES............................................................................................................................. 67
         A. MICROENTERPRISE:.................................................................................. 67
         B. WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION ....................................................... 69
         C. DAIRY ............................................................................................................ 71
         D. CLIMATE CHANGE
         ADAPTATION……………………………………………………………….….72
         E. USAID PARTICIPATING MISSIONS AND MISSION
         SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ................................................................. 73
         F. USAID MISSION CONTACT INFORMATION ....................................... 106
         G. SF-424 FORMS AND INSTRUCTIONS................................................. 112




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          DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001


                  SECTION 1. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION

Pursuant to Automated Directive System (ADS) 303.3.5.2.a, this section includes a general
description of the proposed program, a statement identifying the authorizing legislation, and
a discussion of how the award will be administered.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has established the
Development Grants Program (DGP) under the Office of Development Partners, Private and
Voluntary Cooperation Division (ODP/PVC), as a small grants program for development
activities that respond to overall USAID priorities and support selected USAID Missions’
strategic objectives and sector priorities.

While the term “grant” is used in the title, Development Grants Program, and elsewhere in
the RFA, the assistance to be awarded through this program will be a Cooperative
Agreement (CA) designed to enable USAID to engage and collaborate with organizations
having limited or no experience working directly with USAID. A CA provides for substantial
USAID Mission involvement during the award to assist the grantee in achieving the
supported objectives of the agreement.

By increasing the number and quality of NGO implementing partners to meet the needs of
the communities they serve will also contribute effectively to the accomplishment of the
Agency’s goals and objectives in selected USAID countries. Therefore, the DGP offers
USAID and ODP/PVC an opportunity to collaborate with grant recipients to make
contributions to country development objectives and the U.S. Government (USG)’s priorities.
Specifically, Agency priorities address today’s pressing problems of hunger and food
security, global climate change, global health and pandemics, and the need to find new
ways of engaging with countries and communities that have not been traditional USG
partners.

This RFA encourages potential applicants to propose innovative and effective approaches
that contribute to the achievement of development objectives in the sectors specified for
this, the second cycle of DGP funding. Fiscal year 2009 funds for the DGP are available for
activities in the following four sectors: Climate change adaptation, microenterprise, water
and sanitation, and dairy. It is essential that proposals are responsive to the Agency’s
definitions for program activities in the sector or sectors being proposed for use of these FY
2009 funds (See Section C and K).

USAID encourages cost sharing with non-USG partners and the creation of alliances,
particularly public-private partnerships, where appropriate. An "alliance," in this sense, is a
formal agreement between two or more parties created to jointly define and address a
development problem. Alliance partners combine resources, risks and rewards in pursuit of
common objectives. Alliance partners make financial and/or in-kind contributions to
increase the impact and sustainability of development efforts. Both U.S. PVOs and LNGOs
are encouraged to consider alliances with private partners and foundations as a means of
leveraging the DGP program funding for greater impact and sustainability.

   DGP FUNDING

USAID anticipates awarding small grants of $2,000,000 or less under the DGP through this
RFA. All awards will be made on a competitive basis by participating USAID Missions. Total
funding available for the DGP in fiscal year 2009 is approximately $40,000,000.
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          DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001


Awards funded under this RFA will support activities for up to three-year (3) period of
performance.

Issuance of this RFA does not constitute an award commitment on the part of the
Government, nor does it commit the Government to pay for costs incurred in the preparation
and submission of an application. In addition, final awards cannot be made until funds have
been appropriated, allocated, and committed through internal USAID procedures. While it is
anticipated that these procedures will be successfully completed, potential applicants are
hereby notified that all potential awards are subject to the availability of funds. Concept
papers and applications are submitted at the risk of the applicant. All preparation and
submission costs incurred are at the applicant's expense.


A. BACKGROUND

USAID’s past investment and partnership with U.S. PVOs and LNGOs has produced many
substantial development achievements and has resulted in organizations with strengthened
capacity to achieve critical development outcomes. The DGP will build on this foundation of
achievement by entering into direct development relationships with U.S. PVOs and LNGOs
that can make significant contributions to addressing today’s development challenges.

LNGOs and U.S. PVOs work in a wide variety of sectors. Their expertise, experience,
knowledge of local communities and innovative approaches enable them to make important
contributions to achieving USAID’s development objectives. The DGP is intended to expand
USAID’s partnership with LNGOs and U.S. PVOs in recognition of their comparative
advantages working at the local level across sectors, thereby enhancing our joint capability
to meet development objectives in selected countries.

The DGP was created by the enactment of Section 674 of the Consolidated Appropriations
Act of 2008, which promotes direct grant relationships between USAID, U.S. PVOs and
LNGOs. (See http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-
bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=110_cong_house_committee_prints&docid=f:39564j.pdf).


B. PROGRAM PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES

The purpose of the DGP is to create new partnership opportunities with USAID for LNGOs
and U.S. PVOs that have had limited or no prior funding from and experience working
directly with USAID. A key assumption of the DGP is that by expanding USAID’s NGO
network of development partners and providing capacity building support to the new
partners through other supporting initiatives and mechanisms, USAID will be enabling a
wider range of partners to better meet their beneficiaries’ needs and contribute to
development outcomes. Increased U.S.PVO and LNGO capacity will benefit organizational
and programmatic sustainability.

The objectives of the DGP as presented in this Request for Applications are:

   1. Broadened participation in USAID programs of LNGOs and U.S. PVOs with
      experience and expertise relevant to priority USAID and partner country
      development objectives;

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             DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001


       2. Expanded numbers of LNGOs and U.S. PVOs with planning, management and
          service delivery systems adequate to implement USAID-funded activities; and

       3. Measurable contributions to the achievement of the development objectives for
          participating USAID Missions’ country programs, in particular, as they pertain to
          pressing Agency priorities.


    C. AGENCY PRIORITIES

    The DGP supports the foreign assistance priorities of USAID and the U.S. Government. By
    pursuing opportunities to partner with USAID, U.S. PVOs and local NGOs can make
    important contributions to development and humanitarian objectives in vulnerable countries.
    The DGP supports Agency priorities in food security, health (through water and sanitation)
    and global climate change. Missions are addressing these priorities though programs in
    sectors such as economic growth, agriculture and dairy, water supply and sanitation and
    global climate change adaptation. The DGP also strengthens civil society to promote
    transparent and accountable governance.

       C.1 Food Security and Economic Growth

    More than one billion - nearly a sixth of the world's population - suffer from chronic
    hunger. Reducing hunger will set off a positive ripple effect across people's lives,
    communities, countries -- even continents. This cannot be accomplished by short-term
    interventions; it requires addressing the underlying causes of chronic hunger. Advancing
    agriculture-led growth helps rural farmers - who are the majority of the world's food insecure
    population - to grow more food to feed their families and sell more of their products in
    commercial markets. Women account for the majority of the developing world's agricultural
    workforce and produce half of the world's food. Increasing the productivity of women
    farmers translates into significant increases in overall agricultural productivity. Economic
    output could be increased by 15-40 percent and under-nutrition reduced by 15 million
    children simply by providing women with assets equal to those of men. The issues
    confronting those who are very poor are often the same ones encountered by
    women. Addressing these constraints directly will allow women and those who are very poor
    to realize the potential of their labor and accelerate the expansion of rural growth. Through
    leadership and partnerships with civil society in the sectors of microenterprise, water and
    sanitation, climate change adaptation and dairy, the DGP can accelerate actions that
    improve the ability of millions of food insecure families to increase production of food
    staples, improve nutrition for the vulnerable, and increase household income. Stimulating
    rural economies through agricultural growth will need to address productivity growth in light
    of resource degradation, water shortages 1 and climate change.

    U.S. PVOs and local NGOs can make significant contributions in these areas to revitalize
    local communities and make sustainable contributions to the reduction of chronic hunger.
    The DGP offers an important opportunity for new USAID PVO/NGO partners to increase


1
 Note that while water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WSSH) are not a component of the USG
food security initiative, water is an essential component of human health, food security,
economic growth, national and regional political security, and environmental sustainability. See
Section K.2. discussion of the WSSH Mission sector funding.
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          DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

cash income of women, improve nutritional status of women and children, and expand
adoption of food production practices that conserve (protect) natural resources, such as
soil, water, and biodiversity and building resilience to climate change.

Within the broad priority of promoting sustainable economic growth and improving food
security, selected Missions are focused on microenterprise development, water and
sanitation, programs to promote dairy production, and global climate change adaptation.

USAID Missions will be using the DGP to fund support to microenterprise development,
including strengthening financial services, fostering an enabling environment, and promoting
enterprise development. The DGP will enable new partners to contribute to these programs
by specifically reaching out to include NGOs with limited prior experience working directly
with USAID. Such NGOs might, for example, identify and implement innovative approaches
to support the development and delivery of appropriate sharia compliant financial products
and services where such products are in demand, and/or have the capacity to address food
security through other financial or enterprise development interventions.

Sound water management and access to water and sanitation are critical to human
development and community health. USAID’s strategy for the water sector reflects an
integrated approach that emphasizes access to safe water supply and sanitation
complemented by improved water resource management and productivity. Water resource
management reflects the strengths and weaknesses of local, national and international
governance systems and relations among countries that share water resources and are
greatly influenced by water resource scarcity and consequent conflict. The DGP will engage
new partners to strengthen watershed and river basin management and increase water
productivity.

Assistance in dairy, through increased milk production and marketing will reduce hunger and
undernutrition, the key goals of the USG Global Food Security Response. Expanded dairy
production results in increased availability of and lower prices for milk and dairy products,
important to reducing undernutrition of children. The increased family income resulting from
marketing milk underpins access to food, especially important for families on landholdings
that do not support subsistence levels of grain production. NGO involvement in input
services and marketing can be complementary to government and private sector initiatives.

       C.3 Global Climate Change Adaptation.

With climate change, increased temperatures, altered rainfall patterns, rising sea levels,
melting glaciers, and more frequent extreme weather events are posing serious threats to
developing countries. These impacts threaten development gains in health, economic
growth and resource management; and endanger stability by increasing poverty and the
potential for conflict over scarce resources. Climate change adaptation activities aim to help
households, communities, societies, and economies cope with these impacts. Adaptation
activities also include consideration of changing climate conditions in the planning and
implementation of development projects in areas like health, infrastructure, water, and
agriculture, so that these projects are resilient to anticipated climatic changes.

The USG is committed to expanding its international climate change mitigation and
adaptation efforts, including programs and assistance to fulfill USG commitments that result
from the December 2009 UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, and integrating
climate change considerations throughout the USG development portfolio. In support of

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             DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

   climate change adaptation, the DGP will support USAID’s applied research and analysis,
   tool and guidance development and dissemination, and project implementation to make our
   development assistance “climate resilient” across all sectors. USAID Missions are
   partnering with those developing countries most capable of implementing the policy reform,
   institutional modification and stakeholder involvement required for climate-resilient
   development and climate adaptation.

          C.4 Global Engagement Initiative (GEI)

The Development Grants Program supports the President’s Global Engagement Initiative as
outlined in the President’s speech of June 4, 2009 in Cairo. Through participating USAID
Missions, the DGP will support the GEI through greater outreach to civil society to engage and
strengthen local communities and NGOs. The GEI principle that outreach emphasize listening,
rather than directing, applies broadly to the DGP objectives and this RFA. DGP applicants are
encouraged to fully engage previously neglected communities to assess their needs in
implementing programs and activities that address priority USAID strategies as described
below.


   D. USAID MANAGEMENT OF THE DGP

   The DGP is a USAID Mission driven program coordinated by USAID’s Division of Private
   and Voluntary Cooperation in the Office of Development Partners (ODP/PVC), an
   independent office under the USAID Administrator. USAID Missions will negotiate awards
   and administer all Cooperative Agreements awarded under this DGP RFA. Each
   participating USAID Mission will review proposals submitted for the DGP and will lead the
   selection and administration of its awards. The awardee will be assigned an Agreement
   Officer’s Technical Representative (AOTR), formerly know as the Cognizant Technical
   Officer (CTO), in the Mission who will have USAID technical management responsibility for
   the award and will be the programmatic point of contact for the recipient. The Agreement
   Officer (AO) and the AOTR will be responsible for receiving financial reports and approving
   any modifications to cooperative agreements.

   ODP/PVC provides overall guidance, responds to requests for assistance from Missions,
   ensures transfer of funds to Missions as appropriated by the Congress and allocated by
   USAID. It does not review proposals, but may assist participating USAID Missions as
   requested. ODP/PVC also manages capacity building assistance to NGOs as described
   below.


   E. CAPACITY BUILDING ASSISTANCE

   As needed, capacity-building support will be provided to enhance the DGP partners’
   organizational, technical, administrative and capacities to partner with USAID in addressing
   development priorities and implement their programs effectively. In addition to any technical
   assistance available through Missions, the ODP/PVC-funded Capable Partners (CAP) NGO
   Strengthening Mechanism will provide capacity building support to DGP grantees, as agreed
   to by the recipient and the AOTR. Initial Detailed Implementation and Management Plan
   Workshops will take place for new partners within the first few months of their awards to
   refine work plans and performance measurement plans, as well as to provide financial
   management training.

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Applicants are encouraged to consider public-private alliances to achieve program results
and foster sustainability. USAID’s Private Sector Alliances Division of the Office of
Development Partners (ODP/PSA) provides training and assistance to help Missions
facilitate such alliances. Where appropriate, ODP/PSA or USAID’s Regional Alliance
Builders may offer orientation to prospective applicants on how to identify and build these
partnerships. Additional information about Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) and Global
Development Alliances (GDA) may be obtained from the GDA web page at
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_partnerships/gda/.


F. SUBSTANTIAL INVOLVEMENT

USAID considers collaboration with the Recipient important for the successful
implementation of this program. The intended purpose of USAID involvement during the
award is to assist the Recipient in achieving the supported objectives of the CA. USAID
expects to be substantially involved during the period of the CA. Specifically, the
Agreement Officer’s Technical Representative (AOTR) will be involved in the following ways:

1. Approval of key personnel and any subsequent changes in the positions during the
   period of performance; Review the documented roles and responsibilities of key
   personnel appointed during the period of performance and verify that any achievements
   and duties appear consistent with the requirements of the position.

2. Approval of the Recipient’s annual work plans, and monitoring and evaluation plan;
   Verify that any work plans, or work plan amendments, submitted by the awardee/s are
   consistent with the purpose of the award, support the achievement of the goals,
   objectives and results proposed by the awardee/s.

3. Manage Agency collaboration/participation, if any, as described in USAID’s Automated
   Directives System (ADS) Section 303.3.11(c). (The ADS is available on-line at
   USAID.gov.)

4. Approve the scope of work and selection of evaluator for any mid-term and/or final
   evaluation; Verify that the scope/s of any mid-term and/or final evaluations are
   consistent with the awardees’ proposed objectives and that the qualifications of
   nominated evaluator/s are consistent with meeting the requirements of the scope.

5. Concur with any sub-awards (cooperative agreements, grants, endowments or
   contracts).

6. Request such other reports, returns or information that may reasonably be construed as
   necessary to meeting USAID’s internal and/or external reporting requirements or as may
   be necessary to inform responsible USAID officials of the progress of the Cooperative
   Development Program.

7. With advance notice and specification of the purpose/s, visit selected sites.

Note: In accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, 22 CFR 226.25, the Recipient is
required to obtain the Agreement Officer’s prior approval for any sub-award, transfer or
contracting out of any work under an award.


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                  DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

       G. KEY PERSONNEL

       Key personnel that have been designated as key to the successful completion of the
       objectives of awards must be approved by the AOTR.


       H. REPORTING

       DGP recipients will be required to submit an annual work plan, quarterly financial reports,
       annual reports and a final end of project report according to reporting requirements to be
       finalized at the time of award by the cognizant AO. The annual work plan shall include a
       monitoring and evaluation plan, as USAID will be managing for measurable results. The
       AOTR may require quarterly progress reports for that purpose. The DGP work plan will be
       aligned with the goals of the recipient’s program description and contribute to the expected
       results. Financial reporting will be in accordance with the requirements of the final award
       document. Mid-term (as appropriate based on period of performance) and final independent
       evaluations are required.

       The Recipient will submit the above reports to the Mission AOTR. The timing, format and
       other instructions will be agreed by the AOTR and the recipient’s key personnel at the outset
       of implementation.

       On receipt of an award, the recipient will be responsible for submission of the following
       reports to the AOTR:

             Report                                                      Due
        1.   Annual Work Plan 2                                          As requested by AOTR for first
                                                                         year and each subsequent year.
        2.   Semi-Annual Reports                                         Within one month of the end of
                                                                         each six-month period.
        3.   Quarterly financial reports (SF269, 269A and/or             Within 45 days of the end of each
             272)                                                        FY quarter.
        4.   Interim evaluation                                          At such time as may be mutually
                                                                         agreed, but not later than 18
                                                                         months after the project start.
        5.   Final evaluation                                            Not later than one year of the
                                                                         completion of the award.
        6.   Assessments, evaluations, manuals, training                 As mutually agreed.
             plans and materials, etc.
        7.   Accrual Reports                                             Not later than ten days before the
                                                                         end of each financial quarter.
        8.   Reports of achievements against standard                    As requested by AOTR and
             and/or customized indicators                                consistent with USAID reporting
                                                                         requirements.




2
    The first year’s Work Plan is submitted as a requirement of the RFA Full Application.
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I. AUTHORIZED GEOGRAPHIC CODE

The authorized geographic code for procurement of services for this action is 000. The
authorized geographic code for procurement of commodities for this action is 000. The
Mission may authorize a local geographic code.


J. GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS AND SECTORS

The DGP is a worldwide program with selected USAID Mission participation from Africa,
Asia, Europe and Eurasia, and Latin America and the Caribbean. A list of USAID Mission
participation by sector is provided in Appendix E. Applicants should take into account
Mission supplemental information when designing proposals. Activities in all countries are
subject to legal and policy restrictions that may change without prior notice. Some countries
are legally restricted from receiving U.S. Government funded assistance.

Applicants are requested to respond to Agency and participating USAID Missions’ sector
priorities. These are presented in this RFA in a manner that is consistent with priorities
reflected in Mission strategies of the country in which the Applicant proposes to work, as
well as USAID participating Mission supplemental information (Appendix E). Development
sectors to be addressed by the DGP with FY 2009 funds are microenterprise, water and
sanitation, dairy, and climate change adaptation.

It is preferred that applications select only one DGP sector focus. Innovative strategies and
methodologies are welcome.

For additional Information about USAID's Development Framework, please refer to:
http://www.state.gov/f/c24132.htm.




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   K. DETAILED SECTOR DESCRIPTIONS

The following sections describe in detail the background, program areas and
illustrative activities for the sectors Missions will fund with FY 2009 DGP program
funds. Further details are in the Annexes. Links are provided to additional
information.

      K.1 MICROENTERPRISE

Estimated funding: approximately $10,000,000

The DGP will support the following:
    4.7.1 Inclusive Financial Markets
    4.7.2 Policy Environment for Micro and Small Enterprises
    4.7.3 Microenterprise Productivity

The Missions that will participate in the DGP and will accept Concept Papers for the
MICROENTERPRISE sector are listed in the Table in Appendix E. For additional country-
specific information, see the USAID participating Mission supplemental information also in
Appendix E.

In this era of globalization, generating economic growth in developing countries while
reducing poverty is a fundamental development challenge. To ensure that the contribution of
microenterprises to key subsectors and national economies is maximized, and to ensure
that the poor are not left out of market development, micro and small enterprises (MSEs)
need access to finance, business services, and improved inputs; they also need a
conducive enabling environment that facilitates rather than inhibits their participation in
markets.

USAID’s vision for microenterprise development involves addressing the needs of
poor people within the context of globalization and dynamic domestic and global
markets to help them harness the resources they need to participate meaningfully in
markets.

A vicious cycle entraps many of the developing world’s poor. Lacking resources, they are
denied access to the finances, information and managerial skills that offer a road to a better
life. Relatively small amounts of timely credit, supported by appropriate services, not only
allow microenterprises to succeed, but also serve as a catalyst for increased employment
and as a stimulus to local economies. In addition, microenterprise development is a tool to
help accomplish the goals of livelihood security, which includes the promotion of food
security at both the household and community levels.

USAID defines microenterprises as small-scale, often informally organized business
activities undertaken by poor people with 10 or fewer workers including the
microentrepreneur and any unpaid family workers. USAID supports three types of
activities: (1) improving access to financial services tailored to the needs of poor
households, including credit, deposit services, insurance, and remittance and
payment services; (2) enterprise development, to improve productivity and market
potential for microenterprises, and (3) strengthening the enabling environment
through efforts to reduce regulatory, policy and administrative barriers that limit the
opportunities of micro- and small firms. Since 2001, USAID has promoted an
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integrated approach to microenterprise development that reflects the inherent inter-
connectedness between each of the Agency’s three microenterprise technical pillars.

            K.1.a. Financial Services

USAID’s investments in financial services emphasize asset accumulation and protection for
the poor (client level), building client-responsive and sustainable institutions (retail institution
level), and helping microfinance providers exit from donor support (market level). Client-level
investments deepen access to financial services for populations that are marginalized and
under-served due to socio-economic status, gender, age, religion, culture or ethnicity,
location, or the impact of conflict and disaster. Investments at the retail level continue to
emphasize the operational and financial sustainability of financial institutions as well as their
commitment to deliver products and services that meet the diverse needs of the poor.
Market-level investments encourage microfinance institutions to transition to commercial
(rather than donor) sources of capital and to develop productive partnerships with private-
sector institutions.

Illustrative activities in microfinance include those that deepen outreach to underserved
market segments by:

       Increasing access to financial services among rural and remote populations. This
        may include, but is not limited to, credit, savings, insurance, remittances and
        payment services, such as sustainable, demand-driven mobile banking services;
       Developing appropriate products for the more vulnerable segments of the population
        which may include some of the examples listed above;
       Forging strategic partnerships with non-financial players to provide value-added
        services;
       Facilitating increased linkages between remittances and microfinance services like
        savings, insurance, or credit; and
       Increasing access to financial services in conflict and post-conflict environments.

    K.1.b. Enterprise Development for Microenterprises

USAID advocates an approach to enterprise development that integrates micro and
small enterprises into growing value chains while improving their bargaining power,
expanding their access to business and financial services, and addressing their
needs for a conducive enabling environment. The aim of this work is to enhance
these firms’ access to markets and their capacity to take advantage of market
opportunities. Successful value chain development strengthens the competitiveness
of value chains as a whole while also expanding the depth and breadth of benefits
for microenterprises participating in those value chains.

Among responsive proposals in this area might be those that:

       Facilitate links between microenterprises and larger firms, enabling or strengthening
        microenterprise participation in the value chain;
       Promote various forms of upgrading in the value chain through strategic direct
        technical assistance, expanded access to appropriate finance and other supporting
        services, and improved relationships between buyers and sellers, at both domestic
        and international levels;

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           Support formal or informal linkages among microenterprises to agglomerate products
            for sale, add value, or increase bargaining power;
           Address financing constraints that limit microenterprise participation in value chains;
            and
           Adapt value-chain programming for conflict and post-conflict affected countries.

                K.1.c. Enabling Environment

    The enabling environment remains an important area of investment for USAID
    recognizing that favorable business, financial policy, and investment climates are
    critical to successful, sustainable microenterprise development. An enabling
    regulatory environment is a critical driver to formalize microfinance institutions (MFIs)
    and integrate them into the mainstream financial sector. The legal and regulatory
    framework can also have a significant impact on investor confidence in the transition
    to private capital. USAID supports the reform of laws, regulations, and policies to
    facilitate the creation, operation, and growth of microenterprises and to expand
    access to financial and other services by the underserved poor.

    Enabling environment and institution-level interventions for financial services might include:

           Advising central bank regulators on policies and regulations that promote
            competition, innovation, and financial inclusion;
           Building the capacity of national networks to advocate for reform;
           Strengthening the supervisory capacity of regulatory bodies;
           Continuing to support the further development of industry standards, such as ratings
            initiatives and credit bureaus, to increase financial transparency;
           Proposing innovative solutions, supported by appropriate regulation, to help close
            the “quality gap” in microfinance services by shifting focus away from increasing an
            MFI’s number of clients to focusing on the quality and range of services provided by
            the MFI; and
           Supporting initiatives that promote inclusion of Corporate Social Responsibility and
            Global Reporting Initiative principles.

    The DGP encourages proposals that promote anti-corruption efforts and tax reform,
    including anti-corruption efforts that might be linked to remittance flows. 3

    Business environment interventions for enterprise development might include:

           Helping countries streamline their business registration process;
           Building the micro and small enterprise (MSE) capacity to advocate for policy
            reforms through independent business associations;
           Promoting anti-corruption efforts and tax reform; and
           Financial literacy training and other consumer protection education initiatives.

    For both Financial Services and Enterprise Development, proposals may include a focus on
    improving policies and regulations in sectors of particular importance to microenterprises
    and poor households. Innovative proposals might consider microenterprise approaches that
    are expected to generate meaningful impacts through a context-responsive view of
3
 See http://treas.gov/offices/enforcement/programs and
http://www1.worldbank.org/finance/html/amlcft/docs/aml_implications_complete.pdf
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microenterprise development, including (but not restricted to) (1) economic growth with
poverty reduction, (2) food security, (3) conflict mitigation/post-conflict recovery, and (4)
vulnerable populations/economic vulnerability. Illustrative examples follow after each major
technical area above (Financial Services, Enterprise Development, and Enabling
Environment).

Local NGOs are encouraged to seek opportunities to develop projects that build on
existing host country and/or donor investments in microenterprise development.

Refer to Appendix A for additional information.




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   K.2 WATER SECTOR ACTIVITIES – including Water Supply, Sanitation and
   Hygiene

Estimated Funding: Approximately $18,000,000 ($10,000,000 for Africa only; $8,000,000 for
other regions)

The DGP will support the following:
    3.1.6 Maternal and Child Health
    3.1.6.8 Household Level Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Environment
    3.1.8 Water Supply and Sanitation
    4.5.2 Agricultural productivity
    4.8.1 Natural Resources Management and Biodiversity

The Missions that will participate in the DGP and will accept Concept Papers for the WATER
SUPPLY, SANITATION AND HYGIENE sector are listed in the Table in Appendix E. For
additional country-specific information, see the USAID participating Mission supplemental
information also in Appendix E.

Local NGOs are encouraged to seek opportunities to develop projects that build on existing
host country and/or donor investments in the sector.
Water is an essential component of human health, food security, economic growth, national
and regional political security, and environmental sustainability. However, more than 1.2
billion people worldwide, and one in every four people in the developing world, currently lack
access to an improved water supply; two in every five people have no access to improved
sanitation. The reasons for this shortfall are diverse and include competition for and
inadequate management of water resources; ineffective institutions and related human
resources; shortfalls in financing; and lack of effective demand, especially for sanitation.
Approximately 450 million people in more than 30 countries face serious shortages of fresh
water. By 2025, this number is expected to increase to 2.8 billion people in more than 48
countries; 40 of these countries will be in the Middle East, North Africa, or sub-Saharan
Africa. While most water demand is for agricultural production, competition for scarce local
and regional water resources will increasingly have an impact on water requirements for
domestic purposes. Globally, water demand tripled during the past century alone and is
doubling every 20 years – a strong indication that a continued strong commitment to, and
substantial investment in, efforts to vigorously address the need for water security and
sustainability with equity are required.

Proposals will be considered in the following areas:

      Water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WSSH)
      Water resources management (WRM)
      Water productivity
      Disaster risk reduction (DRR)

           K.2.a Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (WSSH)

More than 1 billion people worldwide lack access to improved water supply services, and
more than 2 billion people lack access to improved sanitation, undermining efforts to
generate economic growth, promote social development, and protect public health. In many
developing countries, the time and effort required to obtain water for daily use detracts from
time and activities that could be devoted to education and other productive employment.
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Girls, who are usually tasked with the duty to fetch household water, suffer the greatest
burden of education lost to the pursuit of water, while young children are particularly
vulnerable to water- and sanitation-related threats to health. Unsafe drinking water,
inadequate sanitation, and poor hygiene cause nearly 2 million deaths from diarrhea each
year – the vast majority in children under age 5 –and unsafe drinking water is the cause of
nearly 90 percent of diarrhea incidence.

The economic, social, and health consequences of limited access to clean water and
improved sanitation services are thus enormous, and the underlying causes of this limited
access are diverse. They include competition for and inadequate management of water
resources; ineffective institutions and related human resources; shortfalls in financing; and
lack of effective demand, especially for sanitation. Success in these areas is linked to many
U.S. Government foreign assistance priorities. Increased coverage is not sufficient in terms
of access to safe drinking water. Only with consistent and correct practice of hand washing
with soap, safe feces disposal, and safe drinking water treatment, if needed, and drinking
water storage that prevents recontamination, are health and social benefits realized.

USAID’s safe drinking water supply projects and related activities specifically address:

1. The provision of clean and adequate supplies of drinking water to rural and urban
   communities and

2. The promotion of practices that protect these supplies from contamination by improper
   handling of domestic water and household waste and inadequate sanitation. They
   include water well development, improvement, or rehabilitation; water delivery systems;
   removal of contaminants through both large scale water treatment and small-scale or
   household POU treatment; and drinking water source protection. USAID activities also
   address the need to improve the capacity of municipal and community governments and
   both public and private organizations to deliver potable water and sanitation
   infrastructure services in a sustainable, cost-effective, and water-efficient manner.
   Additional activities include legal, regulatory, and governance reforms needed to
   sustainably finance, operate, and maintain such infrastructure.


Among responsive proposals in this area are those that include the pillars of effective
WSSH:

      Access to appropriate hardware and supplies – Municipal and community water
       supply systems and sewers, household sanitation facilities, and other household-
       level technologies and products, such as soap and hand washing devices
      Hygiene and sanitation promotion, behavior change, and demand creation –
       Community mobilization for sustained management of drinking water supply and
       latrine building; social marketing of products and behaviors like point-of-use (POU)
       drinking water
      Treatments and sanitation options; magnifying messages through media and
       communication; and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) promotion through
       school and health clinic programs
      Enabling environment – Improved policies, institutional support, community
       organization, finance and cost recovery, and public-private partnerships for improved
       water supply, sanitation, and hygiene.


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USAID’s long experience with best practices in these areas suggests that investments
should focus on five programming activities:

1. Strengthening the capacity and sustainability of small-scale service providers who
   operate in rural and peri-urban areas;
2. Improving the operating environment, operations, and financial sustainability of utilities
   that serve cities and towns undergoing the most rapid population growth;
3. Improving household- and community-level hygiene and sanitation;
4. Mobilizing capital from domestic markets for infrastructure development on a permanent
   and sustainable basis; and
5. Integrating water supply and sanitation with humanitarian assistance/disaster risk
   reduction and response programs.

Illustrative activity types under the Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene category include:

      Access to improved drinking water supply as defined by the Millennium Development
       Goals, i.e., the availability of at least 20 liters per person per day from an "improved"
       source within one kilometer of the user's dwelling. An “improved” source is one that
       is likely to provide safe water, including household connections to a water supply
       distribution network, public standpipes (connected to networked systems, or from a
       community well or surface water source), boreholes, protected dug wells, protected
       springs, and rainwater collection. Access to improved sources can be rural or urban,
       and may be provided through utilities, community-based systems, self-supply, and/or
       other long-term and permanent systems. Unprotected wells, unprotected springs,
       rivers or ponds, vendor-provided water, bottled water, tanker truck water (e.g., for
       emergency purposes) are not considered to be sustainable improved sources.
       Improvements to existing sources can also be carried out for people for already have
       first access to an improved source.
      Access to improved sanitation at the household level as defined by the Millennium
       Development Goals, Sanitation facilities are considered adequate if they are private
       and if they separate human excreta from human contact, including improved
       sanitation facilities, connection to a public sewer, connection to a septic system,
       pour-flush latrines, simple covered pit latrines, and ventilated improved pit latrines.
       Access provided can be rural or urban, and may be provided through community-
       managed simplified systems, utility-managed central network systems, or self-
       supply. Unimproved household level sanitation facilities, including open pit latrines
       or bucket latrines, are not attributable to the goal, and neither are community latrines
       with multiple household users, but also can be carried out.
      Access to public or shared improved sanitation facilities in communal or institutional
       settings (e.g., schools, health clinics, public markets, etc.) if they adequately
       separate human excreta from human contact and have a sustainable management
       and maintenance system in place, as well as sufficient hygiene facilities. (NOTE:
       Public or shared sanitation systems are not considered “improved” under the
       Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and are not reported under the MDGs.
       They are, however, considered eligible activities under this grant program.
      Improvements in the quality of existing drinking water supply or sanitation services,
       including increasing the number of hours of water access per day or quantity of water
       available from a networked water system, improving the quality of water delivered by
       a system, improving the maintenance of systems and reducing the number of days

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       out of service, increasing the number of household connections for people who
       already had access to another communal improved source, etc.
      Treatment of drinking water quality at the system or community level, prior to
       distribution to users (including treatment plants, chlorination and filtering at the
       source or point-of-use (POU), etc).
      Provision of multiple-use water services that include both domestic drinking water
       supply and water supply for productive use needs of the community (e.g., small-
       scale agriculture/gardening, livestock, microenterprise, etc.).
      Hygiene promotion activities to support behavior change in key areas including hand
       washing, feces management (including sanitation promotion and marketing), and
       household point-of-use (POU) water treatment.
      Protection of surface water and groundwater quality of potable water supply system
       from direct contamination prior to distribution to users, including installation of
       barriers to prevent access to the water point by animals, people, or other
       contamination sources, or water quality protection activities where there is a direct,
       and specific cause-effect linkage between the contaminating activity and a drinking
       water source.
      Enabling environment interventions related to the drinking water supply, sanitation,
       and hygiene sectors, including policy reform and legal and regulatory strengthening
       and enforcement.
      Institutional strengthening and reform related to drinking water supply, sanitation and
       hygiene, including capacity building of government and other key actors and
       organizational development, water supply and wastewater utility
       governance/corporatization and utility reform, etc.
      Water infrastructure financing at all scales, including increased access to credit,
       strengthening of domestic private capital markets, and facilitating support from
       domestic financial institutions.
      Small-scale community-managed wastewater collection and treatment infrastructure.
      Software aspects of wastewater management at all scales, including community
       capacity building in technical and financial aspects of system management, large-
       scale utility corporatization and reform, improved cost recovery, and innovative
       financing.

           K.2.b Water Resources Management

Every country and community depends on sustainable fresh water of sufficient quantities
and quality to provide for society’s needs, sustain economic growth, and maintain
ecosystems, and all countries and communities face the challenge of how to best use this
finite but renewable water resource while protecting its quality. Water resources and
hydrologic systems are under enormous pressure today from population growth,
environmental degradation, and climate change. The clearing of forest lands for agricultural
production and mineral and timber resources has degraded many watersheds and impacted
downstream ecosystems – including estuarine and coastal ecosystems – through more
rapid runoff, increased erosion, reduced groundwater recharge (replenishment), and greater
potential for floods and droughts. Climate change may exacerbate these impacts, potentially
forcing shifts in human settlements and agricultural practices and dramatic changes in

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livelihoods. Most countries share water resources with others, further complicating the
management of this essential resource.

The objectives of water resources management (WRM) include optimizing the benefits of
drinking water among competing uses while ensuring that human needs are met and
environmental resources are protected, as well as supporting efforts to manage and/or
adapt to hydrological variability and the risks of floods and droughts. Achieving these
objectives requires governance and management approaches that guide the effective and
sustainable use of limited water resources. As competing demands increase, the potential
for tensions will heighten, placing current cooperative relationships at risk and raising the
possibility of conflicts over water rights, allocations, and use. Avoiding conflicts over water is
vital, as they are expensive and disruptive and interfere with efforts to relieve human
suffering, reduce environmental degradation, reduce vulnerability to future disasters, and
achieve economic growth.

Illustrative WRM activities include: improving water resources planning; addressing water
quantity and quality challenges; strengthening participatory governance; mobilizing
financing; and managing hydrologic variability.

To help governments, civil society, and communities plan, finance, and regulate instruments
for transparent and equitable water allocation and management, USAID engages in:
      Broad-based policy development and institutional strengthening, based on multi-
       stakeholder input and dialogue;
      Strategies and structures to conserve the quality and supply of water;
      Surveys dealing with water balances, water supply, aquatic life, and habitat
       protection; and
      Transboundary WRM focusing on data sharing and common protocol development in
       river basins shared by two or more countries.

Illustrative activity types under the water resources management (WRM) category include:

      Watershed, river basin, or lake resource management, planning and governance
       strengthening.
      Water resource management policy reform or legal/regulatory strengthening,
       including that related to decentralized resource management authority, water rights,
       stakeholder participation, water quality standards, etc.
      Information collection, analysis, and management related to water quantity and
       quality in support of sound decision-making and sustainable resource management,
       including hydrologic water balance assessment, flow modeling, water quality
       monitoring, remote sensing/GIS analysis, etc.
      Education, outreach and communications to promote the sustainable management of
       watersheds and surface water and groundwater resources.
      Best management practices in land use, vegetation, and soil and water management
       to ensure long-term water resource sustainability.
      Water quality management, including point and non-point source pollution prevention
       and control, groundwater/aquifer protection and management, and water safety
       planning and implementation.
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      Protection of watersheds and water resources environmental services including
       establishment of Payment for Environmental Services (PES) schemes to support
       such management.
      Hydrometeorological monitoring, modeling, forecasting, and early warning systems
       to improve disaster prediction, preparedness and response.
      Water harvesting and storage infrastructure design, construction, and management
       at all scales.
      Flood management and drought risk reduction activities.
      Water demand management and water conservation and promotion in the domestic,
       agricultural, industrial/commercial, or energy sector.
      Wastewater treatment infrastructure (domestic and industrial) to protect overall water
       quality. And prevent drinking water contamination
      Wastewater reuse to meet domestic, productive, or ecosystem water needs.
      Freshwater and coastal ecosystem management.
      Activities to strengthen adaptation to climate variability or change and reduce
       vulnerability to altered hydrology and water-related climate extremes.

In specific settings, WRM activities promote the conservation and sustainable use of water
resources in freshwater and coastal areas, thereby protecting the quality of surface
water and groundwater for drinking, irrigation, and other uses, while maintaining aquatic
ecosystem services provided by rivers, lakes, aquifers, fisheries, wetlands, and coastal
environments. WRM also addresses a wide array of land uses within watersheds that may
have local impacts while also affecting downstream communities and ecosystems.
Integrated WRM, water quality protection, and pollution prevention and control support the
management of ground and surface water and their watersheds. WRM also promotes
environmentally sound technologies and clean production practices that reduce the amounts
of raw material, water, and energy used in agricultural, industrial, manufacturing, and other
production processes. WRM programs also seek to enhance the beneficial uses of water
and to reduce human health risks from water by reducing, preventing, and mitigating water
pollution.

Responsive proposals may include aspects of WRM, but preferably WRM will link to WSSH
activities as well, for example, where WRM is focused on pollution control of surface and
ground water, and provision of drinking water.


           K.2.c Water Productivity

Economic activities ranging from agriculture and mining to industrial production require a
dependable water supply. Food production is completely dependent on predictable and
high-quality supplies of freshwater or healthy estuarine and marine waters. Approximately
80 percent of all human freshwater use in the world is devoted to agricultural production,
often in irrigation systems that are inefficient and environmentally unsustainable. As
industrial and commercial water consumption continues to increase, the tradeoffs between
water allocations for domestic use, agriculture, industry, and ecosystem services will only
intensify. Improving the productivity of available water is thus critically important for essential
economic development.

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Responsive proposals may include aspects of water productivity, but preferably linked to
WSSH objectives as well. The U.S. Government’s water productivity improvement programs
seek to maximize the efficient and productive use of water in industrial, agricultural, and
other consumptive sectors, and to support pollution prevention programs and programs that
reduce water losses. They focus predominantly on approaches that:
      Improve water use efficiency in agriculture
      Help countries adapt to hydrologic variability and climate change
      Reduce water pollution by industry
      Improve water use efficiency in cities

Water Productivity programs in the agriculture sector support efforts to improve agricultural
productivity by emphasizing irrigation system efficiency. They work with public and private
extension services to increase farmers’ adoption of improved production technologies,
systems, and appropriate crops for specific environments. Where appropriate, they also
promote the reuse of treated wastewater for agriculture. With the growing expansion of
aquaculture, Water Productivity programs also work with research institutions to develop
improved aquaculture production technologies and systems that increase yields while
reducing water demand and promoting the use of aquaculture species and systems that
improve water quality.

USAID’s Water Productivity activities include such activities as support for irrigation
improvements, livestock water supply improvements, improved water-related agricultural soil
and water management practices, aquaculture, and sustainable fisheries management.

           K.2.d Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR)

Intensive wind storms (hurricanes, typhoons, and cyclones), floods, tsunamis, and droughts
often lead to the loss of many thousands of lives and to economic impacts measured in
billions of dollars. Extreme weather, climate, and water events become disasters when the
events converge with vulnerabilities. The Hyogo Framework for Action, an overall guiding
framework for the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, calls for the development
and strengthening of institutions, mechanisms, and capacities to build resilience to hazards.
Identifying, monitoring, understanding, and forecasting hydrometeorological hazards are
critical first steps for developing plans, strategies, and policies, and for implementing DRR
measures.

Responsive proposals may include aspects of DDR, but these activities should preferably be
linked to WSSH activities as well. The USAID Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance
(OFDA) works closely with communities, national and local governments, international and
regional organizations, and NGOs to identify, manage, and strengthen capacity at all levels
to increase resilience to climate-, weather-, and water-induced disasters.
Hydrometeorological DRR activities have strong linkages to the management of natural
resources, including water, and seek to build resilience to better enable countries and
communities to prepare for and cope with serious events when they occur.

During the last decade, hydrometeorological disasters such as floods, droughts, and
cyclones claimed more than 630,000 lives (62 percent of total fatalities due to natural
disasters), affected about 2.8 billion people (98 percent of total population affected by

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  natural disasters), and estimated to cost more than $800 billion (84 percent of total
  estimated damages from natural disasters). Extreme weather and climate events often have
  significant human, socioeconomic, and environmental impacts, including loss of livelihoods,
  destruction of shelters, damages to infrastructure systems (energy and power, water and
  sanitation, transportation, etc.), health and social service disruptions, migrations, conflicts,
  and scarcities of food and water. The direct and indirect impacts of disasters can increase
  the vulnerability of affected populations to natural hazards and may set back economic
  development due to the costs of response and rehabilitation. Hydrometeorological risk
  reduction activities are aimed at reducing vulnerability to these hazards through an
  integrated multi-sectoral approach that addresses the needs of populations while
  emphasizing capacity building and locally sustainable and environmentally sensitive
  measures.

Refer to Appendix B additional information.
       K.3. INCREASED FOOD SECURITY THROUGH DAIRY DEVELOPMENT

  Estimated funding: approximately $5,000,000
  Mission investments in milk production and marketing will directly contribute to Global Food
  Security Response objectives of expanded food availability, increased food access and
  reduced under-nutrition of infants and children. The Missions that will participate in the DGP
  and accept Concept Papers for the DAIRY sector are listed in the table in Appendix E.

  The DGP will support the following:
      4.5.2 Agricultural Sector Capacity

  For additional country-specific information, see the USAID participating Mission
  supplemental information in Appendix E.

  Small farmer milk production and marketing is a major rural occupation in much of the
  developing world. When organized for the benefit of small farmers, investment in increased
  milk production can result in expanded incomes and food security for households otherwise
  dependent on seasonal crop income or labor. Much of the world’s milk is produced on
  farms that are too small to yield marketable volumes of staple food grains, or even sufficient
  amounts to feed the farm family. Around and even within major urban areas, landless dairy
  producers convert locally available food processing and crop by-products to milk, generating
  income to buy family food supplies. Successful small farmer dairy production depends
  primarily on a remunerative market that encourages producer investment in improved
  productivity. Critical supporting services include extension services, genetic improvement,
  feed, veterinary care and appropriate husbandry practices. In many instances, collective
  action through cooperatives or producer associations enables small farmers to successfully
  procure inputs and services and produce and market milk and milk products.

  Increased milk production and marketing will reduce hunger and under-nutrition, the key
  goals of the USG Global Food Security Response. Expanded dairy production results in
  increased availability of and lower prices for milk and dairy products, important to reducing
  under-nutrition of children. The increased family income resulting from marketing milk
  underpins access to food, especially important for families on landholdings that do not
  support subsistence levels of grain production.




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Because dairy cows are often managed by women, income from sale of milk generally
results in purchase of better, more nutritious food as well as increased expenditures on
housing, children’s education, better clothing and medicines and medical services.

Dairy farms are consumers of inputs, creating opportunities for small and medium input and
service enterprises that generate employment and promote savings and investment, further
increasing the ability of families to purchase food and protect themselves from food price
“shocks”. Because dairy cows respond to better feeding and management with greater
levels of milk production, smallholder dairy producers are generally demanders of technical
assistance, training and research-generated new, appropriate technology, all of which
combine to create demand from nation research and extension agencies. Young adults,
particularly have opportunity to start small in dairy production, growing herd size and milk
volumes marketed with as management skills expand.

Milk is a high-value, but also highly perishable food commodity that requires careful and
timely handling from farm to processing plant to the retail shelf. To reduce costs of handling
and assure raw milk quality milk producers often join together in associations, often
organized as cooperatives. Successful cooperatives are models of community organization
that promote democratic processes and the involvement of women in decision processes.

Milk and cheese are valued food products in most, if not all majority Muslim countries.
Demand for dairy services and inputs create opportunities for young men and women in
these countries to invest in small and medium dairy-related businesses. Women, particularly
will benefit with opportunities to increase marketing of milk and milk products. Children
engaged at an early age in owning and managing dairy heifers can transition their small
herds to full milk production and marketing businesses, linking them to the local community
economy and giving them opportunity for personal growth and asset accumulation through
hard work, adherence to laws and regulations, and cooperative action with fellow
smallholder producers. An expanding dairy sector creates employment opportunities for
young adults, countering the lure of militancy that grows out of unemployment and lack of
personal opportunity.

In many regions, as climate change puts stress on traditional staple grain production
systems, dairy production is an alternative that provides smallholders to stay on their land
and earn income from conversion of pasture grasses, crop residues and food processing by-
products to milk. Income from sale of milk may provide the resources required for
smallholders to purchase new, more adaptable staple grain seed and to make investments
required to capture and manage water. Forages and fodder trees planted to feed dairy cows
capture carbon. With proper shade and access to clean water, dairy cows can be
maintained in climates characterized by relatively high temperatures. Milking cows or
raising heifers and bull calves may provide rural families with income required to purchase
staple grains no longer feasibly to produce due to climatic stress.

Among responsive proposals in this area might be those that:

      Educate consumers on the role of milk and dairy products in the diets of children,
       women and persons with chronic illnesses, reducing under-nutrition that results in
       poor child growth and development;
      Support demonstration and extension of new, appropriate dairy production and
       marketing technology and management systems that will results in increased
       supplies of milk and dairy products and increased smallholder income;
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          DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

      Support democratically-managed development of producer associations such as
       cooperatives that assist small farmers with production, procurement, processing and
       or marketing of milk and milk products;
      Lead to privatization of dairy-related services and input supply, particularly integrated
       veterinary and dairy cow breeding services;
       Offer innovative small farmer training and extension services;
       Strengthen services related to regulation of milk and dairy product quality;
       Support dairy processing and retailing innovation and cost controls that keep dairy
       product prices affordable for consumers;
      Enhance the capacities of women to participate in dairying as primary producers,
       cooperative members and sector leaders; and
      Improves natural resources management on small farmer dairy farms.

Local NGOs are encouraged to seek opportunities to develop projects that build on existing
host country and/or donor investments in dairy development. Particular attention should be
given to opportunities for significant impact and scalability. Examples include assistance to
women and youth entrepreneurs to market business services along the dairy product value
chain, working with producer associations and small processing businesses to develop new
dairy products for niche markets, and working with community-based organizations to link
under-served populations into the dairy value chain through training and cooperation.

Refer to Appendix C for additional information.

           K.4. ENVIRONMENT: CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION

Estimated funding: $7,000,000

Missions accepting Concept Papers for the CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION sector are
listed in Appendix E. For additional country-specific information, see the USAID
participating Mission supplemental information also in Appendix E.

The DGP will support the following:
    4.8.2 Clean Productive Environment

The impacts of climate change—including increased temperatures, sea level rise, increased
rainfall variability, and more frequent extreme weather events—are already affecting water
availability, agricultural productivity, disease vectors, and coastal livelihoods. In developing
countries, economies and livelihoods are often concentrated in climate-dependent activities
such as rain-fed agriculture, fishing, forestry and tourism. Climate change thus exacerbates
existing development challenges in countries where USAID works.

The goal of activities in this focal area is to add a substantial climate change adaptation
component to mission activities in relevant areas. Climate change adaptation activities
concentrate on developing flexible and resilient societies and economies capable of coping
with the impacts of current climate variability and future climate change.

The Agency’s strategy has been to incorporate climate change considerations into
development projects to provide climate related benefits while also meeting development
objectives in the energy and water sectors, urban areas, forest conservation, agriculture,
and disaster assistance. Over time, we want to maximize the impacts of our development
investments by ensuring that our projects are designed to be as resilient as possible to
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         DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

climate variability and change. Consideration of changing climate conditions in planning and
implementation requires assessments of vulnerabilities, access to information, application of
user-friendly tools, and testing and dissemination of tools and methods for development
practitioners in the field.

New climate change adaptation funding should be used directly for activities in one of the
following categories:

      Assessing local climate change vulnerabilities, and incorporate that information into
       the analysis, design and implementation of a development project.
      Capacity building for adaptation.

           K.4.a. Assessing Local Climate Change Vulnerabilities for the Analysis, Design
           and Implementation.

Climate change adaptation funding can be used to assess local climate change
vulnerabilities for the analysis, design and implementation for the design of the development
project. The project could be in nearly any sector where USAID works – e.g., infrastructure,
water, housing, health, agriculture, energy, etc. For example, an irrigation project would not
typically address climate change, but adaptation funding can be used by the project
designers to analyze likely changes in temperature and precipitation and make appropriate
changes to ensure that the irrigation system will be workable under climate change
scenarios. A similar analysis of a drinking water or sanitation project would also count. Also
included in this section are marine, fisheries, or coastal management activities which
explicitly analyze climate vulnerabilities and make adaptations to reduce those threats. The
Obama Administration is prioritizing such efforts to “climate-proof” development.

Adaptation funding can also support the analysis and implementation of actions to build
resilience to climate change in coastal and forest ecosystems, biodiversity hotspots, or
agriculture. For example, projects could:

      Enhance resilience of ecosystems that contribute to adaptation (e.g., mangroves and
       coral reefs that serve as storm buffers).
      Ensure provision of ecosystem services under a changed climate (e.g. enhancing
       resilience of biodiversity and protected landscapes to climate change impacts).
      Improve forestry and agricultural management practices in ways that can
       simultaneously promote diversified livelihoods, climate change adaptation, and
       climate change mitigation (e.g., reforestation can contribute to carbon sequestration
       and prevent soil erosion).

To qualify for funding, the proposed activity must include a climate change assessment and
active stakeholder involvement. All aspects of the vulnerability assessment and
implementation must be documented and available for review. GCC funding can cover the
assessment, option identification, and implementing the actions for adapting to climate
change. Information on conducting a vulnerability assessment is detailed below.

A vulnerability assessment must be conducted using a publicly available methodology;
numerous methodologies exist (and climate change initiative funding cannot be used to
create new methodologies). The assessment must be documented and available for review.
The vulnerability assessment process must identify and evaluate options for adapting to

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          DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

anticipated changes, and include stakeholder participation. Stakeholders provide indigenous
knowledge of climate variability and trends, as well as local techniques for adapting to
change. All options and choices must be documented and specific climate risk(s) addressed
must be clearly identified.

The recently published USAID Climate Change Adaptation Guidance Manual provides a
framework for assessing vulnerabilities and identifying adaptation strategies. Projects are
not required to use this manual, but it is likely to be a useful resource. It can be downloaded
at: http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/environment/climate/docs/reports/cc_vamanual.pdf.

Other pre-existing vulnerability analyses and identification of adaptation priorities, such as
those contained in National Adaptation Plans of Action for the UN/FCCC, can also inform
program design and implementation.

For access to historical weather data and projections of climate change for the decades of
the 2030s and 2050s, you can download the Climate Mapper for SERVIR Viz. It has been
approved by USAID’s Chief Information Officer. The Climate Mapper is available at:
http://www.iagt.org/focusareas/envmon/climatechg.aspx .

Other tools that may be useful include the Adaptation Learning Mechanism (ALM)
(http://adaptationlearning.net/), which has country-specific information on climate change
scenarios, and the Community-based Risk Screening Tool – Adaptation and Livelihoods
(CRiSTAL) (www.cristaltool.org) which was developed to help project planners and
managers integrate climate change adaptation into community-level projects.

                 K. 4.b Capacity Building for Adaptation.

Funding can be used for capacity building activities that are specifically linked to increasing
people’s adaptive capacity and reducing their vulnerability to climate change impacts. This
could include:

      Trainings on how to do vulnerability and adaptation analyses
      Support for national government National Adaptation Plan of Action development
      Efforts to increase access to timely and accurate weather and climate information,
       for farmers, vulnerable communities, development practitioners, and decision
       makers.

In reporting on activities in either category, applicants should explicitly describe the analysis,
the vulnerabilities and the adaptations. In addition, if appropriate, report the "Number of
people with increased adaptive capacity to cope with impacts of climate variability and
change as a result of USG assistance through the DGP funding", or the “Number of people
receiving training in global climate change adaptation”.

Refer to Appendix D for additional information.




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             DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001


                              SECTION 2. AWARD INFORMATION


A. RANGE OF EXPECTED FUNDING LEVELS AND PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE OF
INDIVIDUAL AWARDS

USAID expects to award multiple individual cooperative agreements to LNGOs and U.S. PVOs
to implement project activities for up to a three-year (3) period to begin implementation in
FY2010. USAID anticipates awarding small grants of up to $2,000,000 through this RFA. The
award ceiling (maximum award) for any one award under this RFA is $2,000,000.

B. PROGRAM MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF AWARDS

Applicants must have established financial management, internal control systems, and policies
and procedures that comply with established U.S. Government standards, laws, and
regulations. All potential awardees will be subject to a financial responsibility determination
issued by a warranted Agreements Officer in USAID that may include a pre-award survey and
or audit.


                          SECTION 3. ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION


A. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

    1. U.S. PVOs
U.S. PVOs must be registered with USAID to compete for the DGP. Only PVOs registered at
the time of submission are eligible. For registration information, see
       http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/cross-cutting_programs/private_voluntary_cooperation

    2. Local NGOs
A non-U.S. PVO applicant must be a Local Non-Governmental Organization organized under
the laws of the country in which it is domiciled. LNGO applicants must attach official
documentation of their formal status as an NGO in the host country. LNGOs are not required to
register with USAID.

    3. U.S. PVOs and Local NGOs
Organizations must not have received more than $5,000,000 from USAID in direct assistance
during the past five-year period (Dec. 20, 2004 – Dec. 21, 2009). The $5,000,000 threshold
includes any type of assistance received directly from USAID through a grant or cooperative
agreement during the five-year period. Applicants may have received indirect USAID
assistance (subawards or other indirect assistance).

B. DGP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Applicants must:

      Provide a cost-share match equivalent to, or greater than 10 percent for LNGOs and 15
       percent for U.S. PVOs of the total project cost. The match may be in cash, in-kind, or a
       combination of both. All cash and in-kind contributions committed by partners must be
       documented;
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       If proposing a public-private alliance with an organization or business, provide a copy of
       informal or formal agreements stipulating cash and/or in-kind contributions; and
      Propose technical implementation activities in a USAID-eligible country or countries
       listed in this RFA.

ODP/PVC cannot finance programs that are:

      Pure academic research;
      Construction or commodity procurement;
      Not focused on development (e.g. short-term emergency relief); or
      In violation of the Establishment Clause.




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                  SECTION 4. CONCEPT PAPER SUBMISSION INFORMATION

There are two (2) Steps to the application under this RFA:

         Step One (1): Submission of a Concept Paper; and
         Step Two (2): Submission of a Full Application, if invited.

A.     CONCEPT PAPER SUBMISSION (STEP 1)
Submit Concept Papers to both the appropriate USAID Mission and to ODP/PVC.
For Mission contact information, see Appendix F.

     1. Submit one (1) original plus two (2) paper copies of the Concept Paper to the USAID
        Mission contact (Appendix F) in a sealed envelope with the name of the program (DGP2),
        and the name, address and telephone number of the organization and contact person;

     2. Send one electronic copy by email to the Mission contact (see Appendix F);

     3. Send one copy by email to DGP2@usaid.gov.

     4. Submit one electronic copy to www.grants.gov (RFA # M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001)


     In the subject line of your email submissions, please include: “Concept Paper for DGP2,
     submitted by: [name of your organization].”

 Fax: Faxed Concept Papers will not be accepted.


                      DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF CONCEPT PAPERS
The deadline for Concept Paper submissions is 11:00 am Eastern Standard Time on
Friday, February 12, 2010. Concept Papers received after the deadline will not be
reviewed.

Questions
Any questions about this RFA should be submitted in writing no later than January 12, 2010 to
the following email address: QA-DGP2@usaid.gov. All questions and answers will be posted to
the following websites by January 26, 2010:

        Grants.gov – www.grants.gov, and
        USAID/ODP/PVC – http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/cross-
         cutting_programs/private_voluntary_cooperation/.


B.       CONCEPT PAPER FORMAT AND INSTRUCTIONS

       1. Concept Paper Format
All Concept Papers must be:
       A maximum of five (5) pages;
       Typed, single space on letter size, not legal size, paper;
       12 font size;
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            DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

       Written in English unless otherwise indicated by the Mission to which the concept
        paper will be submitted in Word (version 2000 or later) or Adobe PDF format;
       Spreadsheets may be in MS Excel (version 2000 or later) or a recent version of Lotus
        1-2-3 or in tables that are compatible with MS Word.

The five-page maximum does not include the cover page or attachments. The attachments
must be concise and not be a continuation of the requested five-page content.

       2. Concept Paper Instructions

Concept Papers must respond to the Agency priorities and geographic focus and sector
priorities of the RFA, as well as reflect the Mission’s supplemental priorities listed in Appendix
E.


Important considerations for Concept Paper submission:
      If you plan to submit a Concept Paper for more than one country, you must submit a
         separate Concept Paper for each country.
      Only regional Missions may invite Concept Papers for more than one country if a
         regional Mission participates in the DGP.
      Carefully review Appendix E to ensure a USAID Mission is both participating in the
         DGP, AND accepting applications for the sector relevant to your concept paper.
      Applications that propose interventions specifically targeted at a particular
         community, which may have had no or limited experience with USAID funded
         programs, should emphasize the outreach and expected benefits to that population.
      Applications that promote alliances with public and private partners should clearly
         state in the Concept paper how this will be managed.
Concept Papers must include the following three (3) components. Please organize the
concept paper according to the outline below.

   a. Cover Page
      1. USAID RFA # M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001
      2. Name and address of organization;
      3. Contact person (lead contact name; telephone number, fax and e-mail Information);
      4. Title of proposed program; country and sector(s) being proposed; total dollar
          amount of funds requested for the project period.
      5. Identify applying organization as a registered U.S. PVO or a LNGO;
      6. Names of other organizations or donors to whom you are submitting the application
          and/or which are funding the proposed activities; and
      7. Signature, name and title of the authorized representative of the applicant.

   b. Technical Instructions (5 pages maximum)
      The Concept paper must include:
      1. Situational analysis: a brief background on the specific development challenge/
         opportunity and needs to be addressed by the proposal (include description of the
         target population);
      2. Statement of the goals and objectives and how objectives relate to specific
         challenges/ opportunities in the country and sector(s);
      3. How achieving the objectives of the proposed activities will support accomplishment
         of USAID Mission’s strategic goals and contribute to Agency priorities in food
         security, global climate change, and the President’s Global Engagement Initiative;

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               DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

          4. Method(s) of approach, highlighting any innovations to be employed (include
              gender focus);
          5. Anticipated results and indicative measures to monitor and evaluate results;
          6. Role of proposed partners (NGOs and/or alliances with private businesses) as well
              as amount and source of cost share contribution in cash or in kind, by Applicant;
              (See Section 5, Part B 7 for additional information on Cost Share criteria).
          7. Brief statement as to why the proposed activities are technically and financially
              feasible;
          8. Proposed budget including type of budget support requested from USAID
              disaggregated by Direct, program costs 4 as well as Indirect costs 5 );
          9. How the proposed activities will be sustained after the grant ends; and
          10. Cost Share:

              Submit information indicating the financial and/or in-kind resources to be
              leveraged. A cost-share or match from non-government sources of 10% or more
              for LNGOs is required. A cost share of 15% or more is required for U.S. PVOs.
              Submit a written commitment by other organizations, donors or individuals.


      c. Attachments (includes past performance, institutional capabilities, and
         supporting information) (No page limit; but be concise)
         1. Statement of USAID assistance received during the preceding five year period; a
             brief description of activities, donor(s) and amount of support.
             Organizations that did not receive funds during the preceding five-year period must
             state this fact;
         2. Concise description of the Applicant's development experience including project
             descriptions, results and evaluations;
         3. A brief statement of the history of the organization; its primary development focus,
             capabilities and challenges;
         4. An organizational chart of the Applicant organization;
         5. Proposed staff roles and responsibilities; and
         6. Life of project work plan.


C. CONCEPT PAPER REVIEW CRITERIA




4
  Direct costs include but are not limited to: Costs of Salaries, workshops, travel, communications, report
preparation, passport issuance, visas, medical exams and inoculations, insurance (other than insurance
included in the applicant’s fringe benefits), equipment, office rent, etc
5
  Indirect costs include: Costs that are incurred by an organization overall but that cannot be attributed
directly to a specific project it is working on.
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Concept Papers will be reviewed using the following criteria:

       1. Clarity and logical coherence;
       2. Demonstrated knowledge of the country and sector(s);
       3. How implementation and results of the proposed activities will support and enhance
           the USAID mission’s sector priorities and Agency priorities;
       4. Documented past performance consistent with type and scope of proposed activities;
       5. Degree to which gender considerations have been incorporated in project design;
       6. Presence of a cost share component (required) and extent to which other partners
           would be involved;
       7. Feasibility of proposed activities considering proposed budget, work plan and staff;
           consideration of risks associated with any innovative or untried approaches;
       8. Sustainability of proposed activities beyond grant period;
       9. Ability of organization to manage and account for USAID funds; and
       10. Competency of proposed staff.




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                               SECTION 5: FULL APPLICATION

Do not submit a Full Application unless requested to do so by a USAID Mission.

Missions will notify Applicants on or about March 19, 2010 whether to submit a Full
Application. Applicants should submit a Full Application only at the request of a USAID
Mission following notification inviting a Full Application. If your organization has been requested
by a USAID Mission to submit a Full Application, please follow the instructions below.

A.      FULL APPLICATION SUBMISSION (STEP 2)
Submit Full Applications to both the appropriate USAID Mission and to ODP/PVC according to
the instructions below. For Mission contact information, see Appendix F.

  1. Submit one (1) original plus two (2) paper copies of the Full Application to the USAID
     Mission contact in a sealed envelope with the name of the program (DGP2) and the name,
     address and telephone number of the applicant;

  2. Send one copy by email to the Mission contact (Appendix F);

  3. Send one copy by email to DGP2@usaid.gov.

 In the subject line of your email submissions, please include: “Full Application for DGP2,
 submitted by: [name of your organization].”

 Full Applications received after the deadline will not be reviewed.
 Fax: Faxed Full Applications will not be accepted.

                   DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF FULL APPLICATIONS
The deadline for Full Application submission is 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time on
Friday, April 30, 2010. Full Applications submitted late or after the deadline will not be
considered.

Successful applicants will be notified in June 2010


B.    FULL APPLICATION FORMAT AND INSTRUCTIONS
 1. Full Application Format
           A maximum of twenty-one (21) pages;
           Typed, single space on letter size, not legal size, paper
           12 font size
           Technical and cost applications shall be submitted in one volume and all
             materials and supporting documentation must be in English unless otherwise
             indicated by the Mission requesting the Full Application.
           Text must be in a recent Windows-compatible version of MS Word (version 2000
             or later) or Adobe PDF format;
           Spreadsheets may be in MS Excel (version 2000 or later) or a recent version of
             Lotus 1-2-3 or in tables that are compatible with MS Word.

     The twenty-one page limit does not include:
          The cover page;
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                DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

               Cost application;
               Table of contents;
               Dividers; or
               Appendices or attachments (such as the Curriculum Vitae (CV) for the proposed
                 Project Director), however attachments must not be a continuation of the twenty-
                 one page maximum.

 2.    Full Application Instructions
      The technical application will include the following sections with page limits noted in
      parentheses.

      Technical Application (maximum: 21 pages)
      1.         Cover Page
      2.         Executive Summary (1 page)
      3.         Technical Approach (7 pages)
      4.         Project Management Approach (3 pages)
      5.         Planning matrix (2 pages)
      6.         Monitoring and Evaluation Plan (2 pages)
      7.         Gender Analysis (2 pages)
      8.         Institutional Capabilities/Past Performance (2 pages)
      9.         Cost share component (1-2 pages)
      10.        Attachments (no page limit; please be concise)

The application must address all of the above technical items as well as their respective
components listed below.

The submitted paper copy application will be used for the official page count. Pages in excess of
stated limitation will not be considered. To facilitate the review of applications, narrative portions
of applications should be organized in the same order as they appear below.

For both the technical and the cost application, Applicants who include data that they do not
want disclosed to the public for any purpose or used by the U.S. Government except for
evaluation purposes, should:

      (a)              Mark the title page with the following legend:

      "This application includes data that shall not be disclosed outside the U.S. Government
      and shall not be duplicated, used, or disclosed - in whole or in part - for any purpose other
      than to evaluate this application. If, however, an Agreement is awarded to this Applicant
      as a result of - or in connection with - the submission of this data, the U.S. Government
      shall have the right to duplicate, use, or disclose the data to the extent provided in the
      resulting Agreement. This restriction does not limit the U.S. Government's right to use
      information contained in this data if it is obtained from another source without restriction.
      The data subject to this restriction are contained in sheets (to be filled in by the
      Applicant).”

      (b)              Mark each sheet of data it wishes to restrict with the following legend:

      "Use or disclosure of data contained on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title
      page of this application."


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             DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001


 1. Cover Page: The cover page shall include:
     a. USAID RFA # M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001
     b. Name and address of organization;
     c. Title of proposed program; country and sector(s) being proposed; total dollar amount
        of funds requested for the project period.
     d. Identify applying organization as a U.S. PVO or a LNGO;
     e. Point of contact, hereafter referred to as the “agent,” with the authority to negotiate and
        sign on behalf of the applicant. The agent’s name (both typed and his/her signature),
        title or position in the organization, email and postal addresses, telephone and fax
        numbers should be included.
     f. Names of other organizations to which you are/have submitted the application and/or
        which are funding the proposed activities. If any partner organizations are included in
        the application, they should be listed separately and indicated as subordinate to the
        principal organization; and
     g. A summary table that lists the primary applicant and all partner organizations as well
        as the percentage of overall program activities of each partner.

2. Executive Summary (1 page): Provide a concise summary of the Applicant’s program
description, program methodology and expected results.

3. Technical Approach (maximum 7 pages):

Discussion of the following sections:

Problem Analysis – Portray the current conditions in each program area and discuss factors
likely to affect proposed program outcomes. Also include the following: the proposed program
area (provide a map with scale in an attachment), the process and rationale used to select
these areas; a description of the numbers and types of individuals who will benefit from the
program, with reference to a separate gender analysis in order to demonstrate the different
impact the project may have on men and women; the specific development needs and
challenges in the sector(s) in which you propose to work.

Objectives – Clear and measurable statements of end of activity objectives and an explanation
of why these represent the most appropriate response to the opportunities and/or challenges
presented in the analysis.

Methods – A brief description of the human, financial, technical and material resources that will
be applied to achieve the objectives including the roles and responsibilities of the applicant and
any partners. If alliances are proposed, discussion of how these will be managed. Specific
mention should be made of any innovations in methods that will be employed and why these
have been chosen. Consideration of risks associated with any innovative or untried approaches
that could be critical to achieving results. Describe strategies that will be employed to sustain
the activities beyond USAID funding for these activities as well as the potential for scaling up to
achieve broad-based impact where possible and appropriate.

There should be a clear logic linking the objectives to the problem analysis as well as linking the
methods to the objectives. In preparing the Technical Approach, please ensure that the
application reflects and addresses the Full Application evaluation criteria.

4. Project Management Approach (3 pages): The management approach should be outlined
in the following Implementation Work Plans:
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   a. Proposed first-year Implementation Work Plan should be presented in matrix format
      which includes proposed activities describing what activities and when they will take
      place for the time frame indicated. Identify partners for activities where appropriate. First-
      year work plan, inputs, outputs, and outcomes should be realistic and achievable within
      proposed budget and timeframe and reflect a grasp of the necessary steps to ensure
      efficient, effective execution of program activities.

   b. Proposed work plan that outlines a timeline for phasing of interventions. The proposed
      implementation plan should contain inputs and outputs and present outcomes per year
      that are realistic and achievable within the proposed budget and timeframe and reflect a
      grasp of necessary steps to ensure rapid, effective execution of program activities.
      Provide indicators that are clear and measurable.

5. Planning Matrix (2 pages): Using a tabular format, summarize main activities, objectives,
indicators and measurement methods. Link information coherently to succinctly explain how a
particular set of activities will achieve a specific objective and how these results will be
measured. Each table should contain the following:

   a. A statement of the proposed program goal and the linked to Agency and/or Mission
      sector objectives, as appropriate;
   b. Main results-oriented objectives that the program will accomplish;
   c. Primary activities intended to achieve the each stated objective result(s);
   d. Examples of key indicators that will measure the results of each objective; and
   e. The measurement and data management methods used to collect and analyze indicator
      data (data sources, frequency of data collection, and methods for collecting and
      reporting data).

6. Monitoring and Evaluation plan: (2 pages)
Description of Applicants approach to monitoring and evaluation which the project will utilize and
why this approach is appropriate. Indicate the process by which the indicators will be developed
and how monitoring processes and results will be used to inform project management decisions.
Indicate ways in which impact will be evaluated at the end of the activity. Include a strategy for
achieving long-term development impact through the completion of intermediate results and
benchmarks. These benchmarks (standards by which an activity can be measured or judged)
may be general at this time but should serve as a framework for the final specific indicators and
benchmarks that will be developed subsequently.
7. Gender Analysis: (2 pages)

Include a Gender Analysis to 1) describe existing gender relations in the particular environment,
ranging from within households or firms to a larger scale of community, ethnic group, or nation,
and 2) organize and interpret, in a systematic way, information about gender relations to make
clear the importance of gender differences for achieving development objectives.

8. Institutional Capabilities/Past Performance: (2 pages)

   Applicants shall be evaluated based on past performance on relevant current programs or
   those completed during the past three years only.

   Include:
   a. Concise description of Applicant's, as well as prospective or existing partners’ previous
       work and experience relative to the activities being proposed.
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   b. List of all awards involving similar or related programs, whether or not involving USAID,
      during the past three years; For each award, include a brief statement about:
           The relevance of the Applicant’s past development work to the program being
               proposed;
           Results achieved;
           Duration, size, value;
           List of references and information such as location, award numbers if available,
               brief description of work performed and contact information with current email
               addresses and telephone numbers;
           Include a copy of a final evaluation if one was done within the last three years.

9. Cost Share Component (1-2 pages):

   It is expected that a minimum of 10% for LNGOs or 15% for U.S. PVOs of the proposed
   budget will be generated from non-USG funding or in-kind support for the proposed
   program. The match may be a combination of cash and in-kind. The Applicant must
   demonstrate ability to raise the match proposed. Actual and/or expected sources and
   amounts of the cost-share amount from all sources (other donors, community members,
   businesses, etc.) must be stipulated. In-kind contributions based on USAID 22 CFR may be
   applied above and beyond the 15% cash match.

   Funds received by the PVO or NGO directly from the U.S. Government or USAID
   intermediaries or foreign governments are not allowable elements of the match but should be
   identified as sources in the overall budget if they are critical to the program.

   Applications should identify all critical sources of support for the program, including private and
   public cash receipts recorded in the organization’s accounts and in-kind contributions of goods
   and services and other contributions not recorded in the organization’s accounts but directly
   supporting its grant program activities.

   Criteria for acceptance and allowability for the non-U.S. federal contributions are set forth in
   USAID 22 CFR 226. (Copies of 22 CFR 226 may be obtained through the Government
   Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20401 or from Internet address:
   http://www.usaid.gov/policy/ads/cfr.html#22.




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C.    COST/BUSINESS APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

Applicants invited to submit a full application must also submit a cost/business
application.

The cost application as an attachment should detail all direct costs associated with the
implementation and completion of activities, as well as any indirect costs and program costs
such as those related to any sub-agreements and/or contracts as detailed below. These
amounts are subject to revision depending on availability of funds. Successful applicants may
be asked to scale back portions of their programs to accommodate funding constraints.

The U.S. Government will require the following detailed information from the applicant
organization:

     1. The cost/business application must be completely separate from the Applicant’s
        technical application, and submitted by using SF-424 and SF-424A “Application for
        Federal Assistance.” These forms can be found under Appendix G and can be
        downloaded online at http://www.grants.gov/agencies/aapproved_standard_forms.jsp

     2. The Applicant must provide by email as described above in Section 5, Part A, an
        electronic copy of a budget in Microsoft (MS) Excel, with calculations shown in the
        spreadsheet, and an electronic version of the narrative that discusses the costs for each
        budget line item (preferably in MS Word).

     3. The cost/business application must be for the period of the proposed program (3 years)
        and use the budget format shown in the SF-424A. The form is attached under Annex I
        and is downloadable online at
        http://www.grants.gov/agencies/aapproved_standard_forms.jsp. If the Applicant
        proposes to charge any training costs to the USG as part of any proposed cooperative
        agreement, it must clearly identify them.

     4. If the Applicant is a consortium, the cost/business application must include documents
        that reflect the legal relationship among the parties. The document(s) should include a
        full discussion of the relationship among the applicants, including the identity of the
        applicant that the USG will treat for purposes of administration of any cooperative
        agreement, identity of the applicant that will have accounting responsibility, how the
        applicant proposes to allocate effort under any cooperative agreement, and the express
        agreement of the principals of the Applicant organization to be held jointly and severally
        liable for the acts of omissions of the other.

     5. Applicants must complete the required Representations and Certifications under Section
        7 with the cost/business application.

     6. The Applicant’s proposed budget should provide estimates of the program based upon
        the total estimated costs for the Agreement. Applicants should minimize their
        administrative and support costs for managing the project to maximize the funds
        available for project activities.

     7. The cost/business application should describe headquarters and field procedures for
        financial reporting and the management information procedure(s) to ensure
        accountability for the use of U.S. Government funds. Applicants must describe fully
        program budgeting, financial and related program reporting procedures.
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8. Applicants must provide detailed budget notes or narrative for all costs, and explain how
   they derived costs, consistent with the following guidance on required information:

       a. The breakdown of all costs associated with the program according to costs of, if
          applicable, headquarters, regional and/or country offices;
       b. The breakdown of all costs according to each partner organization involved in the
          program;
       c. The costs, if any, associated with external, expatriate technical assistance and
          those associated with local in-country technical assistance;
       d. The breakdown of any financial and in-kind contributions of all organizations
          involved in implementing the cooperative agreement;
       e. Potential contributions of non-USG or private commercial donors to the grant,
          contract or cooperative agreement;
       f. Procurement plan for commodities if needed (although not encouraged); and
       g. Closeout costs: applicants must include in the required projected organizational
          budget any costs associated with terminating programmatic activities at the
          conclusion of the cooperative agreement.

9. Applicants must provide the following cost element details:
      a. Salary and Wages – Applicants must propose direct salaries and wages in
          accordance with their personnel policies;
      b. Fringe Benefits – These benefits are non-wage compensation that an
          organization can provide to its employees in addition to their salaries. If the
          Applicant has a fringe benefit rate approved by an agency of the U.S.
          Government, the applicant should use such rate and provide evidence of its
          approval. If an Applicant does not have a fringe benefit rate approved, the
          application should propose a rate and explain how the Applicant determined the
          rate; in this case, the narrative should include a detailed breakdown comprised of
          all items of fringe benefits (e.g., unemployment insurance, workers
          compensation, health and life insurance, retirement, etc.) and the costs of each,
          expressed in U.S. dollars and as a percentage of salaries;
      c. Travel and Transportation – The Applicant should indicate the number of trips,
          domestic and international, estimated as necessary to carry out the proposed
          program description, and their estimated costs. Applicants must specify the
          origin and destination for each proposed trip, the duration of travel, and number
          of individuals who would be traveling. If applicable, applicants should base per-
          diem calculations on current, published U.S. Government per diem rates for the
          localities concerned. Applicants should include in their budgets travel for up to
          three people to a five-day regional Detailed Implementation and Management
          Plan Workshop and a three-day technical training. Applicants may not use
          DGP funding to travel to other conferences and international meetings
          unless expressly approved by the USAID CTO.
      d. Other Direct Costs – Applicants should detail any other direct costs, including the
          costs of communications, report preparation, passport issuance, visas, medical
          exams and inoculations, insurance (other than insurance included in the
          applicant’s fringe benefits), equipment, office rent, etc.;
      e. Indirect Costs – These are costs that are incurred by an organization overall but
          that cannot be attributed directly to a specific project it is working on. The
          Applicant should support the proposed indirect cost rate with a letter from a
          cognizant, U.S. Government audit agency, a Negotiated Indirect Cost Agreement
          (NICRA), or with sufficient information to determine the reasonableness of the
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             rates. (For example, a breakdown of labor bases and overhead pools, the
             method of determining the rate, etc.).
       f.     Alliance Opportunities: Alliance Opportunities: USAID encourages the creation
             of alliances where appropriate. An "alliance," in this sense, is a formal
             agreement between two or more parties created to jointly define and address a
             development problem. Alliance partners combine resources, risks and rewards in
             pursuit of common objectives. Alliance partners make financial and/or in-kind
             contributions to increase the impact and sustainability of development efforts.
             Their support may take many forms. Mechanisms for collaboration include
             parallel financing (with common objectives, clear understanding of roles and
             separate funding tracks) or pooled resources (with agreed upon and legally
             binding governance structures and common funding tracks).


             A Global Development Alliance (GDA) is a public-private partnership model that
             allows USAID to leverage resources from private sector partners to improve
             social and economic conditions in developing countries. The GDA approach
             enables alliance partners—corporations, foundations, and NGOs—to leverage
             their assets to address jointly defined development challenges, thereby achieving
             together a solution that would not be possible for any single partner alone. A
             GDA requires:
                     1:1 leverage (cash and in-kind) of USAID resources;
                     Common goal defined for all partners;
                     Jointly-defined solution to a social or economic development problem;
                     Non-traditional partners (companies, foundations, etc.);
                     Shared resources, risks and results, with a preference for additionality
                      of impact and;
                     Innovative, sustainable approaches to development.

       Additional information about Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) may be obtained from
          the GDA web page at http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_partnerships/gda/.
10. Applicants that have never received a grant, cooperative agreement, or contract from
   the U.S. Government are required to submit a copy of their accounting and personnel
   policy manuals. If a copy has already been submitted to the U.S. Government, the
   applicant must advise which Federal Office has a copy, and provide a point of contact
   with contact information (e.g., phone number). Alternatively, applicants may file a self-
   certificate of compliance with USAID standards. This certificate template is available
   from the USAID point of contact listed in this RFA upon request.

11. Applicants must submit evidence of responsibility in order for the Agreement Officer to
    make a determination of responsibility. The information submitted must be provided in
    the third-person and substantiate that the Applicant:

      Has adequate financial resources or the ability to obtain such resources as required
       during the performance of the award;
      Has the ability to comply with the award conditions, taking into account all existing
       and currently prospective commitments of the applicant - nongovernmental and
       governmental;



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        Has a satisfactory record of performance. Past relevant unsatisfactory performance is
         ordinarily sufficient to justify a finding of non-responsibility, unless there is clear
         evidence of subsequent satisfactory performance;
        Has a satisfactory record of integrity and business ethics; and
        Is otherwise qualified and eligible to receive a grant under applicable laws and
         regulations (e.g., EEO).

     The Applicant is reminded that U.S. Executive Orders and U.S. law prohibits transactions
     with, and the provision of resources and support to, individuals and organizations
     associated with terrorism. It is the legal responsibility of the Applicant/Recipient to ensure
     compliance with these Executive Orders and laws. This provision must be included in all
     subcontracts/sub awards issued under this Agreement that results from this RFA.


D. FULL APPLICATION SELECTION REVIEW CRITERIA

    The criteria presented below have been tailored to the requirements of this Request for
    Applications. Concept papers submitted in response to this RFA will be reviewed in terms
    of responsiveness to the RFA, appropriateness of subject matter and creativeness. Full
    applications will be scored based on a possible maximum 100-point scale.

    Applicants should note that these criteria serve to: (a) identify the significant matters which
    applicants should address in their applications, and (b) set the standard against which all
    applications will be evaluated. To facilitate the review of applications, applicants
    should organize the narrative sections of their applications in the same order as the
    evaluation criteria in this Section.

    The technical applications shall be evaluated in accordance with the Technical Evaluation
    Criteria set forth below relative to the information provided to Applicants in Section 4 of the
    RFA. An award will be made to a responsible Applicant whose application offers the
    greatest value, cost and other factors considered.

    Evaluation Criteria (Total: 100 points)

    1. Technical Approach (55 points)
         The application will be judged on its overall approach and potential for achieving
           development impact, i.e., attributable, measurable and positive changes and the
           numbers of individuals who can be expected to benefit;
         Demonstrated understanding of the technical sector(s), particularly in a country or
           region-specific context for which the funding is being requested; applicant must
           also demonstrate how the proposed activities will change policies, programs and
           individual behaviors related to the selected sector(s);
         Objectively measurable statements of significant outcomes (as contrasted with
           vague, subjectively measurable and trivial outcomes) clearly stated;
         Degree to which there is a clear logic linking the needs identified in the situational
           analysis, and the objectives and strategies proposed;
         Clear demonstration of the relevance of objectives to USAID Mission sector
           priorities and, where appropriate, linkage to Agency priorities;
         The provision of references to support assertions of fact made in the application,
           that is, verification, if necessary, of the facts as presented in the application;

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            Clear implementation plan as required by the RFA; and
            For U.S. PVOs, collaboration with and inclusion and strengthening of local
             partners.

     2. Project Management and Institutional Capacity (20 points)
          Clear statement of organizational structure, mission and objectives with description
            of how the proposed project contributes to these
          Demonstrated institutional capacity to manage (technically, administratively and
            financially) a project in a technically and culturally appropriate fashion
          Demonstrated appropriate experience of key staff relative to project goals and
            objectives as well as language capabilities where appropriate. The qualifications of
            the proposed staff members who will be dedicated to the project will be reviewed to
            determine their skills and abilities to successfully implement the proposed activities

     3. Program Indicators and Monitoring and Evaluation Plan (10 points)
          Indicators presented in a clear, objectively measurable way.
          Clear demonstration of how progress and impact will be tracked, measured and
            reported with clear and appropriate milestones and expected accomplishments,
            with measurable output and performance indicators

     4. Past Performance (10 points)
          References to support any past performance or successful institutional presence in
            at least one geographic region identified in this RFA.
          Relevance of current programs or those completed during the past three years
            only, based on the Applicants statement about:
            o The relevance of the Applicant’s past development work to the program being
                 proposed, or from a final evaluation completed in past three years;
            o Results achieved
            o Duration, size, value

     5. Gender (5 points) Demonstrated understanding and analysis of how program will
     impact men and women differently, as it pertains to the development activities.

     6. Cost Share
     Submit information indicating the financial and/or in-kind resources to be leveraged. A
     cost-share or match from non-government sources of 10% or more for LNGOs is required.
     A cost share of 15% or more is required for U.S. PVOs. Submit a written commitment by
     other organizations, donors or individuals.

     7. Cost Application
        The Applicant’s budget will be reviewed for cost reasonableness, allowability and
        allocability. The budget will also be reviewed for accuracy and congruity with the
        activities proposed in the technical application.


   E. ENVIRONMENTAL PROCEDURES

Respondents to this RFA should include as part of their full technical application a clear
statement (no greater than 1 paragraph) of their approach, experience, and/or expertise for
achieving environmental compliance, protection and management over life of the proposed
program.
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All projects funded by this RFA must conform to USAID environmental regulations, 22 Code of
Federal Regulations (CFR) 216, requiring that any environmental impacts that may arise from
proposed activities (e.g., water and sanitation) are properly mitigated or reduced. Through the
development of an “Initial Environmental Examination” or IEE, 22 CFR 216 ensures that any
unintended environmental impacts of USAID-funded activities are identified and mitigation
measures proposed at the design stage. Subsequently, over the life of the program, these
environmental mitigation measures are expected to be a standard component of program
management. The applicant must also comply with host country environmental regulations. In
case of conflict between host country and USAID regulations, the latter shall govern.

No activity funded under this Request for Applications can be implemented unless the
requirements of 22 CFR 216 have been reached for that activity. The ODP Bureau
Environmental Officer (BEO) or any Mission Environmental Officer can be contacted for further
information. For a listing of USAID Environmental Officers and background information on this
requirement please refer to the USAID Environment Website
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/environment/compliance/index.html).


   SECTION 6. AGENCY POLICIES AND CERTIFICATIONS

A. BRANDING
Effective January 2, 2006, all USAID-sponsored assistance awards are required to adhere to
branding policies and revised marking requirements for grants and cooperative agreements in
accordance with ADS 320. This includes visibly displaying the USAID Standard Graphic Identity
that clearly communicates assistance is, “From the American people” on all programs, projects,
activities, publications, public communications, and commodities provided or supported through
USAID assistance awards. ADS 320 requires that, after the evaluation of the applications, the
USAID Agreement Officer will request the Apparently Successful Applicant to submit a Branding
Strategy that describes how the program, project, or activity is named and positioned, how it is
promoted and communicated to beneficiaries and cooperating country citizens, and identifies all
donors and explains how they will be acknowledged. USAID will not competitively evaluate the
proposed Branding Strategy. ADS 320 may be found at the following website:
http://iapp1.usaid.gov/notices/LoadAttachmentFileName.cfm?Attachment=3626


B. MARKING UNDER ASSISTANCE INSTRUMENTS

(a) Definitions

Commodities mean any material, article, supply, goods or equipment, excluding recipient
offices, vehicles, and non-deliverable items for recipient’s internal use, in administration of the
USAID funded grant, cooperative agreement, or other agreement or subagreement.

Principal Officer means the most senior officer in a USAID Operating Unit in the field, e.g.,
USAID Mission Director or USAID Representative. For global programs managed from
Washington but executed across many countries, such as disaster relief and assistance to
internally displaced persons, humanitarian emergencies or immediate post conflict and political
crisis response, the cognizant Principal Officer may be an Office Director, for example, the
Directors of USAID/W/Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance and Office of Transition Initiatives.
For non-presence countries, the cognizant Principal Officer is the Senior USAID officer in a

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regional USAID Operating Unit responsible for the non-presence country, or in the absence of
such a responsible operating unit, the Principal U.S Diplomatic Officer in the non-presence
country exercising delegated authority from USAID.

Programs mean an organized set of activities and allocation of resources directed toward a
common purpose, objective, or goal undertaken or proposed by an organization to carry out the
responsibilities assigned to it.

Projects include all the marginal costs of inputs (including the proposed investment) technically
required to produce a discrete marketable output or a desired result (for example, services from
a fully functional water/sewage treatment facility).

Public communications are documents and messages intended for distribution to audiences
external to the recipient’s organization. They include, but are not limited to, correspondence,
publications, studies, reports, audio visual productions, and other informational products;
applications, forms, press and promotional materials used in connection with USAID funded
programs, projects or activities, including signage and plaques; Web sites/Internet activities; and
events such as training courses, conferences, seminars, press conferences and so forth.

Subrecipient means any person or government (including cooperating country government)
department, agency, establishment, or for profit or nonprofit organization that receives a USAID
subaward, as defined in 22 C.F.R. 226.2.

Technical Assistance means the provision of funds, goods, services, or other foreign
assistance, such as loan guarantees or food for work, to developing countries and other USAID
recipients, and through such recipients to subrecipients, in direct support of a development
objective – as opposed to the internal management of the foreign assistance program.

USAID Identity (Identity) means the official marking for the United States Agency for
International Development (USAID), comprised of the USAID logo or seal and new brandmark,
with the tagline that clearly communicates that our assistance is “from the American people.”
The USAID Identity is available on the USAID website at www.usaid.gov/branding and USAID
provides it without royalty, license, or other fee to recipients of USAID-funded grants, or
cooperative agreements, or other assistance awards

(b) Marking of Program Deliverables

(1)     All recipients must mark appropriately all overseas programs, projects, activities, public
communications, and commodities partially or fully funded by a USAID grant or cooperative
agreement or other assistance award or subaward with the USAID Identity, of a size and
prominence equivalent to or greater than the recipient’s, other donor’s, or any other third party’s
identity or logo.

(2)      The Recipient will mark all program, project, or activity sites funded by USAID, including
visible infrastructure projects (for example, roads, bridges, buildings) or other programs,
projects, or activities that are physical in nature (for example, agriculture, forestry, water
management) with the USAID Identity. The Recipient should erect temporary signs or plaques
early in the construction or implementation phase. When construction or implementation is
complete, the Recipient must install a permanent, durable sign, plaque or other marking.

(3)    The Recipient will mark technical assistance, studies, reports, papers, publications,
audio-visual productions, public service announcements, Web sites/Internet activities and other
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promotional, informational, media, or communications products funded by USAID with the
USAID Identity.

(4)     The Recipient will appropriately mark events financed by USAID, such as training
courses, conferences, seminars, exhibitions, fairs, workshops, press conferences and other
public activities, with the USAID Identity. Unless directly prohibited and as appropriate to the
surroundings, recipients should display additional materials, such as signs and banners, with
the USAID Identity. In circumstances in which the USAID Identity cannot be displayed visually,
the recipient is encouraged otherwise to acknowledge USAID and the American people’s
support.

(5)   The Recipient will mark all commodities financed by USAID, including commodities or
equipment provided under humanitarian assistance or disaster relief programs, and all other
equipment, supplies, and other materials funded by USAID, and their export packaging with the
USAID Identity.

(6)        The Agreement Officer may require the USAID Identity to be larger and more prominent
if it is the majority donor, or to require that a cooperating country government’s identity be larger
and more prominent if circumstances warrant, and as appropriate depending on the audience,
program goals, and materials produced.

(7)     The Agreement Officer may require marking with the USAID Identity in the event that the
recipient does not choose to mark with its own identity or logo.

(8)     The Agreement Officer may require a pre-production review of USAID funded
public communications and program materials for compliance with the approved Marking Plan.

(9)     Subrecipients. To ensure that the marking requirements “flow down'' to subrecipients of
subawards, recipients of USAID funded grants and cooperative agreements or other assistance
awards will include the USAID-approved marking provision in any USAID funded subaward, as
follows:

“As a condition of receipt of this subaward, marking with the USAID Identity of a size and
prominence equivalent to or greater than the recipient’s, subrecipient’s, other donor’s or third
party’s is required. In the event the recipient chooses not to require marking with its own identity
or logo by the subrecipient, USAID may, at its discretion, require marking by the subrecipient
with the USAID Identity.”

(10) Any ‘public communications’, as defined in 22 C.F.R. 226.2, funded by USAID, in which
the content has not been approved by USAID, must contain the following disclaimer:

“This study/report/audio/visual/other information/media product (specify) is made possible by the
generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International
Development (USAID). The contents are the responsibility of [insert recipient name] and do not
necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.”

(11) The recipient will provide the Agreement Officer’s Technical Representative (AOTR) or
other USAID personnel designated in the grant or cooperative agreement with two copies of all
program and communications materials produced under the award. In addition, the recipient will
submit one electronic or one hard copy of all final documents to USAID’s Development
Experience Clearinghouse.

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(c) Implementation of marking requirements.
(1)     When the grant or cooperative agreement contains an approved Marking Plan, the
recipient will implement the requirements of this provision following the approved Marking Plan.

(2)     When the grant or cooperative agreement does not contain an approved Marking Plan,
the recipient will propose and submit a plan for implementing the requirements of this provision
within 45 days after the effective date of this provision. The plan will include:

(i)     A description of the program deliverables specified in paragraph (b) of this provision that
the recipient will produce as a part of the grant or cooperative agreement and which will visibly
bear the USAID Identity.


(ii)    The type of marking and what materials the applicant uses to mark the program
deliverables with the USAID Identity,

(iii)  When in the performance period the applicant will mark the program deliverables, and
where the applicant will place the marking,

(3)     The recipient may request program deliverables not be marked with the USAID Identity
by identifying the program deliverables and providing a rationale for not marking these program
deliverables. Program deliverables may be exempted from USAID marking requirements when:

(i)     USAID marking requirements would compromise the intrinsic independence or neutrality
of a program or materials where independence or neutrality is an inherent aspect of the program
and materials;

(ii)   USAID marking requirements would diminish the credibility of audits, reports, analyses,
studies, or policy recommendations whose data or findings must be seen as independent;

(iii)   USAID marking requirements would undercut host-country government “ownership” of
constitutions, laws, regulations, policies, studies, assessments, reports, publications, surveys or
audits, public service announcements, or other communications better positioned as “by” or
“from” a cooperating country ministry or government official;

(iv)    USAID marking requirements would impair the functionality of an item;

(v)     USAID marking requirements would incur substantial costs or be impractical;

(vi)   USAID marking requirements would offend local cultural or social norms, or be
considered inappropriate;

(vii)   USAID marking requirements would conflict with international law.

(4)     The proposed plan for implementing the requirements of this provision, including any
proposed exemptions, will be negotiated within the time specified by the Agreement Officer after
receipt of the proposed plan. Failure to negotiate an approved plan with the time specified by
the Agreement Officer may be considered as noncompliance with the requirements is provision.

(d) Waivers.


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(1)      The recipient may request a waiver of the Marking Plan or of the marking requirements
of this provision, in whole or in part, for each program, project, activity, public communication or
commodity, or, in exceptional circumstances, for a region or country, when USAID required
marking would pose compelling political, safety, or security concerns, or when marking would
have an adverse impact in the cooperating country. The recipient will submit the request
through the Cognizant Technical Officer. The Principal Officer is responsible for approvals or
disapprovals of waiver requests.

(2)     The request will describe the compelling political, safety, security concerns, or adverse
impact that require a waiver, detail the circumstances and rationale for the waiver, detail the
specific requirements to be waived, the specific portion of the Marking Plan to be waived, or
specific marking to be waived, and include a description of how program materials will be
marked (if at all) if the USAID Identity is removed. The request should also provide a rationale
for any use of recipient’s own identity/logo or that of a third party on materials that will be subject
to the waiver.

(3)    Approved waivers are not limited in duration but are subject to Principal Officer review at
any time, due to changed circumstances.

(4)    Approved waivers “flow down” to recipients of subawards unless specified otherwise.
The waiver may also include the removal of USAID markings already affixed, if circumstances
warrant.

(5)    Determinations regarding waiver requests are subject to appeal to the Principal Officer’s
cognizant Assistant Administrator. The recipient may appeal by submitting a written request to
reconsider the Principal Officer’s waiver determination to the cognizant Assistant Administrator.

(e) Non-retroactivity. The requirements of this provision do not apply to any materials, events,
or commodities produced prior to January 2, 2006. The requirements of this provision do not
apply to program, project, or activity sites funded by USAID, including visible infrastructure
projects (for example, roads, bridges, buildings) or other programs, projects, or activities that
are physical in nature (for example, agriculture, forestry, water management) where the
construction and implementation of these are complete prior to January 2, 2006 and the period
of the grant does not extend past January 2, 2006.




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C. USAID DISABILITY POLICY

The objectives of the USAID Disability Policy are (1) to enhance the attainment of
United States foreign assistance program goals by promoting the participation and
equalization of opportunities of individuals with disabilities in USAID policy, country and sector
strategies, activity designs and implementation; (2) to increase awareness of issues of people
with disabilities both within USAID programs and in host countries; (3) to engage other U.S.
government agencies, host country counterparts, governments, implementing organizations and
other donors in fostering a climate of nondiscrimination against people with disabilities; and (4)
to support international advocacy for people with disabilities. The full text of the policy paper can
be found at the following website:
http://pdf.dec.org/pdf_docs/PDABQ631.pdf.

USAID therefore requires that the recipient not discriminate against people with
disabilities in the implementation of USAID funded programs and that it make every effort to
comply with the objectives of the USAID Disability Policy in performing the program under this
RFA. To that end and to the extent it can accomplish this goal within the scope of the program
objectives, the recipient should demonstrate a comprehensive and consistent approach for
including men, women and children with disabilities.


D. CERTIFICATIONS

The following certifications are required for full proposal submissions and can be found below:

NOTE: When these Certifications, Assurances, and Other Statements of Recipient are used for
cooperative agreements, the term "Grant" means "Cooperative Agreement".

PART I - CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES

       1. ASSURANCE OF COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS AND REGULATIONS
       GOVERNING NON-DISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED
       PROGRAMS

Note: This certification applies to Non-U.S. organizations if any part of the program will be
undertaken in the United States.

        (a) The recipient hereby assures that no person in the United States shall, on the bases
set forth below, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise
subjected to discrimination under, any program or activity receiving financial assistance from
USAID, and that with respect to the Cooperative Agreement for which application is being
made, it will comply with the requirements of:

(1) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub. L. 88-352, 42 U.S.C. 2000-d), which prohibits
discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin, in programs and activities receiving
Federal financial assistance;

(2) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794), which prohibits


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discrimination on the basis of handicap in programs and activities receiving Federal financial
assistance;

(3) The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended (Pub. L. 95-478), which prohibits
discrimination based on age in the delivery of services and benefits supported with Federal
funds;

(4) Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 1681, et seq.), which prohibits
discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs and activities receiving Federal
financial assistance (whether or not the programs or activities are offered or sponsored by an
educational institution); and

(5) USAID regulations implementing the above nondiscrimination laws, set forth in Chapter II of
Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

        (b) If the recipient is an institution of higher education, the Assurances given herein
extend to admission practices and to all other practices relating to the treatment of students or
clients of the institution, or relating to the opportunity to participate in the provision of services or
other benefits to such individuals, and shall be applicable to the entire institution unless the
recipient establishes to the satisfaction of the USAID Administrator that the institution's practices
in designated parts or programs of the institution will in no way affect its practices in the
program of the institution for which financial assistance is sought, or the beneficiaries of, or
participants in, such programs.

        (c) This assurance is given in consideration of and for the purpose of obtaining any and
all Federal grants, loans, contracts, property, discounts, or other Federal financial assistance
extended after the date hereof to the recipient by the Agency, including installment payments
after such date on account of applications for Federal financial assistance which was approved
before such date. The recipient recognizes and agrees that such Federal financial assistance
will be extended in reliance on the representations and agreements made in this Assurance,
and that the United States shall have the right to seek judicial enforcement of this Assurance.
This Assurance is binding on the recipient, its successors, transferees, and assignees, and the
person or persons whose signatures appear below are authorized to sign this Assurance on
behalf of the recipient.




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       2. CERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING

The undersigned certifies, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:

(1) No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the
undersigned, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of
any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a
Member of Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any
Federal Cooperative Agreement, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of any
cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment or modification of
any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.

(2) If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any
person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a
Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of
Congress in connection with this Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement, the
undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form-LLL, "Disclosure of Lobbying Activities,"
in accordance with its instructions.

(3) The undersigned shall require that the language of this certification be included in the award
documents for all subawards at all tiers (including subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under
grants, loans, and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose
accordingly. This certification is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was
placed when this transaction was made or entered into. Submission of this certification is a
prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, United
States Code. Any person who fails to file the required certification shall be subject to a civil
penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.

Statement for Loan Guarantees and Loan Insurance

The undersigned states, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that: If any funds have
been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or
employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an
employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United
States to insure or guarantee a loan, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard
Form-LLL, "Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying," in accordance with its instructions.
Submission of this statement is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction
imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code. Any person who fails to file the required statement
shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each
such failure.




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       3. PROHIBITION ON ASSISTANCE TO DRUG TRAFFICKERS FOR
       COVERED COUNTRIES AND INDIVIDUALS (ADS 206)

USAID reserves the right to terminate this Agreement, to demand a refund or take other
appropriate measures if the Grantee is found to have been convicted of a narcotics offense or to
have been engaged in drug trafficking as defined in 22 CFR Part 140. The undersigned shall
review USAID ADS 206 to determine if any certifications are required for Key Individuals or
Covered Participants.

If there are COVERED PARTICIPANTS: USAID reserves the right to terminate assistance to or
take other appropriate measures with respect to, any participant approved by USAID who is
found to have been convicted of a narcotics offense or to have been engaged in drug trafficking
as defined in 22 CFR Part 140.




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       4. CERTIFICATION REGARDING TERRORIST FINANCING
       IMPLEMENTING EXECUTIVE ORDER 13224

By signing and submitting this application, the prospective recipient provides the
certification set out below:

1. The Recipient, to the best of its current knowledge, did not provide, within the
previous ten years, and will take all reasonable steps to ensure that it does not and will not
knowingly provide, material support or resources to any individual or entity that commits,
attempts to commit, advocates, facilitates, or participates in terrorist acts, or has committed,
attempted to commit, facilitated, or participated in terrorist acts, as that term is defined in
paragraph 3.

2. The following steps may enable the Recipient to comply with its obligations under paragraph
1:

       a. Before providing any material support or resources to an individual or entity, the
       Recipient will verify that the individual or entity does not (i) appear on the master list of
       Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons, which list is maintained by the
       U.S. Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) and is available online at
       OFAC’s website : http://www.treas.gov/offices/eotffc/ofac/sdn/t11sdn.pdf, or (ii) is not
       included in any supplementary information concerning prohibited individuals or entities
       that may be provided by USAID to the Recipient.

       b. Before providing any material support or resources to an individual or entity, the
       Recipient also will verify that the individual or entity has not been designated by the
       United Nations Security Council (UNSC) sanctions committee established under UNSC
       Resolution 1267 (1999) (the “1267 Committee”) [individuals and entities linked to the
       Taliban, Osama bin Laden, or the Al Qaida Organization]. To determine whether there
       has been a published designation of an individual or entity by the 1267 Committee, the
       Recipient should refer to the consolidated list available online at the Committee’s
       website: http://www.un.org/Docs/sc/committees/1267/1267ListEng.htm.

       c. Before providing any material support or resources to an individual or entity, the
       Recipient will consider all information about that individual or entity of which it is aware
       and all public information that is reasonably available to it or of which it should be aware.

       d. The Recipient also will implement reasonable monitoring and oversight procedures to
       safeguard against assistance being diverted to support terrorist activity.

3. For purposes of this Certification

 a. “Material support and resources” means currency or monetary instruments or financial
securities, financial services, lodging, training, expert advice or assistance, safehouses, false
documentation or identification, communications equipment, facilities, weapons, lethal
substances, explosives, personnel, transportation, and other physical assets, except medicine
or religious materials.”

 b. “Terrorist act” means-

       (i) an act prohibited pursuant to one of the 12 United Nations Conventions and
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      Protocols related to terrorism (see UN terrorism conventions Internet site:
      http://untreaty.un.org/English/Terrorism.asp); or

      (ii) an act of premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated against
      noncombatant targets by subnational groups or clandestine agents; or

      (iii) any other act intended to cause death or serious bodily injury to a civilian, or to any
      other person not taking an active part in hostilities in a situation of armed conflict, when
      the purpose of such act, by its nature or context, is to intimidate a population, or to
      compel a government or an international organization to do or to abstain from doing any
      act.

c. “Entity” means a partnership, association, corporation, or other organization, group or
   subgroup.

d. References in this Certification to the provision of material support and resources shall not
   be deemed to include the furnishing of USAID funds or USAID-financed commodities to the
   ultimate beneficiaries of USAID assistance, such as recipients of food, medical care, micro-
   enterprise loans, shelter, etc., unless the Recipient has reason to believe that one or more
   of these beneficiaries commits, attempts to commit, advocates, facilitates, or participates in
   terrorist acts, or has committed, attempted to commit, facilitated or participated in terrorist
   acts.

e. The Recipient’s obligations under paragraph 1 are not applicable to the procurement of
   goods and/or services by the Recipient that are acquired in the ordinary course of business
   through contract or purchase, e.g., utilities, rents, office supplies, gasoline, etc., unless the
   Recipient has reason to believe that a vendor or supplier of such goods and services
   commits, attempts to commit, advocates, facilitates, or participates in terrorist acts, or has
   committed, attempted to commit, facilitated or participated in terrorist acts.

  This Certification is an express term and condition of any agreement issued as a result of
  this application, and any violation of it shall be grounds for unilateral termination of the
  agreement by USAID prior to the end of its term.




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   5. CERTIFICATION OF RECIPIENT

By signing below the recipient provides certifications and assurances for (1) the Assurance of
Compliance with Laws and Regulations Governing Non-Discrimination in Federally Assisted
Programs, (2) the Certification Regarding Lobbying, (3) the Prohibition on Assistance to Drug
Traffickers for Covered Countries and Individuals (ADS 206) and (4) the Certification Regarding
Terrorist Financing Implementing Executive Order 13224 above.

RFA/RFA No. ________________________________

Application No. ______________________________

Date of Application ______________________________

Name of Recipient _______________________________

Typed Name and Title __________________________________

Signature _____________________________________

Date _______________




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PART II - KEY INDIVIDUAL CERTIFICATION NARCOTICS OFFENSES AND DRUG
TRAFFICKING

I hereby certify that within the last ten years:

 1. I have not been convicted of a violation of, or a conspiracy to violate, any law or regulation
of the United States or any other country concerning narcotic or psychotropic drugs or other
controlled substances.

 2. I am not and have not been an illicit trafficker in any such drug or controlled substance.

  3. I am not and have not been a knowing assistor, abettor, conspirator, or colluder with others
in the illicit trafficking in any such drug or substance.

Signature:      ____________________________

Date:           ____________________________

Name:           ____________________________

Title/Position: ____________________________

Organization: ____________________________

Address:        ____________________________

                ____________________________

Date of Birth: ____________________________

NOTICE:

 1. You are required to sign this Certification under the provisions of 22 CFR Part 140,
Prohibition on Assistance to Drug Traffickers. These regulations were issued by the Department
of State and require that certain key individuals of organizations must sign this Certification.

 2. If you make a false Certification you are subject to U.S. criminal prosecution under 18
U.S.C. 1001.




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PART III - PARTICIPANT CERTIFICATION NARCOTICS OFFENSES AND DRUG
TRAFFICKING

1. I hereby certify that within the last ten years:

  a. I have not been convicted of a violation of, or a conspiracy to violate, any law or regulation
of the United States or any other country concerning narcotic or psychotropic drugs or other
controlled substances.

  b. I am not and have not been an illicit trafficker in any such drug or controlled substance.

  c. I am not or have not been a knowing assistor, abettor, conspirator, or colluder with others in
the illicit trafficking in any such drug or substance.

2. I understand that USAID may terminate my training if it is determined that I engaged in the
above conduct during the last ten years or during my USAID training.

Signature:      ___________________________________

Name:           ___________________________________

Date:           ___________________________________

Address:        ___________________________________

                ___________________________________

Date of Birth: ___________________________________

NOTICE:
1. You are required to sign this Certification under the provisions of 22 CFR Part 140,Prohibition
on Assistance to Drug Traffickers. These regulations were issued by the Department of State
and require that certain participants must sign this Certification.

2. If you make a false Certification you are subject to U.S. criminal prosecution under 18
U.S.C.1001.




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PART IV - CERTIFICATION OF COMPLIANCE WITH THE STANDARD
PROVISIONS ENTITLED “CONDOMS” AND “PROHIBITION ON THE

PROMOTION OR ADVOCACY OF THE LEGALIZATION OR PRACTICE OF
PROSTITUTION OR SEX TRAFFICKING.”

Applicability: This certification requirement only applies to the prime recipient. Before a U.S. or
non-U.S. nongovernmental organization receives FY04-FY08 HIV/AIDS funds under a grant or
cooperative agreement, such recipient must provide to the Agreement Officer a certification
substantially as follows:

“[Recipient's name] certifies compliance as applicable with the standard
provisions entitled “Condoms” and “Prohibition on the Promotion or Advocacy
of the Legalization or Practice of Prostitution or Sex Trafficking” included in
the referenced agreement.”

RFA/RFA No. _______________________________

Application No.        _______________________________

Date of Application    _______________________________

Name of Applicant/Subgrantee _______________________________

Typed Name and Title _______________________________

                       _______________________________

Signature              _______________________________




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PART V - SURVEY ON ENSURING EQUAL OPPORTUNITY FOR APPLICANTS

Applicability: All RFAs must include the attached Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for
Applicants as an attachment to the RFA package. Applicants under unsolicited applications are
also to be provided the survey. (While inclusion of the survey by Agreement Officers in RFA
packages is required, the applicant’s completion of the survey is voluntary, and must not be a
requirement of the RFA. The absence of a completed survey in an application may not be a
basis upon which the application is determined incomplete or non-responsive. Applicants who
volunteer to complete and submit the survey under a competitive or non-competitive action are
instructed within the text of the survey to submit it as part of the application process.)




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PART VI - OTHER STATEMENTS OF RECIPIENT

       1. AUTHORIZED INDIVIDUALS

The recipient represents that the following persons are authorized to negotiate on its behalf with
the Government and to bind the recipient in connection with this application or grant:

Name           Title          Telephone No.          Facsimile No.

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

       2. TAXPAYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (TIN)

If the recipient is a U.S. organization, or a foreign organization that has income effectively
connected with the conduct of activities in the U.S. or has an office or a place of business or a
fiscal paying agent in the U.S., please indicate the recipient's TIN:

TIN: ________________________________


       3. DATA UNIVERSAL NUMBERING SYSTEM (DUNS) NUMBER

       (a) In the space provided at the end of this provision, the recipient should supply the
Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number applicable to that name and address.
Recipients should take care to report the number that identifies the recipient's name and
address exactly as stated in the proposal.

         (b) The DUNS is a 9-digit number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet Information Services.
If the recipient does not have a DUNS number, the recipient should call Dun and Bradstreet
directly at 1- 800-333-0505. A DUNS number will be provided immediately by telephone at no
charge to the recipient. The recipient should be prepared to provide the following information:

(1) Recipient's name.
(2) Recipient's address.
(3) Recipient's telephone number.
(4) Line of business.
(5) Chief executive officer/key manager.
(6) Date the organization was started.
(7) Number of people employed by the recipient.
(8) Company affiliation.
        (c) Recipients located outside the United States may obtain the location and phone
number of the local Dun and Bradstreet Information Services office from the Internet Home
Page at http://www.dbisna.com/dbis/customer/custlist.htm. If an offeror is unable to locate a
local service center, it may send an e-mail to Dun and Bradstreet at globalinfo@dbisma.com.

The DUNS system is distinct from the Federal Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) system.

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DUNS: ________________________________________


       4. LETTER OF CREDIT (LOC) NUMBER

If the recipient has an existing Letter of Credit (LOC) with USAID, please indicate the LOC
number:

LOC: _________________________________________


       5. PROCUREMENT INFORMATION

  (a) Applicability. This applies to the procurement of goods and services planned by the
recipient (i.e., contracts, purchase orders, etc.) from a supplier of goods or services for the
direct use or benefit of the recipient in conducting the program supported by the grant, and not
to assistance provided by the recipient (i.e., a subgrant or subagreement) to a subgrantee or
subrecipient in support of the subgrantee's or subrecipient's program. Provision by the recipient
of the requested information does not, in and of itself, constitute USAID approval.

  (b) Amount of Procurement. Please indicate the total estimated dollar amount of goods and
services, which the recipient plans to purchase under the grant:

$__________________________

  (c) Nonexpendable Property. If the recipient plans to purchase nonexpendable equipment
which would require the approval of the Agreement Officer, please indicate below (using a
continuation page, as necessary) the types, quantities of each, and estimated unit costs.
Nonexpendable equipment for which the Agreement Officer's approval to purchase is required
is any article of nonexpendable
tangible personal property charged directly to the grant, having a useful life of more than one
year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per unit.

TYPE/DESCRIPTION(Generic)            QUANTITY               ESTIMATED UNIT COST


  (d) Source, Origin, and Componentry of Goods. If the recipient plans to purchase any
goods/commodities which are not of U.S. source and/or U.S. origin, and/or does not contain at
least 50% componentry, which are not at least 50% U.S. source and origin, please indicate
below (using a continuation page, as necessary) the types and quantities of each, estimated
unit costs of each, and probable source and/or origin, to include the probable source and/or
origin of the components if less than 50% U.S. components will be contained in the commodity.
"Source" means the country from which a commodity is shipped to the cooperating country or
the cooperating country itself if the commodity is located therein at the time of purchase.
However, where a commodity is shipped from a free port or bonded warehouse in the form in
which received therein, "source" means the country from which the commodity was shipped to
the free port or bonded warehouse. Any commodity whose source is a non-Free World country
is ineligible for USAID financing. The "origin" of a commodity is the country or area in which a
commodity is mined, grown, or produced. A commodity is produced when, through
manufacturing, processing, or substantial and major assembling of components, commercially
recognized new commodity results, which is substantially different in basic characteristics or in
purpose or utility from its components. Merely packaging various items together for a particular
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procurement or relabeling items do not constitute production of a commodity. Any commodity
whose origin is a non-Free World country is ineligible for USAID financing. "Components" are
the goods, which go directly into the production of a produced commodity. Any component from
a non-Free World country makes the commodity ineligible for USAID financing.

TYPE/DESCRIPTION QUANTITY ESTIMATED GOODS PROBABLE GOODS
PROBABLE
(Generic)  UNIT COST COMPONENTS SOURCE COMPONENTS ORIGIN

(e) Restricted Goods. If the recipient plans to purchase any restricted goods, please indicate
below (using a continuation page, as necessary) the types and quantities of each, estimated
unit costs of each, intended use, and probable source and/or origin. Restricted goods are
Agricultural Commodities, Motor Vehicles, Pharmaceuticals, Pesticides, Rubber Compounding
Chemicals and Plasticizers, Used Equipment, U.S. Government-Owned Excess Property, and
Fertilizer.

TYPE/DESCRIPTION QUANTITY ESTIMATED PROBABLE INTENDED USE
(Generic)       UNIT COST SOURCE ORIGIN


  (f) Supplier Nationality. If the recipient plans to purchase any goods or services from suppliers
of goods and services whose nationality is not in the U.S., please indicate below (using a
continuation page, as necessary) the types and quantities of each good or service, estimated
costs of each, probable nationality of each non-U.S. supplier of each good or service, and the
rationale for purchasing from a non-U.S. supplier. Any supplier whose nationality is a non-Free
World country is ineligible for USAID financing.


TYPE/DESCRIPTION QUANTITY              ESTIMATED       PROBABLE SLUPPIER
NATIONALITY RATIONALE

(Generic)              UNIT COST (Non-U.S. Only)             for NON-US


  (g) Proposed Disposition. If the recipient plans to purchase any nonexpendable equipment
with a unit acquisition cost of $5,000 or more, please indicate below (using a continuation page,
as necessary) the proposed disposition of each such item. Generally, the recipient may either
retain the property for other uses and make compensation to USAID (computed by applying the
percentage of federal participation in the cost of the original program to the current fair market
value of the property), or sell the property and reimburse USAID an amount computed by
applying to the sales proceeds the percentage of federal participation in the cost of the original
program (except that the recipient may deduct from the federal share $500 or 10% of the
proceeds, whichever is greater, for selling and handling expenses), or donate the property to a
host country institution, or otherwise dispose of the property as instructed by USAID.

TYPE/DESCRIPTION(Generic) QUANTITY ESTIMATED UNIT COST PROPOSED
DISPOSITION




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        6. PAST PERFORMANCE REFERENCES

On a continuation page, please provide past performance information requested in the RFA.



        7. TYPE OF ORGANIZATION

The recipient, by checking the applicable box, represents that -

 (a) If the recipient is a U.S. entity, it operates as [ ] a corporation incorporated under the laws
of the State of, [ ] an individual, [ ] a partnership, [ ] a nongovernmental nonprofit organization, [ ]
a state or loc al governmental organization, [ ] a private college or university, [ ] a public college
or university, [ ] an international organization, or [ ] a joint venture; or

 (b) If the recipient is a non-U.S. entity, it operates as [ ] a corporation organized under the laws
of _____________________________ (country), [ ] an individual, [ ] a partnership, [ ] a
nongovernmental nonprofit organization, [ ] a nongovernmental educational institution, [ ] a
governmental organization, [ ] an international organization, or [ ] a joint venture.



        8. ESTIMATED COSTS OF COMMUNICATIONS PRODUCTS

The following are the estimate(s) of the cost of each separate communications product (i.e., any
printed material [other than non- color photocopy material], photographic services, or video
production services) which is anticipated under the grant. Each estimate must include all the
costs associated with preparation and execution of the product. Use a continuation page as
necessary.




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                                          APPENDICES

The elements/sub-elements supported by the DGP are given in the box below and elaborated in
appendices A to D which follow.

Microenterprise
4.7.1 Inclusive Financial Markets
4.7.2 Policy Environment for Micro and Small Enterprises
4.7.3 Microenterprise Productivity

Water
3.1.6 Maternal and Child Health
3.1.6.8 Household Level Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Environment
3.1.8 Water Supply and Sanitation
4.5.2 Agricultural productivity
4.8.1 Natural Resources Management and Biodiversity

Dairy
4.5.2 Agricultural Sector Productivity

Climate Change Adaptation
4.8.2 Clean Productive Environment


A. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: MICROENTERPRISE

Definitions

Microfinance and microenterprise development is a crosscutting issue. A
microenterprise is a very small enterprise owned and operated by poor people, usually in
the informal sector. For USAID program purposes, the term is restricted to enterprises
with 10 or fewer workers, including the microentrepreneur and any unpaid family
workers. Throughout the developing world, millions of poor families derive an important
share of their income from microenterprise activities.

To help these poor families gain access to economic opportunity, USAID supports three types of
activities: (1) microfinance, to improve access to financial services tailored to the needs of poor
households, including credit, deposit services, insurance, and remittance and payment services;
(2) efforts to reduce regulatory, policy and administrative barriers that limit the opportunities of
micro- and small firms; and (3) enterprise development, to improve productivity and market
potential for microenterprises.

Activities exclusively devoted to microfinance and microenterprise development are reported
under three Program Elements under Economic Growth Program Area 4.7 (Economic
Opportunity), each linked to one of the three types of activities described above: 4.7.1, Inclusive
Financial Markets; 4.7.2, Policy Environment for Micro and Small Enterprises; and 4.7.3,
Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity. However, activities in any foreign assistance objective
can also contribute to microfinance or microenterprise development, to the extent that they
promote one or more of the outcomes summarized here.



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USAID’s integrated approach to microfinance and microenterprise development supports
inclusive financial markets, policy reform, and enterprise development, including producers,
their organizations, and agriculture related microenterprises, to help households build assets,
grow their businesses, improve household security, and participate in the economy on better
terms, thus promoting economic growth with poverty reduction.

Elements and Indicators

4.7 Economic Opportunity

4.7.1 Inclusive Financial Markets
     Number of clients at USG-assisted microfinance institutions
     Number of microfinance institutions supported by USG financial or technical assistance
     Percent of portfolio outstanding of USG-assisted microfinance institutions held as
        poverty loans
     Percent of USG-assisted microfinance institutions that have reached financial
        sustainability
     Percent of USG-assisted microfinance institutions that have reached operational
        sustainability
     Total savings deposits held by USG-assisted microfinance institutions
     Number and types of financial products and services available to, and utilized by, MFI
        clients, including Sharia-compliant financial products and services, as appropriate.

4.7.2 Policy Environment for Micro and Small Enterprises

      Number of proposed improvements in laws and regulations affecting the operations of
       micro enterprises drafted with USG assistance

4.7.3 Microenterprise Productivity
     Number of microenterprises participating in USG assisted value chains
     Number of microenterprises receiving business development services from USG
       assisted sources
     Total number of microenterprises receiving finance from participating firms in a USG
       assisted value chain
     Amount of private financing mobilized with a DCA guarantee

Links
http://www.microlinks.org/ev_en.php
http://treas.gov/offices/enforcement/programs
http://www1.worldbank.org/finance/html/amlcft/docs/aml_implications_complete.pdf
http://www.qfinance.com/investment-management-checklists/an-overview-of-shariah-compliant-
funds
http://www.accountancy.com.pk/articles.asp?id=174




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B. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION

Water Related Activities in USAID Water Issue
The Water Key issue describes activities that are included in the Senator Paul Simon Water for
the Poor Act of 2005. All activities included in the 4 water related Key Sub-Issues are included
in reporting on the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005.

Definitions:

Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation
Rural and urban water supply; water wells/water points; water harvesting; water transmission;
latrines and toilets; point-of-use (POU) and other drinking water treatment; water-related
hygiene promotion; water infrastructure finance; water supply and wastewater utility governance
reform/corporatization; water sector reform; desalination; and wastewater management
[collection (sewers), large wastewater plants and small-scale treatment (including septic tanks,
drain fields, and eco-san systems)].

Watershed/Water Resources Management
Watershed, river basin and trans-boundary river management; water law and policy; surface
freshwater and groundwater drinking water source protection (quality and quantity), urban storm
water management; water quality management, including point and non-point source pollution
prevention and control; freshwater and coastal ecosystem management; water-related tourism;
wastewater reuse; groundwater/aquifer protection and management; aquatic biodiversity/coral
reef protection and management; lake and estuary management; river flow modeling; reservoir
management; water demand management; and water use allocation.

Water Productivity
Agricultural irrigation and irrigation efficiency improvement; agricultural soil/water management;
fisheries management; aquaculture; and hydropower (including mini-hydro).

Disaster Risk Reduction
Water-related disaster preparedness using hydro-meteorological monitoring, modeling, and
forecasting; drought/flood/floodplain management; and disaster risk/vulnerability assessment,
response and preparedness.

Elements and Indicators:

Investing in People, Health, Clean Water, and Sanitation Services
3.1.8 Water Supply and Sanitation
     Number of people in target areas with access to improved drinking water supply as a
       result of USG assistanceNumber of people in target areas with access to improved
       sanitation facilities as a result of USG assistance
     Percent of operations and maintenance costs for water supply and sanitation services
       covered through customer charges in target areas
     Amount of private financing mobilized with a Development Credit Authority (DCA)
       guarantee
     Number of hours per day that households in areas assisted by USG programs have
       potable water services



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3.1.6.8 Household Level Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Environment
     Liters of drinking water disinfected with USG-supported point-of-use (POU) treatment
        products
3.1.6 Maternal and Child Health
     Number of cases of child diarrhea treated in USGG-assisted programs


Watershed/Water Resources Management
4.8.1 Natural Resources Management and Biodiversity
     Number of hectares of watersheds showing improved biophysical conditions as a result
       of USG assistance
     Number of watershed hectares under improved management as a result of USG
       assistance
     Number of people receiving USG supported training watershed management
     Number of people with increased economic benefits derived from sustainable watershed
       management as a result of USG assistance
     Number of policies, laws, agreements or regulations promoting sustainable water
       resources management that are implemented as a result of USG assistance

Water Productivity
4.5.2 Agricultural productivity
     Number of farmers, processors and others who have adopted new technologies or
       management practices as a result of USG assistance
     Number of vulnerable households benefiting from USG assistance
     Number of additional hectares under improved technologies or management practices
       as a result of USG assistance
     Number of producers organizations, water user associations and community-based
       organizations (CBOs) receiving USG assistance

Links

http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_health/eh/index.html
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_health/eh/techareas/improvement.html
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_health/eh/techareas/targets.html
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_health/eh/techareas/pou.html
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_health/eh/techareas/sanitation.html
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_health/eh/techareas/reconstruction.html




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C. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: DAIRY

Definition

Dairy cuts across functional objectives and includes activities that assist small dairy producers,
processors and service providers to maximize their abilities to increase milk yields; produce
higher quality and value-added dairy products; educate consumers; and increase cash incomes
to small farmers, especially women who are the primary caretakers of dairy animals; macro-
dairy development (production, processing, marketing); and cooperative or producer association
building.

Elements and Indicators

4.5 Agriculture
       4.5.2 Agricultural Sector Capacity
     Number of new technologies or management practices under research as a result of
       USG assistance
     Number of new technologies or management practices under field testing as a result of
       USG assistance
     Number of new technologies or management practices made available for transfer as a
       result of USG assistance.
     Number of additional hectares under improved technologies or management practices
       as a result of USG assistance
     Number of additional surveillance and/or control systems in place for agricultural threats
       (biological or environmental) as a result of USG assistance
     Number of vulnerable households benefiting directly from USG interventions
     Number of producer organizations, water users associations, trade and business
       associations and community-based organizations (CBOs) receiving USG assistance
     Number of agriculture-related firms benefiting directly from USG-supported interventions
     Number of public-private partnerships formed as a result of USG assistance
     Number of individuals who have received USG supported short-term agricultural sector
       productivity training
     Number of individuals who have received USG supported long term agricultural sector
       productivity training
     Percent change in value of intra-regional exports of targeted agricultural commodities as
       a result of USG assistance
     Percent change in value of international exports of targeted agricultural commodities as
       a result of USG assistance
     Amount of private financing mobilized with a DCA guarantee
     Percent change in value of purchases from smallholders or targeted commodities as a
       result of USG assistance
     Number of women’s organizations/associations assisted as a result of USG supported
       interventions
     Number of farmers, processors and others who have adopted new technologies or
       management practices as a result of USG assistance

Links

http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/agriculture/livestock.htm

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D. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION

Elements and Indicators
4.8.2 Clean Productive Environment
     Number of laws, policies, agreements or regulations addressing climate change
       proposed, adopted or implemented as a results of USG assistance
     Number of people with increased adaptive capacity to cope with impacts of climate
       variability and change as a results of USG assistance
     Number of people receiving USG supported training in global climate change including
       Framework Convention on Climate Change, greenhouse gas inventories, mitigation, and
       adaptation analysis


Links:
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/environment/climate/policies_prog/vulnerability.html
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/environment/climate/index.html




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E. USAID PARTICIPATING MISSIONS AND MISSION SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

Alphabetical Listing of Countries, with relevant Mission sectors indicated in columns
* Note: this list of eligible countries is subject to change without prior notice.




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       1. USAID PARTICIPATING MISSIONS AND SECTORS IN WHICH THEY WILL ACCEPT APPLICATIONS

USAID Mission                          Microenterprise       Water Supply,            Dairy        Climate Change
                                                             Sanitation, and                          Adaptation
                                                                Hygiene
Angola                                        X                     X                                      X
Armenia                                                             X                                      X
Bosnia and Herzegovina                        X                                                            X
Caucasus-Azerbaijan                           X                     X                   X                  X
Caucasus-Regional Mission                                                                                  X
(Georgia only)
Central Asia Republics (Kyrgyz                                      X
Republic)
Central Asia Republics (Regional)                                                       X                  X
Central Asia Republics (Tajikistan)                                 X
Democratic Republic of the Congo              X                     X
Ecuador                                       X                     X                   X                  X
Egypt – Office of Middle East                                                                              X
Programs (Regional Mission)
El Salvador                                   X
Ethiopia                                                            X                   X                  X
Indonesia                                     X                     X                                      X
Jamaica                                       X                                                            X
Macedonia                                     X                                                            X
Malawi                                                              X
Morocco                                                             X                                      X
Nepal                                                               X
Nicaragua                                                           X                                      X
Panama                                        X                                                            X
Paraguay                                      X
Peru                                                                X                                      X
Regional Development Mission for                                                                           X
Asia (RDMA) – Bangkok
Regional Mission for Ukraine,                                       X                                      X


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USAID Mission                         Microenterprise       Water Supply,            Dairy        Climate Change
                                                            Sanitation, and                          Adaptation
                                                               Hygiene
Moldova and Belarus (Ukraine only)
Russia                                                                                                    X
South Africa and Southern Africa                                   X                                      X
Regional Mission
Sri Lanka                                    X                     X                   X
Timor-Leste                                  X                                         X                  X




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       2. MISSION SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

                                         USAID/Angola

DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Though Angola is endowed with abundant water resources, more than two-thirds of its
population does not have access to safe water supply and sanitation services. According to the
National Institute of Statistics, only about 36 % of the population in peri-urban areas (where the
bulk of Angolans live) has access to safe water and sanitation services. Angola has been
estimated to have among the highest under-five mortality rates in the world (260/1,000).
According to national epidemiological data, 18 % of these deaths are attributed to diarrhea,
meaning five children die every hour from water or sanitation-related diseases. Widespread
unsanitary practices, primarily defecation in open spaces and not washing hands with soap at
critical times, as well as the consumption of contaminated drinking water, remain major causes
of child death, disease, and malnutrition in Angola, especially among the poor. A 2007 UNICEF
study in Angola revealed that national sanitation coverage is 28%, leaving 10.5 million people
routinely practicing unsafe means of excreta disposal. The situation is even grimmer for rural
areas, where less than 15% of households use toilets, with only 7% of these considered
sanitary. The coverage in urban areas is also poor at 38%, much lower than originally thought.

USAID/Angola aims to support the Government and people of Angola in improving water and
sanitation practices through targeted activities 1) to improve safe water access (with a focus on
point of use water treatment and community level water user associations) and 2) to promote
behavior change towards safe sanitation practices. USAID/Angola is currently supporting water
and sanitation activities in the provinces of Bie, Cabinda, Cuando Cubango, Cunene, Huambo
and Luanda. USAID/Angola invites organizations to submit proposals that complement
USAID/Angola’s existing activities and particularly welcomes proposals that extend the reach of
USAID’s impact.


DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Economic diversification, employment creation and small business development across Angola
are central to U.S. goals of promoting broad-based economic growth and political stability.
Angola is afflicted not only by high levels of unemployment, but also pervasive
underemployment, especially among youth who comprise 60% of the population. Micro, small
and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) have a key role to play in Angola to create broad-
based development beyond the oil sector, along with jobs for the rapidly growing population and
a more equitable distribution of income and wealth. Because of Angola’s socialist past and
recent history of conflict, MSMEs in Angola have limited scope and size; poor links to other
enterprises; low levels of management and technical skills, education, and business experience;
as well as limited access to skilled labor, capital, market information and technology. Most
MSMEs lack knowledge about how to use banking services. There is an urgent need to expand
access to finance for MSMEs. Traditionally, commercial banks have catered to a few hundred
major companies and to wealthy individuals.

To help address these gaps, USAID/Angola invites organizations to submit concept papers
supporting entrepreneurship development, market linkages, and improvement of the regulatory
framework for MSMEs. USAID/Angola is particularly interested in programs that support
market-based development, build entrepreneurial capacity, identify and address bottlenecks in
the regulatory environment for microenterprises, focus on workforce development for youth and
women, or support agriculture-based MSME’s. USAID/Angola encourages organizations to
submit concept papers that complement USAID/Angola’s or the Government of Angola’s
existing activities.
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DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Angola is one of the most bio-diverse countries in Africa, extremely rich in natural resources and
host to what is likely the most important water catchment in the Southern Africa region.
Angola’s 1,246,700 square kilometers, only slightly less than twice the size of Texas, includes
57.4 million ha of agricultural land, including 35 million ha of arable land only 5% of which is
currently under cultivation. The expected development of this land would benefit significantly
from improved knowledge of global climate change and adaptation measures. Multiple
obstacles however exist to appropriate and sustainable environmental management, and
subsequent socio-economic development. Protected areas cover only 6% of Angola’s national
territory, the lowest percentage of any African country. Angola has experienced recurrent
natural disaster events, including floods and drought, in the last three years. The country is
quickly losing its forest cover and coastal and marine ecosystems are under significant threat
due to rapid and un-managed population expansion in and around urban centers. Behind the
negative trends affecting Angola’s environment is a fast-growing economy without appropriate
environmental governance. The country’s rapid economic growth in the absence of an
institutional and regulatory framework to ensure that the environmental impact of economic
activities are incorporated into development planning and implementation is a root cause of
environmental degradation and biodiversity loss. The Government of Angola (GoA) is
attempting to address some of these challenges and in 2007 completed its National Biodiversity
Strategic Plan (NBSP). The NBSP presents actions to incorporate measures into development
policies and programs to prevent degradation of ecosystems and loss of biodiversity. There is
lack of information about possible climate change being experienced in Angola and possible
adaptation measures to reduce related impact.

USAID/Angola aims to support the GoA in improving the design of climate change adaptation
policies, strategies and/or programs that simultaneously support economic diversification,
growth and sound environmental management. As a part of this effort, USAID/Angola invites
eligible organizations to submit concept papers for projects that link research on global climate
change and adaptation measures in Angola with results-oriented actions for improved
information distribution, policy and regulatory frameworks, and advocacy and capacity building
efforts. Specifically, USAID is interested in projects that : (i) Synthesize, collect, analyze,
interpret and disseminate existing climate variability information and likely climate extremes,
identify climate change adaptation measures and define criteria for prioritizing these measures
into policies, strategies or programs; (ii) provide awareness and advocate about climate change
and adaptation measures to government officers at central, provincial and local levels, to
members of parliament, civil society organizations, training and research institutions and the
public; or (iii) promote the incorporation or strengthen the teaching of climate change and
adaptation measures into curriculum of meteorological, hydrological and environmental courses
in relevant training institutions in Angola. USAID/Angola is particularly interested in supporting
projects that apply participatory principles in the process of collection, analysis and
dissemination of information and those that work closely with the government of Angola to
achieve project objectives. USAID/Angola will consider interventions in all geographic regions
but particularly welcomes activities targeting the province of Luanda, due to its influence in
decision making centrality, and those provinces experiencing climate change extremes.




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                                        USAID/Armenia

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Mission focus will be development of appropriate tools and implementation of pilot supporting
carbon credit mechanism. We will be working with National Authorities, such as Ministry of
Nature Protection and Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, NGOs and businesses in
Armenia.


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Mission proposes to conduct focused relative risk analysis to identify wastewater investment
priorities needed to minimize risk of food crop contamination from irrigation water.


The results of the Task will allow the GOA to set internal priorities based on economic value,
human health and ecosystems and carry these forward into negotiations with outside donors
and lenders, and Leverage Millennium Challenge Resources.




                                   Bosnia and Herzegovina

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
In order to improve the economic conditions of the country, increase export, spur local industries
to meeting EU regulations, and create the foundation for a sustainable development, the project
will have one main goal: improved efficiency of targeted industry sectors. The assistance will
increase the environmental quality and production efficiency through use of an integrated
environmental management systems, environmental auditing and creation of Best Available
Technologies for the selected sectors. This will help BiH achieve cleaner production, will bring
BiH closer to the EU environmental production standards, will improve the efficiency of selected
companies, and will reduce total production costs thus making the companies more competitive.

DGP Sector: Microenterprise


The Economic Development Office (EDO) private sector goal is to increase the ability of SMEs
to operate in the European and local market. EDO activities work with entrepreneurs in three
key sectors for the growth of the BiH economy: agriculture, wood processing, and tourism. The
Missions high level objective for the sector is: Increased Competitiveness of Targeted Sectors:

Increase competitiveness of agriculture sector by expanding production and sales of value-
added agricultural products, increasing food exports, job creation and improving incomes for
BiH farmers, agribusinesses and related market participants. 2. Increase the competitiveness
of microenterprises in the wood processing and tourism sectors to raise productivity, profits and
employment. Assistance programs are country-wide.
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                                      Caucasus - Azerbaijan

DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID and others in the international development community have made substantial
investments in Azerbaijan’s microfinance sector. To date, nearly USD 250 million has
successfully been leveraged from foreign lenders and investors, which has allowed them to
reach more than 160,000 micro business men and women across the country, including
hundreds of thousands of IDPs and refugees. As critical drivers of economic growth and job
creation in the country, it is critical that an appropriate legislative/regulatory framework be put in
place and that key local NGOs supporting the sector are strengthened. In this regard, USAID
would seek to implement a program that would foster the achievement of these two mutually
reinforcing goals, which, in turn, would help ensure that the significant progress that Azerbaijan
has made over the past 13 years to grow the microfinance industry continues, as well as help
maximize the contribution that this vitally important element of the financial system and
Azerbaijan’s commendable poverty alleviation and sustainable development goals and
objectives. The Mission is currently implementing a program that supports the diversification of
the non-oil sector through improving the business enabling environment and providing some
support to small businesses.


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for applicants:
Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic (NAR) Government, the Nakhchivan State University (NSU),
and the Swiss Government, the State Department’s Office of Population, Refugees and
Migration is supporting a three year effort designed to generate income in NAR rural
communities through kahriz rehabilitation. Kahriz’s are 2,000 year old water systems built along
the Silk Road from Iran to China and other desert and semi-arid regions of the world. They
have proved to be sustainable, environment-friendly sources of water, which is the motivation
behind current efforts to rehabilitate these otherwise forgotten/neglected water systems. In
partnership with PRM and participating local and international organizations, USAID would seek
to support/complement these ongoing efforts by adding a critical sustainability component. In
this regard, USAID would identify and engage an appropriate NGO in the NAR to strengthen its
institutional capacities in a manner that would enable it, in partnership with local government
and the NSU, to offer continuing education opportunities, support local and international
scientific research, and conduct other activities fostering the sustainable, best practices
management and maintenance of these vital socio-economic water systems. The Mission
currently has no active Water programs


DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for applicants:
Although Azerbaijan has a broad framework of laws and has ratified several international
treaties related to environmental and natural resources protection, serious gaps remain in the

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law and in its implementation. Such gaps include but are not limited to a lack of specific risk-
based standards and regulations to control discharges to surface water and groundwater,
ambient air and water pollution levels, modern emissions fee structures, and a general lack of
accessibility and transparency in environmental laws. USAID would seek to implement a
program that introduced best practices in setting environmental standards (e.g., mobile source
air emissions and ambient air quality standards from Europe) which help Azerbaijan make the
transition from environmental aspiration to practice. Environmental monitoring capacities and
practices are also lacking. USAID could address these issues by helping the Government of
Azerbaijan develop a more clearly defining monitoring methods and protocols, redesigning the
monitoring system, and engaging the public in environmental education programs. Addressing
these issues will enhance environmental protection leading to a more efficient, productive and
innovative private sector.


DGP Sector: Dairy

Mission-specific Guidance for applicants:
USAID will select an experienced U.S. PVO and a local NGO to implement a strategic
technology transfer and market development support program targeted to high potential dairy
production enterprises. This will focus on the broadened dissemination of improved cattle-
breeding techniques; improved milk production and quality control techniques and practices;
and expanded operation of milk collection centers. It will also entail enhanced production,
quality control and storage techniques for high value added dairy products. This will entail both
direct farm and enterprise-level technical support and training of specialists and executive staff
of milk production enterprises and service organizations. Such intervention should improve the
skills and knowledge of dairy producers on best practices-consistent dairy product hygiene and
quality standards both to promote expanded local production and to expand regional sales to
neighboring countries.


______________________________________________________________________


                        Caucasus (Regional Mission) – Georgia Only

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Proposed programs should focus on development of a healthier and cleaner environment in
Georgia, addressing specifically reduction/mitigation/adaptation to the threats of global climate
change (GCC). The program is expected to be largely analytical or evaluative in nature, and
should coordinate with the Ministry of Environment of Georgia, as well as USAID/Georgia
environmental programs. Efforts should be geared toward the production of results within
twelve to eighteen months. Anticipated activities may cross a number of sectors, examples may
include efforts to: improve solid waste management (reduction and capture of landfill methane);
promote recycling/reuse (where direct benefit to GCC can be measured); reduce carbon
emissions (industrial efficiency); facilitate modern wastewater treatment (methane capture);
promote carbon sequestration (plantation forestry, improved agricultural techniques, peat
conservation, etc.); conduct public awareness campaigns; among others. The program should
seek innovative approaches to encourage the participation of local NGOs, private sector,
government, communities and volunteers in these climate change mitigation/adaptation
activities. The program may involve assessment/evaluation, technical assistance and training,
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as well as commodity purchase and issuance of sub-grants to support pilot activities, as
appropriate.




                      Central Asia Republics (CAR) - Kyrgyz Republic

DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
For the purposes of this project, the Mission would like to focus on those watershed areas
where applicants will have a capacity to effectively address conflicts, internal as well as
transboundary, over water use issues with a particular focus on water supply and on irrigation,
including:
 1) Integrated watershed use and management assessment and planning:

   To analyze and assess the impact of various water and land use and management on
   selected watersheds, including how various practices, such as grazing, irrigation, waste
   water treatment, industry, affect selected watersheds.

2) Community participation and conflict resolution to help ensure a reliable and adequate supply
of water at present and in the future:

   Work with the community and relevant experts to improve planning, monitoring,
   management and use of the watersheds to avert and manage conflicts over natural
   resources, particularly water. Help develop and introduce benefits of innovative approaches
   to creating incentives for good management watershed practices, with a particular focus on
   irrigation.

The Mission’s Water User Association Support Project will be ending in April 2010. It had a
focus on management of on-the-farm irrigation networks in Southern Kyrgyzstan. Previous local
government projects funded by USAID assisted several cities to address problems in municipal
water supply system management.




                  Central Asia Republics (CAR) – USAID Regional Mission

DGP Sector: Dairy

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Technical assistance on best-practices transfer and small capital grants to support
phytosanitary compliance, productivity, sustainable grazing.


DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:

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Climate-change in Central Asia will primarily affect regional hydrology, and thus water scarcity.
Therefore, activities related to Climate-Change Adaptation concentrate on water-sector
interventions. Two areas are relevant:

   1) Assistance at end-use level, focusing on end-use efficiency in irrigation;
   2) Analysis of likely climate-change-induced variations of water availability, deriving from
      altered precipitation patters and glacial melt.




                          Central Asia Republics (CAR) - Tajikistan


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
For the purposes of this project, the Mission would like to focus on the building capacity of the
most proactive Water Users Associations in Tajikistan and engage them improved management
of water resources and growth of agricultural sector. Water Users Associations are proven
mechanisms to effectively manage on-farm irrigation water and boost agricultural productivity
and profitability. The four proactive established Water Users Associations with capacity to
effectively address the shortage, distribution and mismanagement of irrigation water and
upkeep the existing on-farm irrigation infrastructure will be selected to implement the best water
management practices through the following components:

      Improvement of financial management, institutional management and governance
      Introduction of advanced methods of on-farm irrigation infrastructure improvements
       through rehabilitation of vital on farm level irrigation systems

For the purposes of this project, the Mission would like to focus on improvement of the long-
term technical and financial sustainability of potable water supply services and improved
hygiene behaviors for rural populations in Tajikistan, as well as on establishment or support of
Community-based committees that may ensure sustainability of achievements. Mission will also
look for assistance in the launch of at least one point-of-use drinking water treatment product
which will be marketed in targeted areas.

Mission main objectives are:
1) Increased access to a sustainable, safe drinking water supply in rural Tajikistan through
support for improvements in local government capacity, supply infrastructure, and community
involvement in the operation and management of this infrastructure.
2. Build capacity among local health officials, community leaders, and the private sector to
promote key improved hygiene behaviors and associated products,




                      USAID/Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)

The USAID program in the DRC is fully integrated into the U.S. government’s diplomatic efforts
to foster peace and stability within the DRC and in the region, and complements the more than
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$300 million annual USG contribution to the United Nations Peacekeeping Operation (MONUC)
in the DRC. The goal of the USAID program in the DRC is to assist the country in its transition
to a sound democracy with a healthier, better educated population benefiting from improved
livelihoods. With a bilateral foreign assistance budget of $400 million in FY 2009, U.S. Foreign
Assistance supports programs in conflict mitigation; demobilization, disarmament, and
reintegration (DDR); good governance, human rights, social protection, education, humanitarian
assistance, economic growth, and health. The health program budget increased to more than
$56 million in FY 2009 and includes funding for malaria, TB, family planning/reproductive health,
maternal and child health, water and sanitation, and HIV/AIDS. In addition, USAID continues to
support humanitarian assistance programs in Eastern DRC through its Office of Food for Peace
and Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA).

The U.S. Government has provided supplemental funding and assistance to the DRC in recent
years, including $15 million in FY 2007, $21.6 million in FY 2008, and $55 million in FY 2009, all
of which has been dedicated to conflict mitigation and stabilization programming in Eastern
DRC through DDR activities, support to the current peace process, training and support for a
light infantry battalion, community-based recovery programs, and sexual and gender-based
violence (SGBV). In FY 2009, a second supplemental appropriation was enacted for the DRC
that included $10 million specifically earmarked for SGBV


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
The DRC has abundant water resources, but access to drinking water is very low in rural areas
(80% urban compared to 24% in rural areas, Demographic and Health Survey 2007). Access to
basic sanitation overall is very low, although still showing an urban bias (22% urban versus 15%
rural). At present, there is no overall national strategy guiding the sector in DRC, although a
national water law is currently being developed. The DRC‘s National Water and Sanitation
Committee (CNAEA) is developing key indicators for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of water
projects. The development of these performance measures and their use in a comprehensive
M&E system will help improve transparency in the sector.

The Ministry of Health has developed a Healthy Village/Healthy School initiative to reduce
illness and death from water-borne disease, based on a model piloted under the former USAID-
funded SANRU project, and currently led by UNICEF. This national strategy is based on a
community participation process using the Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation
(PHAST) methodology. In FY 2009, the Healthy Village program was implemented in nine
USAID-supported health zones. In FY 2010 USAID will expand the Healthy Village Program in
Katanga Province. In FY 2010, USAID intends to support increased availability of water
treatment products in both rural and urban areas and will incorporate communications activities,
and community engagement in the promotion of improved hygiene practices.


DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
 USAID/DRC supports small and medium enterprises (SME) in DRC through a grant to the
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), for the rehabilitation of cassava productivity
and emergency response to cassava mosaic disease. Other support to SMEs in the DRC has
promoted sustainable and equitable social and economic recovery, and improved governance in
Katanga province. USAID/DRC hopes to support additional economic recovery and socio-
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economic reintegration activities at the community level, targeting Eastern DRC, through this
RFA.




                                        USAID/Ecuador

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Ecuador is highly vulnerable to because of its location on the equator, wide coastal lowlands,
complex terrain and ecosystems, and the reliance of many population centers on alpine glaciers
and high-elevation grasslands for water supplies. USAID/Ecuador is interested in supporting
adaptation to climate change in two general areas:

   Developing long-term and/or emergency systems to respond to coastal flooding and to
    improve the resilience of threatened communities by integrating climate change adaptation
    into development and/or disaster management planning. Work could include monitoring and
    planning systems and such as weather prediction, fire monitoring, and disaster response.
    Partners could include environmental, disaster response, or municipal authorities, among
    others.

   Developing policies and/or implementing programs to assist population centers in the sierra
    plan and adapt for reduced water flows as a result of increased drought and/or diminished
    glaciers. Programs may address municipal water supplies, hydroelectric power, agriculture,
    industry, or an integrated mix. Innovative approaches to sustainable watershed
    management are encouraged. Partners could include environmental, agricultural,
    municipal, or provincial authorities, among others.


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID/Ecuador has long sought to improve the conservation and management of biodiverse
watersheds providing for key municipal areas, and to improve the living conditions and reduce
disease among the poor by providing water and sanitation. The Mission seeks innovative
programs that will integrate work in these two sectors to assure that communities have the
municipal- and watershed-level institutions and infrastructure needed for sustainable water
supplies, reliable water delivery systems, and safe sanitation systems.

Partners could include environmental, health, and municipal authorities, among others.
Programs should focus on poorest and most vulnerable rural areas of the country, including the
northern and southern border regions.


DGP Sector: Dairy

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
The dairy sector in Ecuador produces currently about 3.5 million liters per day from a million
cows on 300,000 farms covering 3.3 million hectares. Over 12% of the total population depends
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on milk production for a portion of their income or nutrition. Most of these producers are poor,
with only one or two animals, and lack access to systems of pasture management, production,
transportation, processing, and marketing, that could increase product quality, safety, and
incomes.

USAID/Ecuador seeks projects that would work with this value chain and anchor firms (meaning
major buyers of milk and producers of diverse dairy products) to improve incomes and
livelihoods of the rural poor. Improvements in food safety are also encouraged. Both
components should increase food security. Work should focus on poorest and most vulnerable
rural areas of the country, including the northern and southern border regions.


DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Microenterprise is essential to expanding economic opportunities and access to resources for
the poor and rural residents, especially women. Ecuador’s new constitution requires a new
regulatory framework, and the creation a supervisory agency for cooperatives and other small
credit institutions. Four competing draft laws, variously supported by cooperatives, financial
NGOs, the Red Financiera Rural, and government officials, are under review, but there is no
coordination or technical discussion among the factions. USAID would like to support technical
assistance to the government and private sector to consolidate a new regulatory framework for
the “informal” financial sector. This work would also include the development of prudential and
supervisory norms and requirements to establish the regulatory framework. The ultimate
objective would be to improve financial services by increasing productive credit in underserved
markets.

USAID/Ecuador would also like to support an additional or alternative approach to microfinance,
assisting Government of Ecuador (GOE) institutions that have formal mandates and hundreds
of millions of dollars to execute microfinance programs. This work should enable the GOE to
quickly, effectively, and professionally implement loan programs to increase employment,
income, and other measures of economic growth. Potential partners could include the
Coordinating Ministry of Productivity and Competitiveness, Banco de Fomento, Banco
Ecuatoriano de Desarrollo, Corporación Financiera Nacional, among others.




             USAID/Egypt, Office of Middle East Programs (Regional Mission)

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:

 The Office of Middle East Programs is interested in applications which support research,
analyses or dissemination of information on Global Climate Change adaptation models and
practices applicable to the Middle East region (defined as the countries of Egypt, Lebanon,
West Bank/Gaza, Jordan, Morocco and Yemen). For activities to be considered, they should be
uniquely regional in nature, and not duplicate activities that could be undertaken by a bilateral
USAID Mission.


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                                       USAID/El Salvador

DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID/El Salvador is interested in receiving innovative microfinance proposals under the DGP
that would expand access to financial services to low-income entrepreneurs that have
traditionally been under-served by existing financial institutions.




                                        USAID/Ethiopia

DGP Sector: Dairy

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Ethiopia has several million smallholder dairy farmers, and the dairy sector has significant
income generation potential in both urban and rural areas. USAID's Dairy Development
Program (EDDP) is a market-driven program that helps dairy farmers improve their dairy
production, processing and marketing, input supplies and the increase of artificial insemination.
A recent USAID-sponsored dairy demand study indicated that a very large unmet demand
exists in Ethiopia for processed dairy products and packaged traditional products. Major FY
2009 results include $2.1 million in increased dairy sales, an expansion that nearly doubled the
number of beneficiaries who received financing over the original target, and a 50% increase
over the target for those receiving new technologies.

Applicants are not restricted on where they propose to operate, although urban and peri-urban
areas are most likely to be feasible, due to demand for dairy products from Ethiopia’s urban
residents. Helping dairy farmers increase milk and milk products quantity and quality in a
sustainable fashion (i.e., turning these dairy farmers into better micro-entrepreneurs) should be
an important goal of any dairy project. Where possible, working with communities where
existing USAID programs and projects are operating is looked upon favorably.


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Only 42% of Ethiopians has access to safe drinking water, while only 31% of the population has
access to appropriate sanitation facilities according to a 2008 WHO/UNICEF report. Water and
sanitation related illnesses represent a major disease burden, contributing more than 75% of the
cases registered in outpatient departments of public sector health facilities. In approximately
90% of households, women shoulder the responsibility of routine water collection. In response,
USAID/Ethiopia implements several water and sanitation-related programs, the major highlights
of which are:

The USAID Millennium Water Alliance program supported a consortium of NGOs that
successfully established and rehabilitated 96 drinking water systems in 11 districts. The

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systems include 63 hand-dug wells, 21 springs and 12 shallow wells. Post’s programming also
promoted the construction of 15,263 pit latrines for household use and 114 ventilated improved
pit latrines for schools and health centers. Through these efforts, 46,349 people now have
access to safe drinking water, 76,312 people have access to improved sanitation facilities, and
42,709 school children have access to gender-appropriate latrines. Additionally, each water
system established a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) committee responsible for overall
water system management and sanitation and hygiene promotion in the respective village.
USAID trained 311 WASH committee members in water system operation, maintenance and
financial management, and trained 97,424 people in sanitation and hygiene education.

In FY 2009, USAID’s Pastoral Livelihoods Initiative Phase II (PLI II) supported pipeline
extensions in Afar Region that link main irrigation sources with livestock markets. PLI II also
supported water pipeline maintenance that helped institutionalize maintenance within local
communities and governments for long-term sustainability.

The P.L. 480 food aid contribution to the GOE-multi-donor Productive Safety Net Program
(PSNP) supported public works that built more than 90 hand-dug wells and 1,971 community
latrines. Also, USAID supported the establishment and reinstatement of water and sanitation
committees through several trainings in the rural communities. In FY 2010, the new PSNP
PLUS, which increases incomes by giving PSNP beneficiaries access to microfinance and
diversified crop production for sale, will implement activities to improve access to potable water,
sanitation and hygiene of the community in targeted areas. Planned activities include the
construction of water points.

USAID appreciates the active participation of the GOE toward improving access to clean water
and sanitation. The Ethiopian Government (GOE) endorsed the Water Sector Development
Program, which aims to improve access to clean water. Also, the GOE developed a National
Hygiene and Sanitation Policy which promotes the importance of access to adequate sanitation
facilities. Additionally, the Ministry of Health, Health Extension Program promotes health,
sanitation and hygiene at the community level.

Applicants are not restricted on where they propose to operate. Although most of USAID’s
development programs in Ethiopia are rural-focused, urban and peri-urban areas, including
smaller cities and towns, may be considered for water development projects. Where possible,
working with communities where existing USAID programs and projects are operating is looked
upon favorably.


DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Approximately 85% of Ethiopia’s population is rural and engaged in rain-dependent smallholder
farming and pastoralism. Severe pressure on such fragile land has made natural resource
degradation from deforestation, population pressure and unsustainable agricultural practices
one of the country’s greatest environmental challenges. Climate change has a direct bearing
upon achievement of sustainable food security for marginal households, which continues to
diminish as the frequency of extreme weather situations increases. USAID/Ethiopia currently
implements several programs that protect the environment, the major highlights of which are:

USAID’s new ecotourism program will improve management over the protected areas they live
adjacent to by reaping benefits from Ethiopia’s ecotourism industry through jobs,
microenterprises and community development grants.
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The Pastoral Livelihoods Initiative (PLI) focuses on institutionalizing land management practices
within various levels of the Ethiopian Government (GOE), placing particular attention on greater
community participation, especially by women, in land use and land management decision-
making to protect rangelands, which are considered valuable for carbon sequestration.

USAID is the largest donor contributing to the GOE-multi-donor Productive Safety Net Program
(PSNP). Food for work activities in FY 2009 resulted in: 14,786 hectares terraced; 1,087
hectares of farmland applying agroforestry and soil conservation methods; 418 hectares of
degraded land reforested with 6.6 million tree seedlings; 61 kilometers of gullies reclaimed and
18 hectares of gully reclamation land planted with soil protecting forage crops. A total of 43,034
hectares of existing and 1,405 hectares of new area enclosures were protected this year alone,
with impressive visible results such as: a) a cost-effective and sustainable means of
rehabilitating large tracts of land and natural habitats; b) fodder to maintain livestock even
during droughts; and c) income opportunities for ox-less farmers who can sell their fodder
entitlement or access plough oxen in exchange for their share of fodder to ox owners. As
women head 53% of these households, their contribution, not to mention benefit, was
tremendous. Since its inception four years ago, USAID’s food for work activities targeting one-
third of PSNP’s 7.5 million rural poor farmers improved soil and water conservation on 1 million
hectares of farmland and prevented 4.7 million tons of soil loss, as well as sequestered 15.5
million tons of carbon per year.

Applicants are not restricted on where they propose to operate. Where possible, working with
communities where existing USAID programs and projects are operating is looked upon
favorably. For example, building on the extensive efforts on watershed management already
undertaken through the GOE’s PSNP, farm forestry and rainfall management could be
promoted to help farmers better cope with climatic variability. In dryland areas, successful
approaches for enclosing grazing land, reversing bush encroachment and increasing water
catchment have already been tested by USAID and partners, and could be scaled up.
Adaptation to climate change is particularly urgent in these areas, which are subject to
increased drought conditions.




                                       USAID/Indonesia

DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Innovative ideas from any organizations based in Indonesia that respond to expressed local
needs and contribute to achievement of increased access to safe water supply and adequate
sanitation for the urban poor in North Sumatera, East Java, and South Sulawesi provinces.
Cooperative Agreements will be awarded for up to $ 2 million and two to three years of program
implementation.

The proposed programs should achieve results that are concrete, tangible, and provide benefits
to all partners. Program results will be clearly measurable improvements in increasing access to
safe water supply and adequate sanitation for the urban poor. Examples of the intended results
include, but are not limited to, the following:


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       Pilot activities in urban poor communities that increase access to safe water supply
        adequate sanitation, with USAID funding provided on a declining basis.
       Activities, equipment, materials to increase access to water and sanitation services with
        leveraged resources from communities, the private sector, and government.
       Information/education/communications campaigns by an NGO, civil society or the private
        sector to promote water and sanitation services improvement.
       Activities, equipment, materials to develop citizen-based mechanisms for monitoring
        performance of water and/or sanitation services.

Implementation will be coordinated with other USAID water and sanitation programs in
Indonesia to achieve synergistic results.


DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Indonesia is particularly vulnerable to climate change and disasters. Focus to date has been
more on climate change mitigation and disaster response than on climate adaptation and
disaster risk reduction. Furthermore, analysis has revealed that many of the same interventions
are required to reduce vulnerabilities for both disasters and climate change impacts. USAID
solicits innovative proposals to efficiently, effectively and sustainably address the needs for
disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation together among vulnerable populations in
Indonesia. Cooperative Agreement awards will provide $500,000 to $1 million (up to a total of
$2 million) for programs up to three years.

To achieve the desired results, a disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation project
must cover the following areas of concentration:

Reduction of exposure and vulnerability to disasters and climate change, and increase
resilience of communities, including:
    •   Sustainable natural resource and environmental management
    •   Economic alternative activities, including better adapted crops and diversified economic
        activities
    •   Social awareness, preparation and response capacity
    •   Improved infrastructure to prevent and respond to disasters and climate change impacts
    •   Improved land use, spatial planning and zoning.

Building a culture of safety and resilience at all levels, including:
    •   Information management and exchange
    •   Education, training and research
    •   Public Awareness on disasters and climate change

Policy, Institutional Capacity and Consensus Building for Disaster Management and Climate
Adaptation, including:
    •   Focus on national institutional, legal and resource frameworks
    •   Development of human resources in disaster management
    •   Fostering consensus and participation of broad stakeholders

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   •   Elaboration of risk assessment at national, regional or local levels
   •   Improvement of early warning systems
   •   Capacity development in risk assessment and response


DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID solicits proposals from Indonesian NGOs and U.S. PVOs with limited experience with
implementing USAID programs to strengthen microenterprise effectiveness in providing
development services, in enhancing value chains for micro and small enterprises, and in
developing entrepreneurship. Cooperative Agreements will be awarded up to $2 million for up to
a three year program.

Preference will be given to proposals that directly support the Economic Growth strategy aimed
at increasing employment through improving economic policies to encourage employment,
capital for investment, and poverty reduction and through increasing production of selected
high-value crops. The agricultural activities are expected to center on the value chains of cocoa,
coffee, and horticulture, including floriculture, particularly in the North Sumatra, West Java,
Sulawesi, and Papua. Special consideration will be given to proposals that link NGO activities to
those of established firms and institutions. For example, the activity might involve providing
credit in conjunction with Bank Rakyat Indonesia (BRI); helping farmers in cooperation with
research institute, extension service, or commercial buying firms; or encouraging
entrepreneurship in responding to opportunities being opened up by project activities. Of
particular interest are proposals that represent joint endeavors between Indonesian and US
organizations and/or encourage private-public partnerships.

The proposals may include components for organizational and technical capacity building.




                                         USAID/Jamaica

DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID/Jamaica Mission has decided to support the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries
(MOAF) development agenda with a targeted approach to improve Microenterprise Productivity
focusing on the agriculture sector. Microenterprises to improve marketing systems of
horticulture crops and cocoa rehabilitation will be given high priority. Financial markets will also
be strengthened to support financing for this development agenda and a specific aspect of the
program will be the policy environment for micro and small enterprises. Small farmers, small
and medium agro-processors, and supporting rural micro enterprises are the main beneficiaries
of assistance.


DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:

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Jamaica is vulnerable to climate change, particularly increasing frequency and intensity of
storms, increasing temperatures, extended periods of droughts, variations in rainfall and rising
sea levels. USAID/Jamaica will partner with USAID’s Climate Change Team to establish the
baseline and come up with adaptation and mitigation strategies specific to the needs of the
Jamaican agriculture sector. Early baseline studies, assessments and discussions will provide
specific guidance on structuring adaptations to climate change that we will use to train farmers.
Activities may include:

   •   Identification of varieties of crops that can better withstand drought or excessive rainfall;
   •   Agro-forestry techniques that will improve microclimate growing conditions of crops by
       minimizing the damage from extreme heat, wind, and rain. Agro-forestry interventions
       will condition and protect soils and improve water infiltration, thereby recharging
       groundwater supplies;
   •   Provisions of farmers with a steady source of income that is better able to withstand
       weather extremes, including hurricanes. This includes promoting the rehabilitation of
       cocoa and coffee farms;
   •   Enabling farmers to protect their produce from storms and reinitiate production quickly
       after hurricanes through the promotion of greenhouses that can be reassembled quickly
       after a hurricane.
   •   Work with farmers and local planners to better estimate water needs of horticulture
       production and make sure that local supplies, catchment areas, an/or rainfall catchment
       drums are sufficient to protect from drought or low rainfall.




                                       USAID/Macedonia

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID Macedonia is already supporting important recycling and Energy Efficiency (EE) efforts
in Macedonia to protect the environment and at the same time stimulate economic growth.
USAID would like to complement this assistance with a Green Jobs Corps project that would
improve the employment opportunities for unskilled youth by providing practical training for
pursuing green careers (such as energy conservation and/or participation in the recycling
industry), strengthening their work readiness and creating models for integration of the trained
youth into the formal economy. Energy Efficiency activities would focus on lowering poor
families’ energy bills. Recycling activities would support approximately 5,000 poor families
(mostly minority Roma) to earn a livelihood by collecting plastic and other recyclable materials
and integrating into the formal systems. These activities would be coupled with outreach
information campaigns, seminars and workshops to promote the benefits of EE and recycling to
the end-users implemented in partnership with relevant government institutions and private
companies (such as private utility companies, recyclers, etc.).

Although the recycling industry has been particularly hit hard by the economic down-turn, the
proposed outreach activities will prepare an early foundation for a rapid and wide acceptance of
the EE and recycling initiatives, and complement programs by other international donors.
Several local and international NGOs and PVOs that are currently operating in Macedonia could
be likely participants in such a project.


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DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
The recent USAID Macedonia workforce assessment identified an urgent need for the creation
of new jobs to alleviate the very high unemployment rate of 35%, especially among youth. The
assessment recommended significant support for entrepreneurship and enterprise creation to
respond to the extremely low demand for workers in the formal economy. At least two business
incubators and several business support organizations currently operate in Macedonia. USAID
Macedonia is looking to support and strengthen these incubators to extend their services to
increased numbers of start-up businesses. These services could include the provision of space,
infrastructure, joint offices, access to finance (possibly linking to an active DCA initiative), and
ongoing support through training and advisory services.




                                           USAID/Malawi

DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Efforts may increase access to water of appropriate quantity and quality for use in households,
schools, health facilities, and industrial/commercial facilities through protection of existing water
sources, sustainable development of new sources (e.g., well drilling and spring capping);
expansion and rehabilitation of water supply infrastructure, such as pumps and distribution
systems; implementation of appropriate community-based approaches to design, construction,
operation and maintenance. Efforts may also target increasing access to and use of sanitation
services for safe human waste disposal to protect human health and environmental quality,
supporting innovative approaches to building demand for sanitation-related products and
services, facilitating private sector participation in providing sanitation products and services.

USAID/Malawi would also consider efforts in water service delivery to peri-urban areas; water
board capacity building; and financing for water and sanitation improvements at household or
community level. Health surveillance agents (HSAs) may be trained in community-led total
sanitation efforts in target areas. Efforts may also target providing sanitary facilities such as
school latrines which may contribute to decreased discrimination and improved safety and
retention of female pupils in primary schools. Reducing the pupil: latrine ratio and improving
outreach of water, sanitation, and hygiene messages and activities for communities and the
school population may also be a focus area. Activities may explore the integration of WASH
messaging into either pre or in service teacher education curriculum and in the life skills
component of the current primary curriculum.




                                         USAID/Morocco

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:

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Under its new strategy, USAID will enhance the promotion and deployment of clean energy in
such areas as water pumping for agriculture by exploring clean energy and less costly options
(such as solar and wind energy); USAID’s intervention will enhance the enabling environment
(policies, laws, regulations and institutions) that directly support sustainable clean energy
programs.

This program will be implemented in two regions where the major source of water is the ground
water, which was depleted due to several years of drought and over-exploitation of the aquifer.
The Mission’s major focus will be on water resources management in the two regions which are
directly affected by climate change factors.


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID will be working with Government of Morocco (GOM) and private sector key partners to
enhance better resources management and valuation in the agricultural sector. To this effect,
USAID will introduce new approaches to enhance better water governance and allocation which
will allow water savings for other competing sectors such as tourism and industry. Thus, USAID
will assist GOM to better enforce its water laws and strengthen its institutions to better serve the
private sector, promote the development of competitive sub-sectors in agriculture and create
additional opportunities for youth investment and employment.

USAID will be implemented in two regions where the main source of water is the aquifer, which
was depleted due to several years of drought and use in water intensive crops (tomatoes, sugar
beat, etc.). The Mission’s major focus will be on water resources management in the two
regions which are directly affected by climate change factors.




                                          USAID/Nepal

DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
The activity should develop models for cost-effective improvements in drinking water, sanitation,
and hygiene (WASH) for households and health facilities in water vulnerable areas. Health
facility water access and hygiene practices are a recognized need and potential entry point.
The activity should complement the existing mission focus on strengthening the health service
system at the facility level. The project should also complement and reinforce related
components within existing Ministry of Health and Population community-based integrated
management of childhood illness at the level of household and community groups. It will be
required that this activity be complementary with other nutrition and food security initiatives of
USAID Nepal. Health education and behavior change communication strategies should focus
on women’s and disadvantaged groups' involvement and may integrate sustainable income
generation aspects, to the extent that they are WASH sector-related and directly supportive of
the objectives of the project. Community participation in monitoring and evaluation is strongly
encouraged.



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                                       USAID/Nicaragua

DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Despite abundant water resources, because of contamination and poor quality infrastructure
much of Nicaragua has no access to clean water and sanitation services. Eighty percent of
Nicaragua’s freshwater sources are polluted, roughly 40% of the country's population does not
have access to safe, piped water, and 15% do not have access to even basic sanitation
services. Water and sanitation coverage rates tend to decrease, especially in rural communities,
as distance from Managua increases. Throughout the country, the rural poor remain the
population most in need, often relying on contaminated surface water and inadequate sanitation
practices.

Water and sanitation proposals should target small, rural communities and not urban centers,
basic access to clean water and sanitation services. Reconstruction or rehabilitation of existing
systems or construction of new systems for communities that lack basic services

The Mission is planning to hold a pre-bidder conference for interested applicants. The
conference will take place in Managua and the date will made be public following the release of
the RFA.


DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
The 2009 Global Climate Risk Index has ranked Nicaragua the third most vulnerable country in
the world to severe weather-related impacts such as hurricanes and floods. Since 1970, eleven
powerful hurricanes and tropical storms have hit Nicaragua, with Hurricane Mitch in 1998
affecting nearly 20 percent of the country’s population. Watersheds are especially fragile to
degradation, and since 1950, Nicaragua has lost approximately half its forest cover to
commercial timber, fires, and slash-and-burn farming. Forest loss is estimated at 3 percent per
year. Environmental destruction, coupled with climate change, has increased the country's
vulnerability to natural disasters. Future weather events such as hurricanes are likely to
become more intense as temperatures in the seas around Nicaragua increase.

Global Climate Change proposals will target one of three areas: reforestation, adaptation, or
clean energy. Priority will be given to reforestation proposals that focus on using native species
over introduced species and include watershed protection and natural habitat conservation.
Proposals working on carbon sequestration will not be considered. Proposals addressing
adaptation should target household-level interventions in rural communities. Proposals for
projects throughout Nicaragua. Examples include investments in drip irrigation, increasing
organic soil content, and disease vector control. Clean energy should focus on small and
medium businesses, including hospitals and school willing to make necessary investments to
reduce energy costs to make them become more competitive and efficient. Competitive
proposals must adequately address sustainability and medium and long term maintenance of
the projects.



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                                         USAID/Panama

DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
In Panama Canal Watershed (PCW) communities, a number of best management practices and
green businesses have proved environmentally and economically sustainable. However their
replication highly depends on access to micro-financing services. Access to these services is
the biggest hurdle for micro-entrepreneurs in the PCW and other rural areas of Panama to
adopt best management practices, initiate a business, and commercialize products. Support to
financial institutions to implement micro-financing processes will in turn strengthen the micro-
entrepreneurs’ capacity including the management of their products through a value chain.
Additionally, micro-entrepreneurs have limited access to larger companies that can facilitate
growth in areas of demand, commercialization, financing (factoring) and management which
contribute to sustainable growth.
USAID/Panama is interested in supporting microfinance initiatives aimed at promoting value
chain financing and access to financial services in Darien, Colon, Bocas del Toro, and the
Province of Panama (PCW).

   Provide assistance to microenterprises to increase access to finance, promote value chain
    competitiveness, and seize market opportunities (domestic, regional and international).
   Encourage higher value products by facilitating partnerships with larger-scale firms.
   Support implementation of new legislation for micro, small and medium enterprises to
    promote effective micro-entrepreneurship development.

Applicants are required to demonstrate their ability to participate in this program.

USAID/Panama anticipates funding two cooperative agreement or grants with a local institution
for up to $250,000 each, with a life of program between one to three years.


DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Panama’s territory is strategically divided in 52 watersheds conceived to promote water
resources management as a core element in land use planning for sustainable development.
 According to the National Communication to the UNFCCC, water resources in Panama are
particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. Water uses and users at stake
include human consumption, agricultural production, energy production, and maritime
transportation. As result of the incipient national discussions about the potential impacts of
climate change in the various sectors of the economy, the country is starting to realize that
sustainable development initiatives have to be “climate-proofed” and that climate change
adaptation programs and projects in critical watershed and activities should be prioritized.

USAID/Panama is interested in supporting climate change adaptation initiatives that make the
vulnerable regions of the country more resilient to climate change. The goal of activities in the
critical water sector is to add a substantial climate change adaptation component to
USAID/Panama’s activities in relevant areas including planning and capacity building for
adaptation.


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      Conduct an assessment of the Panama Canal Watershed climate change vulnerabilities
       and impacts, and based on the information provided by this assessment; develop a
       climate change adaptation plan for this critical watershed to ensure Panama’s economic
       stability and global commerce.

       Implement a climate change adaptation project to improve forestry and agricultural
        management practices in a watershed of the Darien region in ways that can
        simultaneously promote diversified livelihoods.
To qualify for funding, any proposed activity must include climate change assessments and
active stakeholder involvement. All aspects of the vulnerability assessment and implementation
must be documented and available for review. Vulnerability assessment should follow the
Agency’s guidance.
Applicants are encouraged to demonstrate their ability to engage other partners to participate to
the proposed program.

USAID/Panama anticipates funding up to two cooperative agreement or grants with a local
institution, potentially in collaboration with other organizations, with a life of program between
one to three years.




                                         USAID/Paraguay

DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID/Paraguay supports microenterprise development to advance its strategic objective of
expanding economic opportunity and access for the poor and employment generation.

USAID/Paraguay under the Microenterprise Initiative will commit itself to advance its strategic
objective of expanding economic access and opportunity for the poor by (1) improving the policy
and market environment in which Microenterprises operate, more specifically by streamlining
and facilitating the process for conversion to formal enterprises and (2) by improving the
performance and outreach of organizations that directly provide both financial and/or non-
financial assistance to Microenterprises.

A wide range of host country policies influence the economic opportunities and challenges faced
by microenterprises. These policies affect the institutional and regulatory environment in which
they operate, as well as the social and cultural restrictions they confront. Such bottlenecks
directly impact their overall competitiveness, and even survival, in the marketplace.

USAID/Paraguay will continue to help microenterprises and small-scale producers take
advantage of and meet the requirements of higher-value end markets (domestic, regional, or
international) by various means, such as: partnering with larger-scale firms; increasing the
accessibility, availability, relevance, and sustainability of business services; training and
extension; and provision of inputs, equipment, and technologies that equitably respond to the
needs and capacities of female and male-owned microenterprise firms.




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                                           USAID/Peru

Peru is an important country for consideration for this program for several reasons. First, given
its significant dependency on glacial run-off for water resources, it will be one of the countries
most significantly impacted by climate change. Lima in particular, a city of more than 10 million
inhabitants, is entirely dependent upon glacial run-off and it is currently estimated that the
glaciers providing Lima’s water supply will disappear by 2025. Second, with a significant
expanse of tropical rainforest, fourth in the world, Peru provides an important opportunity for
carbon capture by conserving these resources.
Extractive industries, both illegal and illegal, are threatening Peru’s tropical rainforest.


DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID’s strategy for global climate change in Peru is to significantly increase the number of
hectares under improved natural resource management and to improve the capacity of
Peruvians to adapt to the impact of climate change. Sustainable management reduces large-
scale deforestation, thereby increasing a highly effective form of carbon sequestration and
reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of forests. In addition, USAID is assisting
upstream highland people to adapt to glacier loss and linking them with down stream
agricultural exporters to develop programs and strategies to adapt to changes in water flows as
a result of climate change.

In FY 2008, USAID launched a new international forestry certification program under a global
development alliance with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to strengthen and expand forest
certification in the Amazon region. The development of environmentally sustainable forestry
businesses on these 650,000 hectares of certified forests in different regions of the Amazonian
forest constitutes a significant contribution to mitigate the effects of global climate change.

In FY 2008, USAID Peru received Development Grants Program funds to initiate a program with
The Mountain Institute to bring together upstream and downstream stakeholder in two of
vulnerable areas in Peru greatly affected by glacier loss. This selection was made in
consultation with Peruvian and international scientists, as well as the Peruvian Glacier Authority
and after a review of 6 proposals in response to the DGP RFA.

With the 2009 Development Grant Program (DGP) RFA, USAID Peru is looking to improve upon
and increase the number and quality of NGO implementing partners that can work with the
Government of Peru (GoP), regional authorities, and other stakeholder to mitigate negative
climate change conditions in Peru and help vulnerable populations to adapt to water flow
changes. Proposals should reflect an understanding of the GoP and USG’s climate change
programs, but also incorporate innovative and context appropriate activities which would
enhance a climate change program’s success for the targeted areas.


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID/Peru recognizes that access to quality water and sanitation is key for achieving its health
and economic growth objectives. Access to water and sanitation in Peru is still relatively low,
with greater needs in rural and peri-urban areas. Service financing is still underdeveloped,
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which constrains expansion and efficiency in the use of the resource. Peru’s population is
concentrated along the desert coast in peri-urban areas surrounding major cities. Demand for
water has been increasing rapidly during the last decades due to the rapid growth of agro-
industrial activity and migration to urban areas. Conversely, water related conflicts
(privatization of water and sanitation services, use of water resources, pollution, lack of
services, etc.) have been increasing too. Newly decentralized roles and functions of different
levels of government that play a role over water and sanitation issues needs further
strengthening.

During the past years USAID has provided support for hand-washing, safe drinking water and
improved hygiene and sanitation at the community level and improved access to technically
sound and affordable sanitation tools at the household level. During FY 2009, USAID support
improved the rate of safe water consumption among families in target areas from 27% to 66%,
and sensitized citizens to the importance of improving water and sanitation systems among their
communities. Through public-private partnerships, USAID promoted correct hand-washing
practices in 19 of 26 regions in Peru. USAID also contributed to building a national network of
public, private and civil society partners committed to improving sanitation in Peru. The
initiative’s market-driven approach has already started to produce results: low-cost, market-
driven solutions for household sanitation, strengthened supplies and service providers, and the
creation of financial products (loan programs) for funding household improvements.

With the 2009 Development Grant Program (DGP) RFA, USAID Peru is interested in activities
that improve management of water resources, and water and sanitation services at the local
and regional level. Activities would include investments to support organizational/institutional
capacity-building needed to create sustainable management, to improve efficiency of
management of water resource, and to promote human behavior change. Responsive
proposals in this area might be those that:

   Strengthen capacity of regional and local governments and private sector to develop local
    water schemes to manage water sources for multiple uses (e.g., human, mining,
    agriculture), including cost recovery tariffs, payments for protection of local watersheds,
    quality monitoring and innovative approaches to improve efficiency.
   Develop or promote innovative, cost-effective, affordable, and appropriate technologies for
    drinking water supply, sanitation or hygiene, including household point-of-use treatment of
    drinking water.




                        Regional Development Mission/Asia (RDMA)

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
RDMA is currently conducting an Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation
Assessment. The outcomes of this program planning assessment will be in the second quarter
of FY 2010 and provide recommendations on priority programming opportunities to address
regional climate change adaptation challenges.

One possible area of focus includes regional support for adaptation to climate change impacts
(glacial melt, sea-level rise, increased disaster risk, changing precipitation, etc.) on water

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resources, agriculture, biodiversity, communities, and livelihoods in the Mekong watershed and
delta, as well as other major river systems in the Asia region. Other possible areas of support
include: regional support for climate change resilience in small islands, coastal communities,
and cities; and regional support for national climate change adaptation action planning and
programming.

       RDMA’s regional scope includes 18 countries across South Asia, East Asia, Southeast
       Asia, and the Pacific.

       Multi-country or Regional:
       Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Papa New Guinea, Timor Leste, Solomon Islands (two
       or more countries in connection with the Coral Triangle Initiative),Thailand, Laos,
       Cambodia, and Vietnam (two or more countries in connection with the Mekong River
       Basin);
       Single country: China.”




            Regional Mission for Ukraine, Moldova and Belarus (Ukraine only)

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Note: No Mission-specific guidance was provided by this Mission.




                                         USAID/Russia

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID/Russia seeks applications to implement activities on Global Climate Change (GCC) to
advance Russia's adaptation to global climate change. GCC is an area where the Russian
Federation and the United States share common objectives. Global progress on climate change
cannot happen without Russia's participation; even modest changes in Russian practices can
have a significant impact globally taking into account that Russia has the third largest emissions
of CO2 from fossil fuels (behind the U.S. and China), the world's largest forest resources, the
largest natural gas reserves, and significant inefficiencies in energy production and consumption
systems.

Adaptation measures can be focused in four areas: (1) building a solid knowledge base on the
impact and consequences of climate change, 2) integrating adaptation measures into key policy
areas; 3) employing a combination of policy instruments at local, regional, and national levels
(e.g. market-based instruments, guidelines, public-private partnerships) to ensure effective
delivery of adaptation and 4) stepping up international cooperation on adaptation.

USAID/Russia seeks applications which more actively engage Russia, building on past work in
the areas of (1) clean energy, including energy efficiency, (2) sustainable management of
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forests and affected ecosystems, and (3) policy coordination and science cooperation.
Applications should seek to enhance policy and technical cooperation, improve international
cooperation, catalyze new observations and science, and facilitate better use of resources to
most effectively address GCC. USAID/Russia seeks applications that support the Government
of Russia (GOR) measures on GCC aimed to increase the country’s energy efficiency by 40%
and reduce its air emissions from 22 to 25% comparing to the 1990 level by 2020.

Project components may include the following areas where the Development Grants Program
could be used to address climate change in Russia:

a) Bilateral expert-level discussions on methods of adaptation, including cooperation in design
and development of financing mechanisms for adaptation vital to many of Russia's small
communities.
b) Scale up limited forest management efforts throughout the Russian Far East in partnership
with Russian NGOs to improve forest management, increase public awareness about resource
management, and reduce illegal logging.
c) Explore options for adaptation and mitigation through sustainable woody biomass utilization.
In addition to offering significant social benefits to local communities, woody biomass utilization
would result in reduced greenhouse gas emissions and atmospheric concentrations of
greenhouse gases through substitution of fossil fuels and provision of "carbon neutral" energy.
d) Provide technical assistance to forestry agencies on carbon sink accounting to ensure that
Russia accurately measures forest resources in relation to carbon trading.
e) Encourage the development of energy-efficiency policies in cooperation with local
governments, market-based approaches for reducing flaring.
f) Engage local and regional government on energy efficiency policies, practices, technologies,
financing structures, and demonstration projects which raise community awareness and
reinforce existing democracy programs.

Project Approaches: Program should include a plan for long-term impact and replication;
networking among NGOs, scientific entities, governmental agencies, businesses and existing
USAID projects.

Regional Aspect: USAID/Russia welcomes applications for all geographic regions of the
Russian Federation. Special consideration will be given to the Russian Far East (RFE) and
Baikal region where significant opportunities to cooperate, exchange knowledge, and improve
forest and natural resource management practices exist.




                           USAID South Africa and Southern Africa

DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID Southern Africa is interested in entertaining proposals that build the capacities of local
communities to address climate change in the conservation, forestry, and water sectors.
Emphasis should be placed on ensuring improved resiliency for addressing climate change in
ways that benefit the environment and the communities dependant upon these natural
resources. Activities will achieve meaningful livelihood results by building local capacities to
understand and address climate change while resolving interrelated issues of environmental
degradation, biodiversity loss and poverty. Priority will be given to proposals for work in South
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Africa, non-presence USAID countries in the Southern Africa region (Botswana, Lesotho,
Swaziland), and trans-boundary or regional work (this may include work in presence countries
but must be inherently regional in nature or address a specific trans-boundary issue). Priority
will also be given to South African based organizations and institutions providing South-South
exchanges of resources, technology, and knowledge. Proposals that focus exclusively on work
in a country where USAID has a bilateral Mission (Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Malawi, Zambia,
Namibia, Angola) will not be considered under this particular component of the DGP.


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
USAID Southern Africa is interested in working with local NGOs to deliver safe and clean
drinking water to vulnerable populations in rural areas. Activities should include an institutional
capacity building and behavior change component to ensure lasting success. Any infrastructure
work must ensure local capacity for maintenance. Priority will be given to proposals for work in
South Africa, non-presence USAID countries in the Southern Africa region (Botswana, Lesotho,
Swaziland), and trans-boundary or regional work (this may include work in presence countries
but activities must be inherently regional in nature or address a specific trans-boundary).
Priority will also be given to South African based organizations and institutions providing South-
South exchanges of resources, technology, and knowledge. Proposals that focus exclusively
on work in a country where USAID has a bilateral Mission (Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Malawi,
Zambia, Namibia, Angola) will not be considered under this particular component of the DGP.




                                         USAID/Sri Lanka

The conflict between the Government of Sri Lanka and Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE)
ended in May 2009, after more than two decades of fighting. The long-running conflict
prevented Sri Lanka from reaching its potential, and it’s expected that the end of the conflict will
lead to a prosperous and stable democracy. U.S. Government assistance supports both
economic and humanitarian needs in Sri Lanka. One of the highest priorities is to assist the
more than 280,000 people, displaced during the conflict, to safely return to their homes and be
reintegrated in their communities.

USAID is committed to supporting stabilization and development efforts in Sri Lanka. Current
programs focus on the Eastern Province and adjoining areas, and USAID plans to extend
assistance to the North by helping conflict-affected communities return to normalcy as quickly
as possible. USAID programs help members of all ethnic groups rebuild their local
communities. The newly liberated areas of the North and the former conflict areas of the East
present great opportunities for economic growth and democratic governance in Sri Lanka.
All responsive projects in each sector will attempt to leverage the goals of existing USAID
projects in Sri Lanka. It is expected that the successful proposals will address linkages with
ongoing activities. All proposals should also demonstrate how the activities will strengthen
peace and reconciliation. Gender based programming is also encouraged.


DGP Sector: Dairy


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Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Mission’s Assistance objectives are geographically limited to Sri Lanka’s Eastern and Northern
Provinces and adjacent conflict affected areas of North Central and Uva Provinces. USAID/ Sri
Lanka is currently supporting a Dairy Development project in the Eastern Province and UVA,
which is helping to increase supplies of high-quality milk through the technical training of 850
dairy farmers and buy-back agreements. The milk produced is being processed into pasteurized
milk, ice cream, yoghurt, cheese and butter. Responsive proposals in this area might be those
that:

       Emphasize productivity of the dairy sector through linkages with the private sector
       Strengthen producer groups and producer group-owned chilling centers,
       Improve animal nutrition for increased and sustainable milk yields,
       Improve business services to milk producers
       Organize and facilitate access to and delivery of business inputs
       Improve stock through artificial insemination


DGP Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Mission Assistance objectives are geographically limited to Sri Lanka’s Eastern and Northern
Provinces and adjacent conflict affected areas of North Central and UVA Provinces. The
Mission is currently looking to support activities that i) directly increase access to irrigation for
both small and large scale farmers, and ii) support water and sanitation needs for returning
IDP’s in the North. This includes investments to support both infrastructure as well as those
activities related to organizational capacity-building. Responsive proposals in this area would:

       Create linkages with relevant USAID projects in the Economic Growth and Humanitarian
        Assistance/Transition Initiatives portfolio
       Improve the quality of small scale irrigation systems
       Strengthen capacity of communities in water management
       Create linkages with the private sector to improve management of water systems
       Develop or promote innovative, affordable, and appropriate technologies for irrigation
        and rain water harvesting
       Emphasis private sector owned and operated irrigation including tube wells in areas
        where irrigation services are inadequate,
       Use of advanced irrigation technology such as drip irrigation
       Innovative rain water harvesting at the household and farm level
       Support sanitation infrastructure for returning IDP populations in the North
       Improve the quality of drinking water supply for example rehabilitation of wells


DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Employment creation is central to the U.S. goal of promoting broad-based economic
growth. USAID/Sri Lanka seeks to strengthen micro and small enterprises into growing value
chains while improving their bargaining power and expanding their access to business and
financial services. The Mission also works with a breadth of civil society actors especially
women’s groups. The community based organizations are being supported through the
Mission's Supporting Regional Governance (SuRG) program managed by the Mission's
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democracy and governance (DG) team. In the Batticaloa district, the Government of Sri Lanka
estimates there are more than 18,000 female headed households, many of whom are war
widows. USAID/Sri Lanka seeks to develop a microenterprise program under its economic
growth and democracy and governance program. Proposals addressing the needs in both
these sectors are sought by the Sri Lanka Mission. Mission assistance objectives are
geographically limited to Sri Lanka’s Eastern and Northern Provinces and adjacent conflict
affected areas of North Central and UVA Provinces. Responsive proposals include those that:

      Assist women affected by conflict improve the human security through such bodies as
       the Women’s Rural Development Societies and enhance business services for women
       owned microenterprises
      Complement the USG's integrated approach to support conflict transformation in the
       North and East.
      Support and expand access to appropriate financial services
      Address constraints for access to microenterprise finance
      Emphasize linkages between production microenterprises, including farmers, to value
       chains
      Facilitate microenterprise participation in the value chains
      Promote upgrades to the value chains and other supporting services
      Technical assistance for start up, expansion, and development of new products
      Build the capacity of service providers for microenterprises
      Help small scale enterprises to take advantage of higher value end markets




                                     USAID/Timor-Leste

DGP Sector: Microenterprise

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Projects implements in this sector, Mission would like to focus on those micro and small
enterprises at remote areas to improve entrepreneurial capacity by:

   1. Improve access to business services, training, inputs, equipment, and technology
      needed to improve and expand businesses.
   2. Help micro-businesses and small scale producers to meet requirements of higher-value
      end markets
   3. Promote entrepreneurship development and support model for youth and women
      especially rural population in Timor-Leste.


DGP Sector: Dairy

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Projects implements in this sector, mission would like to support micro and small dairy
entrepreneurs in remote areas in Timor-Leste to improve capacity by:
    1. Linking micro and small dairy producers (men and women) to commercial markets at
       both locally and/or national level.


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   2. Supporting producers associations to access market both local and national markets,
      support marketing strategies, including risk management strategies, and market access
      information system.
   3. Supporting small and micro producers in meeting market demands, including storage,
      packaging and processing.


DGP Sector: Climate Change Adaptation

Mission-specific Guidance for Applicants:
Projects implements in this sector, mission would like to focus in rural and urban areas in Timor-
Leste where environmental degradation especially deforestation is high by:
   1. Supporting activities of preventing or reducing earth’s surface temperature causing by
       human activities, including supporting reforest and or agro forestry initiatives.




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F. USAID MISSION CONTACT INFORMATION

(Listed Alphabetically By Country)

Applicants are advised to verify commercial courier addresses and contact person directly with the Missions. Applicants are also strongly
encouraged to verify that submissions have been received by the proposed Mission(s) and to send emails to USAID/W with receipt requested.

      USAID Mission                           Mailing Address for Proposal/Full Application   Contact Name & Email Address for
                                              Submission                                      Proposal/Full Applicant Submission
      Angola                                  Mr. Jonathan Richter                            Submit Proposal to: Jonathan Ricther -
                                              Program Office                                  jrichter@usaid.gov
                                              USAID/Angola
                                              Rua Houari Boumedienne # 32, Miramar
                                              Luanda, Angola
      Armenia                                 Mr. Timothy Alexander                           Submit Proposal to: Timothy Alexander -
                                              Program Office                                  talexander@usaid.gov
                                              USAID/Yerevan
                                              Department of State
                                              Washington, DC 20521-7020
      Bosnia and Herzegovina                  USAID/Bosnia-Herzegovina                        Submit Proposal to: Kanan Mustafayev -
                                              PPO Office                                      kmustafayev@usaid.gov
                                              Hamdije Cemerlica 39
                                              71000 Sarajevo
                                              Bosnia and Herzegovina

      CAR-Kyrgyz Republic                     Andrew Segars                                   Submit Proposal to: Andrew Segars -
                                              USAID Kyrgyz Republic                           asegars@usaid.gov
                                              171 Mira Ave.,
                                              Bishkek 720016
                                              Kyrgyz Republic
      CAR-Regional                            Mike Trainor                                    Submit Proposal to: Mike Trainor -
                                              USAID Central Asian Republics                   mtrainor@usaid.gov
                                              Park Palace Building
                                              41 Kazibek bi Street
                                              Almaty 050010
                                              Republic of Kazakhstan




                                                                    106
                              DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

USAID Mission                            Mailing Address for Proposal/Full Application   Contact Name & Email Address for
                                         Submission                                      Proposal/Full Applicant Submission
CAR-Tajikistan                           Kevin Dean                                      Submit Proposal to:
                                         USAID Tajikistan                                Kevin Dean - kdean@usaid.gov AND Jeffrey
                                         109 "A" Ismoili Somoni Ave.                     Lehrer - jlehrer@usaid.gov
                                         Dushanbe 734019
                                         TAJIKISTAN
Caucasus-Azerbaijan                      The Landmark Building, 6th Floor                Submit Proposal to: Kanan Mustafayev -
                                         96 Nizami Street                                kmustafayev@usaid.gov
                                         AZ 1010 Baku, Azerbaijan

Caucasus (Regional Mission) – Georgia    USAID/ Caucasus -Regional Mission               Submit Proposal to: Mariam Ubilava -
Only                                     11 George Balanchine St.                        mubilava@usaid.gov
                                         Tbilisi 0131
                                                                                         DGP Contact: Mariam Ubilava -
                                                                                         mubilava@usaid.gov
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)   International:                                  Submit Proposal to: Allyson Gardner -
                                         For Submission by Post:                         agardner@usaid.gov

                                         USAID/Democratic Republic of the Congo
                                         c/o Allyson Gardner
                                         Unit 2220 Box 183
                                         DPO, AE 09828

                                         For in-person submission:
                                         USAID/Democratic Republic of the Congo
                                         198 Isiro Avenue
                                         Kinshasa/Gombe, Democratic Republic of Congo
Ecuador                                  International:                                  Submit Proposal to: Karina Duran -
                                         USAID/Ecuador                                   kduran@usaid.gov
                                         Thomas Rhodes
                                         3420 Quito Place
                                         Washington, DC 20521-3420

                                         Local:
                                         Thomas Rhodes
                                         USAID
                                         Av. Avigiras E12-170 y Eloy Alfaro
                                         Quito, Ecuador



                                                                107
                               DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

USAID Mission                            Mailing Address for Proposal/Full Application       Contact Name & Email Address for
                                         Submission                                          Proposal/Full Applicant Submission
Egypt, Office of Middle East Programs    U.S. Agency for International Development - Egypt   Submit Proposal to: Dana Rose -
(Regional Mission)                       1A Ahmed Kamel Street                               drose@usaid.gov
                                         off El-Laselki Street
                                         New Maadi, Cairo, Egypt
                                         Postal Code 11435
El Salvador                              Embajada Americana                                  Submit Proposal to: Sandra Duarte
                                         Edificio USAID                                      sduarte@usaid.gov
                                         Oficina de Crecimiento Economico
                                         Blvd. Santa Elena,
                                         Antiguo Cuscatlan, La Libertad
                                         El Salvador
Ethiopia                                 International                                       Submit Proposal to: Kevin Smith
                                         Bob Schmidt                                         Kevsmith@usaid.gov
                                         Contracts & Agreements Officer
                                         USAID/Ethiopia
                                         2030 Addis Ababa Place
                                         Washington, DC 20521-2030

                                         Local:
                                         Bob Schmidt
                                         Contracts & Agreements Officer
                                         USAID/Ethiopia
                                         Riverside Building
                                         P.O. Box 1014
                                         Addis Ababa

Indonesia                                John Packer, Program Office                         Submit Proposal to: John Packer -
                                         American Embassy/ USAID                             jpacker@usaid.gov
                                         Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan, No.3-5,
                                         Jakarta 10110, Indonesia
Jamaica                                  USAID/Jamaica                                       Submit Proposal to: Malden Miller -
                                         142 Old Hope Road                                   malmiller@usaid.gov
                                         Kingston 5, Jamaica




                                                                108
                DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

USAID Mission             Mailing Address for Proposal/Full Application   Contact Name & Email Address for
                          Submission                                      Proposal/Full Applicant Submission
Macedonia                 US Embassy                                      Submit Proposal to: Tim Donnay -
                          Samuilova 21                                    tdonnay@usaid.gov
                          1000, Skopje
                          Macedonia
                          Att: USAID
Malawi                    USAID/Malawi                                    Submit Proposal to: Nyembezi Mfune -
                          NICO House                                      nmfune@usaid.gov
                          P.O. Box 30455
                          Lilongwe, Malawi



Morocco                   USAID/Morocco                                   Submit Proposal to: Mustapha El Hamzaoui
                          BP 120 – Souissi, Rabat                         melhamzaoui@usaid.gov
                          Morocco



Nepal                     Pradeep Neupane                                 Submit Proposal to: Pradeep Neupane -
                          A&A Specialist                                  Pneupane@usaid.gov
                          Contracting Office
                          U.S. Agency for International Development
                          G.P.O. Box 295
                          Brahma Cottage, Maharajgunj
                          KATHMANDU, NEPAL

Nicaragua                 Local:                                          Submit Proposal to: Steven Fondriest -
                          USAID/Nicaragua                                 stfondriest@usaid.gov
                          Embajada Americana
                          Km. 5.5 Carretera Sur
                          Managua, Nicaragua

                          International:
                          USAID/Nicaragua
                          Unit 3240 Box 170
                          DPO, AA 34021-0170




                                                  109
                               DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

USAID Mission                             Mailing Address for Proposal/Full Application   Contact Name & Email Address for
                                          Submission                                      Proposal/Full Applicant Submission
Panama                                    USAID/Panama                                    Submit Proposal to: Carlos Blandón -
                                          P.O. Box 0816-02561                             cblandon@usaid.gov
                                          Panama 5, Republic of Panama

Paraguay                                  Rose Rakas                                      Submit Proposal to: Michael Kaiser
                                          USAID/Paraguay                                  mkaiser@usaid.gov
                                          Juan de Salazar 364 near Artigas -
                                          Asunción - PARAGUAY
Peru                                      USAID/Peru                                      Submit Proposal to:
                                          Av. La Encalada S/N                             Lima, DGP2 – dgp2lima@usaid.gov
                                          Cdra. 17 Monterrico - Surco
                                          Lima, Peru


Regional Development Mission for Asia     Regional Development Mission for Asia           Submit Proposal to: Orestes Anastasia -
(RDMA) - Bangkok                          Athenee Tower, 25th Floor                       oanastasia@usaid.gov
                                          63 Wireless Road, Lumpini, Pathumwan
                                          Bangkok, 10330 Thailand


Regional Mission for Ukraine, Moldova and USAID/Ukraine                                   Submit Proposal to: Victoria Grib -
Belarus (Ukraine only)                    19 Nizhniy Val                                  vgrib@usaid.gov
                                          Kyiv, Ukraine 04071
Russia                                    USAID/Russia                                    Submit Proposal to: Donella Russell -
                                          SPOEDE Building, 1st, 2nd Floor                 drussell@usaid.gov
                                          Novinskiy Blvd., 19/23
                                          121099 Moscow
                                          Russian Federation
South Africa and Southern Africa Regional USAID/Southern Africa Mission                   Submit Proposal to: Doreen Robinson -
Mission                                   PO Box 43                                       drobinson@usaid.gov
                                          Pretoria, South Africa 0027

Sri Lanka                                 USAID/Sri Lanka                                 Submit Proposal to: Poonam Smith-Sreen -
                                          44, Galle Road, Colombo 3, Sri Lanka            psmith-sreen@usaid.gov




                                                                 110
                DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

USAID Mission             Mailing Address for Proposal/Full Application   Contact Name & Email Address for
                          Submission                                      Proposal/Full Applicant Submission
Timor-Leste               US Agency for International Development         Submit Proposal to: Maria Arenas -
                          USAID/Timor-Leste                               marenas@usaid.gov
                          Dr. Sergio Vieira de Mello Road
                          Light House Area, Farol
                          Dili, Timor-Leste




                                                111
G. SF-424 FORMS AND INSTRUCTIONS

     SF424 Forms:

                SF-424, Application for Federal Assistance
                SF-424A, Budget Information, Non-construction Programs
                SF-424B, Assurances, Non-construction Programs




                                                        112
                              DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

Standard Form 424                                                  OMB Approval No.
                     0348-0043
              APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL                     2. DATE SUBMITTED            Applicant Identifier
              ASSISTANCE
                                                                                               NA
              1.    TYPE OF SUBMISSION:                   3. DATE RECEIVED BY          State Application
                                                          STATE                        Identifier
              Application      Reapplication    NA              NA                             NA
                                     Construction         4. DATE RECEIVED BY          Federal Identifier
              Construction                                FEDERAL AGENCY
                 X   Non-           Non-Construction                                          NA
              Construction
              5. APPLICATION INFORMATION
              Legal Name:                                 Organizational Unit
              Address (give only county, state, and zip   Name and telephone number of person to be
              code):                                      contacted on matters involving this application (give
                                                          area code)


              6. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION                  7. TYPE OF APPLICATION: (enter            M
              NUMBER (EIN):                               appropriate letter in box)
                                                          A. State                   H. Independent School
                                                                                     Dist
              8. TYPE OF APPLICATION                      B. County                  I. State Controlled
                                                                                     Institution of Higher
                                                                                     Learning
                 X     New          Continuation           C. Municipal              J. Indian Tribe
              Revision
              If Revision, enter                          D. Township                  K. Individual
              appropriate letter(s)
              in box(es)
              A. Increase        D. Decrease Duration     E. Interstate                L. Profit Organization


                                                             113
             DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

Award
B. Decrease  E. Other (specify):         F. Inter-municipal           M. Other (specify)
Award
C. Increase                              G. Special Dist.
Duration
10. CATALOG OF FEDERAL                   9. NAME OF FEDERAL AGENCY
DOMESTIC ASSISTANCE NUMBER:
             NA                                USAID/GH/HIDN
   TITLE:                                11. DESCRIPTIVE TITLE OF APPLICANT'S
                                         PROJECT:

12. AREAS AFFECTED (Cities,
Counties, States, etc.):

13.           14. CONGRESSIONAL
PROPOSED      DISTRICTS OF:
PROJECT
S END         a. Applicant               b. Project
T DATE
A
R
T

D
A
T
E
                  NA                            NA
15. ESTIMATED FUNDING:                   16. IS APPLICATION SUBJECT TO REVIEW BY
                                         STATE EXECUTIVE ORDER 12372 PROCESS?
a $
.


                                            114
           DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

F
e
d
e
r
a
l
b $                                    a.    YES. THIS
                                       PREAPPLICATION/APPLICATION WAS MADE
A                                      AVAILABLE TO THE STATE EXECUTIVE ORDER
p                                      12372 PROCESS REVIEW ON:
p
li
c
a
n
t
c $   NA
.
S
t
a
t
e
d $   NA                                          DATE
.
L
o
c
a
l
e $                                    b.         NO.        PROGRAM IS NOT


                                            115
            DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

.                                       COVERED BY E.O. 12372
O                                                       OR PROGRAM HAS NOT
t                                       BEEN SELECTED BY STATE FOR REVIEW
h
e
r
f $
.
P
r
o
g
r
a
m

I
n
c
o
m
e
g $
.
T
O
T
A
L
17. IS THE APPLICANT DELINQUENT          Yes If "Yes",        No
ON ANY FEDERAL DEBT?              attach an explanation
18.    TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE AND BELIEF, ALL DATA IN THIS


                                           116
                                  DGP - RFA - Request for Applications No. M/OAA/GRO/EGAS-DGP-10-001

                  APPLICATION/PREAPPLICATION ARE TRUE AND CORRECT, THE DOCUMENT HAS
                  BEEN DULY AUTHORIZED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE APPLICANT AND THE
                  APPLICANT WILL COMPLY WITH THE ATTACHED ASSURANCES IF THE ASSISTANCE IS
                  AWARDED.
                  a. Type Name of Authorized       b. Title            c. Telephone Number
                  Representative

                  d. Signature of Authorized Representative                                e. Date Signed

                              Standard Form 424 (REV 4-92);         Prescribed By OMB Circular A-102



INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SF 424


Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 45 minutes per response, including the time for
reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing
the collection of information. Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information,
including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Office of Management and Budget. Paperwork Reduction Project (0348-
0043), Washington, DC 20503.

PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR COMPLETED FORM TO THE OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET, SEND IT TO THE
ADDRESS PROVIDED BY THE SPONSORING AGENCY.



This is a standard form used by applicants as a required face sheet for preapplications and applications submitted for Federal
assistance. It will be used by Federal agencies to obtain applicant certification that States which have established a review and
comment procedure in response to Executive Order 12372 and have selected the program to be included in their process, have
been given an opportunity to review the applicant's submission.




                                                                 117
                                                     obligation or contingent liability from an
Item:                 Entry:                         existing obligation.

1.       Self-explanatory.                           9.     Name of Federal agency from
                                                     which assistance is being requested
2.     Date application submitted to                 with this application.
Federal agency (or State if applicable) &
applicant's control number (if                       10.    Use the Catalog of Federal
applicable).                                         Domestic Assistance number and title of
                                                     the program under which assistance is
3.      State use only (if applicable).              requested.

4.     If this application is to continue or
revise an existing award, enter present
Federal identifier number. If for a new              Item:                 Entry:
project, leave blank.
                                                     11.    Enter a brief descriptive title of
5.     Legal name of applicant, name of              the project. If more than one program is
primary organizational unit, which will              involved, you should append an
undertake the assistance activity,                   explanation on a separate sheet. If
complete address of the applicant, and               appropriate (e.g., construction or real
the name and telephone number of the                 property projects), attach a map
person to contact on matters related to              showing project location. For
this application.                                    preapplications, use a separate sheet to
                                                     provide a summary description of this
6.     Enter Employer Identification                 project.
Number (EIN) as assigned by the
Internal Revenue Service.                            12.      List only the largest political
                                                     entities affected (e.g., State, counties,
7.    Enter the appropriate letter in the            cities).
space provided.
                                                     13.     Self-explanatory.
8.     Check appropriate box and enter
appropriate letter(s) in the space(s)                14.     List the applicant's Congressional
provided:                                            District and any District(s) affected by
                                                     the program or project.
         - "New" means a new assistance
award.                                               15.    Amount requested or to be
                                                     contributed during the first
       - "Continuation" means an                     funding/budget period by each
extension for an additional                          contributor. Value of in-kind
funding/budget period for a project with             contributions should be included on
a projected completion date.                         appropriate lines as applicable. If the
                                                     action will result in a dollar change to an
       - "Revision" means any change                 existing award, indicate only the amount
in the Federal Government's financial                of the change. For decreases, enclose
                                                     the amounts in parentheses. If both

                                               118
basic and supplemental amounts are
included, show breakdown on an
attached sheet. For multiple program
funding, use totals and show breakdown
using same categories as item 15.

16.    Applications should contact the
State Single Point of Contact (SPOC)
for Federal Executive Order 12372 to
determine whether the application is
subject to the State inter government
review process.

17.    This question applies to the
applicant organization, not the person
who signs as the authorized
representative. Categories of debt
include delinquent audit disallowances
loans and taxes.

18.    To be signed by the authorized
representative of the applicant. A copy
of the governing body's authorization for
you to sign this application as official
representative must be on file in the
applicant's office. (Certain Federal
agencies may require that this
authorization be submitted as part of the
application.)
       SF 424 Back (Rev. 4-92)




                                            119
    Budget Information - Non-Construction Programs
SECTION A - BUDGET SUMMARY
Grant Program     Catalog of       Estimated Unobligated Funds         New or Revised Budget
Function          Federal
Or Activity       Domestic
{a}               Assistance
                  Number
                  {b}
                                   Federal           Non-Federal       Federal          Non-Federal   Total
                                   {c}               {d}               {e}              {f}           {g}
1. Headquarters $        NA        $     NA          $     NA          $                $             $
2. Field                 NA              NA                NA
3. NA                    NA              NA                NA                NA                NA             NA
4. NA                    NA              NA                NA                NA                NA             NA
5.TOTALS          $      NA        $     NA          $     NA          $                $             $
SECTION B – BUDGET CATEGORIES
6.    Object Class Categories          USAID PROGRAM                   RECIPIENT FUNDS                Total
                                                                                                      {5}
                                       (1) Federal   (2) Non-Federal   {3}              {4}
       a. Personnel (1)                $             $                 $     NA         $      NA     $
       b. Fringe Benefits (1)                                                NA                NA
       c. Travel (1)                                                         NA                NA
       d. Equipment (3)                                                      NA                NA
       e. Supplies (3)                                                       NA                NA
       f. Contractual (3)                                                    NA                NA
       g. Construction      N/A                                              NA                NA
       h. Other (1), (2) (see notes)                                         NA                NA
       i. Total Direct Charges (sum                                          NA                NA
of 6a-6h)
       j. Indirect Charges (4)                                               NA                NA
       k. TOTALS (sum of 6i and 6j)    $             $                 $                $             $

7. Program Income                    $            $                    $                $             $
                                 STANDARD FORM 424A (cont'd)

SECTION C - NON-FEDERAL RESOURCES
                                                           121
 (a) Grant Program                                  (b) Applicant     (c) State   (d) Other    (e) TOTALS
                                                                                  Sources
 8. Headquarters                                  $                  $      NA    $            $
 9. Field                                                                   NA
 10. NA                                                   NA                NA          NA
 11. NA                                                   NA                NA          NA
 12. TOTAL (sum of lines 8-11)                    $                  $      NA   $             $
 SECTION D - FORECASTED CASH NEEDS
 13. Federal                        Total for 1st 1st Quarter        2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter   4th quarter
                                    Year
                                    $             $                  $           $             $
 14. Non-Federal
 15. TOTAL (sum of lines 13 and 14)
 SECTION E - BUDGET ESTIMATES OF FEDERAL FUNDS NEEDED FOR BALANCE OF THE PROJECT
 (a) Grant Program                                Future Funding Periods
                                                  (b) First          (c) Second  (d) Third     (e) Fourth
 16. Headquarters                                 $                  $           $             $
 17. Field
 18. NA                                                   NA                NA          NA           NA
 19. NA                                                   NA                NA          NA           NA
 20. TOTAL (sum of lines 16-19)                   $                  $           $             $
 SECTION F – OTHER BUDGET INFORMATION
 21. Direct Charges:                              22. Indirect Charges:
 23. Remarks:

Authorized for Local Reproduction Standard Form 424 A (Rev. 4-92) Page 2




                                                           122
Standard Form 424A (cont'd.)
     INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SF 424A



Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 180
minutes per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing
data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and
reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding the burden estimate
or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing
this burden, to the Office of Management and Budget. Paperwork Reduction Project
(0348-0044), Washington, DC 20503.

PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR COMPLETED FORM TO THE OFFICE OF
MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET, SEND IT TO THE ADDRESS PROVIDED BY THE
SPONSORING AGENCY.



                                                     Section A. Budget Summary Lines 1-
General Instructions                                 4 Columns (a) and (b)

This form is designed so that application            For applications pertaining to a single
can be made for funds from one or more               Federal grant program (Federal
grant programs. In preparing the                     Domestic Assistance Catalog number)
budget, adhere to any existing Federal               and not requiring a functional or activity
grantor agency guidelines, which                     breakdown, enter on Line 1 under
prescribe how, and whether budgeted                  Column (a) the catalog program title and
amounts should be separately show for                the catalog number in Column (b).
different functions or activities within the
program. For some programs, grantor                  For applications pertaining to a single
agencies may require budgets to be                   program requiring budget amounts by
separately shown by function or activity.            multiple functions or activities, enter the
For other programs, grantor agencies                 name of each activity or function on
may require a breakdown by function or               each line in Column (a), and enter the
activity. Sections A, B, C and D should              catalog number in Column (b). For
include budget estimates for the whole               applications pertaining to multiple
project except when applying for                     programs where none of the programs
assistance which requires Federal                    require a breakdown by function or
authorization in annual or other funding             activity, enter the catalog program title
period increments. In the latter case,               on each line in Column (a) and the
Section A, B, C and D should provide                 respective catalog number on each line
the budget for the first budget period               in Column (b).
(usually a year) and Section E should
present the need for Federal assistance              For applications pertaining to multiple
in the subsequent budget periods. All                programs where one or more programs
applications should contain a                        require a breakdown by function or
breakdown by the object class                        activity, prepare a separate sheet for
categories shown in Lines a-k of Section             each program requiring
B.
                                               123
the breakdown. Additional sheets
should be used when one form does not             Line 5 - Show the totals for all columns
provide adequate space for all                    used.
breakdown of
data required. However, when more
than one sheet is used,
the first page should provide the
summary totals by programs.
 Lines 1-4, Columns (c) through (g)
                                                        SF 424A (Rev. 4-92) Page 3
For new applications, leave Columns (c)
and (d) blank. For each line Entry in
Columns (a) and (b), enter in Columns
(e), (f), and (g) the appropriate amounts
of funds needed to support the project
for the first funding period (usually a
year).

For continuing grant program
applications, submit these forms before
the end of each funding period as
required by the grantor agency. Enter in
Column (c) and (d) the estimated
amounts of funds which will remain
unobligated at the end of the grant
funding period only if the Federal
grantor agency instructions provide for
this. Otherwise, leave these columns
blank. Enter in columns (e) and (f) the
amounts of funds needed for the
upcoming period. The amount(s) in
Column (g) should be the sum of
amounts in Columns (e) and (f).

For supplemental grants and changes to
existing grants, do not use Columns (c)
and (d). Enter in Column (e) the amount
of the increase or decrease of Federal
funds and enter in Column (f) the
amount of the increase of non-Federal
funds. In Column (g) enter the new total
budgeted amount (Federal and non-
Federal) which includes the total
previous authorized budgeted amounts
plus or minus, as appropriate, the
amounts shown in Columns (e) and (f).
The amounts(s) in Column (g) should
not equal the sum of amounts in
Columns (e) and (f).
                                            124
       Standard Form 424A (cont'd.)

       INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SF 424A (continued)


Section B. Budget Categories
                                                   Lines 8-11 - Enter amounts of non-
In the column headings (1) enter                   Federal resources that will be used on
Federal, and (2) enter Non-Federal.                the grant. If in-kind contributions are
When additional sheets are prepared for            included, provide a brief explanation on
Section A, provide similar column                  a separate sheet.
headings on each sheet. For each
program, function or activity, fill in the                  Column (a) - Enter the program
total requirements for funds (both                 titles identical to Column (a), Section A.
Federal and non-Federal) by object                 A breakdown by function or activity is
class categories.                                  not necessary.

Lines 6a-i - Show the totals of Lines 6a                  Column (b) - Enter the
to 6h in each column.                              contribution to be made by the
                                                   applicant.
Line 6j - Show the amount of indirect
cost.                                                      Column (c) - Enter the amount of
                                                   the State's cash and in-kind contribution
Line 6k - Enter the total of amounts on            if the applicant is not a State or State
Lines 6i and 6j. For all applications for          agency. Applicants who are a State or
new grants and continuation grants the             State agencies should leave this column
total amount in column (5), Line 6k,               blank.
should be the same as the total amount
shown in Section A, Column (g), Line 5.                  Column (d) - Enter the amount of
For supplemental grants and changes to             cash and in-kind contributions to be
grants, the total amount of the increase           made from all other sources.
or decrease as shown in Columns (1)-
(4), Line 6k should be the same as the                  Column (e) - Enter totals of
sum of the amounts in Section A,                   Columns (b), (c), and (d).
Columns (e) and (f) on Line 5.
                                                   Line 12 - Enter the total for each of
Line 7 - Enter the estimated amount of             Columns (b)-(e). The amount in Column
income, if any, expected to be                     (e) should be equal to the amount on
generated from this project. Do not add            Line 5, Column (f) Section A.
or subtract this amount from the total             Section D. Forecasted Cash Needs
project amount. Show under the
program narrative statement the nature             Line 13 - Enter the amount of cash
and source of income. The estimated                needed by quarter from the grantor
amount of program income may be                    agency during the first year.
considered by the federal grantor
agency in determining the total amount             Line 14 - Enter the amount of cash from
of the grant.                                      all other sources needed by quarter
                                                   during the first year.
Section C. Non-Federal Resources
                                             125
Line 15 - Enter the totals of amounts on           Line 23 - Provide any other
Lines 13 and 14.                                   explanations or comments deemed
                                                   necessary.
Section E. Budget Estimates of
Federal Funds Needed for Balance of
the Project

Lines 16-19 - Enter in Column (a) the
same grant program titles shown in
Column (a), Section A. A breakdown by
function or activity is not necessary. For
new applications and continuation grant
applications, enter in the proper
columns amounts of Federal funds
which will be needed to complete the
program or project over the succeeding
funding periods (usually in years). This                SF 424A (Rev. 4-92) Page 4
section need not be completed for
revisions (amendments, changes, or
supplements) to funds for the current
year of existing grants.

If more than four lines are needed to list
the program titles, submit additional
schedules as necessary.

Line 20 - Enter the total for each of the
Columns (b)-(e). When additional
schedules are prepared for this Section,
annotate accordingly and show the
overall totals on this line.

Section F. Other Budget Information

Line 21 - Use this space to explain
amounts for individual direct object-
class cost categories that may appear to
be out of the ordinary or to explain the
details as required by Federal grantor
agency.

Line 22 - Enter the type of indirect rate
(provisional, predetermined, final or
fixed) that will be in effect during the
funding period, the estimated amount of
the base to which the rate is applied,
and the total indirect expense.


                                             126
The following object class categories are those required on USAID Form 424A
(Section B - Budget Categories):

a.    Personnel

The category includes the salary of each long-term and short-term, paid position for the
total estimated life-of-project, except consultants, and the projected cost-of-living or
bonus/merit increase for each position.

b.    Fringe Benefits

This category includes the amount and percentage of fringe benefits for each
headquarters and field personnel identified above. Include here all allowances such as
housing, schooling, leave benefits, and other items.

c.    Travel

This category includes all projected travel, per diem and other related costs for
personnel except consultants. Include the method by which airfare costs were
determined; i.e. quotes for coach and if per-diems are based on established policies.

d.    Equipment

In accordance with 22 CFR 226, 'equipment' means tangible non-expendable personal
property, including exempt property charged directly to the award having a useful life of
more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per unit. Information
should be included in the application on how pricing was determined for each piece of
the equipment.

There are statutory constraints relating to the purchase of agricultural commodities,
motor vehicles, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, rubber compounding chemicals and
plasticizers, used equipment and fertilizer with USAID project funds. PVOs/NGOs may
obtain specific information on these regulations on USAID Web Site at
http://www.usaid.gov/pubs/ads.

e.    Supplies

In accordance with 22 CFR 226, 'supplies' means all personal property excluding
equipment, intangible property, debt instruments and interventions.

There are statutory constraints relating to the purchase of agricultural commodities,
motor vehicles, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, rubber compounding chemicals and
plasticizers, used equipment and fertilizer with USAID project funds. PVOs/NGOs can
obtain specific information on these regulations on USAID Web Site at
http://www.usaid.gov/pubs/ads/300/312/htm.




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f.     Contractual Services

This category is for all subcontracts with organizations, which will provide services to
the project and any short- or long-term consultant cost including fees, travel and per
diem. This category is not to be used for sub-grants, which should be included in other.

g.     Construction

N/A

h.     Other

PVOs/NGOs are to identify all costs associated with training of project personnel.

PVOs/NGOs planning to use USAID funds to send project staff or local counterparts for
training in the U.S. or a country other than the host country, will be required to follow the
guidance on USAID Participant Training Regulations, which may be found on the
USAID Web Site http://www.usaid.gov/pubs/ads.

The PVO/NGO should provide information on any costs attributed to the project not
associated above; i.e. communications, facilities, fuel vehicles, repair, maintenance and
insurance.

Include in this budget class category all sub-grants.

i.     Indirect Charges

Include a copy of the PVO’s/NGO’s most recent negotiated indirect cost rate agreement
(NICRA) from the cognizant audit agency showing the overhead and/or general
administrative rate.

USAID Form 424A, Section C should reflect the PVO’s/NGO’s and other sources’ cash
contribution to this program. A cash match means that funds are used to support the
budget elements discussed above. This does not include volunteer labor from U.S. or
host country sources. The cash value of donated equipment or supplies must be
documented.

A narrative that justifies the costs as appropriate and necessary for the
successful completion of the program should be attached to USAID Form 424.

The Cooperative Agreement Budget generally has four (4) different categories called
Budget Cost Elements: Program, Training, Procurement, and Indirect Costs. A sample
Agreement Budget is included below. On Standard Form 424A, Section B–Budget
Categories, all eleven Object Class Categories have a footnote number next to them.
The footnote numbers next to the Object Class Categories correspond to one of the four
Cost Elements of the Cooperative Agreement Budget. The 11 Object Class Categories



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fit within the four Cost Elements of the Cooperative Agreement Budget. For this
application, submit only the Standard Form 424 and 424A, with the corresponding
eleven (11) Object Class Categories, supported by a detailed narrative. Do NOT use
the four Cost Elements of the Cooperative Agreement Budget shown below.




SAMPLE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT BUDGET

                                SF 424, Sec.B, Item 6

Budget Cost Element             Object Class Category            Budget Amount

Program                         Line a, b, c, and h       $_____
Training                        Line h                    $____
Procurement                     Line d, e and f           $_____
Indirect Costs                  Line j                    $_____
Program’s Total Budget                                    $_____

Funding arrangement:
Total USAID Amount                                        $_____
Recipient’s Cost Share                                    $_____
Total Program Funding                                     $_____




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